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Contents - School of Hotel Administration

VIEWS: 26 PAGES: 56

									Contents
Welcome to the School of Hotel Administration  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
Office of Student Services Staff .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 5
Academic Calendar .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 5
Academic Honors and Awards  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6
Academic Integrity  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6
Academic Status Definitions  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 7
Access to Records  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 8
Add/Drop Deadline  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 9
Administration  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 10
Advanced Placement Credit  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11
Advisors  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11
Alcohol Policy  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Auditing Classes  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Binenkorb Computer Center  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Bursar Bill  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Career Management in the Office of Student Services  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Certification  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13
Communication Center, School of Hotel Administration  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 14
Concentration  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 14
Course Load  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 15
Course Numbering System .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 15
Class Time Conflicts  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 16
Courses of Study  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 16
Credit  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 16
Culinary Institute of America (CIA)/School of Hotel Administration Alliance  .  . 16
Curriculum Requirements  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 16
Dean of Students, Cornell  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 18
Dean of Students, School of Hotel Administration .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 18
Dean’s List  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 19
Degree Audit, Online  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 19
Degree Requirements  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 19
Disabilities  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 20
Distance Learning  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 20
Distributive Electives  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 20
Double Dipping  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 21
Electives  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 21
Enrollment .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
Examinations .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
First-Year Writing Seminar .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 22
Grade Computation  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 23


                                                                                                1
Grade Dispute  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24
Grade Option  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24
Grade Reports  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24
Half-Term Classes  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24
Hotel Ezra Cornell (HEC)  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 24
Incomplete Grade .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25
Independent Study Projects .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25
Insurance Verification  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25
International Students  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 25
Language Requirement  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 26
Learning Strategies Center  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 26
Management Intern Program  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 26
Minors  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 27
Master of Management in Hospitality Program  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 27
Multicultural Programs  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31
Ombudsman  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 31
Petition  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 32
Physical Education Requirement .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 32
Practice Credit Requirement  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 33
Records  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 33
Registration .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 33
Religious Observances  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 33
Repeating Courses  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 33
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Grades  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34
Schedule  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34
Statler Leadership Development Program (SLDP)  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34
Student Advisory Board, School of Hotel Administration  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35
Student Center  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35
Study Abroad  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 35
Summer Study Abroad .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
Summer Session Courses  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
Transcript  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 36
Transfer Credit Policy  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 37
Winter Session Courses  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 37
Appendix 1, Practice Credit, Requirements and Guidelines .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 38
Appendix 2, Election of Undergraduate Minor and Concentration  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 40
Directory  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 53




                                                                                               2
This Student Handbook is a resource manual for academic program planning . It explains the complexi-
ties of the curriculum, options, and graduation requirements . Descriptions of student services and orga-
nizations also are found here .
Information in this Student Handbook was updated in June 2009 but is subject to change by action of
the faculty .
Cover photo caption: Members of the Board of Directors of the 82nd Annual Hotel Ezra Cornell
Cover photo by University Photography
Produced by the Office of Publications and Marketing at Cornell University
Cornell University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action employer and educator .
Printed on recycled paper                                                         7/09 415 AP 090345


                                                    3
Welcome to the School of Hotel
Administration (SHA)!
Traditionally, we have taken as our motto the words of our benefactor,

E . M . Statler, “Life is service—the one who progresses is the one who

gives his fellow men a little more, a little better service .” This Student

Handbook is intended to give you a little more, a little better service .

We’ve listed topics in alphabetical order to make the handbook easy

to use . If, as you read through this handbook and use it for reference

throughout your studies with us, you find a topic that has not been

included, or one that needs to be more clearly defined, please let us

know . We want to provide you with the best reference information

possible .

Remember, each school or college at Cornell has its own policies and

procedures . Use this handbook, together with other university resources,

to get the answers to your questions .

If you need assistance, check with the staff in the Office of Student

Services, Room 180 Statler Hall, or send e-mail to student_services@sha .

cornell .edu .



Enjoy your studies!

The Staff of the Office of Student Services




                                      4
Office of Student Services Staff
                                607 .255 .6376
Lisa Shaffer, Director                            ls272@cornell .edu

Molly de Roos, Associate Director                 msb16@cornell .edu
 for Career Management

Sheri Mahaney, Associate Director                 sfm3@cornell .edu
  for Graduate Programs

Dina Kristof, Registrar                           dre2@cornell .edu

Cheryl Utter, Student Services Program Manager    cau8@cornell .edu

Michelle Zirbel, Student Services Coordinator     mlz2@cornell .edu

Ann Marie Kaminski, Recruiting Coordinator        amk14@cornell .edu

Shawn Meyer, Employer Relations Assistant         smm236@cornell .edu

Curtis Ferguson II, Assistant Director for        cf272@cornell .edu
  Multicultural Programs

Steve Shaum, Undergraduate Advisor                sls243@cornell .edu

Barbara Lang, Undergraduate Advisor               bl28@cornell .edu

Kathy Mix, Reception                              klm27@cornell .edu




           CORNELL UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                          2009–10
               See: http://www.cornell.edu/academics/calendar/.




                                        5
Academic Honors and Awards
At the start of spring semester, the Class Marshals and Banner Bearers are
selected by the faculty to represent the graduating class at Commencement .
Each year, two class marshals and two banner bearers (plus two alternates)
are chosen based on academic excellence as measured by the cumulative
grade-point average .
  Students are selected to receive Graduation with Distinction, also based on
academic excellence, as measured by the cumulative grade-point average .
Out of the top 15 percent of the graduates for the academic year, up to
10 percent of the students may be selected to receive this honor .
  The Latin Honors program was established to promote the school’s mis-
sion to create and disseminate knowledge about hospitality management
to the global hospitality industry by encouraging student research . Students
leverage theories acquired from coursework to create new knowledge, to
develop meaningful relationships with a faculty thesis advisor, and to dem-
onstrate mastery of research skills to graduate schools and future employers .
In the final year of their matriculation, students engage in two semesters
and 6 credits of research directed by the school’s professorial faculty and
are recognized upon completion with a Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude,
or Summa Cum Laude designation commensurate with the quality of their
completed theses and academic qualifications .
  Merrill Presidential Scholars rank among the top 5 percent in their
respective schools and colleges at the university . In the School of Hotel
Administration, two fourth-year students selected by the dean may pay trib-
ute to the secondary school and college teachers who have had a vital effect
on their academic careers . The students and their teachers are honored at
a luncheon hosted by the president of the university, generally in the week
immediately preceding Commencement .

Academic Integrity
Academic integrity is a critical issue for all students and professors in the
academic community . All new students are required to attend a session
during SHA orientation that familiarizes them with the Code of Academic
Integrity . Students are expected follow the code and understand that the
faculty and administration of the School of Hotel Administration take
academic-integrity violations very seriously .
  The code’s introduction presents broad principles that should help stu-
dents conduct themselves honorably: “Absolute integrity is expected of
every Cornell student in all academic undertakings . .  .  . Academic integrity is
expected not only in formal course work but in all university relationships
and interactions connected to the educational process, including the use of
university resources  .  .  .

                                         6
  “A student’s submission of work for academic credit indicates that the
work is the student’s own  .  .  .”
  A student who has been found guilty of violating the code may receive
a penalty that ranges from the loss of points on a specific assignment to
expulsion from the university . Moreover, no student who has been found
guilty of a breach of the Code of Academic Integrity will be eligible for Ye
Hosts membership, a management internship, or academic distinction or
other graduation honors and awards .
Note: For the complete Code of Academic Integrity,
see http://theuniversityfaculty.cornell.edu/policies/pol_main.html.


Academic Status Definitions
Good Standing—a duly registered full-time student, enrolled in 12 or more
  credit hours (not including Phys Ed), whose semester and cumulative
  grade-point average (GPA) are above 2 .0 .
Warning—issued when a student’s semester and/or cumulative GPA fall
  below 2 .0 .
  The student is warned that a 2 .0 must be attained in the following semes-
  ter or he/she faces further action, such as a required leave or withdrawal .
Required Leave (one or two semesters)—generally issued after a student has
  been warned but may be issued at any time the student’s semester and/
  or cumulative GPA fall below 2 .0 . The student is advised that he/she must
  leave the university for a period of one or two semesters, and, if the stu-
  dent wishes to return in the future, he/she must follow the readmission
  requirements included with the Required Leave letter .
Note: Students returning from required leaves must attain a minimum 2.3
grade-point average and must not have any grades of “F” or “Incomplete” in
the rejoin term. Otherwise, the student will be subject to further disciplinary
action.

Voluntary Leave—may be requested for any reason before the drop dead-
  line (normally the end of the seventh week of classes) by a student in
  good academic standing, by submitting a petition signed by the student
  and his/her academic advisor to the Office of Student Services . Written
  approval from the Director of Student Services or the Registrar must be
  obtained . Students are advised to check with the University Bursar for
  tuition refund policies in the event a voluntary leave is requested once the
  semester has commenced . Students are responsible for all tuition, fees,
  and administrative charges incurred, and it is the student’s responsibility
  to contact the Office of Financial Aid, Student Housing, and the ISSO, if
  applicable . There will be no record of enrollment for the leave semester .


                                       7
Conditional Leave—is defined as any leave request after the drop deadline
  (which must be petitioned for), and/or any leave request from a stu-
  dent not in good academic standing (including those on Warning, Final
  Warning, or Rejoin status). Students who find themselves in this situa-
  tion must submit a petition for a leave signed by their academic advisor .
  Most conditional leaves are for two semesters . The student’s record for
  the semester will show all grades as “W .” The school may set conditions
  for completion of work, internships, course work, or other activities dur-
  ing the conditional leave period . Written approval from the Director of
  Student Services or the Registrar must be obtained . Students are advised
  to check with the University Bursar for tuition refund policies in the
  event a conditional leave is approved once the semester has commenced .
  Students are responsible for all tuition, fees, and administrative charges
  incurred, and it is the student’s responsibility to contact the Office of
  Financial Aid, Student Housing, and the ISSO, if applicable . A student may
  request a conditional leave after the 12th week of classes only in highly
  unusual circumstances.
Health Leave—must be requested and approved through Gannett Health
  Services . If granted a health leave, which usually is at least six months in
  duration, the student may not return to the university until approved by
  Gannett .
Voluntary Withdrawal—Students who fail to register by the end of the fifth
  week of the semester will be dropped from their classes by the Office of
  the University Registrar and be considered to have voluntarily withdrawn,
  meaning they have separated from the university and are no longer stu-
  dents at Cornell .
Required Withdrawal—issued when a student’s academic record is such that
  the faculty deems that the student should leave the university on a per-
  manent basis .
Suspension—issued when a student has been convicted of a gross violation
  of the Code of Academic Integrity or the Campus Code of Conduct . A sus-
  pension is generally temporary .
Expulsion—is a permanent separation from the university wherein the stu-
  dent may not reregister in the future .

