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					Basics of Branding




                                     Created By:
            Juggernaut Marketing Communications
                        809 Baker St. Nelson, BC
                             Phone: 250.505.5016
                          info@juggernaumc.com
                        www.JuggernautMC.com
                                                                              Basics of Branding


 Introduction
 Branding is the face you give your company. It is how your customers recognize your
 products, and should represent what you want people to think about your business, in a 3
 second period. Many small businesses feel overwhelmed by the academics of branding, and
 there are a ton of experts out there willing to charge very big money to guide you in your
 branding exercise. This is great for those who have a lot of money to spare, but such is not
 the common state for most small business.

 In this course we will examine the Basics of Branding – the key details that are most
 important in establishing a brand that is representative of your business, vision, service and
 products. We will discuss how to effectively use your brand to get the most bang for your
 buck, and to find a brand the represents you.

 In this Module we will cover:

            •   Components of Your Company’s Identity
            •   What goes into a strong Brand
            •   Name Your Business in 3 Easy Steps
            •   The Laws of the Logo
            •   Branding for Small Business
            •   Brand Building
            •   The Basics of Business Cards
            •   Online Branding for Your Small Business
            •   Special: Design Tips for the Beginner

 Objectives:

 After reviewing this module you will:

    1. Have a comprehensive understanding of what is required to produce and maintain a
       Brand Image.
    2. Be able to create a brand that best suits your company.
    3. Have the ability to ensure that all Branding activities will best reflect your business.




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                                                                                                                  Basics of Branding



 Introduction............................................................................................................................... 4
    1.0 Components of Your Company’s Identity...................................................................... 6
    2.0 What goes into a strong Brand........................................................................................ 8
        2.1 Important Brand Associations......................................................................................8
        2.2 Strong Brands Require Vision .....................................................................................8
        2.3 The Strongest Brands ...................................................................................................9
    3.0 Name Your Business in 3 Easy Steps ........................................................................... 10
    4.0 The Laws of the Logo ................................................................................................... 12
        4.1 Crafting Your Logo....................................................................................................12
        4.2 Where to use your logo ..............................................................................................13
        4.3 Using Your Logo in Memorable Ways......................................................................15
    5.0 Branding for Small Business ........................................................................................ 17
    6.0 Brand Building.............................................................................................................. 19
        6.1 Publicity as a Brand Building Tool............................................................................19
        6.2 The Power of Word of Mouth....................................................................................19
    7.0 The Basics of Business Cards ....................................................................................... 20
    8.0 Online Branding for Your Small Business ................................................................... 22
        Worksheet 1.1 Identifying your Company’s Identity ......................................................23
        Worksheet 1.2 Strategic Branding Questions ..................................................................25
        Worksheet 3.1 Naming Your Business ............................................................................27
        Worksheet 5.1 Guide to Better Branding.........................................................................28
        Worksheet 5.2 Branding Checklist ..................................................................................30
        Special: Design Tips for the Beginner .............................................................................32




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INFO@JUGGERNAUTMC.COM              809 BAKER STREET, NELSON, BC V1L 4J8 250.505.5016 JUGGERNAUTMC.COM
                                                                              Basics of Branding


 Introduction
 Branding is the face you give your company. It is how your customers recognize your
 products, and should represent what you want people to think about your business, in a 3
 second period. Many small businesses feel overwhelmed by the academics of branding, and
 there are a ton of experts out there willing to charge very big money to guide you in your
 branding exercise. This is great for those who have a lot of money to spare, but such is not
 the normal state for most small business.

 In this course we will examine the Basics of Branding – the key details that are most
 important in establishing a brand that is representative of your business, vision, service and
 products. We will discuss how to effectively use your brand to get the most bang for your
 buck, and to find a brand the represents you.

 Let’s start with some definitions.

 Brands — Some Definitions

 Brands are:
        Names or symbols that identify the unique source of a product or service
        The personification of an organization, product or service
        The source of a promise to the customer
        A trust mark
        A single concept or idea imbedded in the mind of the customer
        A set of associations that enhance or detract from the related product or service
        The source of customer loyalty
        That which allows one to charge a price premium for an otherwise generic product or
        service
        A unique value proposition
        The source of emotional connections with customers
        The primary source of customer ‘goodwill'
        That which should drive the design of the ‘total customer experience'

 From http://brandcoolmarketing.com/brand-basics.htm




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                                                                                     Basics of Branding


    “A brand is the personification of a product, service or even entire company. Like any person, a
  brand has a physical “body”, generally the products and/or services it provides. Also, like a person,
   a brand has a name, a personality, character and a reputation. Like a person, you can respect, like
 and even love a brand. You can think of it as a deep personal friend, or merely an acquaintance. You
 can view it as dependable or undependable; principled or opportunistic; caring or capricious. Just as
 you like to be around certain people and not others, so also do you like to be with certain brands and
      not others. Also, like a person, a brand must mature and change its product over time. But, its
 character, and core beliefs shouldn't change. Neither should its fundamental personality and outlook
  on life. People have character … so do brands. A person's character flows from his or her integrity:
 the ability to deliver under pressure, the willingness to do what is right rather than what is expedient.
   You judge a person's character by his/her past performance and the way he/she thinks and acts in
                     both good times, and especially bad. The same is true of brands.”
                      Robert T. Blanchard of Procter & Gamble in his “Parting Essay,” dated July 1999

 History of Branding
 We tend to think of branding as a modern day phenomenon. Certainly, during the late 1990s
 and the early 2000s, branding emerged as a significant area of emphasis not only for
 companies and their products, but also for municipalities, universities, other non-profit
 organizations and even individuals. Branding became ubiquitous.

 Historically, many consumer product companies began branding their products in earnest in
 the mid-to-late 1800s. But branding dates back much further than this. For instance,
 companies that sold patented medicines and tobacco began branding their products as early
 as the early 1800s. Around the same time, some fraternities and sororities branded their
 pledges (literally) during initiation rites as a form of identification and bonding, a practice
 that has long since been identified as hazing and therefore abandoned. But that is still recent
 history—relatively.

