Docstoc

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Document Sample
GRADUATE PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL CHANGE Powered By Docstoc
					                 Department of International Development, Community and Environment (IDCE)
                                                                            950 Main Street
                                                                       Worcester, MA 01610




               GRADUATE PROGRAM IN
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL CHANGE (IDSC)

                    STUDENT HANDBOOK
                         2010-2012

      www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/academicsGradID.cfm
Overview.................................................................................................................................................... 3
IDSC Course of Study ............................................................................................................................ 4
    Master’s Degree Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 4
     Required Core Courses ................................................................................................................................................. 4
     Elective Courses – A Sampling .................................................................................................................................. 4
     Directed Study ................................................................................................................................................................. 5
     Transfer credits ................................................................................................................................................................ 6
     B.A./M.A. Fifth Year Pathway ................................................................................................................................... 6
Suggested Sequencing and Program Plan for IDSC/M.A. ............................................................ 7
    First-year Fall Semester .................................................................................................................................... 7
    First-year Spring Semester ............................................................................................................................... 7
    Second-year Fall Semester ................................................................................................................................ 7
    Second-year Spring Semester .......................................................................................................................... 8
IDSC Faculty ............................................................................................................................................ 9
    Program Faculty ................................................................................................................................................. 9
    Research Faculty .............................................................................................................................................. 10
    Affiliate Faculty ................................................................................................................................................ 10
    Adjunct Faculty ................................................................................................................................................ 11
Research, Internships, and Careers .................................................................................................. 12
    Research Resources ......................................................................................................................................... 12
    Field Research .................................................................................................................................................. 12
    Current IDCE Research Activities .............................................................................................................. 12
    Internships ......................................................................................................................................................... 13
    Careers ............................................................................................................................................................... 13
IDSC Final M.A. Project ..................................................................................................................... 14
    Option 1. Final M.A. Research Paper ......................................................................................................... 14
    Option 2. Final M.A. Practitioner Report.................................................................................................. 14
    Option 3: Final M.A. Thesis .......................................................................................................................... 15
Procedure and Timeline for IDSC Final M.A. Project................................................................. 16
The Quality, Style and Content of the IDSC Final M.A. Project ............................................... 19
IDSC Final M.A. Project Checklist ................................................................................................... 21
IDCE Internships – Requirements for Graduate Students ......................................................... 22
    Negotiating an Internship .............................................................................................................................. 22
    Academic Component of Internship ........................................................................................................... 22
IDCE Internship Proposal .................................................................................................................. 24
IDCE Internship Report ...................................................................................................................... 26
Internship Supervisor Evaluation ..................................................................................................... 27
IDSC Checklist for the Masters Degree Program ......................................................................... 29
Checklist for the Graduate Component of the B.A./M.A. Degree Program ........................... 30
IDCE Intent to Graduate Form ......................................................................................................... 32

IDCE Graduate Student Guide…………………………………………………………..……33



                                                                                                                                                                                     2
Overview
The Master of Arts degree in International Development and Social Change (IDSC) emphasizes the
connection between critical thinking and effective action. It is designed for scholars of international
development, as well as for present and future practitioners of grassroots, community-based development.

Offering alternatives to centralized planning and implementation, the IDSC Master’s program has been a
pioneer in participatory development and a leading force in creating tools for social change. The
challenge for the 21st-century is to promote just and equitable development and sustain environmental
resources through critical thought, local planning, and action. The IDCE Department and the IDSC
program stress participatory approaches that foster alliances and partnerships between local institutions
and broader entities such as external development agencies, universities, and state and non-governmental
organizations.

This master’s program helps students conceptualize innovative approaches to development problems by
building an understanding of the complex causes, influences and implications of poverty, social injustice,
and conflict. Rooted in the belief that effective approaches merge many disciplines, the IDSC program
employs a trans-disciplinary focus, with faculty from anthropology, economics, environmental sciences,
women’s studies, geography, history, government, and management. Links with collaborating institutions
in countries such as Kenya, Nepal, Ghana, India, Senegal, and Mexico provide important real-world
perspectives and field work opportunities. The IDSC Master’s program has three key elements:

        1. Challenging conventional ideas about development and seeking innovative alternatives,

        2. Understanding how the interplay of power relationships gives rise to social injustice and
        inequity, and

        3. Exploring the linkages between critical thinking and effective development practices at the
        community, regional, national, and global levels.

Courses introduce classical and contemporary approaches and critiques of development and provide
practical skills to advance professional goals in the field of development. The unique blend of theory and
practice enables students to link local planning and action to policy making at different levels. The
program also focuses on gender issues and social justice, bridging differences in post conflict areas,
building alliances among institutions, and learning from the voices of marginalized people.




                                                                                                             3
IDSC Course of Study

Master’s Degree Requirements
The master’s degree in International Development and Social Change requires a minimum of 12 graduate
course units. These include five required core courses, including a final M.A. project, and seven electives
courses to form the student’s field of specialization.

Through action-oriented, critical studies linking theory and practice, this master’s program offers
opportunities to specialize in such topics as political economy, conflict and development, education and
development, health and development, culture and development, resource management, community-based
development, gender and development, and more.

Required Core Courses

All IDSC MA students must satisfy the following requirements:

1. IDCE 360 Development Theory provides a critical overview of classical and contemporary theories
of development across many disciplines. Encourages thinking historically, politically and analytically
about the multiplicity of development processes and the complex relations of power that underlie them.

2. IDCE 361 Development Program and Project Management develops skills in needs assessment,
project design, implementation, management, budgeting, scheduling, work plans, and
monitoring/evaluation.

3. One Graduate-level Economics Course, such as IDCE 30217 Economic Fundamentals for
International Development introduces economic history, as well as microeconomics and macroeconomics
to the non-economists, while illustrating practical applications of these techniques to real-world
development situations.

4. IDCE 30291 Research Design and Methods (or its equivalents) reviews topics in social research
design and methodology including problem definition, research strategies, sampling, data collection
techniques and procedures, and proposal writing.

5. IDCE 30213 Final M.A. Project is the culminating experience of the IDSC Masters program where
students have the opportunity to develop their research and professional interests independently.

Elective Courses – A Sampling

Students select electives to focus their research, deepen their understanding of, and develop an area of
specialization. IDSC MA students are encouraged to develop critical and practical skills and develop a
research or career focus through choosing from electives offered by the IDSC program, other IDCE
programs (CDP, ES&P and GISDE), and across Clark University, including the School of Geography and
the Graduate School of Management. Clark is also a member of the Colleges of Worcester Consortium,
and students may thus take classes at other member institutions. Students work with their advisors to
develop an individualized course of study.

A sampling of recently offered electives offered through the IDCE department includes:

    •   IDCE 30201 GIS and Community Profiles: Mapping Strategies for Planning & Comm. Dev.
    •   IDCE 30206 Technology and Sustainability: Perspectives from the Global South

                                                                                                          4
    •   IDCE 30207 Gender, Militarization and Development
    •   IDCE 30221 Education and Development
    •   IDCE 30229 Program Monitoring and Evaluation
    •   IDCE 30235 Globalization and its Illicit Commodities
    •   IDCE 30239 Microfinance, Gender, and Liberalism
    •   IDCE 30243 Seeing Like a Humanitarian Agency
    •   IDCE 30248 Gender and Health
    •   IDCE 30254 Gender, Power and Social Change
    •   IDCE 30256 Peasants, Rural Development and Agrarian Change
    •   IDCE 30269 Raced Nature, Gendered Developments: The Political Economy of Environmental
        Conservation
    •   IDCE 30271 NGOS and Advocacy
    •   IDCE 30284 Transnationalism and Social Networks
    •   IDCE 30292 Participatory Development Planning
    •   IDCE 30328 Public Communication Seminar
    •   IDCE 304 International and Comparative Analysis of Community Development
    •   IDCE 312 Famine and Food Security
    •   IDCE 341 Management of NGO Organization
    •   IDCE 353 International Political Ecology
    •   IDCE 354 Beyond Victims and Guardian Angels: Third World Women, Gender & Dev.
    •   IDCE 366 Principles of Conflict Negotiation
    •   IDCE 369 Religion, Identity and Violence in a Globalizing World
    •   IDCE 373 Social Movements, Globalization and the State
    •   IDCE 388 Advanced Vector GIS
    •   IDCE 396 Advanced Raster GIS

Please view Clark’s official Academic Catalog (www.clarku.edu/academiccatalog) for a
complete listing of current course offerings.

Directed Study
As part of your elective credits, you have the option of doing an internship or a directed study with any
IDSC core or affiliate faculty member. Directed studies are an opportunity for students to engage in
advanced level work (beyond what they learn in seminars) on issues of special interest to them. Directed
studies take different form (e.g. literature review, annotated bibliography, research paper, thesis
preparation, grant proposal development, etc.) depending on the interest and abilities of each student, and
the degree of involvement from the faculty.