Access to Records
The educational records of all matriculated students at Cornell, regardless
of student age, are protected under both the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974 and the Cornell University Access to Student Information
Policy 4 .5 . Under these policies, matriculated students are treated as legal
adults, with the responsibilities and privileges inherent in that status . They
are expected to make decisions about course work, classes, social life, and


                                       8
their personal well-being . They also are expected to learn from and take
responsibility for the consequences of those decisions . To view Cornell’s policy
online, visit: http://registrar.sas.cornell.edu/Student/records.html .
  The university regards a student’s enrollment status (for example: regis-
tered, on leave, withdrawn) as directory information that may be released
unless a student submits a “no-release” request to the University Registrar .
Additionally, where the university believes that it is in a dependent student’s
best interest, information from the student’s educational records may, at the
university’s discretion, be released to the parents or legal guardians of such
a dependent student . Such a disclosure generally will be limited to informa-
tion about a student’s official status at the university, but parents or legal
guardians of a dependent student may also be notified when a student has
voluntarily withdrawn from the university or has been required by the uni-
versity to withdraw; when a student has been placed on academic warning;
when the student’s academic good standing is at issue; when a student has
been placed on disciplinary probation or restriction; or when a student oth-
erwise engages in behavior calling into question the appropriateness of the
student’s continued enrollment at the university . Unless otherwise indicated
in writing by the student at the time of registration or thereafter, the uni-
versity will presume that a full-time undergraduate student is a dependent
as that term is defined in the U .S . Internal Revenue Code . Undergraduate
students who are not financially dependent and do not wish to permit
their parent(s) or legal guardian(s) to have access to their education records
should advise the Office of the University Registrar in writing and provide
evidence of financial independence . Graduate and professional students
are not assumed to be financially dependent upon their parent(s) or legal
guardian(s) for these purposes .
  Students who want additional information on access to their records may
contact the Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, or the Office of the
University Registrar, B7 Day Hall . An inventory of those student records
maintained by Cornell University offices in Ithaca, their location, and cogni-
zant officers are available in the Office of the Dean of Students, 401 Willard
Straight Hall .

Add/Drop Deadline
Students may add classes to their enrollment in the first three weeks of each
term and may drop classes before the end of the seventh week of classes .
Students must turn in Add/Drop forms by the specified date each term .
  Add/Drop with “W”—Students with documentable extenuating circum-
stances may petition to drop a class after the end of the seventh week of
classes . If approved, a grade of “W” will appear . No classes may be dropped
after the final scheduled day of class for the semester .


                                        9
Administration
Dean, School of Hotel Administration,
 Michael D . Johnson
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs,
  Steven Carvell
Dean of Students,
 Judith Brownell
Executive Director of the Center for Hospitality Research,
  Rohit Verma
Director of Corporate Affairs, Center for Hospitality Research,
  Joseph Strodel
Managing Director, The Pillsbury Institute for Hospitality Entrepreneurship,
 Thomas Ward
Managing Director, The Statler Hotel,
 Richard D . Adie
Associate Dean for Business Administration,
  David Strong
Associate Dean for External Affairs,
  Jon Denison
Director of Enrollment Management and International Programs,
  Brad Walp
Director of Student Services,
  Lisa M . Shaffer
Associate Director for Career Management,
  Molly deRoos
Associate Director for Graduate Programs,
  Sheri Mahaney
Registrar,
  Dina Kristof
Assistant Director for Multicultural Programs,
  Curtis Ferguson II
Director of Development,
  Meg Keilbach
Director of Alumni Affairs,
  Christine Natsios
Director of Communication,
  Nancy Knowles




                                        10
Advanced Placement Credit
The primary purpose of Advanced Placement (AP) credit is to exempt stu-
dents from introductory courses and to place them in advanced courses .
In the case of SHA students, credit may be awarded only in Free Electives,
with two exceptions: microeconomics (score 4/5) and the Freshman Writing
Seminar (score 5) . If you receive AP credit, you may not subsequently enroll
in a similar course as outlined in Courses of Study for credit at Cornell unless
the AP credit is removed .
   Students may earn AP credit from one of the following:
1 . The requisite score on a departmental examination at Cornell (usually
    given during Orientation Week) or on a College Entrance Examination
    Board (CEEB) test . The requisite scores for the CEEB exams are determined
    by the relevant department at Cornell, vary by subject, and are published
    in Courses of Study .
2 . A regular course taught at an accredited college to college students and
    approved by the relevant department at Cornell . Some departments have
    delegated the review of courses to college staff according to guidelines
    they have formulated . Some departments review each request individu-
    ally . Some departments accept credit from virtually all accredited colleges;
    some do not .
3 . Credit for the international baccalaureate, the German Abitur, the GCE A
    levels, etc ., is evaluated individually .
Note: Cornell does not accept credit for courses sponsored by colleges but
taught in high schools to high school students. This is true even if the college
provides a transcript of such work. Students who have taken such courses may,
however, take the appropriate CEEB test to qualify for credit as in paragraph
1 above.

  See the university’s Courses of Study at http://www.cornell.edu/
academics/courses.cfm for information and limitations on AP credit.

Advisors
Faculty Advising—Student–faculty interaction is a hallmark of the School of
Hotel Administration . Students benefit both personally and professionally
from developing relationships with individual faculty members .
  The school offers two different faculty advising relationships during the
undergraduate years:




                                       11
•	 Transition Advisors—These faculty members work with first- and
   second-year students, and are responsible for helping students make a
   smooth transition to life and work at Cornell and the School of Hotel
   Administration .
•	 Career Advisors—These faculty advisors help students explore and con-
   nect their career interests to the curriculum and the industry, helping stu-
   dents network with faculty and staff members, and alumni . Students are
   transitioned to a career advisor during the second semester of the sopho-
   more year (transfer students are transitioned once they have completed
   most of the first- and second-year core courses) .
Office of Student Services (OSS) Advising—Experienced, professional staff
members in the Office of Student Services supplement the advice of faculty
members .
  OSS advisors:
•	 assist	students	in	making	good	decisions,	and	support	students	during	
   difficult or vulnerable times—when they are confused, overwhelmed, or
   troubled by academic or personal matters .
•	 help	students	design	imaginative	and	solid	curricula	that	satisfy	appro-
   priate degree requirements, and inform them about the school’s many
   special academic options, such as the Management Intern Program, the
   Statler Leadership Development Program, and Study Abroad .
•	 help	students	make	the	fullest	and	best	possible	use	of	university	and	
   college resources .
•	 provide	career-management	advising,	assisting	students	in	linking	their	
   academic work to career goals .
Career Management Advising—Career management is an integral part of
the Office of Student Services . OSS advisors can:
•	 assist	in	honing	résumé	and	cover	letter–writing	skills.
•	 conduct	mock	interviews.
•	 guide	and	instruct	students	on	school	and	campus	job	search	resources.
•	 help	to	build	the	confidence	necessary	for	a	successful	job	search.
•	 offer	students	assistance	in	mapping	out	strategy	and	determining	career	
   goals .
Responsibilities of Student Advisees
•	 Be	considerate	of	your	advisors’	schedules.	Be	on	time	to	meetings;	leave	
   plenty of notice if you need to reschedule .
•	 Be	open-minded	and	receptive.
•	 Get	to	know	your	faculty	advisor	and	your	OSS	advisor.
•	 Initiate	career	and	academic	discussions	with	your	advisors.
•	 Learn	the	degree	requirements.
•	 Make	regular	appointments	with	your	academic	advisor.	Come	prepared	
   with questions, course selections, and alternatives .
•	 Take	responsibility	for	your	decisions.



                                      12
Alcohol Policy
No individual or group may bring alcohol into Statler Hall . Students under
the age of 21 caught consuming alcohol risk having their names forwarded
to the Judicial Administrator . Please see Policy 4 .8 for more information on
the university policy regarding alcohol and other drugs on campus . (http://
www.policy.cornell.edu/vol4_8.cfm)

Auditing Classes
Undergraduate students may not audit courses . SHA courses may be audited
only by SHA graduate students .

Binenkorb Computer Center
Use of the Binenkorb Computer Center is restricted to SHA students . The
center, which maintains and supports more than 125 state-of-the-art PC
workstations, is open from 8 a .m . to 11:30 p .m . in 365 Statler Hall .

Bursar Bill
The bursar bill summarizes what you owe to the university and is issued by
the Office of the Bursar, 260 Day Hall, 607 .255 .2336 . All bursar communica-
tions are sent via e-mail. It is important that you check your Cornell e-mail
regularly . All registered students will receive monthly bursar bills electroni-
cally through Cornell Net .Pay, the online billing and payment service . Each
month, you will receive an e-mail at your Cornell e-mail address with the
subject line “Your New Cornell E-bill Is Now Available.”
  You can also view your bursar bill by accessing your Student Center .
  See: Student Center.

Career Management in the Office of Student Services (OSS)
For more information about Career Management, log onto the web at
http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/careers/ugrad/, stop by the OSS
office at 180 Statler Hall, or call us at 607 .255 .6376 .
  Additional resources for careers outside of hospitality can be found at
Cornell Career Services, 103 Barnes Hall, 607 .255 .5221; web site: www.
career.cornell.edu .

Certification
The Office of the University Registrar is responsible for certifying student
enrollment and degree status . Certification requests can be made online at
http://certification.cornell.edu by all students with a valid U .S . Social Security
Number, and an active NetID and password .

                                         13
Communication Center, School of Hotel Administration
The Communication Center provides free consulting for written and oral
assignments, and can also assist with recurring writing problems . Center
staff members help SHA students further develop and fine-tune their com-
munication skills to be industry leaders . The center is located in 330 Statler
Hall, 607 .255 .8263 . Students can request an appointment online at http://
www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/comm .

Concentration
Students may select an optional 12-credit concentration within the Hotel
Elective requirement . Courses that fulfill concentrations are defined by the
academic areas within the school . To declare a concentration and have it
appear on your final transcript, all courses must be taken for a letter grade
(unless they are only offered as S–U), and a 3 .0 minimum cumulative GPA in
the concentration courses must be attained . The deadline to declare
a concentration is the last day of the student’s penultimate semester .
The Declaration of Concentration form is available online at http://www.
hotelschool.cornell.edu/academics/ugrad/concentrations/ .
Note: Students may complete the requirements for more than one concen-
tration, but only one officially declared concentration will appear on the
final transcript. (All verified completed minors will appear on the student’s
transcript.)

Note: The 12 concentration credits are often taken within the School of
Hotel Administration, which naturally fulfills the degree requirement for
12 credits of upper-level SHA Electives. Some concentrations may offer the
option or require that the student take courses outside the School of Hotel
Administration. If courses outside the school are used to fulfill any of the
entire concentration credit requirement, the student must still fulfill the
degree requirement of 12 credits of upper-level SHA Electives.

  See also the listing of approved concentrations online at http://www.
hotelschool.cornell.edu/academics/ugrad/concentrations/, talk to your
faculty advisor or an advisor in the Office of Student Services, or contact
the faculty representative in your concentration area.

 See: Minors and Appendix 2—Undergraduate Concentrations and Minors.

Core Courses
First- and second-year students are pre-enrolled in their core courses by the
Office of Student Services . Students may not drop core courses during the
first and second years.

                                       14
Course Load
A student must take at least 12 credits each semester, and the typical course
load per term is 15–18 credits per semester . Physical education does not
count toward full-time enrollment or toward total hours needed for gradua-
tion . If your cumulative GPA is below 2 .50, you may not enroll in more than
18 credits per semester . With the written approval of your advisor, you may
take more than 18 credits if your GPA falls within the following ranges:
Cumulative GPA                                                                           Maximum Credits per Semester
2 .50–2 .99  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3 .00–3 .49  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3 .50 and above  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Note: Students who enroll for more course credits than are permitted will be
dropped from courses until they meet the permitted number of course cred-
its. Students seeking to exceed their course credit limit need to petition for
exceptions.