 Between the 1600s and 1800s, criminals were branded (again literally) as a form of
 punishment and identification. In England, they branded an S on a person's cheek for
 stealing, while in France, they branded a fleur de lis on the shoulder if they had spent time in
 jail. As repugnant as it may be to us today, slaves were also branded roughly during the same
 time period to connote ownership. In the 1200s, England required bread makers, goldsmiths
 and silversmiths to put their marks on goods, primarily to insure honesty in measurement. In
 the Medieval times, printers also used marks as did paper makers (watermarks) and various
 other craft guilds.

 But branding goes back even further. As far back as 1300 BC, potter's marks were used on
 pottery and porcelain in China, Greece, Rome and India. Branding of cattle and livestock go
 back as far as 2000 BC. And archaeologists have found evidence of advertising among
 Babylonians dating back to 3000 BC. So, how far back does branding go? At least 5000
 years.

 Branding originated from the need to insure honesty, provide quality assurance, identify
 source or ownership, hold producers responsible, and differentiate, as a form of identification
 and to create emotional bonding. Interestingly, people value brands for many of the same
 reasons today. Clearly, history provides some insight and perspective on modern day
 branding.
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                                                                             Basics of Branding



 1.0 Components of Your Company’s Identity
 How your market perceives your company should be deliberate, calculated and coherent
 rather than accidental and confused. Think about how you'd like your company to be
 perceived, then investigate whether or not actual perceptions match your intent - and adjust
 your marketing to reinforce the qualities you want your customers to associate with you.


 1. Values
 Do you stand for stability, like Prudential insurance? Innovation, like 3M? Educational
 curiosity, like the Discovery Channel? Social consciousness, like Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream?
 Child-friendliness, like McDonald's? Personal freedom, like Harley-Davidson motorcycles?
 What values are important and unique to your business, and how would you like to
 communicate this to your customers, staff and potential customers?

 2. Personality
 If the company were a vegetable, which one would it be? If it were a cartoon character,
 would it be Bugs Bunny, Wonder Woman, Road Runner or Dick Tracy? From the company's
 personality flows ad campaigns, kinds of special events to sponsor, company colors and
 typefaces, corporate gift selection, even the way you record company voice mail messages.

 3. Behavior
 Your company's image includes not only how you promote yourselves but also how you act
 toward customers and the public. Things like how you answer the phone, how you greet
 shoppers, how cheerfully you correct mistakes or accept returns, how aggressively you
 negotiate contracts all become bound up in one composite image.

 4. Price
 How much you cost in comparison to competitors often becomes part of your image. If
 you're tempted to keep price out of the equation until someone expresses a desire to buy,
 think twice. When you're candid about pricing, you cut down on the number of "tire-kickers"
 you need to deal with. Above all, make sure your pricing fits with the other components of
 your image.

 5. Range
 Customers should understand the spectrum of products and services that you sell. If you
 handle only, say, commercial cleaning accounts and not residential, or only, say, bookings of
 locally based and not nationally prominent speakers, make sure your specialty becomes part
 of your company image. If it's not part of your company name or company slogan, include
 your focus in your ads, brochures, sales letters and other promotional pieces.


 6. Geographical roots
 Where did your company come from? If you're a locally owned family business competing
 with multinational giants, make sure people know that. If you're selling nationally but rooted
 in a picturesque corner of the country, capitalize on that
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                                                                             Basics of Branding



 7. Longevity
 Whenever you've been around much longer than competitors, you can profitably incorporate
 that into your image.

 8. Slogan
 Which brand "tastes good like a cigarette should"? Which car is "the ultimate driving
 machine"? What product are you not supposed to "leave home without it"? Even local or
 specialized companies can achieve this kind of awareness with their clientele.

 9. Benefits
 What do buyers get when they purchase from you? Most companies provide intangible,
 emotional benefits (Volvo cars: safety; Hallmark cards: friendship; Victoria's Secret:
 sensuality) as well as tangible, practical ones (Burger King: inexpensive, satisfying meal;
 Boston Pops: a fun night out; Kodak: photos with true-to-life colors).

 When both you and those who buy from you know clearly what these benefits are, and when
 those benefits match the other dimensions listed above, you undoubtedly have a
 comprehensive, effective company image. Congratulations!

 Worksheet 1.1 Identifying your Company’s Identity




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                                                                              Basics of Branding


 2.0 What goes into a strong Brand
 2.1 Important Brand Associations
 Establishing your brand requires thought about what you want the public to associate with
 your business or product. As a rule, most brands will want to be associated with the
 following by their target customers.
         Trustworthy
         Authentic
         Relevant
         Unique
         Stands for something important to me
         Feels ‘just right' to me
         Popular
         Appealing
         Likeable
         Admirable
         High quality
         Innovative
         Service oriented

 2.2 Strong Brands Require Vision
 A brand is much more than a logo or an advertising campaign. It is the implementation of
 your organizational vision. The one ingredient that must be present for the organizational
 brand to be truly successful is a clearly articulated, strongly felt and universally embraced
 organizational mission and vision. And that generally requires strong leadership at the top,
 and to even greater effect, throughout the organization.

 That mission and vision is often based on powerful intuition or a strongly held conviction.
 Frequently that intuition is informed by careful and detailed analysis. Ideally, the mission and
 vision focus on a deep consumer need that the organization has unique abilities to meet. That
 mission and vision should be strongly encoded in the organization's mission and vision
 statements and in the organizational brand's stated essence, promise and personality.

 The entire organization should be designed to deliver on that mission and vision. And, there
 should be mechanisms in place to reward behavior that promotes the mission and vision and
 averts behavior that sabotages them.

 If you go online, you will find a great amount of talk about various brand management sub-
 disciplines (e.g. brand research, brand positioning, brand identity standards and systems, and
 measuring and managing brand equity), but all of these must be focused on delivering against
 a well thought out and a widely and passionately held sense of organizational mission and
 vision. If they do, there will be no stopping you in your success within your market space.