To undertake a directed study, you must first develop a preliminary reading list and a draft proposal
describing the topic you wish to explore in depth, the rationale for it, the shape of the final product (e.g.
literature review, annotated bibliography, a brief research paper, etc.), and a timeline for it. Once you
have those issues outlined, share the draft proposal with the faculty member you wish to work with. The
faculty member will let you know if s/he feels your topic matches with his or her area of interest and can
direct your study. If the faculty member agrees to work with you, you must finalize your course of study
and get the faculty’s permission to register for the necessarily credits (IDCE 399).

Given the complexity and level of thought that goes into a directed study, you must begin to prepare for
this well in advance of course registration. Typically, a directed study is not undertaken until your second
year of the program, when you have a clear idea of the focus for your final project. You can take a total of
two (2) internship and/or directed study credits over the course of your IDSC M.A. program. If you want
to take more than 2 credits of internship and/or directed study, you must submit a written request and
rationale to the coordinator of the IDSC program and the IDCE Director.



                                                                                                                5
Transfer credits

Up to two graduate course units (8 credits) may be transferred from another institution into an IDCE
Graduate Program to count towards the 12-course-unit requirement for graduation. These transfer credits
must be approved by the IDSC Graduate Program Coordinator and the Director of IDCE and must be
relevant to your particular course of specialization. These transfers are to occur before students begin their
M.A. at IDCE or soon after. Retrospective transfers are unusual. A student may petition the IDSC
Program Coordinator and the Director of IDCE to request such a transfer and it is their prerogative to
assess the possibility of such transfers.


B.A./M.A. Fifth Year Pathway

Eligible Clark University students who proceed to the fifth year M.A. degree program in IDSC take eight
credits over two semesters. These include the five required courses described above and three elective
courses to form the student’s focus or “area of specialization,” which may be the same or different from
the undergraduate major area of specialization.

The fifth-year scholarship requires students to complete all requirements within the prescribed year. The
IDSC faculty highly encourage all participants in the B.A./M.A. program to complete a M.A. paper, thesis
or technical report at the same pace as the regular M.A. students (to be filed in late March). However,
students can extend their M.A. studies into subsequent semesters at their own cost.

Due to the intensive nature of the fifth year, B.A./M.A. students petition their faculty readers for
extension to this deadline according to two alternative scenarios:

        Scenario B: Completion of this requirement by September 21 for an October graduation. The
        student will receive his/her diploma in the following October graduation, but will not have to pay
        additional fees.

        Scenario C: Completion of this requirement by January 10 for a February graduation. Because
        faculty are not available for advising over the summer, the student should have completed enough
        work to continue writing independently over the summer and then seek feedback when faculty
        return in late August. The student will receive his/her diploma in the following December
        graduation, paying all necessary fees ($200 as a non-resident student) for the fall semester.




                                                                                                            6
Suggested Sequencing and Program Plan for IDSC/M.A.

First-year Fall Semester
Courses
   • IDCE 360 Development Theory: Required core course to be taken in the fall semester.
   • IDCE 30217 Economic Fundamentals for International Development: Required core course.
       Strongly recommended that this be taken in the first year fall semester for students without any
       economics background. OR, if you have an economics background, take an Elective or Skills
       course.
   • An Elective course in an area of your interest or to explore potential interests and develop skills.

Progress towards M.A. Project
   • Discuss research interests with your advisor, other faculty and second year students.

First-year Spring Semester
Courses
   • IDCE 361 Program and Project Management: Required and to be taken in the spring.
   • IDCE 30247 Development Economics: Required core course for students with familiarity with
       basic economics. Strongly recommended that students take this in their first year. OR, if you have
       already taken IDCE 30217 take Elective or Skills units.
   • IDCE 314 Research Design and Methods or its equivalents (IDCE 305, IDCE 390, and IDCE
       30291): Required core course. Strongly recommended that students take this in their first year.
   • In early spring, begin assessing your research interests and professional goals and what final
       M.A. project format (research paper, practitioner report, or thesis) is best suited to meeting them.

Progress towards M.A. Project
   • By pre-registration advising week (late March): Draft a two-page final M.A. project prospectus
       with specific topic, students’ courses, field research or work, and methods relevant to the topic
       student plans to use. Submit to your faculty reader, advisor, and IDSC Graduate Program
       Coordinator for approval.

Second-year Fall Semester
Courses
   • Two elective units
   • IDCE 30217 Economic Fundamentals: Take now, if not taken in the first year.
   • IDCE 314 Research Design and Methods or its equivalents (IDCE 305, IDCE 390, and IDCE
       30291): Take now, if not taken in the first year.

Progress towards M.A. Project
   • IDCE 30213 Final M.A. Project: Required core credit. Sign up for half or one credit with faculty
       reader.
   • Finalize project aim and plan of work by first month of fall semester.
   • Work on drafts independently, and in conjunction with peers throughout the fall semester.
   • Submit a draft of your final M.A. project to your faculty reader for review before the December
       holidays or, if you plan to work over the winter break, submit the draft well ahead of schedule.
       Please work with your faculty reader to ensure positive communications and to agree on
       deadlines and goals. Don’t forget to check the dates of the winter break as most faculty are not on
       campus during the holidays, may be traveling and otherwise out of communication during this
       time.


                                                                                                            7
Second-year Spring Semester
Courses
   • Complete Elective requirements in your area of specialization

Progress towards M.A. Project
   • IDCE 30213 Final M.A. Project: Sign up for this required core credit, half or one credit with
       faculty reader.
   • Work on finalizing a draft by late January/ early February, submit it to your faculty reader, and
       meet with him/her to discuss changes necessary to create a polished draft.
   • Submit an Intent to Graduate form, including date of review session, to the IDCE Student and
       Academic Affairs Office by the end of February.
   • Send polished draft to your faculty reader by late February (or at least a week before review
       session) and have a review session with your faculty readers before Spring Break (which is
       usually the first week of March). Check Spring Break dates and note that faculty are not available
       during break. Please remember that it is the student’s responsibility to coordinate with his/her
       reader and schedule this review session at a time convenient for both parties.
   • During Spring Break incorporate comments, revise, and put paper in final publishable format.
   • By end March (check exact date with IDCE’s Student Services Office) submit one formatted
       copy of final paper signed by your advisor and a CD to IDCE Student and Academic Services
       Office for processing.
   • Consider presenting your final IDSC M.A. project at Clark’s Multidisciplinary Graduate Student
       Conference. The conference is usually held in late April, but the Call for Presentations is much
       earlier.




                                                                                                        8
IDSC Faculty

Program Faculty
Kiran Asher, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change
Political economy, feminist and critical development theory, post-colonial studies, cultural politics, Latin
America

David Bell, Ed.D.
Associate Professor of Practice - International Development and Social Change
IDCE Assistant Director
education and development, community empowerment, social transformation, teacher education and
social change, educational policy reform, power-relations and development, peace building and conflict
transformation, participatory development, child labor and education, monitoring and evaluation,
research-learning and service-learning, and African perspectives and contributions to education and
educational leadership

Anita Fábos, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change
Coordinator of the Graduate Program in International Development and Social Change
Ethnicity and race, gender, urban refugees, Sudanese immigrants and refugees, Middle Eastern
immigration and naturalization policies, transnationalism and citizenship, transnational Islam, narratives
of exile, Hungarian refugees

Jude Fernando, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change
Economic development and political economy, with emphasis on non-profit organizations, environment,
gender, and child labor, particularly in South Asia

William F. Fisher, Ph.D.
Professor of International Development and Social Change
IDCE Director
Anthropology, social movements and development, global civil society, NGOs, involuntary resettlement,
ethnicity, political economy, South Asia

Ellen Foley, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change
Coordinator of the Undergraduate International Development and Social Change Program (Fall 2010)
Anthropology of development, gender, Islam, knowledge systems, medical anthropology and West Africa
(specifically in Senegal), gender and household health, reproductive care and fertility and healthcare
reform

Liza Grandia, Ph.D. (on leave Fall 2010-Spring 2011)
Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change
Political economy and corporate capitalism, the commons, political ecology and the politics of
biodiversity conservation, peasants and agrarian change, Mesoamerica and the Q’eqchi’ Maya people,
DR-CAFTA and the Puebla to Panama Plan, indigenous knowledge and cultural survival, the global
cancer epidemic

Ken MacLean, Ph.D. (on leave Fall 2010)
Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change
Coordinator of the Undergraduate International Development and Social Change Program (Spring 2011)
States and state-effects, political violence, extractive industries, displacement and irregular migration,
                                                                                                             9
critical humanitarianism, (late and post-) socialism, legal regimes, science and technology studies, and
comparative cartographies in Mainland Southeast Asia and the Greater South China Sea

Marianne Sarkis, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change
Disparities in obstetric care, migration and identity, culture in clinical encounters, diasporic health,
bioethics, demographic anthropology, Participatory Action Research (PAR), history of obstetrics, Somali
history and culture, globalization and health, advocacy anthropology, Social Networks Analysis (SNA),
rumors in health care, Arab culture and identity

Research Faculty
Cynthia Enloe, Ph.D.
IDCE Research Professor of International Development and Social Change
The interactions of feminism, women, militarized culture, war, politics, and globalized economics in
countries such as Japan, Iraq, the U.S., Britain, the Philippines, Canada, Chile, and Turkey