Course Numbering System
The first two digits of the SHA course number is indicative, in most cases, of
the level at which the course would normally be taken, i .e .:
  11—First-Year Students/Introduction
  22—Second-Year Students
  33—Third-Year Students
  44—Fourth-Year Students
  55—Provisional Course Offerings
  66—Graduate Electives
  77—Courses required for the MMH degree
  88—MS
  99—PhD
  This, however, is not ironclad: upper-class students will be found in 1100-
and 2200-level courses, and undergraduates may be enrolled in 6600-level
offerings . The determining factor is the prerequisites/limitations statement
for the course in question .
 The third digit of the SHA course number designates the academic area
within the school:
 0—Operations
 1—Management, Organizational Behavior, and Human Resource
        Management
 2—Finance, Accounting, and Real Estate Development
 3—Food and Beverage Management
 4—Marketing, Tourism, and Strategy

                                                                                                      15
  5—Facilities Management, Planning, and Design
  6—Managerial Communication
  7—Information Systems
  8—Law
  The fourth digit of the SHA course number indicates a specific course with-
in the area of instruction .

Class Time Conflicts
Since instructors have the right to expect that the students registered for
their courses will attend for the entire class period, enrollment in courses
with overlapping schedules is not permitted .

Courses of Study
The university’s online course catalog, Courses of Study, is available at:
http://www.cornell.edu/academics/courses.cfm.

Credit
Credit, earned by successfully completing a class, is measured in credit hours .

Culinary Institute of America (CIA) /
School of Hotel Administration Alliance
The Cornell School of Hotel Administration’s alliance with the Culinary
Institute of America (CIA) has created a collaborative program for students
with a passion for food and foodservice operations . In an intensive program
designed to challenge students in every aspect of the foodservice indus-
try, SHA students can now earn their BS degree from the School of Hotel
Administration and their Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) degree
from the CIA during their four years at Cornell .
  For more information, e-mail CIA_Alliance@sha .cornell .edu, call
607 .255 .4611, or log onto: http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/academics/
special/cia/ciasha.html.

Curriculum Requirements
You can track your progress toward meeting your degree requirements
online at: http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/audit/index.
html.




                                       16
Core Courses (number of credits in parentheses)
Operations
 HADM 1105 (2): Introduction to Hotel Operations
 HADM 1106 (2): Introduction to Food Service Operations
 HADM 2201 (3): Hospitality Quantitative Analysis
 HADM 3301 (3): Service Operations Management
 HADM 3305 (4): Restaurant Management

Management and Organizational Behavior; Human-Resource Management
 HADM 1115 (3): Organizational Behavior and Interpersonal Skills
 HADM 2211 (3): Human Resource Management

Finance/Accounting; Real Estate Development
  HADM 1121 (3): Financial Accounting
  HADM 2221 (3): Managerial Accounting
  HADM 2222 (3): Finance
  HADM 3321 (3): Hospitality Financial Management

Food and Beverage Management
  HADM 2236 (4): Culinary Theory and Practice

Marketing, Tourism, and Strategy
 HADM 1141 (3): Microeconomics for the Service Industry
 HADM 2243 (3): Marketing Management for Services
 HADM 4441 (3): Strategic Management

Facilities Management, Planning and Design
  HADM 2255 (3): Hospitality Development and Planning
  HADM 3355 (3): Hospitality Facilities Management

Managerial Communication
 HADM 1165 (3): Managerial Communication I
 HADM 3365 (3): Managerial Communication II
 (3): First-Year Writing Seminar

Information Systems
  HADM 1174 (3): Business Computing
  HADM 2275 (3): Introduction to Information Systems Management

Law
  HADM 3387 (3): Business and Hospitality Law
  Total Core      69
  SHA Electives 12*
  Distributive Electives 18**
  Free Electives 21***
  Total Program 120

                                   17
Note: Physical education does not count toward your total credit hours
earned for graduation.

Note: All core courses must be taken for a letter grade. SHA Electives also
must be taken for letter grade unless only offered on an S–U basis (such as
HADM 4430).

  See: Satisfactory–Unsatisfactory Grades.

* A minimum of 12 credits, 3300-level or higher, in the School of Hotel Administration .

** A minimum of 18 credits, to be taken outside the School of Hotel Administration . Online
courses taken during the fall or spring semester will not count toward Distributive Electives .
Students must take a minimum of 3 credit hours in Humanities/Languages/Fine Arts/Performing
Arts, Social Sciences, and Biological and Physical Sciences/Mathematics .

*** A minimum of 21 credits, to be taken either in or outside the School of Hotel
Administration .


Dean of Students, Cornell
Cornell’s Office of the Dean of Students extends its umbrella over a wide
array of services to students, including Cornell United Religious Work,
fraternity and sorority affairs, new student programs, peer support, and
student activities . The main office is located in 401 Willard Straight Hall,
607 .255 .6839 .

Dean of Students, School of Hotel Administration
Professor Judi Brownell serves as the dean of students for the School of
Hotel Administration . The dean of students plays a lead role in designing,
implementing, and coordinating processes related to the smooth opera-
tion of the undergraduate program, advising, and the activities that directly
affect students and their educational experience . The school and the uni-
versity have a wide range of resources available, and the dean of students
helps students connect to these resources, to better support their personal,
academic, and professional goals . Students who have questions, concerns, or
suggestions are encouraged to discuss these with Dean Brownell .
  Dean Brownell also works with the Student Advisory Board to identify and
address student concerns, and to effectively communicate the school’s activi-
ties and priorities to students .
  See: Student Advisory Board




                                               18
Dean’s List
The Dean’s List recognizes academic achievement each semester . Criteria are
satisfactory completion of at least 12 credits for a letter grade; no INC, F, or
U grades in the semester; and a semester GPA of 3 .3 or better . MMH stu-
dents must have a minimum 3 .7 GPA to qualify, but only the top 10 percent
are selected for the Dean’s List .
  If you satisfy these criteria, you will receive a letter from the dean and a
notation will be made on your official undergraduate transcript .

Degree Audit—Online
Enrolled students are encouraged to track their own academic progress
toward their degree using the online Degree Audit, at
http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/audit/.
  You have instant access to: course requirements completed, required cours-
es still needed, Electives (Distributive, Free, and SHA) completed, concentra-
tion (if declared), and documented Practice Credit hours .

Degree Requirements
To earn a Bachelor of Science degree you must:
1 . Complete eight terms in residence, or the requirement designated for
    transfer students . To satisfy a term of resident study, a student must be
    enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit hours, not including any Phys Ed cred-
    it . Under certain circumstances, a student may petition for early gradu-
    ation . (Students who wish to stay beyond eight semesters must petition
    and may not be awarded aid from the School of Hotel Administration .
    Students who wish to graduate early must petition to do so .)
2 . Earn a minimum of 120 credits, exclusive of Phys Ed credit .
3 . Complete the prescribed course curriculum and attain a cumulative GPA of
    at least 2 .0 .
4 . Earn a GPA of at least 2 .0 in a full-time schedule of courses on campus in
    the final semester .
    Students must be in residence (on campus) during the last semester.
    Exceptions for extraordinary reasons may be petitioned if all other gradu-
    ation requirements, such as Practice Credit, physical education, etc., have
    been met and the student has a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the penultimate
    semester.
5 . Receive a final grade in any courses in which a grade of “incomplete” was
    issued .
    See: Incomplete Grade
6 . Meet the qualification requirement of one language other than English .
    See: Language Requirement


                                       19
7 . Complete two units of Practice Credit .
    See: Practice Credit Requirement and Appendix 1 .
8 . Complete the physical education requirement, including a swim test, usu-
    ally during your first year of residence .
    See: Physical Education Requirement for complete policies, including
    transfer students .
Note: Students who have met all graduation requirements and, therefore,
can graduate are expected to do so. Financial aid, with the exception of assis-
tance for students enrolled under the Higher Education Opportunity Act, is
awarded for a maximum of eight semesters.


Disabilities
Cornell University has been providing reasonable academic and program
accommodation to students with disabilities since the implementation of
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 . The university is committed
to ensuring that all qualified persons with disabilities have the opportunity
to participate in its education and employment programs and services on an
equitable basis .
  Students must register with Student Disability Services (SDS) to be eligible
for disability services and accommodations . Documentation guidelines for
each category of disability and more information about SDS can be found
on the web site at: http://sds.cornell.edu/ . Advance notice is needed to have
some accommodations and services in place at the beginning of the semes-
ter . If you would like to meet with an SDS counselor, call 607 .254 .4545 to
schedule an appointment . Call 607 .255 .6376 to make an appointment to
speak to a SHA advisor regarding SDS .

Distance Learning
Students may only enroll in distance learning courses offered by Cornell
University, including winter and summer sessions . Students may not receive
credit for distance learning courses from other universities or colleges .
Cornell University Distance Learning courses may not count for Distributive
Electives in the fall or spring semester (academic year) .
Note: During the fall and spring semester, online courses will only count
toward Free Electives.


Distributive Electives
 See: Electives .




                                       20
Double Dipping
You may not take two courses that are identical or similar for credit . (This
includes equivalent AP courses .) You may not use the same course to fulfill
multiple graduation requirements . If you have any questions about this
policy, consult with the staff in the Office of Student Services .
Note: Students pursuing two concentrations can count an Elective course
that fulfills the requirements of both concentrations in both areas.


Electives
In addition to the core curriculum, students are given the option of selecting
Electives, either in or outside the School of Hotel Administration .
   Students must take a minimum of 12 credits of SHA Elective courses at
the 3300 level or higher . All courses taken under the SHA Elective area must
be taken for a letter grade unless the course is offered only with the S–U
option .
   Distinguished Lectures in Hospitality Management (HADM 1110), Statler
Leadership Development Program (HADM 2217), the Management Intern
Program (HADM 4493 and HADM 4494), Undergraduate Independent Study
(HADM 4498–4499), Managerial Leadership in the 21st Century (HADM
4415), and Club Management (HADM 3304) may not count toward SHA
Electives, only toward Free Electives . Up to 3 credits of Hotel Ezra Cornell
(HADM 4491) may count toward SHA Electives . Hospitality Management
Seminar (HADM 4410) is offered for a letter grade and is a SHA Elective .
Students may declare a concentration or minor within SHA Electives .
   See: Concentration, Minors, and Appendix 2 .
   In order to broaden and strengthen the intellectual and analytical base
of students’ thinking, students are required to take a minimum of 18
Distributive Elective credits outside the school, with a minimum of 3 credits
each to be taken in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural or
physical sciences . A maximum of 6 credits total in Distributive Electives may
be taken on an S–U basis and no more than 4 credits may be taken in any
one term .
   Finally, the student must take a minimum of 21 Free Elective cred-
its in Electives of his/her choice either in or outside the School of Hotel
Administration .
Note: First-year writing seminars may not be taken to fulfill the Distributive
Elective requirements, as the seminars do not provide the thorough under-
standing of the way of thinking and development of the various disciplines
that the distribution requirement is designed to provide.



                                       21
Note: Online/Distance Learning courses taken in the fall or spring semester
will not count toward Distributive Electives.

 Caution: See Double Dipping .