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                                                                             Basics of Branding


 2.3 The Strongest Brands

 The strongest brands aren't created with a logo or a tag line. They aren't created with an
 advertising campaign. They aren't even created with a product or service. They begin with a
 compelling vision—a vision whose foundation is deep customer insight. The insight may be
 informed by personal experience, in-depth research, active listening, intuition, or one or more
 of many other paths to customer intimacy.

 The strongest brands strive to understand cultural context, underlying values, hopes,
 anxieties, fears and other motivations. They also strive to understand self image, icons that
 evoke strong memories and feelings and other emotional stimuli. The most progressive
 organizations find ways to experience relevant contexts and situations with their customers.

 The strongest brands are authentic and stand for something. They possess integrity. That is,
 they are internally and externally consistent; they are who they say they are.

 The strongest brands have a distinctive and consistent ‘voice' and visual style. They weave
 compelling stories. And they strive to develop emotional connections to their intended
 customers.

 The strongest brands transcend specific products, services and delivery vehicles. These
 brands are most closely associated with functional, emotional, experiential and self-
 expressive customer benefits. They exist to meet deeply felt human needs in unique and
 superior ways.

 You know your brand is winning in the marketplace when:

        The brand is mentioned to customers and potential customers, and they brim with
        enthusiasm in their response.
        Your brand's external messages “ring true” with all employees.
        Employees are enthusiastic and consistent in recounting what makes their brand
        special.
        The brand's market share is increasing.
        Competitors always mention your brand as a point of reference.
        The press can't seem to write enough about your brand.
        You have a strong vision for the organization and its brand.
        Your organization's leaders always seem to “talk the brand” and “walk the brand
        talk.”




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                                                                               Basics of Branding


 3.0 Name Your Business in 3 Easy Steps
 Without a good name, you cannot come up with a good brand. Naming your business is one
 of the most crucial decisions you'll make as an entrepreneur. Not only does your company
 name serve as a first impression of your business, it serves as the heart of your brand.
 Branding is about bonding. You want a name that bonds with your target customer--a name
 that creates comfortable, positive thoughts and feelings.

 So how can you come up with a compelling, legally accessible, URL-available name? Follow
 this three-step process.

 Step 1: Brainstorm.

 First, write down anything and everything that enters your mind, especially ideas that seem to
 "come from nowhere." This means no self-editing. Your initial responses are key. Ask others
 for input as well.

 Prime your mind with the following questions:

 Who are my target customers?
 What are they looking for?
 What's my competitive advantage (e.g., quality, speed of service, etc.)?
 What adjectives would I apply to my company (e.g., smart, easy, etc.)? Can I combine any of
 these words to form a catchy new word or phrase?
 Are there any metaphors or symbols that come to mind?

 Step 2: Evaluate your names, then narrow them down to a short list of five to 10 names.

 Appraise the names on your brainstorm list using the following criteria. Strike any name that
 you can't answer "yes" to on the first five questions.

 Is it easy to say? Names are said more than read. After all, when words are read, they're also
 spoken in the mind of the reader.
 Is it easy to spell? Can customers find it in the phone book or "Google" it without trouble?
 Usually words that are easy to spell are also relatively short. You may want to avoid
 acronyms and "clever" names that require analysis from your reader (e.g., "CU4 Lunch").

 Does it have a positive connotation that'll appeal to customers? Words carry both a literal
 meaning and an emotional meaning. You want to create a positive emotional tie as well as a
 positive cognitive one. For example, "Li'l Sis" carries more emotional meaning than "Little
 Sister."
 Is it legally available? Start by checking with 1-Stop Business Registry
 http://www.bcbusinessregistry.ca/introduction/index.htm

 Is it, or some logical form of it, available as a URL? (.com or .org, or .net preferably.) This is
 less important if the internet won't play a large role in your distribution methodology.
 However, virtually all businesses these days maintain some kind of web presence.
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                                                                                 Basics of Branding



 Is it interesting or unique? Generic names like "Bikes For Less" are descriptive but not
 emotionally compelling. What's more, generic names usually have less stamina from a
 branding perspective, since our minds tend to remember things that are unique.

 Do you visualize anything when you read the name? "Victory Real Estate" might bring to
 mind a trophy. The addition of a visual element reinforces the name, making it more
 memorable.

 Is it descriptive? If it's not, that's okay. You can always add a tagline or byline for
 description.

 Step 3: Get feedback from potential customers.

 Present your shortlist for feedback to as many potential customers as possible. Don't simply
 hand your list to family and friends who are of a different gender/age/socioeconomic
 background, etc. than your potential customers. The name for a business targeting women
 should be evaluated by women, not men, because (believe it or not) men tend to be attracted
 to different things than women. Also, gauge people's initial reaction--don't let them dissect
 the names. Actual customers won't take the time or effort required to study your name, so
 don't require it from your test customers. In this case, it's possible to overthink something.

 Finalize a name based on your personal opinions and the feedback of others. Try not to
 second-guess yourself. When in doubt, go with your gut--that's what customers do!

 Worksheet 3.1 Name Your Business




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                                                                              Basics of Branding


 4.0 The Laws of the Logo
 4.1 Crafting Your Logo
 Historically, logos have been more of a luxury than a necessity. Businesses once attracted
 customers because they were the only choice in town. But that's no longer the case. Today's
 highly competitive industries, global markets and visually oriented consumers have
 catapulted the logo to prominence. Now your logo is one of the most critical components of
 your brand. So how can something so little make such a big difference to the success of your
 business?

 1. Your branding efforts not only start with your logo but are dictated by it.
 Your logo should appear on all your sales tools, from your business cards and stationary to
 your website. As a result, your logo design influences the design of all your sales tools--for
 better or worse. A professional-looking logo can be leveraged to create professional-looking
 materials. A poorly designed logo can't. In other words, you need a "brandable" logo--one
 you can make use of when designing other materials to brand your company.