Richard Ford, Ph.D.:
IDCE Research Professor of International Development and Social Change
Resource trends and resource management in Africa, community participation and sustainable
development, conflict mediation, community-based planning, monitoring and evaluation

Heidi Larson, Ph.D.
Associate Research Professor of International Development and Social Change
Coordinator of aids2031
Risk analysis, risk communications, public health issues, including HIV/AIDS, TB, and child health and
vaccines, particularly focusing on the socio-cultural and political determinants of health, including the
role of religion and belief systems

Barbara Thomas-Slayter, Ph.D.
IDCE Research Professor of International Development and Social Change
Local institutions, women and public policy, peasant-state relations, gender issues, non-governmental
organizations

Affiliate Faculty
Parminder Bhachu, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Sociology

Joseph de Rivera, Ph.D.
Professor, Hiatt School of Psychology
Director, Peace Studies Program

Jody Emel, Ph.D.
Associate Director and Professor, School of Geography

Odile Ferly, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of French, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

Jacqueline Geoghegan, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Economics

Amy Ickowitz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics

                                                                                                            10
James T. Murphy, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Geography

Richard Peet, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Geography

Paul W. Posner, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

Dianne Rocheleau, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Geography

Paul Ropp, Ph.D.
Research Professor, Department of History

Srinivasan Sitaraman, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

Valerie Sperling, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

Kristen Williams, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

Adjunct Faculty
Sarah Woodside, M.A.
Adjunct Instructor, International Development and Social Change




                                                                  11
Research, Internships, and Careers

Research Resources
The Jeanne X. Kasperson Research Library has special collections on risk and hazards, global
environmental change, sustainable development, water resources, energy, technology and a growing set of
collections on selected countries.

The George Perkins Marsh Institute sponsors research through its Clark Labs for Cartographic
Technology and Geographic Systems and the Center for Community-Based Development (CCBD).

The Center for Community-Based Development (CCBD) promotes research on community
institutions, gender, participation, and conflict resolution.

Visit the IDCE website online for more information about research resources:
www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/researchResources.cfm.

Field Research
Many students conduct field-based research during their M.A. course of studies, often through funding
from external agencies. A small number of IDSC research travel grants are also available every summer
to help fund transportation to research field sites. Other student research projects have received external
support from the Compton Foundation, U.S. State Department Presidential Management Fellowship, E7
Sustainable Energy Development Scholarship, David L. Boren Graduate Fellowships, Mickey Leland
International Fellowships, Greenville Foundation, National Science Foundation, InterAmerican
Foundation, the Switzer Foundation, and Catholic Relief Services. Students often draw on their field
experience and data to develop their final research paper.

Students may also work with faculty on current IDCE research activities. Check faculty web pages for
research interests and opportunities.

Current IDCE Research Activities
aids2031

As one of numerous global partners, Clark University, represented by IDCE and the George Perkins
Marsh Institute, is collaborating in and coordinating a global consortium, aids2031. The initiative is
reshaping how people in the development and medical fields think about the next 25 years of AIDS.
IDSC professor Heidi Larson, coordinator of the aids2031 consortium, says, “aids2031 is a two-year
project which has revisit some of the assumptions that were made about AIDS when it was first identified
in 1981. A lot has changed in the medical and technology fields as well as in the geo-political
environment, so we wanted to investigate what new approaches we need to take. We aimed to generate
new evidence to inform our response to AIDS during the next 25 years. With a critical look at past and
current responses and in light of world changes, we hoped to learn how we can influence the state of
AIDS at its 50-year mark, in 2031.” IDCE has also been host to one of the principle working groups of
aids2031 looking at social drivers of the epidemic. William Fisher is the co-convener of the working
group.

For more research activities, visit: www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/researchActivities.cfm.




                                                                                                          12
Internships
IDSC students have participated in internships at development and planning agencies in the U.S. as well
as overseas. Some of their internship experiences have been with Catholic Relief Services in Liberia,
Honduras, Macedonia, Senegal, and Somalia; USAID in the Sudan; Human Rights Watch; Grass Roots
International; Cultural Survival in Mali; United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Geneva;
Near East Foundation in Morocco; Oxfam-America in Cambodia; Aid to Artisans in Zimbabwe; and the
World Bank in Washington, D.C.

For more information about IDSC internship experiences of past IDCE students, visit:
www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/academicsGradIDIntern.cfm. To view internship opportunities on the
Careers Database, visit: www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/studentsCareers.cfm.

Careers
IDSC alums work on the front lines of development around the world. Among the careers of recent
graduates: Research Assistant for the Center for Fair and Alternative Trade Studies, varied positions
throughout Mercy Corps, India Program Manager for the World Resource Institute Center for Sustainable
Transport, Junior Environmental Analyst for Systems, Research and Applications International, Inc.,
Development Associate and Grant Manager for Communities for a Better Environment, Field Program
Manager of Alternative Livelihoods/North, Program Manager for the Women in Technology Program in
Yemen, Gender and HIV/AIDS Consultant for INGO War Child-Holland, Training Consultant for
Windle Trust-UK, consultant for the World Wildlife Fund Vietnam, program planner for the New
Hampshire State Department of Health and Human Services, Brownfields Coordinator for the Economic
Development Division of the City of Worcester, Housing Development Coordinator with Housing
Opportunity Development Corporation, Applications Management Specialist at Winrock International,
Estuary Educator for the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Programme Coordinator
for WWF’s Toxics Programme, GIS Coordinator for EPA Region 1 at the Environmental Protection
Agency in Boston, M.A., Project Manager for the Resource Management Plan, Head of Mission for
Première Urgence (a French NGO), the state program coordinator for Learn and Serve Montana, National
Grassroots Coordinator of the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, and many more.

To read more about IDCE alumni and their individual career paths, visit:
www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/studentsAlumni.cfm.

For information about job postings and how to plan your professional trajectory, visit:
www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/studentsCareers.cfm.




                                                                                                      13
IDSC Final M.A. Project
All four programs within IDCE offer three options for a final M.A. project, which is the culminating
experience of an IDCE Masters degree. In IDSC the three options are: (1) a Research Paper, (2) a
Practitioner Report, or (3) a Thesis. None of the options is considered more prestigious than the others.
Students choose the option that is most compatible with their research and professional interests, and then
develop these interests independently through the final project.


Option 1. Final M.A. Research Paper
The final M.A. research paper must focus on a question or problem of particular within the field of
international development and social change. Students identify a suitable topic for a paper (from course
work, library research, and/or field experience) and review the existing literature on this topic. They then
formulate a line of argument regarding the topic, collect the relevant data, describe the research
methodology, and synthesize and analyze the data carefully to develop their argument. Finally, they offer
critical insights on the central question or problem analyzed in the paper. The may be based on primary or
secondary data, be 25-35 pages long (double spaced; 12 pt. font size) and must be reviewed by a faculty
reader (a core IDCE faculty member). Students should submit a research proposal to their advisor by the
end of the first year of their program, have a confirmed faculty reader by their third semester (usually the
fall semester of their second year), and submit the final paper by their fourth and last semester (details of
this schedule are below).


Option 2. Final M.A. Practitioner Report
The final M.A. practitioner report should reflect an innovative, applied project carried out by the student
that contributes to a development process or organization—e.g. in building capacity, fomenting better
participation, improving monitoring and evaluation, raising funds, or contributing new data for
planning—whatever the case may be. The practitioner report should describe and reflect upon an original
contribution that the student has made. That is, the work must be original and demonstrate state-of-the-art
practice.

The work may be either voluntary or paid, but it should have been carried out during the two years of the
M.A. program. The standard of work for this practitioner paper should go beyond something carried out
for an internship both in timing (it should be more than the required 210 hours of an internship) and
substance (as reflected by the professional responsibilities assumed). That is, the student must
demonstrate both initiative and creativity in some aspect of the project cycle and give appropriate credit
and cite should any information or data acquired from the organization but not collected by the student.

The student is solely responsible for making contacts and establishing a relationship to a development
organization or process of their choice. The faculty reader may provide some ideas, but it is the task of the
student to do all the necessary groundwork for finding a practice experience suitable to his/her own skills
and interests.

While the student may choose to write up a separate report for the internal purposes of the development
organization with which he/she collaborated, the practitioner report submitted to IDSC should be
understandable to a broader audience that may not be familiar with the background, context, and
institutional history of the actors involved.




                                                                                                          14
Option 3: Final M.A. Thesis
Graduate students of extraordinary academic achievement may pursue a thesis option with the written
permission of the IDSC Graduate Coordinator and IDCE Director. Like a M.A. research paper, a thesis
must focus on a theme, question, or problem of particular interest within the field of international
development and social change. However it must be based on a deeper review and analysis of the chosen
topic than a M.A. paper. To reflect this depth, the thesis is expected to be longer than a research paper,
approximately 100 pages, and must be defended orally before a committee of two faculty, including one
core IDSC faculty member. The first reader or thesis committee chair should be a core IDCE faculty
member.
         To pursue the thesis option, students must make a written request to the IDSC Graduate
Coordinator before the end of the student’s second semester (by mid April). The request must contain a
transcript, a note outlining the student’s ability to pursue independent thesis research, and well-developed
thesis proposal (including central question/hypothesis located within the relevantly reviewed literature,
data to be collected, research methodology to be used, timeline of research and writing, and a preliminary
bibliography of 10-20 sources). A recommendation from the prospective thesis reader may also be
included. This request is reviewed and approved by the IDSC Graduate Program faculty before the
summer break.