Enrollment
Students use the Student Center to request classes for upcoming semesters
during the pre-enrollment periods, and to add or drop classes for the cur-
rent semester during the add/drop period . Student Center is available at
http://www.studentcenter.cornell.edu. You will need your NetID and pass-
word . You may log in 24 hours a day, during the specified pre-enrollment
and add/drop periods .
  Students are notified of pre-enrollment and add/drop period dates
through e-mail, posters, and notices in the Cornell Daily Sun.
  Before course enrollment, students should discuss their program plans
with their faculty and OSS advisors . The university’s course roster is available
online at: http://www.cornell.edu/academics/courses.cfm.
Note: First- and second-year students are pre-enrolled in their core courses
by the Office of Student Services.


Examinations
The preliminary and final examination schedules are available at http://
www.cornell.edu/academics/courses.cfm. Refer to Courses of Study for
complete policies on preliminary and final examinations .

First-Year Writing Seminar
Students are required to complete a first-year writing seminar during their
first year of study in the School of Hotel Administration . Exceptions are for:
(1) those students who scored a “5” on the Advanced Placement exami-
nation in English Literature and Composition or English Language and
Composition, in which case the seminar is waived, and the 3 units will be
credited to the student’s required core courses; and (2) transfer students
who had substantial writing courses at their previous college or university, in
which case they may receive transfer credit for the seminar . For more infor-
mation on transfer credit and the first-year writing seminars, go to: http://
www.arts.cornell.edu/knight%5Finstitute/.
Note: First-year writing seminars may not be taken to fulfill the distribution
requirements as the seminars do not provide the thorough understanding of
the way of thinking and development of the various disciplines that the distri-
bution requirement is designed to provide.


                                       22
Grade Computation
The official university grading system uses letter grades with pluses and
minuses . Passing grades range from A+ to D–; F is failing . INC denotes
incomplete, and R is the grade given at the end of the first semester of a
year-long course . A grade of W (withdrawn) is automatically assigned when
a student is given permission to drop a class after the drop deadline . The
grades of INC, R, S, SX, U, UX, and W do not have quality point equivalents
attached .
  To compute a term average, add the products of hours x the associated
quality points and divide by the number of credit hours taken (in the exam-
ple below, 51 .2÷16=3 .2) .
  Cumulative average (averages taken for two or more terms) equals the
sum of the products of all terms at Cornell divided by the total number
of credits taken . A grade of F carries no quality points but the credits are
added to the total credit hours, thereby lowering the average . Incomplete,
S–U, and withdrawn grades are not calculated in the grade-point average .

Quality Point Equivalents:
  A+ = 4 .3                    C+ = 2 .3
  A = 4 .0                     C = 2 .0
  A– = 3 .7                    C– = 1 .7

  B+ = 3 .3                    D+ = 1 .3
  B = 3 .0                     D = 1 .0
  B– = 2 .7                    D– = 0 .7

                               F    = 0 .0



Example: Calculating a GPA
 Course           Grade   Quality    Credit   Product
                          Points     Hours

 HADM 2236         C+        2 .3      4         9 .2
 HADM 1115         A         4 .0      3        12 .0
 HADM 1174         A–        3 .7      3        11 .1
 HADM 1121         B         3 .0      3         9 .0
 GOVT 1110         B+        3 .3      3         9 .9
  Total                                16      51.2
  51.2/16 = 3.2 GPA



                                        23
Grade Dispute
If you find yourself in a significant disagreement with your professor over a
grade, you have options:
1 . Meet with your professor and try to resolve your differences .
2 . Seek the advice of your advisor to discuss your strategy for resolving the
    disagreement .
3 . Meet with the Dean of Students for the school, Professor Judith Brownell .
4 . Meet with the University’s Ombudsman, 118 Stimson Hall, 607 .255 .4321 .

Grade Option
Every class is offered for a grade option, either letter grade (A through F) or
satisfactory–unsatisfactory (S–U) .
  See: S–U Grades.
  Some classes are offered for either letter grade or S–U grade, giving stu-
dents the opportunity to choose the option they wish to be graded under .
Students must make the decision on the grade option for all of their classes
before the end of the third week of the semester (the add period) . Check
with the Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, for the specific date
each semester .

Grade Reports
The fastest way to learn your grades at the end of the term is to view them
on your Student Center . A hard copy of your grades can be printed from the
Student Center .
  See: Student Center .


Half-Term Classes
Occasionally a professor may offer a class that only meets only for half of a
semester (seven weeks) . A half-term class may be added or dropped during
the first week of class, unless otherwise stated in the course description .

Hotel Ezra Cornell (HEC)
HEC gives the students of the School of Hotel Administration an opportunity
to showcase their skills to alumni and industry leaders through a weekend
management of the Statler Hotel . A year’s coordination built on more than
seventy years of tradition leads up to the yearly extravaganza in April . Up to
3 credits of HADM 4491 may count toward SHA Electives, and count for 50
hours of Practice Credit .




                                      24
  To be on the HEC Board of Directors, students must (1) be in good stand-
ing with a grade-point average of 2 .0 or higher; and (2) receive approval of
the faculty at large and the course instructor .

Incomplete Grade
A grade of Incomplete is given when a student is unable to finish the work
for a course on time due to extenuating circumstances . In order to receive a
grade of Incomplete, the student must have substantial equity in the course
(i .e ., be passing) . The final decision as to whether a grade of Incomplete will
be given rests with the instructor .
    If the work is completed within the designated time period agreed upon
by the instructor and student, the Incomplete will be changed to a regu-
lar grade on the student’s official transcript . A course in which a student
received a grade of Incomplete will be noted with an asterisk on the stu-
dent’s official transcript when the final grade is recorded . If the work is not
completed within the designated time period, the grade of Incomplete will
automatically be converted to an F .
Note: A student may not graduate with an Incomplete on the transcript.


Independent Study Projects
Forms for undergraduate independent study projects (which may be con-
ducted only with resident faculty members) are available in the Office of
Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, or online at http://www.hotelschool.
cornell.edu/students/ugrad/forms.html . These must be turned in at course
enrollment time, and they will not be accepted without an outline and
faculty sponsor’s signature . The usual Add/Drop deadlines apply to indepen-
dent study projects .
Note: Independent study projects only count toward Free Electives.


Insurance Verification
Some insurance companies require verification of your registration in the
university . Should you need such verification for insurance or other purpos-
es, visit the web site at https://certification.cornell.edu/.

International Students
The International Students and Scholars Office, B50 Caldwell Hall,
607 .255 .5243, provides a broad range of services to international students .
All international students should maintain contact with the ISSO . You also
can visit their web site at http://www.isso.cornell.edu/.


                                        25
Language Requirement
All students are required to meet the qualification requirement of one lan-
guage other than English . Any one of the following meets the requirement:
1 . Three years of high school study of one foreign language .
2 . A score of 560 on the Cornell Placement Test (CPT) .*
3 . Passing language 1210 and 1220, or the equivalent, and attaining a mini-
    mum grade of at least C– or Satisfactory in each (C or above for transfer
    credit from other institutions) .
4 . Passing language 1230, or the equivalent .
   To be exempted from the language requirement if your native language is
other than English, you must still be evaluated by the appropriate language
department . (See note below .)
   * Placement exams are offered at the beginning of each semester, and
students may receive up to 6 credits in Free Electives, depending upon the
results of these exams .
Note: Students whose speaking, reading, and writing competence in a lan-
guage other than English is at the same level we would expect our entering
first-year students to have in English (as shown by completing high school in
that language or by special examination during their first year at Cornell) are
exempt from the school’s language requirement.


Learning Strategies Center
The Learning Strategies Center is the central academic support unit at
Cornell University that provides undergraduate students with tutoring and
supplemental courses in biology, chemistry, economics, mathematics, and
physics . Assistance in improving general study skills is available through
semester-long courses, workshops, individual consultations, and web site
resources . Please visit the LSC at 420 CCC or call 607 .255 .6310 . Hours and
more information at http://lsc.sas.cornell.edu/.

Management Intern Program (MIP)
As a participant in the Management Intern Program, a six- to eight-month
work-study experience, a student will receive 12 academic credits for Free
Electives and 1 unit of Practice Credit, and may earn a salary from the spon-
soring company .
  For further information regarding the MIP, please contact the Office of
Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, or visit http://www.hotelschool.cornell.
edu/students/careers/ugrad/mip.html .




                                       26
Minors
The School of Hotel Administration lists official university minors on stu-
dents’ transcripts . Students interested in external minors need to visit the
appropriate college/department within the university to obtain information
and apply .
 See: Appendix 2 on Minors and Concentrations


  Master of Management
  in Hospitality Program                                          MMH
MMH Degree Requirements
Students must complete 48 credits, including 29 credits of required core
courses (CC), 12 credits of career track courses, 7 credits of additional
Elective courses, and 2 units of professional development (PD) activities .
Students must earn a cumulative and semester grade-point average of at
least 2 .5 on a 4 .0 scale .
                                                                        Credits
Semester I(a)
HADM 7723: Corporate Finance (CC)                                               3
HADM 7724: Managerial Accounting (CC)                                           3
Professional Development (PD)                                                 n/c

Semester I(b)
HADM 7703: Operations Management (CC)                                     3
HADM 7743: Marketing Management for Services (CC)                         3
HADM 7797: Hospitality Industry Leadership Development Program (LDP) (CC) 1
Professional Development (PD)                                           n/c

Semester II
HADM 6610: MMH Discussion Forums in Hospitality Management (CC)                 1
HADM 7711: Organizational Behavior (CC)                                         3
HADM 7751: Properties Development and Planning (CC)                             3
HADM 7761: MMH Managerial Communication (CC)                                    3
HADM 7796: MMH Charrette (CC) (TBD)                                           (1)
Career Track Required Courses                                                   6
Free Elective Courses                                                           4
Professional Development (PD)                                                 n/c

Intersession
Externship (PD)                                                            n/c
Master Class                                                          optional


                                      27
Semester III
HADM 7712: Human-Resource Management (CC)                                      3
HADM 7744: Strategic Management (CC)                                           3
Career Track Required Courses                                                  6
Free Elective Courses                                                          3
Total Required                                                                48

Core Course Waiver Policy
An MMH student may waive a core course (without receiving credit) with
the permission of the instructor by exhibiting an understanding of the
body of knowledge covered by the course . The student must replace the
course with an equivalent number of credit hours during the same term .
The student must justify the waiver by submitting a written request to the
instructor including a statement about how (s)he will complete the assigned
credit hours (with copies to the current director of graduate studies (SHA)
and the Office of Student Services (SHA), or to the Dean at Cornell–Nanyang
Institute and staff, as appropriate) . Typically, the waiver will only be consid-
ered if the student has previously completed an undergraduate major or
taken graduate courses in the area, and has three or more years of related
work experience .

Career Tracks
Students will choose one of four career track options: Human Resource
Management, Operations and Revenue Management, Real Estate Finance
and Investments, or Marketing Management . Students are required to com-
plete 12 credits of career track courses as specified by the career track fac-
ulty advisor . All Career Track courses must be taken for a letter grade unless
they are only offered S–U .

Course Load
A student must take at least 12 credits each semester . The typical course
load for MMH students is 15–18 credits per semester . If your cumulative GPA
is below a 2 .5, you may not enroll in more than 20 credits per semester . You
may take more than 20 credit hours if your GPA falls within the following
range:
   Cumulative GPA         Maximum Credits per Semester
   2 .50–3 .49            20 credits
   3 .50–3 .74            21 credits
   3 .75                  22 credits (maximum allowed)




                                       28
Residency Requirement
You must complete three semesters in residence at Cornell University,
enrolling for at least 12 credits each semester . As with most graduate-level
degrees, it is not possible to transfer residency from other universities . The
director of graduate studies will set a maximum number of credit hours that
a student may take each semester .