 Brandable logos are scalable, memorable and meaningful. If people can't remember what
 your logo looks like, they won't remember your brand. Think of the logos of some of the
 popular brands today. Do you think of M-shaped arches, a shell or a swoosh? All are simple
 concepts, effectively employed by McDonalds, Shell and Nike. How can you tell if a logo's
 going to be memorable? If you can't look at a logo for fewer than 10 seconds and re-draw it
 with decent accuracy, it's probably too complex to be easily remembered. (Besides being
 difficult to remember, most complex logos can't effectively be reduced in size or rendered in
 black and white, making them useless for such elements as fax cover sheets, photocopying
 and other business forms.)

 2. You only have a minute (actually 3 seconds) to grab your consumer’s attention
 Your logo is a quick visual cue that conveys the essence of your brand in an age when image
 is everything and time is short. In today's markets, not only do you face ever-increasing
 competition, you also face an audience accustomed to visually stimulating media,
 convenience and instant gratification. Sure, a few people may read your entire ad, more may
 read some of it--but everyone will SEE it. The overwhelming amount of choices faced by
 time-crunched consumers forces them to identify shortcuts. Your logo is such a shortcut: it
 instantly conveys your brand message and emotional appeal, and hopefully cues your
 customers to think of your product in a positive manner.

 3. Awareness and familiarity are keys to growing your business, and your logo is
 instrumental in both areas.
 Your logo is your brand's most basic graphic element. It ties together all your sales materials-
 -in fact, your logo may be the only visual element your materials have in common. The right
 logo helps solidify customer loyalty while differentiating you from the competition.




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                                                                               Basics of Branding


 4. Your logo may be the only thing by which a potential customer can judge your
 business.
 Think of small newspaper or Yellow Pages ads. Often all that fits in these small spaces is
 your contact information and your logo. If your logo projects the right image, it may be the
 sole reason someone decides to try your company. Conversely, if it looks unprofessional or
 unclear, it alone may be the reason they choose to look somewhere else.

 5. Your logo affords a unique opportunity for you to look like a bigger (that is, more
 established) business than what you are.
 With the right logo, you can look like a larger company that's been around for awhile even if
 you have only one employee and just opened your doors last month. People who see it will
 associate the positive attributes of big companies--like security and financial stability--with
 your company. And you can still deliver the entrepreneurial qualities--like personal attention
 and superior customer service--that you're known for.
 Building a solid brand identity is pivotal to success in business today. Lay the right
 foundation with a professional, brandable logo.

 4.2 Where to use your logo
 Realize just how important your company logo is. It appears on everything from your
 business card to letterhead to your website, reaching customers, prospects, suppliers and the
 press. In Your logo reaches everyone who has any contact with you and is the first
 impression someone will have of your company. Because of its potential impact, your logo
 must offer a favorable impression of your business. Present yourself clearly and dynamically,
 and you'll look like a pro, even if your office is in your home's basement.

 Here are some time-tested guidelines you can follow in your quest for a great logo. Whether
 you hire an agency or decide to create it yourself, follow these tips to get the best logo for
 your company.

 1. Your logo should reflect your company in a unique and honest way. Sounds obvious, but
 you'd be surprised how many business owners want something "just like" a competitor. If
 your logo contains a symbol--often called a "bug"--it should relate to your industry, your
 name, a defining characteristic of your company or a competitive advantage you offer.

 What's the overriding trait you want people to remember about your business? If it's quick
 delivery, consider objects that connote speed, like wings or a clock. Or maybe you simply
 want an object that represents the product or service you're selling. Be clever, if you can, but
 not at the expense of being clear.

 2. Avoid too much detail. Simple logos are recognized faster than complex ones. Strong lines
 and letters show up better than thin ones, and clean, simple logos reduce and enlarge much
 better than complicated ones.

 But although your logo should be simple, it shouldn't be simplistic. Good logos feature
 something unexpected or unique without being overdrawn. Look at the pros: McDonald's,


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                                                                               Basics of Branding


 Nike, Prudential. Notice how their logos are simple yet compelling. Anyone who's traveled
 by a McDonald's with a hungry 4-year-old knows the power of a clean logo symbol.

 3. Your logo should work well in black and white (one-color printing). If it doesn't look good
 in black and white, it won't look good in any color. Also keep in mind that printing costs for
 four-color logos are often greater than that for one- or two-color jobs).

 4. Make sure your logo's scalable. It should be aesthetically pleasing in both small and large
 sizes, in a variety of mediums. A good rule of thumb is the "business card/billboard rule":
 Your logo should look good on both. The best test of a logo is to photocopy it, big and small.
 A good logo will translate into all sizes. Remember that most often logos are used on a very
 small scale, like on a pen or in a small ad.

 5. Your logo should be artistically balanced. The best way to explain this is that your logo
 should seem "balanced" to the eye--no one part should overpower the rest. Just as a painting
 would look odd if all the color and details were segregated in one corner, so do asymmetric
 logos. Color, line density and shape all affect a logo's balance.

 Many logo gurus insist your logo should be designed to last for up to 10 or 15 years. But I've
 yet to meet a clairvoyant when it comes to design trends. The best way to ensure logo
 longevity, in addition to the rules I've listed above, is to make sure you love your logo. Don't
 ever settle for something half-baked.

 And once you commit to your logo design, be sure you have it in all three of these essential
 file formats: EPS for printing, JPG and GIF for your website. If you are paying for your
 logo, ask for it in 72dpi RGB (for web sites), high resolution CMYK (how most printers will
 want it), and CMYK/Greyscale/reversed.tif

 Essentially, these file conversions render your logo as a single piece of art-so it's no longer a
 symbol with a typeface. Which brings us to the most important rule in logo design. . .

 Never, ever re-draw or alter your logo! If you want to animate it for your website, fine. But
 don't change its essence. Reduce and enlarge it proportionally. And if you become tired of
 your logo, that's good. Because that's usually about the time it's starting to make an
 impression on everyone else!