Students who get approval to pursue an IDSC M.A. thesis must sign up for one credit of directed study
(IDCE399) in addition to IDCE 30213. This credit may be taken in the fall or spring semesters of the
second year of the M.A. degree.

(Please note: IDCE reserves the right to modify guidelines and procedures at any time.)




                                                                                                          15
Procedure and Timeline for IDSC Final M.A. Project
1) In the fall semester of the first graduate year, students reflect on their interests, what they learn in their
course work and identify possible themes for their final project. They also think about the suitability of
the final project topic, its relationship to their area of specialization, and the feasibility of the approach
they wish to take to develop it.

2) In the spring semester of their first year, students prepare a two-page prospectus indicating the specific
topic and form of their final project, the relevance of courses taken and work conducted or to be
conducted on the topic. Students should meet with their advisor and potential faculty readers to explore
their topic and assess whether a faculty member is available to serve as reader. During fall pre-registration
advising week, submit a copy of this prospectus (signed by the faculty who agrees to serve as your
reader), to your faculty advisor, and the IDSC Graduate Program Coordinator for approval. Students
should file a copy of the signed prospectus in the IDCE Student and Academic Services Office and with
their reader.

3) Once the prospectus is approved, the student designs a plan of work for the summer. Remember that
while your faculty reader can provide guidance, students are expected to work independently on their
final project (whatever its format).

4) Throughout the fall semester of their second year students continue work on their final M.A. project
(checking in with their reader as necessary). Students are required to have an approved topic and reader
by drop-add period of their third semester (typically the fall semester of their second year). In conjunction
with the reader’s schedule, students should work out a timeline to complete the various stages of the
paper. At this time, students select a second reader from among the IDSC core or affiliate faculty to serve
on a two-person Final Project Review Committee. (Note that the last day of classes is in early December;
finals are mid-December. Classes resume in mid-January. Most faculty members are not on campus
during the holidays and semester break.)

5) By the beginning of the February (of their fourth and last semester) before a May graduation, students
submit a draft of their final M.A. project to their readers to discuss the necessary changes to the project.
Re-work this draft into a polished version. If you wish to receive your Master’s degree in May, you must
submit an Intent to Graduate form to the IDCE Student and Academic Services Office on the last
working day in February.

6) By the end of February (of their fourth and last semester), the student has a review session with the two
readers. Both readers should receive the polished draft at least one week before the review session. At this
session, the paper, its scope, contents, fit with the literature, etc. will be thoroughly reviewed. This
meeting is not designed as a “defense” and is not open to other students. Rather, it is a work session for
the student and the two readers. Students should anticipate that they will require several more weeks to
finalize the paper or report. If a student is planning to have an M.A. degree awarded in May, the review
session must be held by the end of February in order to allow time to incorporate comments, make
revisions, and put the paper in the required final format by the end of March. It is the student’s
responsibility to set up the review session. (Note: Spring break is usually the week after the first
weekend in March and faculty are not available during break.)

7) Once both readers have approved the revised paper, the student submits one hardcopy and one CD of
the final version signed by the reader to the IDCE Student and Academic Services Office by the last
working day in March. The paper should be in the format required by the Clark University Graduate
School for theses and formal papers including proper front matter, accepted page numbering, and can be
found at www.clarku.edu/graduate/current/formattingguides.cfm.

8) The Clark University Board of Trustees meets quarterly to grant degrees. If you wish to receive your
                                                                                                               16
Master’s degree in May, hand in the finished, formatted and signed copy of your final M.A. project to the
IDCE Student and Academic Services Office on or before the end of March (check exact date with the
IDCE Student Services Coordinator, Dilma Lucena). There are no exceptions to this deadline. If you miss
the deadline to graduate in May or wish to graduate in October, discuss this with your advisor and submit
the Intent to Graduate form to the IDCE Student and Academic Services Office before the start of
classes in August (to avoid being charged Non-resident Student fees). The finished, formatted copy of
your final M.A. project, signed by your advisor, is due into the IDCE Student and Academic Services
Office before the last week of September.

9) After final revisions have been made, the student should confer with the two faculty readers on their
views regarding journal submission and proceed according to their recommendation. If readers of the
student’s final project judge the work to be of exceptional merit and originality, they will recommend its
submission to an academic journal such as World Development, Signs, Environment, Development &
Sustainability; Human Ecology, Water Resources Development, or Development in Practice. It is not a
requirement to submit the paper to an academic journal. It is an honor to be asked do so, as well as a mark
of distinguished accomplishment if the paper is accepted for publication.

10) Students are strongly encouraged to present their final M.A. projects at the Multidisciplinary Graduate
Student Conference held in April every year and organized by the Clark University Graduate Student
Council.




                                                                                                        17
      The procedures and timing for the IDSC Final M.A. project are outlined in the Table below.

Timing                 M.A. Paper                        M.A. Practitioner Report             M.A. Thesis
 st
1      March/April     Reader chosen & topic             Supervisor chosen &                  Petition made and approved,
yr                     approved                          organizational contacts              Reader chosen
                                                         established for a feasible work
                                                         plan
       End of          Research proposal completed       Terms of reference completed         Research proposal completed
       semester
       Summer          Research (Primary or              Internship or applied work           Research (Primary)
                       Secondary)

2nd    Fall semester   Conduct literature review and     Conduct research on                  Conduct literature review and
yr                     research analysis. Sign up for    comparative best practices,          research analysis. Sign up for
                       IDCE 30213 (½ credit or 1         contextual background, and           IDCE 399 (½ credit or 1 credit)
                       credit, or leave this until the   other relevant research from         and IDCE 30213 (½ credit or 1
                       spring)                           grey literature. Sign up for         credit or leave this until the
                                                         IDCE 30213 (½ credit or 1            spring).
                                                         credit or leave this until the
                                                         spring)
       Spring          Complete the final M.A.           Sign up for IDCE 30213 (½            Complete the final M.A. project.
       semester        project. Sign up for IDCE         credit or 1 credit or none if this   Sign up for IDCE 399 (½ credit
                       30213 (½ credit or 1 credit, or   was done in the fall)                or none if 1 credit was taken in
                       none if 1 credit was taken in                                          the fall ) and IDCE 30213 (½
                       the fall)                                                              credit or 1 credit or none if 1
                                                                                              credit was taken in the fall)
       Feb/March       Working session with reader       Working session with reader          Oral Defense with two-member
                                                                                              committee




                                                                                                                        18
The Quality, Style and Content of the IDSC Final M.A. Project
The final M.A. research paper or thesis should:

   •   Articulate a clear question or problem to be addressed in the paper/thesis, and your argument
       regarding this question/problem.

   •   Locate the topic within the key debates and literature in the field of international development
       and social change.

   •   Describe your research methodology. That is, indicate what constitutes the principle data or
       evidence of your work, how it was collected (from primary or secondary sources), and how it will
       be used to address the central research question.

   •   Develop your argument systematically by drawing on supporting evidence and organizing your
       points clearly so that they speak to your central question.

   •   Conclude by offering insightful remarks or making an original contribution to the discussion of
       the central issue you have chosen to address.

The practitioner report should:

   •   Contain a concise executive summary describing the development problem or project tackled.

   •   Make clear the appropriate institutional, historical, geographic context, such that it is
       understandable by any development practitioner.

   •   Describe the work carried out and how it contributed to solving the problem defined.

   •   Show evidence of how the student put into practice new ideas, theories, or skills learned as part of
       his/her course of study. If the work is part of a team project, the student should clarify his/her role
       and contribution to the team’s work.

   •   Conclude with specific, but realistic recommendations.

   •   Append appropriate annexes that show:
          o Written evidence of how the report has been presented by the development organization,
             for example, a cover letter, copy of a PowerPoint presentation, or a transcript of oral
             presentation,
          o And/or any feedback received from the organization in response to the work conducted.
          o If the report is part of a team project, the report itself or its annexes should clearly
             describe the role and contribution of each student.

All final M.A. projects should

   •   Contain a correctly and consistently formatted bibliography of relevant sources and references
       cited in the paper, report or thesis. See:
       www.fas.harvard.edu/~expos/index.cgi?section=resources.

   •   Reflect professional or graduate-level standards in terms of the writing quality, style and content
       of the final project. The project, including bibliography and footnotes, should be in the format
       required by Clark University Graduate School and the IDSC Program. Clark University’s Thesis
       Format guidelines are available at www.clarku.edu/graduate/current/formattingguides.cfm. If you
                                                                                                           19
    have questions see Denise Robertson in the Graduate School Office, 2nd floor, Geography
    Building. If you wish you may use the template available at
    www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/docs/IDSC_masterstemplate.pdf to format the first few pages
    of your final M.A. project. Also see the IDSC M.A. Project Checklist below.

