Road rage

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					Road rage

Aggressive driving is made up of the syndrome of habits that stick together with plenty of individual
variation.


Young drivers are more aggressive in all driving behaviors than older drivers; senior drivers are the least
aggressive. Men are more aggressive than women when the drive sports cars and light trucks (S-10,
Pick-up, Ram, Ranger, F-150, Silverado, Dakota, etc.), women are more aggressive than men when the
drive SUVs and luxury cars. For economy and family cars, it depends on the specific behavior. The
overall lesser aggressiveness of women drivers contribute a tremendous benefit to society. Thank you
all women drivers! This should also be an encouragement for men to reduce their aggressiveness.

It is important to discover what are the motives of drivers to maintain an attitude of aggressiveness of
behind the wheel. Differences in aggressiveness between young drivers and older drivers is a cultural
norm about how we change our behavior as we get older.

Men who drive cars to see themselves as less aggressive than the women who drive family cars.
Similarly both the amen and the women who drive light trucks see themselves as more aggressive than
other drivers.

Aggressiveness syndrome is made of the following a driver behaviors:

       1. Feeling more stress
       2. Swearing more often
       3. Acting on more frequently in a hostile manner
       4. Speeding on a regular basis
       5. Driving through red lights
       6. Yelling more at other drivers
       7. Honking more at other drivers
       8. Making more insulting of gestures
       9. Tailgating more often
       10. Cutting off more often
       11. Expressing road rage behavior more often
       12. Feeling enraged more often
       13. More often indulging in violent fantasies
       14. Feeling more competitive with other drivers
       15. Rushing on more of the time
       16. More often feeling the desire to drive dangerously
       17. Feeling less calm and levelheaded behind the wheel

These 17 driving behaviors defy the aggressive driver syndrome. They are all significantly inter
correlated. This means that if you do one of them are regularly, you will also do the other sixteen on a
regular basis. The fact that aggressive driving behaviors occur together as a syndrome is evidence for
my theory that aggressive driving the styles are cultural norms we learn from parents, television, and
one‘s natural tendency when unchecked or disciplined.
   1. FEELING MORE STRESS

The first step in any self retraining effort is to acknowledge our problem, our inadequate performance.
This acknowledgement creates the motivation to change. This is where more education can bring about
a greater understanding and awareness of the aggressive driving the problem. Aggressive driving is a
behavioral addiction. We want to do it more and more, and, we feel incapable of stopping ourselves
when we try. This is what aggressive driving is like. Before we make the acknowledgement step we are
incapable of driving in a supportive way except when there is a threatening authority present ( police,
driving inspector, insurance agent) . When we feel free, we drive according to the addictive habit -- --
aggressively pushing our progress forward, tailgating, lane hopping, speeding, jerking the car around,
driving through red lights, rolling down the window and screaming, cutting off to make our hurt ego
feel better, and many other insanities is that cost lives and money.

   2. SWEARING

Swearing at other drivers is a serious offence in England for which you can go to jail for two years, and
more and more a state legislatures are passing a similar laws. Why do people swear? The fact is people
are not good at understanding why they get angry. What about women drivers? Do women out-swear
and out-cuss drivers behind the wheel? Yes, indeed: 65% versus 58% ( a highly significant difference
statistically). The driver aggressiveness norm is now growing among women, though not in the same
areas as it is growing for men.
There are large differences in drivers swearing behavior. Younger drivers (15 to 24) swear the most
(66% do it), but as they get older (25 to 54), they tend to reduce somewhat (60%), and finally, when they
enter the senior category of drivers (55 to 94), they greatly reduce their swearing (42%). Swearing is a
cultural driving and norm related to age, and a strong one. 6 out of 10 younger drivers swear and cuss at
the other drivers, and 4 out of 10 senior drivers do so. Obviously, we need to examine of this lack of
civility between drivers.
What about the swearing/cussing and the type of car one drives? By their own admission, drivers of
sports cars and light trucks swear the most (67% or two out of three drivers) . Drivers of economy cars
and vans swear the least a (about a 52% or one out of two). It might be dubbed the Dangerfield
Phenomenon since comedian Rodney Dangerfield is known for saying that there ―ain't no respect
anymore." This is now true for the highway community, or lack of it.