Registration
At the beginning of your first semester you will need to complete the
Nomination of Special Committee form for the graduate school (This form is
in your orientation packet) . The MMH program is one of ninety-five gradu-
ate programs at Cornell University administered through the graduate
school . Unlike other fields, however, you will not be asked to choose Special
Committee members . All MMH students will have one committee member
and chair, the current director of graduate studies (DGS) . Over the course of
the year you will be asked to complete other forms too, so please use the
following terminology:
  Field: Hotel Administration
  Major: Hotel Administration
  Chair: the current director of graduate studies

  All forms must be submitted and approved by the Office of Student
Services, 180 Statler Hall, prior to their submission to the graduate school .

Elective Credit
Students may only enroll in 3 credit hours of Free Electives per semester out-
side of the School of Hotel administration .
CAUTION: Graduate Elective credit is not given for 1100- or 2200-level
courses. Additionally, students will not receive Elective credit in 3300- or 4400-
level courses if there is an equivalent graduate course.

  Students must receive permission from their faculty advisor to receive
credit for undergraduate courses taken outside the School of Hotel
Administration . Physical education credits do not count toward your MMH
degree .
  Foreign language courses, at the introductory level, may be taken for
Elective credit with written permission from your faculty advisor .
  Remember that neither Cornell University nor the School of Hotel
Administration is able to offer all courses each semester.
  Independent study is another option for earning Elective credit . You must
submit a specific proposal to a faculty member for approval . Once approved,
you must obtain the appropriate form from the Office of Student Services,
complete it with the assistance of the faculty member, and then return it to


                                        29
the Office of Student Services . Independent study courses allow you to gain
expertise in a specific area of interest, and they often evolve into publish-
able papers .
  Taking courses on a satisfactory–unsatisfactory (S–U) basis is limited to 4
credit hours each semester, not including those courses only offered S–U,
and may only be in non–career track courses . Core and career-track courses
must be taken for a letter grade.
  Audit: MMH students may choose to audit courses at the School of Hotel
Administration . Students must formally register to audit SHA courses .
Required core and career-track courses cannot be audited . An auditor may
never take the place of a student who would take the course for credit, so
you may not be able to audit a course with limited enrollment .
  Transfer credit is not accepted .

Academic Deficiency
The minimum GPA for continuation in the MMH program is 2 .5 in each
semester of the program . If a student has a semester GPA of less than 2 .5 at
the end of any of the three semesters (at the end of the two summer ses-
sions, the end of the fall semester, or the end of the spring semester), the
student will be automatically dismissed from the MMH program . This dis-
missal is subject to appeal to the Graduate Committee, as delegated by the
graduate faculty .

Faculty Advising
One of the most significant parts of graduate school is your relationship
with the faculty . The SHA faculty is uniquely positioned to offer you aca-
demic advice, career planning, and networking contacts . Your faculty advisor
is the faculty director of your particular career track .

Career Advising
Equal in importance, and more specifically the objective of your educa-
tion, is a promising and fulfilling career in the hospitality industry . Career
Management, located in the Office of Student Services, is a resource for
your winter externship and permanent job search . Additionally, the MMH
Professional Development course guides you through the many crucial steps
and skills necessary for a successful job search and provides you with best
practices for lifelong career management .

Leave of Absence (LOA)
Occasionally students need to interrupt their studies by requesting a leave of
absence because of extenuating circumstances beyond their control . Three
types of leaves are available to graduate students:
  1 . Medical leave

                                       30
  2 . Personal leave
  3 . Part-time study leave
  To apply for a LOA, you must complete and submit the LOA form to
the Office of Student Services at the School of Hotel Administration . Your
request is reviewed by the Graduate Committee and the director of gradu-
ate studies . If approved, it is forwarded to the graduate school for approval .
Approval is not automatic and only students in good academic standing may
request a LOA .
  To be readmitted, you must submit the request in writing to the Office of
Student Services .




Multicultural Programs
In support of the primary mission of Cornell University to create a more
inclusive community, Multicultural Programs, within the Office of Student
Services in the School of Hotel Administration, is responsible for providing
programs that enhance the successful recruitment, retention, and gradua-
tion of African American, Native American, Latino, and Asian American stu-
dents, and all students in general . Multicultural Programs:
1 . Provides developmental opportunities for students to become inclusive,
    culturally competent, as well as effective leaders in their interpersonal
    relationships with family and friends, careers, communities, and the hospi-
    tality industry .
2 . Engages in research and assessment of programs that creates an inclusive
    campus environment which emphasizes respect for diversity and pluralism
    in all forms .

Ombudsman
The Office of the University Ombudsman, open to all members of the
Cornell community, can help resolve problems or complaints within the uni-
versity and achieve equitable settlements . Its services are independent of the
university administration and are confidential . It can provide information
on university policies and practices, help examine alternatives, and find the
proper authorities to resolve the situation . As an unbiased “third party,” the
office can frequently find solutions that have eluded the interested parties .
The office is located in 118 Stimson Hall . Office hours are 8:30 a .m . to 4:30
p .m ., Monday through Friday, or other times by appointment . Please call
607 .255 .4321, email ombudsman@cornell .edu, or visit: http://ombudsman.
cornell.edu.



                                       31
Petition
The petition process permits students to request exceptions to existing regu-
lations . Petitions based on documentable extenuating circumstances are
considered individually, weighing the unique situation of the petitioning
student against the intent of SHA and university regulations . Students can
avoid the necessity to petition by observing the deadlines and other poli-
cies that affect their academic program . To determine whether a petition is
appropriate, students should discuss the situation with the Office of Student
Services, 180 Statler Hall . Petition forms must be signed by their faculty advisors .
  Petitions are available in the Office of Student Services or online at http://
www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/forms.html. Your advisor’s
signature is required . The advisor’s signature signifies only endorsement of
the petition and does not guarantee approval . Petitions will be considered
on an as-needed basis . Be sure to allow sufficient time for the process . You
will be notified by email of the decision .

Physical Education Requirement
First-year students are required to complete 2 credits of physical education
(Phys Ed) during their first year . Students may not take two Phys Ed classes in
the same semester for credit without the approval by Phys Ed; however, the
same Phys Ed course (with the exception of marching band) may be taken
for credit two semesters in a row . It is the student’s responsibility to sign up
for Phys Ed classes by reporting to Teagle Hall during university registration .
Be sure to check add/drop deadlines for Phys Ed classes, which often are dif-
ferent from the normal university course add/drop deadlines .
   Transfer students who have completed two or more terms of full-time
study elsewhere, regardless of whether those terms included Phys Ed
courses, do not need to take Phys Ed or complete the swim test at Cornell .
Transfer students who completed only one term elsewhere must take one
term of Phys Ed, including the swim test, at Cornell .
   Phys Ed requirements may be modified for the following reasons:
1 . Health Reasons: Either a temporary medical postponement or a perma-
    nent medical waiver, which must be officially certified by Gannett Health
    Services .
2 . Work: If a student works twenty or more hours per week, he or she may
    qualify for postponement or a waiver, which must be approved by the
    athletic director’s office in Teagle Hall .
3 . Team Sport: Upon approval of the athletic director’s office, students partic-
    ipating in a team sport will receive credit toward the Phys Ed requirement .
   In addition to the above requirements, students must pass a basic swim
test to graduate . The test, conducted during the first week of classes, con-
sists of a continuous 75-yard swim using front, back, and optional strokes .

                                          32
Any student who cannot pass the test must include swimming as his or her
Phys Ed before choosing any Elective Phys Ed class .
 All students are encouraged to explore opportunities offered by the
Department of Athletics and Physical Education, 607 .255 .4286 . More infor-
mation also is available on the web at http://www.pe.cornell.edu/physed .
Note: The credits of Phys Ed are not included in the 120-credit graduation
requirement or in the minimum 12-credits-per-semester requirement.


Practice Credit Requirement
To graduate from the School of Hotel Administration and receive the
Bachelor of Science degree, students must fulfill the Practice Credit require-
ment and submit verification thereof prior to registering for their second-to-
last semester . To complete this requirement, students must work a minimum
of two 400-hour units (paid or unpaid) in the hospitality industry with a
minimum of two separate employment periods . Typically, this requirement
is fulfilled in two summers . However, part-time employment is accepted .
Upon completion of this requirement, the designation “Practice Credit—
Complete” will appear on the student’s Cornell transcript .
   See the web site: http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/careers/
ugrad/practice.html.

Records
The Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, maintains your official aca-
demic records in the School of Hotel Administration .

Registration
See http://registrar.sas.cornell.edu/Student/registration.html.

Religious Observances
The University’s Religious Accommodation Policy can be viewed at http://
www.policy.cornell.edu/vol6_13_8.cfm.

Repeating Courses
Students are allowed to register a second time for topic courses only (i .e .
HADM 1110, 4499) . If students re-enroll in a course they already passed with
a grade above an “F,” the second registration will not count toward gradu-
ation requirements, and the grade received will not be figured into the
cumulative average .
  Students are allowed to enroll a second time for a course in which they
previously received the grade of “F .” For the second enrollment, the credits

                                       33
will count toward graduation requirements, and the grade received will be
figured into the cumulative average . The “F” remains on the record and is
included in the computation of the grade-point average .
Note: The only courses that can be repeated are an Independent Study or
HADM 1110.


Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Grades
Some courses are offered on a Satisfactory–Unsatisfactory (S–U) basis .
University regulations concerning the S–U system require that a grade of
“S” be given for work equivalent to a “C–” or better; for work below that
level, a “U” must be given . “S” or “U” grades are not included in the com-
putation of semester or cumulative averages; however, a course in which a
student receives an “S” is counted for credit . No credit is received for a “U .”
Both the “S” and “U” grades appear on a student’s record . Taking courses
as S–U is limited to 4 credit hours each semester, not including those only
offered S–U, and may only be in non–career track courses (MMH) or non-
concentration courses (undergraduate). A maximum of 6 credits in total in
Distributive Electives may be taken on an S–U basis.
  If a class is offered for letter or S–U grades, students must sign up for that
option during pre-enrollment or during the add period . After the deadline,
students must petition to change the grade option .
Note: The deadline for changing the grading option is the end of the third
week of the term.


Schedule
You can view your course schedule at any time by accessing the Student
Center . If you want a printed copy of your schedule, you can print it from
the Student Center . Be sure to check your schedule several times during the
semester to verify you are enrolled in the courses you think you are!

Statler Leadership Development Program (SLDP)
The SLDP is designed to blend academic coursework with managerial experi-
ence to prepare students to quickly assume leadership positions following
graduation . To qualify, students must work 200 hours at the Statler Hotel
during their first year while maintaining a 2 .5 minimum GPA . In the spring
of their first year, students may apply and interview with the SLDP Executive
Board . If accepted into the program, students select a development track
from the following: Accounting, Food and Beverage Division, Human
Resources, Rooms Division, or Sales and Marketing . Following a specifically


                                        34
designed path, students may progress through four stages: entry-level,
supervisor, manager, and director . In conjunction with the work experience,
students are required to take HADM 2217: Statler Leadership Development
Program, HADM 4410: Hospitality Management Seminar, and HADM 4417:
Hospitality Leadership .