•   Avoid plagiarism. For the University policy on Plagiarism and for resources on how to avoid it,
    see: www.clarku.edu/departments/writingatclark/citation.cfm.




                                                                                                      20
IDSC Final M.A. Project Checklist
Name: ______________________________________________________________________

Final M.A. Project Title:
______________________________________________________________________

Complete and submit this checklist with your final M.A. Project to the Format Advisor in the
Graduate School Office. Make sure you have obtained all necessary signatures and that your
manuscript is in a sturdy stationary box.

Check Page   Form
here  Number
             Graduate Fee Form               With check made payable to Clark
                                             University available in the Graduate School
                                             Office or online
                   Microfilm Agreement       Available in the Graduate School Office or
                   Form                      online
                   Abstract Title Page       With signature of Reader, no page number
            1      Abstract Text             Numbered in Arabic numerals in the upper
                                             right-hand corner, starting with page 1 on the
                                             first page of the text
            i      Two Title Pages           With signature of Reader, assumed page i
                                             only; do not print number on page
            ii     Academic History          Assumed number ii only; do not print
                                             number on page
           iii     Dedication
           iv      Acknowledgements          Page iii if no dedication
            v      Table of Contents (for    Page iii if no dedication or
                   THESES and                acknowledgements (NOT NECESSARY
                   REPORTS, not              FOR IDSC M.A. PAPERS)
                   recommended for
                   IDSC M.A. papers)
            vi     List of Illustrations,    Page iv if no TOC. May be on separate pages
                   Maps, Tables, Figures
            1      Text                      Page 1, Chapter 1….
                                             See formatting guide for specific page
                                             number placement
                   Reference Materials       *Bibliography, Appendix,
                                             Glossary….numbered appropriately
                   Blank Page                Final Item

*If footnotes are not used at the bottom of each page, you may wish to have a “Notes” page at the
end of the text. This page will come before the reference materials.




                                                                                                    21
IDCE Internships – Requirements for Graduate Students
IDCE faculty can assist students in identifying internship opportunities; however, students are encouraged
to identify their own internships. Internships can be done for credit, as negotiated with faculty, and
depending on the opportunity, interns may also earn a stipend paid by the host agency. You must
complete all steps of the Internship Requirements in order to receive credit.

Negotiating an Internship
Step 1: Search for an Internship
Search the Internet, job listings, the Careers Database on the IDCE website, IDCE ALL email messages,
and the IDCE internship files in the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office for possible NGOs or
local institutions that have paid or unpaid summer or semester internships. Talk to faculty who may know
of openings. Ask second-year IDCE grad students and alums where they found internships. Inquire with a
personal call, letter, or formal email to request updated information from an organization of your choice
about current internships available and/or an application for internships. For a summer internship, begin
your search by October or November.

Step 2: Apply for the Internship
Once you find an internship that interests you, apply well before the deadline. Competition will be stiff
for choice internships.

Step 3: Complete an Internship Report
Once you have secured the internship, begin to fill out the Internship Report. This is a short paper that
answers some general questions about the place of your internship. This report should be returned to the
Student and Academic Affairs Office by the time your internship is complete.

If you wish to receive academic credit for your internship, continue on with Step 4.

Step 4: Get Internship Approval
Once you secure an internship, fill out an Internship Proposal form. Complete the form and meet with
your faculty sponsor to describe your internship, its relevance to your studies, and the appropriate
academic component that you wish to pursue. Once your faculty sponsor approves your internship and
signs the application form, return two signed copies of the completed Internship Proposal form to the
Student and Academic Affairs Office to be added to your student file.

Step 5: Register Your Internship for Credit
An internship must be a minimum of 210 hours to qualify for academic credit. You will need to secure a
faculty sponsor to oversee your internship and complete an academic component in order for it to count
towards one credit. You can register for academic credit for a summer internship in the fall semester
following the internship ONLY if you have completed an Internship Proposal form and received
approval from your faculty sponsor in the previous spring semester.

Academic Component of Internship
Before starting your internship, discuss the internship with your faculty sponsor, so that he/she can
determine the academic component that best fits your internship. Your faculty sponsor must sign off on
your academic component in order for you to receive credit. The options include:

1. Research Paper: A 15- to 20-page paper describing a research topic that you explored during the
internship.



                                                                                                            22
2. Research Materials: Produced as part of your internship, this is research that you carried out for the
organization, such as a handbook, manual, report, or study.

Step 6: Complete the Internship
Before the final week of your internship, have your internship supervisor complete the Internship
Supervisor Evaluation form and send it to the Student and Academic Affairs Office. Remember to fill out
the Internship Report, too, and return it to the Student and Academic Affairs Office by the time your
internship is complete.

Step 7: Complete the Academic Component
If you wish to receive credit, submit the academic component of your internship to your faculty sponsor
within four weeks of completing the internship. This is the Research Paper or Research Materials. Talk to
your faculty sponsor for guidelines and expectations regarding your academic component.




                                                                                                            23
IDCE Internship Proposal
An internship must be a minimum of 210 hours to qualify for academic credit. Not more than 25% of your
job duties should be clerical by nature.

Complete this form after you have secured an internship. Once your faculty sponsor signs below, please
return two copies to the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office in Room 24 of the IDCE House to be
added to your student file.

PLEASE NOTE: Before the final week of your internship, have your internship supervisor complete the
Internship Supervisor Evaluation form and send it to the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office
in Room 24 of the IDCE House. If you wish to receive credit, submit the academic component of your
internship to your faculty sponsor within four weeks of completing the internship.

Internship Proposal: _____________________________________________________________________

Student Name: __________________________________________________________________________

Address during internship: ________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________

Campus address: ________________________________________________________________________

Telephone: __________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________


                                       Sponsoring Organization

Name of Organization: ___________________________________________________________________

Address: _______________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________

Telephone: __________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________

Website: ________________________________________________________________________________

Description of the Organization: ___________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________

Internship Supervisor: ____________________________________________________________________

Title and Department: ____________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________
Internship Title and Responsibilities:
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                   24
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________

Goals or End Product (reports, publications, etc.) of the Internship
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________

Proposed Weekly Schedule (if possible, attach a work timetable that you have agreed upon with your
internship supervisor.)
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________

Hours per week: _______________________ Total # of weeks: __________________________________

(Please note that international students must have any paid internship approved by the Director of
International Students and Scholars.)


Faculty Sponsor: _________________________________________________________________________

Department: ____________________________________________________________________________


Faculty Signature for Approved Internship: __________________________________________________


After your faculty sponsor signs, please return two copies to the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs
Office in Room 24 of the IDCE House.




                                                                                                      25
IDCE Internship Report
Please answer the following questions and submit your report to the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs
Office not more than four weeks after the internship is completed (by October 15 for summer internships).
For GISDE students who will graduate in December under the internship option, this exact date should be
coordinated with your advisor and the final M.A. project’s deadline.

Internship Proposal: _____________________________________________________________________

Student Name: __________________________________________________________________________


I. Description of the sponsoring organization

• What is the organization’s mission?
• What are its main areas of work and expertise, and where does it carry out its mission (in the U.S., other
countries)?
• What is the organizational structure (e.g., staff composition, gender, cultures, etc.)?
• What are the organization’s strengths? What areas need attention?
• How effectively does it accomplish its mission?


II. Description of the Internship Responsibilities

• Describe your responsibilities in the internship.
• How was your internship connected to the organization’s mission?


III. Assessment of Your Internship

• What did you learn during this internship?
• How well did the internship relate to your course of studies and/or overall career goals?
• Would you recommend this internship for other IDCE students? Please explain.




                                                                                                         26
Internship Supervisor Evaluation

Student Name: __________________________________________________________________________

Internship: _____________________________________________________________________________

A letter from the internship supervisor describing internship responsibilities and performance is required for
IDCE graduate students to receive academic graduate credit. Please request that your supervisor send this
completed form to:

Clark University
Department of International Development, Community, and Environment - Internships
950 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01610-1477


Name of Supervisor: _____________________________________________________________________

Name of Organization: ___________________________________________________________________

Address: _______________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________

Telephone: __________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________

Website: ________________________________________________________________________________


1)      How well did the Clark IDCE intern perform the responsibilities of the internship and live up to your
expectations?




2)      How well did the intern assimilate into the organization environment and culture?




3)      Was the intern receptive to feedback?




4)      Were there any areas in which a need for improvement was evident? Any particular problems? If so,
please explain.




                                                                                                         27
5)     Was the intern’s academic preparation adequate for the internship?




6)    Would you be willing to sponsor another IDCE intern? If so, would you sponsor an intern for the
summer? For a semester? Paid or unpaid?