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                                                                             Basics of Branding


 4.3 Using Your Logo in Memorable Ways

 So you've created a logo you love, have gotten positive feedback from staff and customers,
 so now what? Here are 5 creative ways to get your logo noticed.
 Building your brand requires many steps that culminate a common goal: creating strategic
 positioning for your company. Many elements go into brand development including your
 copy style, layouts and colors, and core messaging. But perhaps nothing is quite as
 compelling, or can have as significant an effect, as your logo. Once you've designed your
 logo, your work has just begun; you need to creatively use it to ensure maximum exposure to
 your target market.

 The consistent use of your logo on everything that emanates from your company is an
 important way to brand your company that shouldn't be overlooked. At its highest level, a
 well-branded logo can stand on its own to represent a company (e.g., McDonald's golden
 arches). That familiarity certainly doesn't happen overnight, but is a byproduct of the
 frequent, repetitive and often creative use of the logo.

 The "instantaneous gratification" Generation

 Given the age in which we live, the importance of logos has probably never been as high. We
 don't read; we scan. We don't research; we surf. We want information quickly, at a moment's
 notice, and we don't want to sort through meaningless data to find what we want. A logo can
 actually be considered a shortcut--a way to quickly memorialize everything your company
 stands for in a quick way that captures the attention of the time-short consumer.

 Your goal should be to have a memorable logo that evokes your company's messaging, but
 you have to start somewhere. Even if your logo isn't well known, using it in creative ways
 will help build familiarity and generate interest in learning about the brand behind it.

 Remember that the goal isn't necessarily to saturate the entire market with your logo, but to
 make sure your target audience gets a heavy dose of it. Be savvy in choosing opportunities
 and strategies that are relevant for your company. Here are a few suggestions to get you
 started:

 1. Sponsor industry events.
 Regardless of your industry, it's probably associated with a number of organizations and/or
 special events like trade shows and seminars that draw your competitors as well as potential
 partners and customers. Sponsorship opportunities can range from the very affordable to the
 obscenely expensive, with your company getting publicity based on its level of investment. It
 can be quite valuable to have your logo included on event banners, programs and other
 marketing materials. Being associated with events that benefit your consumers can create a
 positive association for your business. Of course, the opposite is also true. Be aware of
 possible consequences of poor choices of sponsorship.



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                                                                              Basics of Branding


 2. Sponsor local sports teams.
 Organizations from Little League to weekly bowling leagues are always looking for support
 from the community. Determine which organizations offer the best exposure to your target
 customers and provide contributions--money, equipment and/or volunteers--in exchange for
 having your logo appear on their uniforms, scoreboards or other marketing materials.

 3. Use promotional products...cleverly.
 Most people have plenty of pens and pads of paper imprinted with company logos. Almost
 anything you can think of can be personalized to promote your company, so be creative and
 put your logo on items that make sense for your product or service.

 4. Incorporate your logo into your packaging and/or collateral.
 If your company offers a product, be sure your logo is prominently represented on the
 packaging. Definitely think outside the box; if you use tissue paper, for instance, order some
 imprinted with your logo. If your company provides a service, be sure your logo is
 prominently placed on all your collateral pieces and everything else you leave with potential
 customers, including business cards.

 5. Mobilize your logo.
 You don't need delivery trucks to use vehicles as a way to publicize your logo. Have your
 sales team affix logos to their cars so they're a mobile publicity force. This is an especially
 valuable strategy if your company is located in an urban area where drivers are often caught
 in stop-and-go traffic, and thus have time to notice the vehicles around them. Remind them
 that they are now traveling representatives of your company, and their driving should reflect
 this. We had one client lend his car to his son, who drove recklessly. The result was
 numerous calls to his business complaining about the irresponsible driving.




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                                                                               Basics of Branding


 5.0 Branding for Small Business
 http://www.netregistry.com.au/news/articles/45/1/Marketing-Basics-Part-2-of-6.html

 Branding is usually seen as something reserved for a very large business with a very large
 budget. But it is also crucial for small business to have a strong sense of who they are and
 what they do.

 This 'image' of your business is important both internally - for your staff and existing
 clientele - as well as externally - for future business and marketing strength.
 Having a style guide for all marketing material or collateral is not only time-saving, but it
 creates sense of consistency for your business.

 So the first things to decide are:
 who you are as a business?
 how you want to be portrayed to prospective customers.

 What is marketing collateral?
 Business cards, brochures, websites, advertisements, flyers, newsletters, catalogues, signage,
 letterhead, with compliments slips, postcards, emails, stickers, envelopes and everything else
 that sells your business.

 Follow these simple steps:

 Decide on your corporate colours and fonts.
 Choose one, two or three colours that will work for your business. Include paper colours and
 all print colours. Make sure that they are readily available and affordable. The colours should
 be able to be applied to all marketing collateral. Think about it.
 Choose one, two or three fonts that are appropriate for your business and that work together
 for all marketing collateral. Choose the font sizes also. Apply these to headings, subheadings
 and text.

 Choose a tagline.
 A tagline should express who you are or what you do in a very short sentence or a few words.
 The shorter the better - less is more. For example, Woolworths: the fresh food people. It is
 concise, to the point and memorable.

 Choose a logo if necessary.
 If you decide on using a logo, it is probably best designed by a professional. They are usually
 a good investment and should last five years or so. It can cost between $450 - $4000.




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 Once these things are chosen, document the details and use them in all marketing material
 without deviation. Make sure that all staff use them in all outgoing material. This is called a
 style guide. A style guide will:
         save a lot of time as you will not be recreating your marketing material over and
         again.
         create a memorable experience and a sense consistency for your contacts or
         prospects.
         make the creation of marketing material quicker and easier.
         provide a 'template' for all marketing material.

 If you create a series of brochures for a number of different products, create one template and
 insert different text only with the same layout, colours and fonts.

 Branding is a great tool for small business when used well and consistently. It should save
 lots of time and money, and make you memorable to your prospects and clients.
 The earlier you brand the better.