Student Advisory Board, School of Hotel Administration
The Student Advisory Board was created to give undergraduate SHA stu-
dents an effective way to communicate with the school’s senior admin-
istrators . You are encouraged to express your ideas and concerns, and
provide input, suggestions, and feedback to the board by visiting http://
ww.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/advisory/ . All comments to the
board are anonymous unless you wish to include your name .

Student Center
The Student Center offers a way to access your information 24/7 .
Information is arranged in three broad areas:
•	 Academics—including registration status, class schedule, faculty advisor,
   grades, transcript requests, and Pre-Enroll and Add/Drop .
•	 Finances—including your bursar account and financial aid package .
•	 Personal	Information—including home/local addresses and emergency
   contact information . .
  You should regularly check your enrollment on Student Center before the
add/drop deadlines to make any necessary corrections in a timely manner .
  Student Center is available at http://www.studentcenter.cornell.edu.

Study Abroad
Students are encouraged to consider studying abroad to gain international
experience and an appreciation of different cultures . A minimum GPA of 3 .0
is required to be considered for Study Abroad . For details on how to apply,
schedule an appointment with SHA’s Cornell Abroad Advisor, in 180 Statler
Hall, or visit the CU Abroad office in 300 Caldwell Hall, or log onto https://
www.cuabroad.cornell.edu.
Note:
1. Grades on transcripts from abroad are not incorporated in the Cornell
University cumulative GPA.
2. Students are expected to take 15 credits when abroad. This is viewed as a
full load with the university. If students only take 12 credit hours abroad, they
will be awarded only 12 credit hours on their transcript.
3. Students must take courses for a letter grade (no S–U designations).



                                       35
Summer Study Abroad
1 . Students must submit the Study Abroad form, listing courses they expect
   to take, to the SHA Study Abroad advisor .
2 . The SHA Study Abroad advisor reviews and signs the summer abroad
   paperwork confirming that the School of Hotel Administration will accept
   the credit .
3 . Students will receive credit upon receipt of a university transcript by the
   SHA registrar .
4 . No approval or paperwork goes through CU Abroad .
5 . If a class is in the language of the country (other than English), it may
   apply to humanities .

Summer Session Courses
Any student planning to take courses for credit on or off campus over the
summer session must complete the appropriate forms for approval available
in the Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, well before summer ses-
sion begins .
  At Cornell, up to 4 credits may be taken in the three-week session, up to
9 in the six-week session, and up to 12 in the eight-week session . The total
may not exceed 15 credits .
  The only online courses accepted by the university are those from Cornell .
Note: Credit is given only for courses taken at four-year, accredited institu-
tions, and courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or above.

  Further information is available in the Office of Student Services, 180
Statler Hall . Forms are available online at http://www.hotelschool.cornell.
edu/students/ugrad/forms.html.
  See also: Winter Session Courses .



Transcript
A transcript is an official record of the courses, credits, and grades that you
have earned at Cornell University . The Office of the University Registrar,
B7 Day Hall, issues official academic transcripts . Official transcripts can be
ordered online at http://www.transcript.cornell.edu.
  Unofficial transcripts can be printed from the Student Center .




                                       36
Transfer Credit Policy
Transfer students are required to complete all degree requirements with at
least sixty (60) credits from Cornell University . Thus, a maximum of sixty (60)
hours in transfer credit, for courses passed with a grade of “C” or above,
may be allowed from other accredited colleges or universities .
•	 Transfer	credit	is	not	awarded	toward	SHA	Electives.
•	 Up	to	twenty-one	(21)	credits	may	transfer	toward	SHA	core	required	
   courses .
•	 Up	to	eighteen	(18)	credits	may	transfer	toward	Cornell	Distributive	
   Electives .
•	 Up	to	twenty-one	(21)	credits	may	transfer	toward	Cornell	Free	Electives.
Note: Cornell University does not accept credit for courses sponsored by col-
leges but taught in a high school to high school students, even if the college
provides a transcript of such work.


Winter Session Courses
Any student planning to take courses for credit on or off campus over the
winter session must complete the appropriate forms available in the Office
of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, well before winter session begins.
Note: Credit is given only for courses taken at four-year, accredited institu-
tions, and courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or above.

  Further information is available in the Office of Student Services, 180
Statler Hall . Forms are available online at: http://www.hotelschool.cornell.
edu/students/ugrad/forms.html.
  See: Summer Session Courses .




                                       37
Appendix 1: Practice Credit—
Requirements and Guidelines
http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/careers/ugrad/practice.html

Purpose and Objective
The purpose of Practice Credit is to expose students to the hospitality indus-
try and people who work in the industry, and to obtain practical experi-
ence in real working environments . This experience enhances the overall
education students receive at the School of Hotel Administration . Students
are urged to seek a variety of practical experience in the global hospitality
industry .
  The objective of the Practice Credit requirement is to ensure that the stu-
dent’s education has the essential balance between theory and practice . In
attaining this objective, students will be able to:
•	 compare	and	contrast	different	types	of	organizations,	company	cultures,	
   and management styles;
•	 explore	different	departments/areas	within	an	organization,	and	gain	
   invaluable perspective regarding issues, concerns, and behaviors of
   employees at various levels;
•	 improve	their	marketability	upon	graduation;
•	 network	with	key	people	in	the	industry;
•	 put	classroom	theory	into	practice	in	the	real	working	environment	and	
   utilize this practical experience in future academic assignments;
•	 recognize,	develop,	and	practice	skills	necessary	in	their	future	careers;
•	 test	their	career	interests	and	gain	valuable	work	experience	in	the	various	
   segments of the hospitality/service industry .

Program Administration
The Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, administers the Practice
Credit program . The role, scope, and authority of the Practice Credit pro-
gram reside with the faculty of the School of Hotel Administration .

Fulfilling and Calculating Your Practice Credit Requirement
To graduate from the School of Hotel Administration Bachelor of Science
program, students must work a minimum of 800 hours (two units), paid or
unpaid, in the hospitality/service industry as defined by the School of Hotel
Administration .
•	 You	must	work	a	minimum	of	two	separate	employment	periods,	hold-
   ing a minimum of two significantly different positions . No single position


                                      38
   may qualify for more than 400 hours (one unit). If students have worked
   in one particular job for more than 400 hours, it will only qualify for one
   unit .
•	 To	receive	two	units	of	Practice	Credit	from	the	same	organization,	stu-
   dents must obtain prior approval from the Office of Student Services . The
   nature of the jobs must be different .
•	 Entering	first-year	students	may	not	receive	Practice	Credit	for	positions	
   held prior to matriculation in the School of Hotel Administration . Work
   experience while in high school or the summer(s) between the high school
   senior year and first year at Cornell will not be considered for Practice
   Credit .
   Students must fulfill the Practice Credit requirement and submit verifica-
   tion prior to university registration for their final two semesters . You will
   not be allowed to graduate unless you:
•	 submit	employment	verification	forms	for	appropriate	work	experience	to	
   the Office of Student Services;
•	 receive	an	e-mail	notification	notifying	you	that	the	Practice	Credit	
   employment verification form has been processed .




                                       39
Appendix 2: Election of
Undergraduate Minor and/or
Concentration
Students may complete the requirements for more than one concentration,
but only one officially declared concentration will appear on the final tran-
script . For concentrations only the Area Concentration name will appear,
not the specific focus of the concentration (i .e ., FARE, OMCL, HFO, MISST) .
The number of credits for each course appears in parentheses following the
course title .

Minors
Students may elect to pursue a university approved minor . For more details,
students must contact the home college/school registrar to discuss a minor
in a specific field . Additionally, it is the student’s responsibility to verify with
the home college/school registrar that they have met the requirements . The
home school/college registrar will notify the SHA registrar to make note of
the minor on the student’s transcripts .
Note: More than one minor may be noted on a student transcript, but only
one SHA concentration.


Undergraduate Minor in Real Estate (School of Hotel Administration)
Advisors: J . Corgel, J . deRoos, P . Liu, D . Quan

The Minor in Real Estate is designed to prepare students for careers in the
commercial real estate industry . Both the U .S . and international capital mar-
kets are undergoing fundamental changes, as is the nature of real estate
ownership . This Minor field of study at Cornell specifically focuses on careers
as a real estate investor, in real estate finance, in real estate consulting, in
structured finance, and in real estate transaction support . Cornell University
is at the forefront of knowledge in commercial real estate and will help pre-
pare for a rewarding career .
   The Minor in Real Estate consists of three components: coursework, con-
nections, and careers . All are designed to help students obtain the necessary
knowledge, skills, and contacts for careers as real estate investment profes-
sionals . Some examples of these positions include: asset management with
a REIT or real estate fund, financial analyst with a Wall Street firm or real
estate broker, associate with a Real Estate Advisory/Consulting firm, loan
origination and underwriting with commercial and investment banks acqui-


                                           40
sitions analysis with pension fund advisor, and providing the foundation for
a career developing and owning real estate .
  Coursework: The Minor is fulfilled with a minimum of six (6) courses . Four
(4) courses are required and two (2) or more Electives complete the Minor .
A minimum of eighteen (18) credit hours is required to complete the Minor .
Note that the required courses are different for students in the School of
Hotel Administration . The ideal sequence is as follows:
  1 . Foundations of Financial Management—Accounting and Finance
  2 . Foundations of Real Estate—RE Principles and RE Finance and
  Investments
  3 . Enrichment Complementary Skills Electives
Requirements for students in the School of Hotel Administration (Four
courses)—These courses must be taken for a letter grade .

Foundations of Financial Management—Accounting and Finance
•	 HADM	1121:	Financial	Accounting	(3)	or	equivalent	course,	as	approved	by	
   the Minor coordinator
•	 HADM	2222:	Finance	(3)	or	equivalent	course,	as	approved	by	the	Minor	
   coordinator

Foundations of Real Estate—RE Principles and RE Finance and Investments
•	 HADM	3321:	Hospitality	Financial	Management	(3)
•	 HADM	4423:	Hospitality	Real	Estate	Finance	(3)
Requirements for students in colleges and schools outside the School of
Hotel Administration: (Four courses)—These courses must be taken for a let-
ter grade (unless offered only S–U)

Foundations of Financial Management—Accounting and Finance
Any of the following Accounting courses satisfies the Minor:
•	 AEM	2210:	Financial	Accounting
•	 HADM	2223:	Financial	Accounting	Principles
•	 ILRHR	6630:	Managerial	Financial	Analysis
•	 ORIE	3150:	Financial	and	Managerial	Accounting	

* or equivalent course, as approved by the Minor coordinator

Any of the following Finance courses satisfies the Minor:
•	 AEM	3240:	Finance
•	 HADM	2225:	Finance
•	 ILRHR	6910:	Finance	for	Human	Resources
•	 ORIE	4151:	Economic	Analysis	of	Engineering	Systems

* or equivalent course, as approved by the Minor coordinator



                                          41
Foundations of Real Estate—RE Principles and RE Finance and Investments
•	 HADM	4420:	Principles	of	Real	Estate
•	 HADM	4428:	Real	Estate	Finance	and	Investments

Electives:
There are two sets of Elective courses; Real Estate Enrichment courses and
Complementary Skills courses . Students must select at least one course from
each set to complete the Minor . Courses with fewer than 3 credit hours need
to be combined with another course or courses to meet the requirements
for the Minor in Real Estate . Deviations from the Electives must be approved
by the Minor coordinator .