Signature: _________________________________________________Date: _________________________




                                                                                                   28
                IDSC Checklist for the Masters Degree Program
Name:

Core Courses (5 units)

Core course name                                                Course       Semester       Taught by
                                                                number       completed
1. Development Theory                                           IDCE 360

2. Development Program and Project                              IDCE 361
Management
3. Economic Fundamentals for International                      IDCE
Development (or equivalent)                                     30217

(NOTE: Advanced students with the permission of their advisor
may take IDCE 30247: Development Economics)
4. IDCE 314: Research Design and Methods (or
one of these equivalents: IDCE 305, 390, 30212,
30291)

Class chosen:

5. IDCE 30213: Final M.A. Project (1 credit in fall or
spring semester of second year, or half credit each
in both semesters of second year)


Elective Courses* (7 units)

Elective course name                                            Course       Semester       Taught by
                                                                number       completed
6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

Additional space, if any are taken as half credits

Additional space, if any are taken as half credits


* See the IDSC Course of Study (p.4) for a sampling of elective courses, and some suggested areas of
specializations. Refer to Clark’s academic catalog (www.clarku.edu/academiccatalog) for a full list of
Clark University courses available to IDCE students.


                                                                                                         29
      Checklist for the Graduate Component of the B.A./M.A. Degree
                                 Program
Name:

Transferred Credits (2 units)

Course name                                                     Course     Semester    Taught by
                                                                number     completed
1.

2.


Core Courses (5 units)

Core course name                                                Course     Semester    Taught by
                                                                number     completed
3. Development Theory                                           IDCE 360

4. Development Program and Project                              IDCE 361
Management
5. Economic Fundamentals for International                      IDCE
Development or Development Economics                            30217
                                                                or
(NOTE: Advanced students with the permission of their advisor   IDCE
may be able to waive this requirement and substitute an         30247
elective)

6. IDCE 314: Research Design and Methods (or
one of these equivalents: IDCE 305, 390, 30212,
30291)

Class chosen:

7. IDCE 30213: Final M.A. Project (1 credit in fall or
spring semester of second year, or half credit each
in both semesters of second year)


Electives * (3 units)
M.A. students are required to take two electives, preferably from ones that parallel their area of
specialization.

Skills/Electives course name                                    Course     Semester    Taught by
                                                                number     completed
8.

9.

10.

Additional space, if any are taken as half credits



                                                                                                   30
Internships (2 units)

Graduate-level internships require 210+ hours, plus submission of an appropriate written
academic component (15-20 pages) to be determined in conjunction with the faculty internship
supervisor.

Graduate-level Internship                            Course        Semester      Taught by
                                                     number        completed
11.


12.


* See the IDSC Course of Study for a sampling of elective courses, and some suggested areas
of specializations. Refer to Clark’s academic catalog (www.clarku.edu/academiccatalog) for a
full list of Clark University courses available to IDCE students.




                                                                                               31
 IDCE Intent to Graduate Form

Name: __________________________________________ Program: _____________________

Final Paper/Project Title:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________


_____ Please check here if you have received permission from the Director of IDCE to write a thesis.



Academic Advisor: ______________________________________________________

First Reader: ___________________________________________________________

Second Reader (if applicable): _____________________________________________

Date of Review Session (if applicable): ______________________________________


When do you intend to graduate? __________________________________________


NOTE: All completed final M.A. projects, signed by your advisor and first reader, are due in the
IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office (Dilma Lucena’s office), Room 24, in advance of the
Clark University Graduate School deadline.

For the Academic Year 2010-20111, the Student and Academic Affairs deadlines for submitting your final
project are as follows:

September 21, 2010 – for October Graduation
January 10, 2011 – for February Graduation
March 25, 2011 – for May Graduation

By this time, the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office must have received verification from
your advisor that you have or will satisfactorily complete all course work required for graduation.

For the Academic Year 2010-2011, please check with your faculty advisor or Student and Academic Affairs
for the deadline to submit the Intent to Graduate form.

      Please complete and return this form to the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office, Rm 24.

If you have any questions please contact Dilma Lucena by email at dlucena@clarku.edu.




                                                                                                      32
IDCE GRADUATE STUDENT GUIDE

Choosing Your Course of Study

Balance Your Schedule: Challenge yourself, but don’t overload and take too many classes. Three classes
a semester, plus laboratory work and readings, will usually fill your schedule. Most students complete the
degree requirements in 2 years as a full-time student. Students in the GISDE program can complete the
program in three semesters, although most prefer the two-year schedule. Exceptionally qualified students
may complete the GISDE program in a 12-month intensive track. You will need to talk with your advisor
about these options.

Take Your Time: Choosing courses may seem difficult at first, but many people are here to help you.
Your advisor and other IDCE faculty are valuable resources. Second-year IDCE students are another
source of informal advice for courses. It is important to get as much information as possible and don’t
rely solely on one person’s opinion.

Evaluate Interesting Courses: Here are some suggestions for evaluating classes:

• Get a syllabus or class outline and/or go to the University Bookstore online or in person to see what
books are required for the class. Is the reading interesting? Does it challenge you?

• Talk to faculty and other graduate students. Think about how you want to structure your IDCE courses,
independent study, and research and how their integration will help you gain the skills you desire. Use
your program’s course of study or your advisor to guide your decisions and planning.

Meet with Your Advisor: To make an appointment, contact your advisor to schedule a meeting via
phone, email, or in person during office hours. IDCE faculty are all accessible, but it is important to make
a scheduled appointment in advance to ensure that you have adequate time for discussion.
Registration

You have been given instructions from the ITS Department to create your Clark email account. Call ITS
if you have questions. Students should check their Clark email accounts regularly for information from
the Registrar’s Office regarding the online registration process. Please note: only your Clark email
address will be used for all University and IDCE communications.

To be able to register, you are required to have health insurance and be cleared by Health Services
regarding mandatory immunizations. You will also need to have paid your deposit and have obtained the
signature of your advisor for your course selection. During the Clark Graduate School Orientation, the
Registrar’s Office will assist new students with registering online. Continuing students have their courses
approved by their advisors and then are cleared for pre-registration during the preceding semester.

Students are advised to read the Clark Refund Policy before registering for classes. You can find the
information here: www.clarku.edu/offices/business/studentaccounts/refund.cfm.

Full-time/Part-time Status: Full-time students must take at least three course units per semester. If
you register for fewer than three course units, you will be considered part-time. Check with your
Student Accounts representative about whether your student loans can be deferred if you are a part-time
student. Part-time students lose their Student Health Insurance coverage. International students should
check with the Office of Intercultural Affairs before changing status.

Transfer Credits: Under some circumstances, up to two graduate course units (8 credits) may be
transferred from another institution into a Clark University Graduate Program to count toward the 12-
course-unit requirement for graduation. Transfer credits into an IDCE graduate program must be
approved by the Program Coordinator and the Director of IDCE and must be relevant to your particular
course of specialization. Please note that transfers of credit requests are seldom approved due to the
                                                                                                          33
uniqueness of IDCE courses and each program. The transfers should be approved before students begin
their M.A. course of study at IDCE or soon thereafter. Retrospective transfers are unusual. A student
may petition the Program Coordinator and the Director of IDCE to request such a transfer and IDCE
will assess the possibility of such transfers.

Non-resident Student Status: If you have completed all course work but are finishing your final M.A.
project, you should register online as a “Non-Resident Graduate Student.” A completed Graduate Dean’s
Action Form must be approved by the IDCE Director before you are moved to non-resident student
status. In addition, you must pay a non-resident student fee to maintain registered student status each
semester until your requirements are completed. If you withdraw and then apply later to be reinstated to
complete your requirements and receive your degree, you will be charged non-resident fees for each
semester you were not enrolled.

Graduate Grading Policies
The grades of A and B (with "+" and "-") are acceptable for graduate credit; anything lower than a B- is
not acceptable. A Pass/Fail grading option is possible, where P (pass) signifies that the student has
performed at a B- or above. Incompletes are awarded at the discretion of the instructor for a period not
exceeding one year.

Graduation: IDCE graduates students in October, December, and May. The Commencement ceremony
happens once a year (in May) and that is the only chance that students have to “walk” with their fellow
graduates. Students that graduate during the other months will be allowed to walk in May of the
subsequent year. Discuss your graduation plans with your advisor.

If you wish to receive your degree in May, submit the finished, formatted and signed copy of your final
M.A. project, as well as the Intent to Graduate form, to the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office
on or before the set deadline. Students will be notified of the deadline through email. (Note: It is the
student’s responsibility to check the exact date with the IDCE student and academic affairs coordinator
each year; deadlines are usually one month prior to the graduation month). There are no exceptions to this
deadline.

If you are not graduating in May, submit the Intent to Graduate form before the start of classes in
August (to avoid being charged non-resident student fees).


Writing and Research

Final M.A. Project: IDCE program handbooks contain specific information on the requirements, format,
and deadlines for each program’s final research requirement. Typically students choose between three
options: research paper, practitioner paper, and thesis. Because an M.A. from IDCE requires a final M.A.
project, specific guidelines and timetables for working with your faculty reader must be followed if you
wish to receive your degree on time. IDCE reserves the right to make modifications to guidelines and
procedures at any time.

The Writing Center: You can improve your written work by making appointments to meet with a
graduate writing consultant at the Writing Center in Corner House, 142 Woodland Street. In a session, a
consultant can help you generate ideas, organize your paper, or make revisions to an existing draft. Bring
a copy of your writing assignment and whatever writing you have towards that assignment (even if it is a
rough draft).