 Worksheet 5.1 Guide to Better Branding




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                                                                                Basics of Branding


 6.0 Brand Building
 6.1 Publicity as a Brand Building Tool
 Proactive publicity can be one of the most powerful and cost effective brand building tools,
 especially for smaller organizations that can't afford significant advertising. Publicity is free,
 almost six times as many people read articles as read ads and the articles are more credible as
 they are perceived to be third party endorsements versus self-promotion. And, the average
 salary of an in-house copywriter is very low compared to the average ad agency fee to create
 a comparable amount of advertising.

 How to Get the News Media to Cover Your Story
 Stories have a better chance of being covered if they:

        Tie into what people are talking about today
        Add to discussions on current “hot” issues or topics
        Reference prominent people, places or things
        Have visual impact
        Are dramatic
        Are unexpected, controversial or outrageous
        Directly impact a publication's readership
        Have “human interest”
        Educate or entertain a publication's readers
        Have a “local” angle
        Tie into a holiday or special occasion
        Represent a significant milestone or a major honor

 6.2 The Power of Word of Mouth
 In his book, Eating the Big Fish: How Challenger Brands Can Compete Against Brand
 Leaders, Adam Morgan indicates that people enthusiastically share information for one of
 four reasons: (1) bragging rights, (2) product enthusiasm, (3) aspirational identification or (4)
 news value.

 Stories and anecdotes make a point real to people and imbed it in their memories. Brand
 stories and anecdotes can become legends. As they are told and retold, they can raise the
 brand to a mythological level. Stories are often told about consumer experiences that far
 exceed expectations. This could be the result of extraordinary customer service or some other
 incredible experience with the brand. Going out of your way as an organization to create
 these experiences will pay huge dividends – word-of-mouth marketing can not be
 underestimated. Ideally, you create experiences that reinforce your brand's point of
 difference.

 For instance, a Hallmark card shop owner cared so much for one of her customers that when
 the customer could not find what she was looking for in the store, the owner drove several
 miles away to a few other Hallmark stores until she found what the customer was looking
 for. She hand delivered it to the customer's house that evening, at no charge, reinforcing
 Hallmark's essence of “caring shared.” Now that is the stuff of legends. Delivering this type
 of service, even occasionally, generates significant word-of-mouth brand advocacy.
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 7.0 The Basics of Business Cards
 A professional business card that accurately reflects your brand image is an important part of
 your collateral package. It's often the first item prospects receive from you, and the most
 likely piece of collateral that they will keep referring to, so use this opportunity to make a
 strong, positive impression on them.

 The preponderance of do-it-yourself online business-card printing companies is an interesting
 and somewhat troubling phenomenon. With limited exceptions, it's fairly easy to spot an
 inexpensively produced card. When you choose to "go cheap" on your business cards, what
 message does that send to those with whom you wish to do business? Are you really doing
 yourself any favors by missing out on the opportunity to start building a positive brand image
 right from the start?

 Cheaper isn't always better when it comes to first impressions. Give clients a great first
 impression with these tips and tactics:

 Design Tips

 Tip #1: Enlist the help of a professional designer unless you have the skills to design
 your business card yourself.
 Ideally, this person's also tasked with designing your other collateral (letterhead, brochures,
 website, etc.), so it'll be intuitive to carry your brand image through from those pieces to your
 card.

 Tip #2: Keep it simple.
 Business cards are typically just 3.5" x 2", so you don't have too much space with which to
 work. Don't make your logo too large, don't make the type too small to be comfortably read,
 and don't be afraid to use white space.

 Tip #3: Keep to the standard business card size--unless you're the adventurous type.
 There are things you can do to a 3.5" x 2" card to differentiate yourself (e.g., rounded
 corners), but going with an unusual shape can be tricky. A round card, for instance, is quite
 memorable, but it certainly won't fit in standard business-card holder devices. You must be
 willing to trade convenience for memorability if you choose an unconventional shape or size.
 Any changes to standard business card size will translate into more money. If you’re trying to
 be cost-effective, keep it simple and standard.

 Tip #4: Carefully choose the information that will appear on your card.
 What's most important? Your name certainly needs to be there, along with the name of your
 company (via your logo), your phone number and your e-mail address. Space permitting, you
 can add your physical address, fax number, cell-phone number and company website
 address, if desired. Don't clutter things up too much--as with the design, simpler and cleaner
 is always better.


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 Tip #5: Keep the back blank, or use it for non-critical information.
 How often will people see the back of your business card? Traditional card storage modes
 assume that side is blank. If you do wish to put copy on it, be sure the information is of a
 supplemental nature: e.g., your company's mission or tagline. While business cards should
 promote your brand identity, they shouldn't be confused with advertising. Printing on the
 back will also double the print cost (it has to go through the print press twice). Think about
 whether or not this is a good use of budget.

 The Bottom Line
 Think about how you use other people's business cards when you make decisions regarding
 your own. It can be frustrating to not be able to find the information you need. Stay away
 from type that is too small to read (think about older eyes, or those with visual difficulties,
 particularly if this is relevant to your customers). Never choose a font that's hard to decipher.

 Make sure your business card is a positive reflection of both you and your company, and it
 mirrors your well-defined brand identity.




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                                                                             Basics of Branding


  8.0 Online Branding for Your Small Business
 Excerpt from http://www.allbusiness.com/articles/SalesMarketing/1216-26-1766.html
 An online business has a greater chance for success if those who buy its products and
 services recognize its brand. A recognizable brand also makes a business's site more
 attractive to potential advertisers and partners. But remember: Recognizable doesn't
 necessarily mean universally known. It simply means that a business's brand increases its
 chance to compete successfully for attention and market share in the appropriate space. It
 doesn't take an expensive global advertising campaign to brand your business. Branding can
 be accomplished through partnerships, direct marketing, a robust Web site and a modicum of
 good public relations.

 Fundamentally, branding online is pretty similar to branding offline. The palette is different
 because the medium is reduced to a screen instead of a billboard or a print advertisement, but
 the opportunity for messaging is the same.