Real Estate Enrichment: (Minimum of three (3) credit hours)
  CRP 5320: Real Estate Development Process
  CRP 6560: Real Estate Transactions and Deal Structuring
  HADM 4423: Hospitality Real Estate Finance
  HADM 4425: Securitization and Structural Finance‡‡
  HADM 4428: Real Estate Finance and Investments‡
  HADM 4451: Restaurant Development
  HADM 4457: Hotel Development
  HADM 4487 or CRP 657: Real Estate Law
  HADM 6622: Hospitality Asset Management

Complementary Skills: (Minimum of three (3) credit hours)
  AEM 4110: Introduction to Econometrics
  AEM 4210: Derivatives and Risk Management
  AEM 4260: Fixed-Income Securities
  AEM 4280: Valuation of Capital Investment
  AEM 4510: Environmental Economics (also ECON 4090)
  CEE 5950: Construction Planning and Operations
  CRP 3270: Regional Economical Impact Analysis (also CRP 6270)
  CRP 3430: Affordable Housing Policy and Programs (also CRP 6430)
  CRP 3840: Green Cities (also CRP 5840, LA 4950)
  CRP 4040: Urban Economics (also CRP 5040)
  CRP 4080: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (also CRP
  5080)
  CRP 4510: Environmental Law (also CRP 5510)
  CRP 4590: Legal Aspects of Land Use Planning (also CRP 5590)
  CRP 5040: Urban Economics
  CRP 5190: Urban Theory and Spatial Development
  CRP 5330: Real Estate Marketing and Management
  CRP 5520: Land Use Planning



                                     42
  CRP 5530: Land Use Regulations
  CRP 5560: Design in Real Estate Development
  CRP 6070: GIS Applications Workshop
  CRP 6590: Urban Development Planning
  CRP 6640: Economics and Financing of Neighborhood Conservation and
  Preservation
  DEA 4530: Planning and Managing the Workplace
  DEA 4720: Environments for Elders: Housing and Design for an Aging
  Population
  HADM 3351: Hospitality Facilities Design
  HADM 4424: Financial Statement Analysis
  HADM 4429: Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
  HADM 4452: Sustainable Development and the Global Hospitality Industry
  HADM 5502: Advanced Hospitality Quantitative Analysis
  HADM 6611: Negotiations in the Hospitality Industry
  ILRCB 6011: Negotiation: Theory and Practice
  NBA 5060: Financial Statement Analysis
  NBA 5110: Financial Modeling
  NBA 5420: Investment and Portfolio Analysis
  NBA 6730: Introduction to Derivatives, Part 1

Connections:
The Cornell Career Services office, the Real Estate faculty, and the Minor in
Real Estate Advisory Board help students by providing industry network-
ing, facilitating the search for summer internships, and for permanent jobs .
The Minor will sponsor a hospitality finance and real estate roundtable
with high-level executives to be held in conjunction with the Center for
Hospitality Research once per year to help expose students to various seg-
ments of the hospitality real estate industry . The Minor will conduct at least
two afternoon real estate forums each term; forums will feature recent
and seasoned alumni in an informal setting to discuss careers, real estate
markets, and real estate deals . Students selecting the Minor in Real Estate
will have the opportunity to participate in the annual Cornell Real Estate
Conference, held each fall .

Careers:
  All students will have the opportunity to participate in career-planning
activities provided through Cornell’s Career Services offices .

Questions:
 Contact the Minor in Real Estate Coordinator in 465 Statler Hall .




                                       43
Concentrations
Students may select an optional 12-credit concentration within the Hotel
Elective requirement . Courses that fulfill concentrations are defined by
the academic areas within the School of Hotel Administration . In order
to declare a concentration and have it appear on your final transcript, all
courses must be taken for a letter grade (unless they are only offered as
S–U), and a 3 .0 minimum cumulative GPA in the concentration courses must
be attained . The deadline to declare a concentration is the last day of the
student’s penultimate semester . Concentration forms are available online at
http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/forms.html.
Note: Before selecting an optional undergraduate concentration, students
should consult the appropriate area director during their sophomore year to
plan the sequence of courses that will best fit their program.

Note: The 12 concentration credits are often taken within the School of
Hotel Administration, which naturally fulfills the degree requirement for
12 credits of upper-level SHA Electives. Some concentrations may offer the
option or require that the student take courses outside the School of Hotel
Administration. If courses outside the school are used to fulfill any or all of
the concentration credit requirement, the student must still fulfill the degree
requirement of 12 credits of upper-level SHA Electives.


Finance, Accounting, and Real Estate (FARE)
The finance, accounting, and real estate concentration focuses on the analysis,
financing, investing, control, and valuation of individual, corporate, and
portfolios of hospitality assets . The School of Hotel Administration offers
students five ways to concentrate in the FARE area . Students choosing a
FARE concentration should choose the “track” that most closely matches
their career objectives .
  Students concentrating in the FARE area are strongly urged to augment
their education with courses in probability and statistics, economics, econo-
metrics, and mathematics . Firms hiring for entry-level positions look favor-
ably on candidates with quantitative abilities . Taking courses in these areas
will dramatically improve your competitiveness when interviewing for a
position and will make you more effective as an industry professional .




                                       44
1. Corporate Finance/Financial Consulting
Advisors: L . Canina, C . Chang, Q . Ma, G . Potter
This track of the concentration is designed for students seeking a career
as a financial consultant in a hospitality consulting firm and as a corporate
finance analyst in a hospitality company .
Any four of the following courses totaling 12 credits:
 HADM 4423: Hospitality Real Estate Finance
 HADM 4426: Advanced Corporate Finance
 HADM 4429: Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
 HADM 6622: Hospitality Asset Management
 HADM 6624: Reporting and Analysis of Financial Statements
 HADM 6625: Securitization and Structured Financial Products

2. General Financial Management
Advisors: Any FARE faculty member .
This track of the concentration is designed for students who wish to have
flexibility in their career path and/or want to prepare for a more general-
ized financially oriented career in either operations or consulting .
Required Courses
  HADM 4423: Hospitality Real Estate Finance
  HADM 4426: Advanced Corporate Finance
  HADM 4429: Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
Plus any other FARE area courses totaling 3 credits.


3. Hospitality Controllership
Advisors: D . Dittman, J . Hesford, G . Potter
This track of the concentration is designed for students seeking a career as a
financial controller or as a managerial accountant in hospitality operations .
Any four of the following courses totaling 12 credits:
 HADM 4421: Internal Control in Hospitality Operations
 HADM 4422: Taxation and Management Decisions
 HADM 4426: Advanced Corporate Finance
 HADM 4429: Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
 HADM 6624: Reporting and Analysis of Financial Statements

5. Securities Analysis/Investment Banking
Advisors: L . Canina, C . Chang, Q . Ma
This track of the concentration is designed for students wishing to pursue a
career on Wall Street as a securities or investment banking analyst .



                                         45
Required Course
  HADM 4429: Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
Plus any three of the following courses, totaling 9 credits:
  HADM 4423: Hospitality Real Estate Finance
  HADM 4426: Advanced Corporate Finance
  HADM 4427: Multinational Finance and International Risk Management
  HADM 6624: Reporting and Analysis of Financial Statements
  HADM 6625: Securitization and Structured Financial Products

Hospitality Facilities and Operations
The hospitality facilities and operations concentration consists of courses
that define the primary sources of revenue generation in the industry: res-
taurants, lodging facilities, clubs, catering and special events, casinos, spas,
beverage operations, etc . The choices enable a student to pursue an area
of concentrated study in any one of eight tracks, organized in four broad
areas: those that revolve around food service and beverage operations
(tracks 1–4), specialty operations such as clubs, casinos, spas, etc . (track 5),
revenue management (track 6), and facility asset management, planning,
and design (tracks 7 and 8) .

1. Beverage Management
Advisors: S . Mutkoski, G . Pezzotti
This track of the concentration focuses on the beverage side of the food and
beverage industry . Career paths include beverage managers in restaurants,
hotels, and resorts and staff positions with major wineries, wholesale dis-
tributors, or importers of various beverage products .
Required Courses
  HADM 4430: Introduction to Wines
  HADM 4431: Wine and Food Pairing Principles and Promotion
  HADM 4436: Beverage Management
Additional courses that will benefit the student who chooses this career path
(Select any combination that will yield a minimum 12-credit
concentration.)
  HADM 4435: Selection, Procurement, and Supply Management
  HADM 4437: Anheuser Busch Seminar in Quality Brewing and Fine Beer
  HADM 6606: Restaurant Revenue Management




                                        46
2. Corporate Food and Beverage Operations: Restaurant, Resort, and Hotel
Chains
Advisors: S . Mutkoski, G . Pezzotti, A . Susskind, M . Tabacchi
This track of concentration focuses on the corporate, multiunit foodservice
industry . Career paths include food and beverage management in hotel and
resort companies, multiunit or regional management in corporate foodser-
vice organizations, and the management of chain restaurant corporations .
Required Courses
  HADM 4435: Selection, Procurement, and Supply Management
  HADM 4436: Beverage Management
Additional courses that will benefit the student who chooses this career path
(Select any combination that will yield a minimum 12-credit concentration.)
  HADM 4403: Specialty Food and Beverage Operations: Guest Chefs
  HADM 4404: Catering and Special Events Management
  HADM 4432: Contemporary Healthy Foods
  HADM 4435: Selection, Procurement, and Supply Management
  HADM 4451: Restaurant Development
  HADM 4453: Foodservice Facilities Design
  HADM 6602: Spa and Spa Hotel and Resort Development and
  Management
  HADM 6606: Restaurant Revenue Management
  HADM 6631: Seminar in Multiunit-Restaurant Management

3. Design
Advisors: R . Penner, S . Robson
This track of the concentration deals with the planning and design of a vari-
ety of hospitality facilities . Careers include hotel interiors and foodservice
design, corporate technical assistance, and renovation management .
Required Course
 HADM 3351: Hospitality Facilities Design
 Plus one or both of the following:
 HADM 3352: Hotel Planning and Interior Design
 HADM 4453: Foodservice Facilities Design
 Plus courses from the following, for an overall total of 12 credits:
 HADM 4457: Hotel Development
 ARCH 1501: Drawing I: Freehand Drawing
 ARCH 2602: Building Technology, Materials, and Methods
 DEA 3030: Interior Materials and Sustainable Elements
 DEA 3500: Human Factors: The Ambient Environment
 See the advisors for related courses beyond the courses listed above.



                                      47
4. Development
Advisors: R . Penner, S . Robson
This track of the concentration focuses on the creation of new hotels and
restaurants . Topics include project feasibility, financing, planning, design,
and construction . Careers include real estate development, both as an entre-
preneur and in a corporate environment .
Required Courses
HADM 3351: Hospitality Facilities Design
HADM 4423: Hospitality Real Estate Finance
HADM 4457: Hotel Development
Recommended Courses
HADM 4451: Restaurant Development
HADM 4459: International Hotel Development
HADM 4462: Communication and the Multicultural Organization
HADM 4487: Real Estate Law
HADM 6628: Real Estate Finance and Investments
CEE 5950: Construction Planning and Operations
 See the advisor for related courses beyond the courses listed above.