The Center’s library includes materials on writing in various disciplines and information about citation
styles. Appointments are available Monday to Thursday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. On Fridays, the Writing
Center has appointments available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. You may schedule, cancel, or change an
appointment online www.rich17.com/clarku. You may also call the Writing Center at (508) 793-7405 (on
campus x7405) to schedule an appointment.
                                                                                                           34
The Center also has links to helpful writing resources at:
www.clarku.edu/departments/writingatclark/center.cfm.

Please remember the Writing Center is very busy at midterm and finals.

Standards of Academic Integrity: You must be exceedingly careful to avoid plagiarism, which carries
serious penalties in U.S. academic institutions. Remember that you must indicate the source of your
information whenever you:

  • summarize what another has written or said,
  • restate another source’s words or ideas, or
  • use a direct quotation of the exact words written or spoken by another.

You may want to stop by the Writing Center to get a better idea about how to cite sources and complete a
thesis statement prior to beginning your final M.A. project.
Extracurricular Opportunities

IDCE Student Association: The IDCE Student Association is run by and for IDCE students. It provides
an informal social and intellectual forum for IDCE students, faculty, and staff to exchange ideas. Its
purpose is to enrich the graduate student experience and to express student views. During meetings and
retreats, IDCE students may discuss questions, concerns, and observations about the curriculum. In this
way, the Student Association acts as a sounding board, providing an opportunity to voice opinions about
IDCE programs and to propose changes to the department. The association also provides support and
guidance during your time at Clark. Many IDCE graduate students have extensive field experience and
theoretical knowledge to share with each other and with undergraduates. The Student Association hosts
IDCE-sponsored events throughout the academic year. All IDCE students are automatically members of
the IDCE Student Association.

IDCEALL Email List: IDCE provides its graduate students with information regarding social events,
lectures, conferences, funding opportunities, internships, and job opportunities. This information is
delivered via your Clark email account, so it is important that you check your Clark email very regularly.
(IDCEALL email is monitored, so inappropriate messages and “spam” will never be distributed.
Remembering to delete old and sent messages will help ensure that your email account will always be
able to receive new mail.)

IDCE provides an effective avenue to share invaluable professional resources and information among
IDCE community members online at www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/studentsCareers.cfm. You are
encouraged to email any job, internship, or event to IDCE staff for distribution to your fellow students.

Don’t forget to also check out the guide Things to do in the Woo, a sourcebook created by former IDCE
students. You can find it here: www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/docs/Things_Worcester.pdf.

Teaching and Research Assistantships: There are usually a limited number of Teaching Assistant and
Research Assistant positions available within the IDCE Department. Other paid positions may be
available to graduate students as needs arise within the IDCE department or within other departments on
campus. These will be posted through IDCEALL. These positions are filled on the basis of merit,
experience, and fit to the required responsibilities.
Campus Resources

Academic Commons at Goddard Library: Named for the Clark physicist who invented the rocket
technology that made space travel possible, Goddard Library has recently been transformed into The
Academic Commons at Goddard Library. The project reshaped the University's main library into a
cutting- edge facility for research, teaching and learning by centralizing academic and research support
services for students and faculty. The Academic Commons provides traditional and electronic resources,
                                                                                                            35
including Goddard's collection of more than 375,000 volumes, 275,000 monographs, subscriptions to
1,500 periodicals, full Internet access, nearly 50 subject specific data bases and a public on-line catalog
available 24-hours a day. The Academic Commons houses an Archives and Special Collection area.

Check out the Goddard Library web page at www.clarku.edu/research/goddard for details. You can find
additional help at the Library’s Reference Desk. The reference librarians will help you to access the
Goddard Library collection, as well as the extended resources of the Worcester Consortium and the
Internet.

Mosakowski Institute: Universities conduct a great deal of research that seeks to both advance our
knowledge and to enable us to make a positive difference in our world. Too often, however, this
knowledge remains in the academy and does not find its way into the hands of those who could use it to
improve public policies and programs and the lives of people they affect. The mission of the Mosakowski
Institute for Public Enterprise is to improve through the successful mobilization of use-inspired research
the effectiveness of government and other institutions in addressing social concerns.

The Jeanne X. Kasperson Library: The Jeanne X. Kasperson Research Library is dedicated to higher
learning and to supporting those who seek to expand their knowledge. The primary mission of the Library
is to support Clark University’s extensive environmental research programs. This includes but is not
limited to programs conducted under the aegis of the George Perkins Marsh Research Institute, the School
of Geography, and the Department of International Development, Community, and Environment. The
Library is committed to serving the educational functions of the University and the broader community in
order to further research related to sustainability and global environmental change, international
development, and risk and hazards to society and the environment.

The Kasperson Research Library offers one of the most extensive research collections in North America
on risks and hazards and global environmental change. In addition, the library collection includes
holdings in technology, water and energy policy, and sustainability.

The Kasperson Research Library collects publications on relevant subjects from international, national
and subnational institutions and is also one of the few libraries that systematically collects reports from
national and international programs such as the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme,
Diversitas, the Millennium Ecosystems Assessment, and the Human Dimensions of Global
Environmental Change Programme. The library staff tracks international and regional treaties and
protocols, national and subnational legislation and the initiatives of multinational corporations and trade
associations. The library also maintains informal exchange agreements with 25 institutions worldwide.

The George Perkins Marsh Institute: The Marsh Institute at Clark University is dedicated to research
on one of the most fundamental questions confronting humankind: What is and ought to be our
relationship with nature? Named after the noted environmentalist George Perkins Marsh and built on a
tradition of basic and applied research on environmental hazards and international development, the
Institute fosters team-based research that engages graduate students and research faculty in problem
formulation and resolution. It is home to some 63 research faculty, staff, and graduate students, with
appointments ranging from the humanities to the social and natural sciences.

The Marsh Institute is organized as a consortium of research centers or units and the Jeanne X. Kasperson
Research Library. Studies focus on human-environment relationships across a wide array of themes
including: risks and hazards; the human dimensions of global environmental change; resource and
environmental policy; industrialization and globalization; homeland security; and the development and
application of geographic information science across multiple disciplines.

The Institute does not grant degrees, but advanced degrees can be sought through the affiliated programs
and departments of Clark University. Support comes from the University, private donations, grants from
foundations, and grants and contracts from state and federal agencies.


                                                                                                              36
Language Arts Resource Center (LARC): Located on the fourth floor of Goddard Library, this is a
multimedia language instruction center. Multiple sources for learning include an extensive library of
computer programs, audio and video tapes, and interactive translation facilities. The LARC area also
houses a satellite-connected television, which provides worldwide news.

Information Technology Services (ITS): ITS provides general purpose computing facilities, software,
network connectivity, and network resources for the University. Information about ITS services is
available at www.clarku.edu/ITS. If you need computing assistance, the Help Desk is available to answer
your questions by calling 793-7704, or by email at sos@clarku.edu.

Career Services

Clark’s Career Services provides services and programs to assist students in making informed decisions
regarding their long- and short-term career goals. The following services and resources are available:

Career Advising – Students may schedule individual appointments with a Career Advisor to clarify their
goals, preferences, skills, and interests.

Career Resources – The Career Services Library contains information on career fields, internship and job
search techniques, employer directories, and literature. In addition to print resources, Career Services
subscribes to a number of online resources that may be useful to IDCE students. Workshops and
internship/job fairs are offered throughout the academic year.

Alumni Networking – Career Services advisors have access to the Clark Alumni Online Community
database, which can assist students in identifying alumni who may provide useful career and networking
information.

For IDCE students specifically, the department has created an online Career Database and our Career
Postings site with advertisements for jobs, internships, funding and conferences. You may access the
pages here: www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/studentsCareers.cfm and login with your Clark credentials.

IDCE also has an entire Careers Component on the IDCE website. You may view these and other
valuable resources online at www.clarku.edu/departments/idce/careers.

In Fall 2010, IDCE is hiring a Director of Career Development and External Relations. Please inquire
within the IDCE House for information as this search progresses.
Recreation and Culture

On Campus: The Visual and Performing Arts Department often sponsors plays in Little Center Theater,
concerts in the Traina Center, music in Estabrook Hall, and art exhibitions in the Art Gallery on the
ground floor of the Goddard Library. Cinema 320 offers a reasonably priced film series in Room 320 of
Jefferson Academic Center. Check the Cinema 320 website at www.cinema320.com and for event
listings; also remember to check Clark activity calendars at www.socialweb.net/clark.

Intramurals: Many IDCE students enjoy playing intramural co-ed volleyball or soccer. Visit
www.clarku.edu/athletics/intwellness to learn more.

In Worcester: From Wednesday through Sunday, there are concerts, film series, special art exhibitions,
and lectures to enjoy at the Worcester Art Museum on Salisbury Street. Admission is free with your
Clark ID. The museum is accessible from the Consortium shuttle bus stop at WPI on Salisbury Street.
During the year there are concerts ranging from rock to opera at Mechanics Hall and the DCU Center.
The EcoTarium features exhibits on ecology and native wildlife, while Higgins Armory presents one of
the largest collections of medieval armor in the country.
Transportation


                                                                                                         37
Getting around Worcester without a car can be a challenge, so it is helpful to use public transportation or
to arrange carpool trips or shared taxis with friends to visit the supermarket, etc.