 When a brick-and-mortar company takes its business to the Web, an online brand usually
 serves as an extension of its offline presence. Think of FedEx, AT&T, or CNN. For these
 companies, their online brands reinforce or influence what people already think about the
 companies.

 On the other hand, think of Amazon or Yahoo. They have developed brands that, for the
 most part, only exist online. Dot-coms need to carefully execute their brands and remember
 that there are more restrictions due to the constraints of the Web.

 Your logo is a visual cornerstone of a company's brand. Your company's identity is visually
 expressed through its logo, which, along your company's name, is one of the main things that
 makes your business memorable. Think of eBay, Google, and Yahoo. Each one of these
 companies has a distinctive logo that a large percentage of people would be able to describe
 without seeing.

 Your domain name is also an essential part of your branding efforts. Unfortunately, it's
 becoming increasingly difficult for companies to find available domain names. While a URL
 certainly has to be unique and easy to remember, it doesn't necessarily have to relate to what
 you sell in order to be successful. How does the name "Amazon" relate to books and other
 products? "Google" to a search engine? These are successful names and brands, but it's a
 stretch to say they have anything to do with the companies' offerings.

 Even if your business is an Internet-only venture, that doesn't mean you can't brand offline.
 You can get offline brand exposure across lots of different media through TV, radio, print
 advertisements, and public relations efforts. Remember, even for dot-coms, a brand is
 something that constantly reinforces a business's identity. You probably already strengthen
 your brand in ways you probably don't even think about -- distributing business cards at trade
 shows, sending invoices, letters and holiday cards to your clients, wearing your company's
 logo on a T-shirt, and through a variety of other activities.


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                                                                       Basics of Branding


 Worksheet 1.1 Identifying your Company’s Identity

 1. What Values does your company pride itself on? How do these values play a role in
 your business?
 Eg. My company prides itself on being environmentally conscious, therefore we give
 discounts for people who bring their own bags and containers, and try to buy the most
 environmentally friendly products possible.
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________

 2. Personality
 How would you personify your company? Which public figure would your company be?
 What flavour ice cream, what kind of music, which cartoon character? Have fun, and be
 creative.
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 3. Behavior
 Your company's image includes not only how you promote yourselves but also how you act
 toward customers and the public. Things like how you answer the phone, how you greet
 shoppers, how cheerfully you correct mistakes or accept returns, how aggressively you
 negotiate contracts all become bound up in one composite image. What behaviors would you
 like to promote about your business? What behaviors are important for you to communicate
 to your staff?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________

 4. Price
 How much you cost in comparison to competitors often becomes part of your image.
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________




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 5. Range
 Customers should understand the spectrum of products and services that you sell. If it's not
 part of your company name or company slogan, include your focus in your ads, brochures,
 sales letters and other promotional pieces. What is you complete range of products?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________


 6. Geographical roots
 Where did your company come from?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________


 7. Longevity
 Whenever you've been around much longer than competitors, you can profitably incorporate
 that into your image. If you are new, what makes you as good or better than the established
 competition?

 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________


 8. Slogan
 You have 3 seconds to grab your customer’s attention, what slogan (less than 10 words)
 describes your business?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________

 9. Benefits
 What do buyers get when they purchase from you?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________




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                                                                       Basics of Branding


 Worksheet 1.2 Strategic Branding Questions

 1. What is your brand's vision?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 2. What are the good attributes of your brand (or company, or product, or service)?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 3. What are the practical benefits associated with your brand?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 4. What are the bad aspects of your brand, and how can you fix them?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 5. What emotions are behind customer purchases of your products/services?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 6. How is your brand positioned against the competition?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 7. Which well-known personality does your brand best represent?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 8. Which personality characteristics does this person embrace?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________




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 9. Do all elements of your branding strategy integrate with one another?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 10. Are these elements delivered consistently?
 ________________________________________________________________________

 11. Does your branding effort take into account different cultural aspects at the international
 level?
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 __________________________________________________________________

 12. Are you investing in your ongoing branding efforts through both time and money?
 ________________________________________________________________________




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                                                                               Basics of Branding


 Worksheet 3.1 Naming Your Business

 Step 1: Brainstorm.
 Who are my target customers?
 What are they looking for?
 What's my competitive advantage (e.g., quality, speed of service, etc.)?
 What adjectives would I apply to my company (e.g., smart, easy, etc.)? Can I combine any of
 these words to form a catchy new word or phrase?
 Are there any metaphors or symbols that come to mind? For example, an apple is a common
 symbol for education.
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ____________________________________________________________

 Step 2: Evaluate your names, then narrow them down to a short list of five to 10 names.
 Appraise the names on your brainstorm list using the following criteria. Strike any name that
 you can't answer "yes" to on the first five questions.

 Is it easy to say?
 Is it easy to spell?
 Does it have a positive connotation that'll appeal to customers?
 Is it legally available?
 Is it, or some logical form of it, available as a URL? (.com or .org or .net, preferably.)
 Is it interesting or unique?
 Do you visualize anything when you read the name?
 Is it descriptive? If it's not, that's okay. You can always add a tagline or byline for
 description.

 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________

 Step 3: Get feedback from potential customers.
 Present your shortlist for feedback to as many potential customers as possible.
 Finalize a name based on your personal opinions and the feedback of others. Try not to
 second-guess yourself. When in doubt, go with your gut--that's what customers do!




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                                                                            Basics of Branding


 Worksheet 5.1 Guide to Better Branding

 1. Do you have a company logo?

 What you should be after is simple shapes, fonts, colors, everything. You should be able to
 look at the page from a distance and know which company it's for. The best trademarks end
 up cemented into the minds of individuals worldwide.

 It is most important to remember that your logo should be consistently displayed wherever
 your company promotes itself.

 2. Does your website put forward your company theme?

 The initial point of contact for most businesses is their website. Each web page should be
 based on a template, no matter how simple or complex, so that each page has the same look
 and feel.