   3. SPEEDING

Speeding is a highly controversial issue, with citizen activism on both sides, those who support an
increase in law enforcement activities against speeding and those who oppose it because they don‘t
believe that speeding causes accidents, but rather those who go too slow.. The overall level of speeding,
as perceived by the drivers themselves, is massive.
We start out speeding as younger drivers ( 52% own up to it), then more and more of us reduce that
behavior: modestly at first ( 41% for drivers aged25 to 54), than quite substantially: the 19% for the
senior group ( 55+). Even at the senior driver level, one in five still wants to break the speed limit by up
to 25 MPH above the legal level!

   4. LANE HOPPING
Lane hopping without signaling is both dangerous and aggressive. It‘s a bad habit that indicates the
driver‘s willingness to take risks at the expense of others. It adds both hostility and stress to the
highway environment. The self-confessed leaders of lane hoppers among the select states is Texas with
40%. Almost every other driver in Texas doesn‘t bother to signal lane changes on a regular basis.

   5. TAILGATING

There are as you might expect, age differences as well as gender differences. Among young drivers,
19% admit to tailgating dangerously, which is about one in five. This is more than that middle aged
drivers (15%) and senior drivers (6%). This age patter recurs in many a aggressive driving behaviors: as
we get older, we drive less aggressively. Women admit to as much a tailgating as men (15%).
The ―soft‖ cars (family and economy) tailgate less than those who drive the ―hard‖ cars (sport and
SUVs) with a ratio of two to one. This holds true for both men and women. However, with SUV
drivers there is a reversal between the genders: more female SUV drivers tailgate dangerously, by their
own admission, than male drivers of SUVs.
Patterns that parents of SUVs, transmit their dangerous tailgating practices to their children, while
parents of sports cars do not. Parents of family cars have a positive influence on their children so that
the children tailgate less than the parents. One aspect of aggressive driving is becoming a more and
more clear from these results: type of car is a major influence in how aggressive the driver gets.

   6. FANTASIES OF VIOLENCE

Why should people enjoy fantasies of violence?? Note that this is a different from ―having‖ fantasies of
violence – which is a natural occurrence in situations where we‘re competing strenuously with others.
But this item has to do with ― enjoying" these fantasies. This aspect goes beyond having fantasies, and
carrying them one and dangerous step further. The healthy thing to do when you have fantasies of
violence against other drivers is to immediately stop them dead in their track, or else they may stop you
dead! If drivers don‘t oppose these fantasies, they are putting themselves at risk for ―losing it.‖

   7. COMPASSION

You can see that the women feel more compassion than the men, and that the older drivers feel more
compassion than the young. But there is a complicating factor that is quite revealing when you
compare the men and women in the three age groups. The younger women drivers are only slightly less
compassionate than the older women drivers (5.1 vs. 5.5) while of the young male who drivers are quite
a bit less a compassionate than either the women of their age or the men who are older.
There is nothing wrong with feeling compassion on every car trip. It reduces stress and restores driving
to an act of community shared pleasure, not frustration and mutual hostility. However, we need to learn
HOW to feel compassion on a regular basis, it isn‘t easy without training ourselves

   8. YELLIING

Yelling at people is obviously a cultural norm, so it‘s not surprising that drivers in different states yell at
one another each according to their custom. There is one reason why we yell at each other in that may
be the single most important reason to get aggressive and hostile: cruising in the left lane, also referred
to as blocking the passing lane.
   9. GESTURES

Almost every other young a male driver indulges in this dangerous habit, according to their own
confession, while one in four young women drivers do it. Making an insulting gesture to another driver
betrays a lack of respect for both others and of the law. More states are legislating new laws that include
jail term and finds for making insulting gestures.
The survey is divided into three categories of items, in each being an escalation of aggressive driving
behavior. Zone one is called the zone of impatience because it lists items like a mild speeding (5 to 10
above the limit), making rolling stops, lane hopping, swearing, going through red lights, etc. Zone two
is made of more serious aggressive behaviors such as serious speeding (15 to 25 above limit), Yelling
and honking at other drivers, tailgating, shining your brights to annoy a driver, and blocking the passing
lane. This zone is called the zone of hostility for obvious reasons. Finally, we reach zone three, which
is the zone of road rage: break job, cutting off, blocking, chasing, and fighting. Combined, how
regularly do you do things in this category for each of the 3 zones?