The Consortium Shuttle: The Colleges of Worcester Consortium Shuttle helps you get to other
campuses in the Worcester area and to a few other local spots. You can pick up the shuttle outside of
Atwood Hall on Downing Street. It leaves every hour on the 26th minute, with the first shuttle leaving at
7:26 a.m. and the last at 6:26 p.m. You can find more information, including a detailed schedule, at
www.cowc.org/college-student-resources/shuttle.

Student Council Van: This provides regular transportation to Walgreens, Union Station, Highland
Street, and the Shoppes at Blackstone Valley. The van runs between 3 p.m. and 12 a.m. Fridays, and 1
p.m. and 1 a.m. Saturdays.

Student Escort Service: The Student Escort Service provides all members of the Clark community with
escort service from 5 p.m. to 4 a.m. during the academic year, within a quarter of a mile from campus.
Call 508-793-7777 (x7777 from an on-campus phone) for a ride.

Taxi: Local taxi companies include Yellow Cab at 508-754-3211 and Red Cab at 508-792-9999.

Car Rental: Most of the major rental agencies such as Hertz, Budget, Avis, Thrifty, and Enterprise have
offices in Worcester. If choosing Enterprise, members of the Clark community can ask for the Clark
University rate.

City Buses: Worcester Regional Transit Authority (WRTA): You can pick up a city bus outside of the
University Center, on Main and Grand streets, or at Main and Beaver streets. For more information and a
complete schedule, visit www.therta.com.

Intercity Buses and Trains: Worcester's beautifully renovated Union Station houses intercity train and
bus services.

Buses. Serviced by Greyhound Lines, Inc. and Peter Pan Bus Lines. For fares and schedule information
about Greyhound, call 1-800-231-2222, or visit www.greyhound.com. For more information about Peter
Pan, which only services the northeastern seaboard, call 1-800-343-9999, or visit
www.peterpanbus.com.

Trains. You can get to and from more than 500 cities nationwide. Commuter trains to Boston stop at
several stations along Boston's subway system (known locally as “The T”). You can get to Union Station
by bus if you transfer to the 1, 5, 12 or 15 at City Hall. Schedule information is available from
www.amtrak.com or the MBTA Commuter Rail information at www.mbta.com.

International Airports: There are three international airports serving the Worcester area, all
approximately an hour away depending on weather and traffic conditions:

Boston, MA: Logan International Airport
Providence, RI: T.F. Green Airport
Hartford, CT: Bradley International Airport

Getting to the Airport: You can arrange a limousine van ride from Worcester to either T. F. Green or
Logan by calling Worcester Airport Limousine Service at 800-660-0992 or visiting them on the web at
www.wlimo.com. Be sure to make your reservations early.

Alternative ways to get to Logan Airport, Boston: In addition to Worcester Airport Limousine Service,
Logan is accessible from Worcester by bus and commuter rail. If you’re in Boston already, you can use
the subway or “T”.


                                                                                                          38
Student Health Services and Insurance

Health Services is located at 501 Park Avenue and is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There
are no services during the summer or school vacations. As a primary care setting, Clark University Health
Services provides acute illness care, gynecological and contraceptive services, allergy desensitization, as
well as health counseling and education. The professional Heath Services staff includes nurse
practitioners, registered nurses and part-time physicians. Students are also referred to a number of
excellent specialists from an extensive referral network.

By law, Clark cannot release information about your health or health records without your
authorization—even to your parents. Please be sure to give Health Services your permission each time
before your parents call us.

Whenever you have a health-related problem, an appointment with the Health Services staff will help you
identify the problem and give you the information needed for you to make the best choice for treatment.
Clark Health Services also provides information for international students as well as information about
insurance and health forms and medication requirements.

The Clark University Health Service is a primary care outpatient clinic offering a variety of services and
programs including:

• Diagnosis and treatment of acute and sub-acute episodic illnesses and injuries
• Ongoing and follow-up care of pre-existing chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, colitis, etc.
• Diagnostic laboratory testing
• Contraceptive counseling and gynecological services
• Sexually transmitted disease (STD) health education
• Immunization to prevent diseases
• Desensitization (allergy injections)
• Sports medicine
• Stress reduction
• Eating disorders and nutrition counseling
• Smoking cessation

Clinical Services are provided by nurses, nurse practitioners, physicians and support staff. Physicians
affiliated with the major teaching hospitals in the Worcester area are present in the Health Service every
day.
Other Health Services

Worcester is home to two community health centers. Each is a comprehensive, multicultural, community
health center with medical, dental, and mental health services, available to families and individuals of all
ages regardless of the ability to pay. Health Centers pay special attention to chronic disease management,
including diabetes, HIV and AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. Services can be arranged in the following
languages: Spanish, Portuguese, Vietnamese, Albanian, and others by appointment. Family Health Center
of Worcester, Inc. is within a mile walking distance. For services visit: www.fhcw.org. Great Brook
Valley Health Center is located at 19 Tacoma Street, Worcester.

Further, the University of Massachusetts Medical School and UMass Memorial Health Care, located in
Worcester, are world class institutions that provide medical education and care. The University of
Massachusetts Medical School and UMass Memorial Health Care share a common campus and a
common goal: to serve the people of the region through excellence in education, patient care, biomedical
research and public service.

Obtaining a Social Security Number

Changes made to Social Security regulations during the past year now require international

                                                                                                          39
students studying in the U.S. on F-1 and J-1 visas to present evidence that they have secured a job in
order to be eligible for a social security number. All necessary information regarding a Social Security
Number application will be presented during the International Graduate Student Orientation.

Please note that newly admitted students who are eligible for a SSN will not be able to obtain all the
necessary documents and submit their SSN application until the second week of their first semester (due
to immigration regulations as well as processing time within the Social Security Administration and the
University).

Receiving Mail at IDCE

All IDCE students have a mail folder in the Student Lounge area file cabinet inside the IDCE House. This
file is primarily for internal use. Faculty and students will often communicate through the mail folders
and campus mail will be delivered to your file. Both campus and off-campus mail is usually delivered to
the IDCE House from the Clark University Mailroom twice a day. Students living off-campus should
have all mail delivered to their home address.

Students Living in On-Campus Housing: The only option for students living in on-campus housing is
to have their mail delivered to IDCE. All personal mail of students living on campus will be placed in
these files. It is the student’s responsibility to check the file frequently. Please keep in mind that the file
cabinet is not locked. Your address is as follows:
NAME
Clark University - IDCE Department
950 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01610

Packages: As with regular mail, all packages for students living on-campus will be delivered to the IDCE
House. Anyone else expecting a package to be delivered to IDCE should inform a staff member.

Clark University Checks: All Clark University payroll checks and reimbursement checks for IDCE
students are delivered to IDCE from Clark University Accounting and Payroll Offices. They are delivered
on alternating Fridays. Checks can be picked up in the IDCE Student and Academic Affairs Office on that
same Friday or the following Monday. Please pick up your statement even if you have an automatic
deposit set-up. Make sure that your address is correct and updated with Glenn Godfrey in the Payroll
Office on Downing St.

Summer Mail: Mail is not forwarded in the summer. It will accumulate in your mail folder. If you are in
the area, please check your folder periodically.

After Graduation: All students who graduate are asked to remove their folder from the file. This will
remind us that you are no longer in the area. Mail is forwarded for three months after graduation. After
that it is “Returned to the Sender.” IMPORTANT!!! Please notify any agency, friend, family member,
magazine subscription, or other mail contact of your new address once you leave IDCE.


Remember that the IDCE website is a great communication tool while you are completing your studies.
You can find information on faculty, alumni, research activities, as well as download our program’s
handbook, check out events, and much more: www.clarku.edu/idce.

Administration and Staff

Director of IDCE                                    Assistant Director of IDCE
William F. Fisher, Ph.D.                            Dave Bell, Ph.D.

Program Coordinators
                                                                                                              40
IDSC: Anita Häusermann Fábos, Ph.D.
ES&P: Tim Downs, Ph.D.
CDP: Laurie Ross, Ph.D.
GISDE: Yelena Ogneva-Himmelberger, Ph.D.

To contact IDCE faculty, please see their office hours on their office doors or visit their webpage for
contact information.

Student and Academic Affairs Manager                      Student and Academic Affairs Assistant
Erika Paradis                                             Cindy Gabriel

Admissions Manager                                        Admissions Assistant
Paula Hall                                                Brittany Crompton

Budget Manager/Assistant to the Director                  Administrative Assistant for
Heather Keenan                                            Departmental Operations
                                                          Hien Nguyen

Marketing and Publications Manager                        Careers Development & External Relations
Jillian Ferguson                                          Director
                                                          Sharon Hanna




                                                                                                          41

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:11
posted:8/13/2011
language:English
pages:41