 3. Are your products branded?

 4. Does your company have a standard font?
 Every company should have a standard font that they use for all promotional material

 5. Do you brand your events?
 What this highlights is a company's ability to successfully partner their brand with events
 that their target market either attend or watch.
 You should have a promotional sign.
 Any presentations should use a standard PowerPoint presentation template
 You should use branded plastic bags
 Evaluation forms should have clear branding
 When it comes to branding events, you need to remember that it's often the little things that
 make the biggest difference. That evaluation form or gift bag that you gave out to someone at
 one of your events could land in the hands of one of your biggest clients in the future, so be
 diligent and consistent.

 5. Do you have cool business cards?
 You should spend the extra dollars to ensure that you get nice cards and your employees are
 proud of them. That way they will give them away at every handshake, which is fantastic free
 advertising for your company.

 6. Do you brand your employees?
 Extend opportunities to use our branded shirts. Cool shirts with small logos. Your employees
 are in effect, walking billboards. The corporate uniform should be stylish, and the branding
 can be subtle and effective at the same time. Branding employees is especially important at
 events such as conferences, user groups and client meetings.
 Wherever your employees gather in large numbers, ensure they come branded.


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 7. Do you brand your cars?
 Brand your employees when they're on the road. Those employees who are driving company
 cars are essentially moving billboards.


 8. Do you use email signatures?
 Email signatures are a great way of adding some advertising and branding to a medium
 which isn't seen as too obtrusive. E.g. A URL in a footer from your friend isn't as taboo as
 junk mail from a unknown company.
 Set a standard where every email that goes to an external address must have an appropriate
 email signature. The general rule of thumb is that a URL to the company website should
 always be on the signatures

 9. Do you use a consistent phone message?
 You should remember that any point of contact leaves an impression on clients or customers
 so even the answering service on your phones should be taken into consideration. If you have
 a cell phone which is used for work purposes, use a standard message.




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 Worksheet 5.2 Branding Checklist

                                        Yes, well          Needs         Not at all
                                        branded        Improvement        branded
 Company name
 Taglines
 Product & service names
 Trademarks/Service marks
 Fonts & typestyles
 Logos
 Color schemes
 Business cards & letterhead
 Envelopes
 Annual reports
 Promotional brochures & flyers
 Direct mailers & postcards
 Point of purchase
 Advertisements
 Sales kits
 Presentations/pitch books
 Media Kits
 Press Releases
 Package Inserts
 Packaging
 Videotape labels/covers
 CD/Audio tape labels/covers
 Shipping Containers
 Company signage including
 Directional signs
 (“All Deliveries this way…”)
 Storefronts & store interiors

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 Reception area signage
 Conference & board rooms
 Websites
 Business vehicles (e.g. sales,
 service, delivery)
 Uniforms
 Trade show booths & banners
 Your building’s exterior
 appearance
 Floors
 On-hold messaging
 Voicemail greetings
 Product Manuals
 Gift Certificates
 Store background music
 Yellow Page ads
 Website URL’s
 E-Zines
 Banner Advertising
 Autoresponder emails
 Autoresponder faxes
 Directory listings (online +
 offline)
 Signature files on outgoing
 emails
 Contests
 Viral Marketing
 Email newsletter text ads
 Pay-per-click ads
 Other

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                                                                              Basics of Branding


 Special: Design Tips for the Beginner

 Basics of Design:

 Before you start, decide on the following…

 1. Purpose: What are you trying to say? What do you wish to achieve?
 2. Audience: Who are you trying to say it to? (age/gender/size of group etc)
 3. Image: What kind of image do you want to project
 4. Method: How will this be reproduced? Use of design (i.e. bus cards etc), graphics,
    colours used etc.
 5. Constraints: budget, deadline/timeline, legal requirements, and specifications of size.

 DO NOT USE ALL CAPITALS
 This is equivalent of yelling and is considered ill mannered in the print world.

 Same goes for underlining, bold, or italics:
 Special formatting should only be used for very special messages or headings. Same as with
 the all-caps, if this is over-used the result is bad.

 Pick one font, and use it for all of your material. Font communicates so much that people
 don’t realise, be it funky, serious,  fancy       or fun. Make sure the font is appropriate to
 your message, and most importantly, that it is readable by all age groups. Sans Serif (i.e.
 without the little ornamental details such as feet and tails like Times New Roman) is cleaner,
 but harder to read by senior citizens.

 Pick one alignment and try to stick with that. Don’t left-align some stuff and centre other
 stuff, unless it is a heading.

 Keep page set up and margins the same for all material.

 The most important thing is to be consistent. Pick one style for all documents and stick to it.




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                                                                             Basics of Branding


 On a lighter note…

 A Caution When Taking Brands Global
 Make sure you understand the direct translation and the meaning of your brand's name,
 slogan and advertising copy when you take the brand global. Following are some brands that
 encountered problems when doing so:

 Frank Perdue
 Slogan: ‘It takes a strong man to make a tender chicken'
 Slogan in Spanish: ‘It takes an aroused man to make a chicken affectionate.'

 Chevy Nova
 Name: Nova
 Name's meaning in Spanish: ‘It doesn't go.'

 Schweppes Tonic Water
 Name: Schweppes Tonic Water
 Name's translation in Italian: ‘Schweppes Toilet Water'

 Coors
 Slogan: ‘Turn it loose'
 Slogan in Spanish: ‘You will suffer from diarrhea'


 Source: Brand Failures: The Truth About the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time by
 Matt Haig, Kogan-Page, London (2003)


 It Just Doesn't Translate
 Marketers can get into trouble when they introduce their products to new countries if they
 don't pay close attention to cultural differences. A case in point: Gerber introduced baby food
 in jars in certain African markets. The jars bore a picture of a cute baby. Sales were very
 disappointing. When they investigated the problem, they discovered why the baby food
 wasn't selling. As many people in Africa are illiterate, people generally expect labels to
 visually portray the contents of the package. Luckily, cute babies were not very appetizing.

 Source: Global Brand Strategy by Sicco van Gelder, AMACOM, 2003




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