             Gravity of AGGRESSIVE DRIVING behavior by AGE and GENDER
           Zone 1                           Zone 2                           Zone 3
        IMPATIENCE                         HOSTILITY                       ROAD RAGE
  Young    Middle  Senior           Young    Middle  Senior          Young   Middle  Senior
 M    F   M     F  M    F          M    F   M     F  M    F         M    F   M    F  M    F
 6.9 6.5 6.4 6.4 4.9 4.7           5.4 4.4 4.4 4.2 3.4 2.8          3.9 2.9 3.0 2.7 2.5 2.1



The numbers at the bottom tell the tale. It‘s a ten point scale going from 1=never to 10= quite regularly.
Note the range as you run your eyes from left to right. From a high of 6.9 to a low of 2.1. Summary of
the scale is as follows:
Zone one—aggressive behaviors (being impatient or rushing all the time), the young of both genders are
the most aggressively impatient, and among these, the men are more so than the women. The middle
aged drivers are only slightly lower, and equal for both genders (6.4). That senior drivers are quite a bit
lower, for both men and women (about 4.8).
Zone two – aggressive behaviors (being hostile and attacking), the younger men are much more
aggressive and hostile than the young women (5.4 versus 4.4). Even as drivers enter the middle aged
group, the men are significantly more aggressive and hostile than the women ( 4.4 versus 4.2 – small but
reliable, the error rate is only 0.15) . By the time we enter the senior age category, drivers are much less
hostile, but the men still more than the women (3.4 versus 2.8).
Zone three – aggressive behaviors or road rage (cutting off, break job, blocking, chasing, and fighting),
all drivers report a lower incidence, but the pattern remains. Young men more violent than young
women drivers (3.9 versus 2.9), middle aged men more violent than middle aged women (3.0 versus
2.7), and senior men more than a senior women drivers (2.5 versus 2.1). Note that the overall
occurrence of aggressive behaviors in the three zones decreases: for impatience (zone 1), the range is
from 6.9 down to 4.7; for hostility (zone 2), the ranges from 5.4 to 2.8; for road rage violence, the range
is 3.9 to 2.1.
                              HOW TO PREVENT ROAD RAGE

1.  Stay out of the way. Give aggressive drivers plenty of room to get around you.
2.  Drive defensively. Do not assume other drivers will follow traffic rules.
3.  Do not insist on your right-of-way if another driver is challenging you.
4.  Give a tailgater an opportunity to pass you by changing lanes.
5.  Be a learned to those who are putting on makeup, talking on car phones, reading, eating or
    otherwise not paying attention to driving.
6. Give cars room to merge ahead of you.
7. Follow these tips to avoid rude or aggressive driving tendencies yourself.
8. Don‘t make eye contact with an aggressive driver.
9. Don‘t use obscene gestures.
10. Use your horn sparingly.
11. Don‘t block the passing lane.
12. Don‘t switch lanes without signaling.
13. Avoid blocking of the right hand turn lane.
14. Do not tailgate.
15. Don‘t get distracted by the car phone.
16. Don‘t play the radio excessively loudly.
17. Allow plenty of time for your trip.
18. Driving is transportation, not competition. Want to compete? Find race track.
19. Be courteous, even when other drivers are not. Retaliating won‘t get you where you‘re going
    any sooner. Don‘t assume the other driver is out to antagonize you, he or she may just be in a
    hurry, too.
20. It‘s not your job to teach others to drive. If, for example, you block a speeding car to slow it
    down, you might be inviting trouble. Leave law enforcement to the police.
21. Make time good instead of making good time. If it takes 25 minutes to get to work, why leave
    yourself only 15? Leave earlier and don‘t play beat the clock. If driving makes you impatient,
    play music or listen to a book on tape to pass the time.
Call it ‗road rage‘ and whip out the race card.
Written by Patrick Bedard
SEPTEMBER 1998