5. Food and Beverage Support Services
Advisors: S . Mutkoski, R . Spies
This track of the concentration will focus on companies that manufacture,
process, or distribute food and beverage products to the restaurant, hotel,
and allied industries .
  Career opportunities include wholesale and retail sales and distribution,
supply and logistics, foodservice consulting, and government regulatory
bodies .
Required Course
  HADM 4435: Selection, Procurement, and Supply Management
Additional courses that will benefit the student who chooses this career path
(Select any combination that will yield a minimum 12-credit concentration.)
  HADM 4431: Wine and Food Pairing Principles and Promotion
  HADM 4436: Beverage Management
  HADM 4453: Foodservice Facilities Design
  HADM 6609: Airline Service Management




                                      48
6. Independent Restaurant Operations
Advisors: G . Pezzotti, A . Susskind
This track of the concentration focuses on the skills and competencies neces-
sary for the management, operation, and ownership of an entrepreneurial
or independent restaurant enterprise . Along with ownership, career oppor-
tunities include general restaurant management, fine dining, private clubs,
and small hotel operations .
Required Courses
  HADM 4401: Restaurant Entrepreneurship
  HADM 4435: Selection, Procurement, and Supply Management
Additional courses that will benefit the student who chooses this career path
(Select any combination that yields a minimum 12-credit concentration.)
  HADM 3303: Club Management
  HADM 4403: Specialty Food and Beverage Operations: Guest Chefs
  HADM 4431: Wine and Food Pairing Principles and Promotion
  HADM 4436: Beverage Management
  HADM 4451: Restaurant Development
  HADM 4453: Foodservice Facilities Design
  HADM 6606: Restaurant Revenue Management

7. Revenue Management
Advisor: B . Carroll, C . Anderson
This track of the concentration focuses on helping hospitality firms more
profitably manage their capacity . Careers include revenue manager, front
office manager, reservations manager, and consultant .
Required Courses
  HADM 4474: Strategic Information Systems
  HADM 6605: Yield Management
  HADM 6606: Restaurant Revenue Management
Plus one of the following courses:
   HADM 4447: Managing Hospitality Distribution Strategies
   ENGRI 1101: Engineering Applications of Operations Research
   NBA 6000: The Strategic Role of Information Technology
   See the advisor for a complete list of related courses beyond the courses
listed above.




                                      49
8. Specialty Operations: Clubs, Casinos, Catering, and Spas
Advisors: R . McCarthy, R . Spies, M . Tabacchi
Required Courses

Any 12-credit combination of the following courses:
  HADM 3303: Club Management
  HADM 4403: Specialty Food and Beverage Operations: Guest Chefs
  HADM 4404: Catering and Special Events Management
  HADM 4408: Introduction to Casino Operations
  HADM 6602: Spa and Spa Hotel and Resort Development and
  Management
  HADM 6631: Seminar in Multiunit-Restaurant Management

Marketing, Strategy, and Information Systems
1. Information Systems Management
Advisor: P . Clark

This track of the concentration is designed for students who are interested
in technology and information systems, their development, management,
and use . This track suits a broad range of career aspirations: management
and IS consulting, project management, business and systems analysis, and
corporate and business-unit technology management .
Required Courses
  HADM 4474: Fundamentals of Database Management and Data Analysis
  HADM 4476: Visual Basic for Applications: End-User Programming
or
  HADM 3375: Internet Technologies for the Entrepreneur
Plus other courses recommended by the concentration advisor, for an overall
total of 12 credits.


2. Services Marketing Management
Advisors: B . Carroll, C . Dev, R . Kwortnik, M . Lynn

This track of the concentration focuses on how to get and keep profitable
customers . It is appropriate for anyone planning a career in consulting, dis-
tribution, sales, marketing, and/or marketing research .
Required Courses
  HADM 2243: Marketing Management for Services
  HADM 3343: Marketing Research for Decision Makers
  HADM 3347: Consumer Behavior
  Recommended Electives (students must take any two of these courses):




                                          50
  HADM 3340: Franchising in the Hospitality Industry (2)*
  HADM 3374: Fundamentals of Database Management and Data Analysis
  HADM 4440: Understanding and Managing Hospitality Sales (1cr)*
  HADM 4442: Strategic Marketing
  HADM 4446: Hospitality Pricing and Analysis (2)*
  HADM 4447: Managing Hospitality Distribution Strategies (2)*
  HADM 4449: Integrated Marketing Communications
  HADM 5540: Brand Management
  HADM 5541: International Marketing
  HADM 6645: Services Marketing and Customer Experience Management

*Any two of the 2 or 1 credit courses counts as one Distributive Elective in the concentra-
tion .



Organizational Management, Communication, and Law
This concentration offers a wide array of courses in organizational behavior,
human-resource management, business communication, and law . Required
courses emphasize critical reasoning, analytical thinking, and human-
resource management skills . Elective courses provide opportunities to
explore cutting-edge topics in management .

1. Human Resources
Advisors: M . Sturman, B . Tracey, S . Way
Optional Selections (Minimum of 12 credits)
  HADM 3313: Training and Development
  HADM 4411: Negotiations in the Hospitality Industry
  HADM 4413: Introduction to Hospitality Entrepreneurship
  HADM 4462: Intercultural Communication in the Hospitality Industry
  HADM 4485: Employment Discrimination Law and Union–Management
  Relations
  HADM 5512: Managing Compensation
  HADM 5513: Strategic Human-Resource Management in Hospitality
  HADM 6604: Workforce Staffing and Scheduling
(No more than one of the above courses may count toward satisfying the
credit requirements for more than one concentration in Organizational Man-
agement, Communication, and Law.)




                                            51
2. Law
Advisor: D . Sherwyn
Required Courses (Take four required courses. All four may come from set A, or
three may come from Set A and one from Set B)

Set A (Minimum of 9 credits)
  HADM 3385: Business Law I
  HADM 4485: Employment Discrimination Law and Union–Management
  Relations
  HADM 4487: Real Estate Law
  HADM 4489: The Law of the Internet and e-Commerce
Set B (Up to 3 credits)
  HADM 3340: Franchising in the Hospitality Industry
  HADM 4411: Negotiations in the Hospitality Industry
  HADM 4420: Principles of Real Estate
  HADM 4423: Hospitality Real Estate Finance
  HADM 4426: Advanced Corporate Finance
  HADM 4481: Labor Relations in the Hospitality Industry

3. Managerial Leadership
Advisor: T . Hinkin
Set A (Minimum of 2 credits, but at most 6 credits to count toward concentration)
  HADM 3310: Statler Leadership Program
  HADM 4410: Hospitality Management Seminar
  HADM 4415: Managerial Leadership in the 21st Century
  HADM 4491: Hotel Ezra Cornell
(Although students may take more credits associated with HEC, only up to 4
may count toward the Managerial Leadership concentration.)

Set B (Minimum of 6 credits, but no more than 10 credits to count toward
concentration)
  HADM 3364: Corporate Communication
  HADM 4411: Negotiations in the Hospitality Industry
  HADM 4443: Innovation and Dynamic Management
  HADM 4444: Introduction to Hospitality Entrepreneurship
  HADM 4462: Intercultural Communication in the Hospitality Industry
  HADM 4485: Employment Discrimination Law and Union–Management
  Relations




                                       52
Directory
This list is categorized into areas that students inquire about most often . For
more services and locations, refer to the Cornell University Faculty, Staff, and
Students Directory .

Crises or Emergencies
Life-Threatening Emergencies, 911
Police, G2 Barton Hall, 607 .255 .1111
Gannett Health Services, 607 .255 .5155
Cayuga Medical Center at Ithaca Emergency Room, 607 .274 .4411
Advocacy Center, 607 .277 .5000
Suicide Prevention and Crisis Service, 607 .272 .1616
Victim Advocacy Program, 118 Stimson Hall, 607 .255 .1212

Academic
Academic Difficulties
Course Instructor
Faculty Advisor
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 146 Statler Hall,
607 .255 .3692
Academic Program: Requirements and Planning
Student’s Faculty Advisor
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Admissions
Office of Admissions, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Internal Transfer Division, 220 Day Hall, 607 .255 .4386
Career Management
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Cornell Career Services, 103 Barnes Hall, 607 .255 .5221
Courses: Adding or Dropping
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Student Center, http://www.studentcenter.cornell.edu
Disability Services
Student Disability Services, 420 CCC Building, 607 .254 .4545
SHA Representative, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376




                                        53
Graduation Requirements
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Learning Skills Improvement
Learning Strategies Center, 420 CCC, 607 .255 .6310
Hotel Communication Center, 607 .255 .8263; http://www.hotelschool.cornell.
edu/students/ugrad/comm
Leaves of Absence, Types of and Forms for
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Petitions, Forms for
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/students/ugrad/forms.html
Certification
https://.certification.cornell.edu/
University Registrar, B7 Day Hall, 607 .255 .4332
Records
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Study Abroad
SHA Advisor, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Cornell Abroad Office, 300 Caldwell Hall, 607 .255 .6224
Transcripts
University Registrar, B7 Day Hall, 607 .255 .4232
http://www.transcript.cornell.edu
Transfer Credit: Evaluation
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6421

Other
Counseling and other resources
CAPS: Counseling and Psychological Services, 607 .255 .5208
Advocacy Center (24-hour hotline), 607 .277 .5000: provides support and
services to people impacted by domestic violence, child sexual abuse, and
sexual assault
EARS: Empathy, Assistance, and Crisis Service, 607 .255 .EARS (607 .255 .3277)
Suicide Prevention and Crisis Service (24-hour hotline), 607 .272 .1616
Dining
Director of Dining, 607 .255 .5952
Financial
University Financial Aid Office, 203 Day Hall, 607 .255 .5145




                                        54
Grievances, Appeals, Unjust Treatment; General
Office of Student Services, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .6376
Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 146 Statler Hall,
607 .255 .3692
University Ombudsman, 118 Stimson Hall, 607 .255 .4321
Housing
Campus Life Management Office, 607 .255 .5511
International Students
International Students and Scholars Office, B50 Caldwell Hall, 607 .255 .5243
Legal Matters
Legal Aid Clinic, G40 Myron Taylor Hall, 607 .255 .4196
Office of the Judicial Administrator, 607 .255 .4680
University Counsel, 300 CCC Building, 607 .255 .5124
University Ombudsman, 607 .255 .4321
Victim Advocacy, 607 .255 .1212
Medical
Emergencies, anytime: Dial 911
Counseling and Psychological Services, 607 .255 .5208
Cayuga Medical Center at Ithaca Emergency Room, 607 .274 .4411
Cornell Police, 607 .255 .1111
Gannett Health Services, 607 .255 .5155
Medical and Sexual Health Counseling
The Advocacy Center, 607 .277 .5000
Cornell Women’s Resource Center (CWRC), 607 .255 .0015
Gannett Health Services, Health Promotion, 607 .255 .4782
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Resource Center (LGBT RC), 282
Caldwell Hall, 607 .254 .4987
Planned Parenthood of the Southern Finger Lakes, 314 West State Street,
607 .273 .1513
Multicultural Student Services
Advisor for Multicultural Programs, 180 Statler Hall, 607 .255 .8322
Religious Matters
Cornell United Religious Work, 119A Anabel Taylor Hall, 607 .255 .4214
For other contact information, see: http://cuinfo.cornell.edu/.




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Notes




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