On a Friday evening in May, 41- year-old Jimmy Williams pulled up in his truck to an exact-
change tollbooth on the Cross Florida Greenway and then discovered he didn't have exact
change. A black Blazer behind began honking. When Williams got out of his truck and walked
back toward the Blazer, the honking driver shot him. Williams was pronounced dead an hour
later.
This is a shooting, right? A homicide? Nope. According to the Palm Beach Post, it's "another
case of fatal road rage."
Road rage. A brilliant concept! The marketing geniuses at Procter & Gamble, who gave us Pert,
Prell, Puffs, Pampers, and Pringles, couldn't have created a catchier name. Road rage! Fun to
say. It fans the flames of fear. It's a smash hit!
The Honorable Ricardo Martinez. M.D., head fakir at National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, told a House subcommittee last year that a third of the nation's highway crashes
and two-thirds of the resulting fatalities "can be attributed" to road rage.
Actually, he attributed them to "aggressive driving," but the two terms are artfully blurred
together by Martinez and other seeking to criminalize what amounts to impatience on the
highway.
Lessee, a third of the crashes are caused by aggressive driving. Other NHTSA pronouncements
say more than 20 percent are caused by speeding, 41 percent involve alcohol, 50 percent result
"driver inattention." That's 144 percent—more than all the crashes we still haven't added in the
caused by all this red-light running I've been hearing about.
Funny, but N1HTSA's latest summary of highway statistics—Traffic Safety Facts 1996—says,
"Operating vehicle in erratic, reckless. careless, or negligent manner" is a factor in only 5.1
percent of fatal crashes.
Isn't "aggressive driving" the same thing we used to call reckless? Martinez somehow pumps
that fraction of 5.1 percent way up to a third of all crashes and two-thirds of fatalities; that's
23.000 deaths, closing in on AIDS as a killer.
A new menace! But, whew, government is here to help.
This is Marketing 101, ring around the collar pumped up to life-threatening proportions. The
Maryland State Police have stepped in to save us with their new Aggressive Driver Imaging and
Enforcement system, ADI&E. But when you peel away the baloneyhoo, ADI&E is nothing more
than "photo laser." Installed in a sport-ute parked along the road, it measures speed with a laser
instead of radar and then shoots video still pictures of the target vehicle as it passes by.
ADI&E is purely a measuring device, but speed enforcement has lost its luster now that the limit
has been lifted to 70 or 75 mph on most interstates— with to discernable consequences. No
problem. Change he marketing program. Transform speed enforcer into road rage protection,
never mind that can't tell an aggressive driver from one that's falling asleep.
NEWS FLASH: This just in n from the Maryland State Police Marketing Department: ADI&E
has been replaced by the new and improved ADVANCE. Aggressive Driver Video and Non-
Contact Enforcement. Same old gizmo with a new name.
ADI&E cum ADVANCE is a product of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center. Remember the
"peace dividend" that was to come when the cold war ended? We'd beat our swords into
plowshares and give the taxpayers a break? Fuhgedaboudit. Now that commies are no longer a
threat. Washington is making new swords and pointing them at taxpayers. The Federal Highway
Administration paid the Army 5400.000 to design and develop ADVANCE.
The advertising for ADI&E/ADVANCE is exploitative beyond anything Big Business would
dare try. On my desk is a slick brochure bearing the Maryland State Police shield. The cover
shouts: "Aggressive Driving Kills.' There's a photo of aggressive drivers straight from central
casting. We see truckers in black leathers. We see a woman in what looks like a white fire suit,
wearing shoulder pads and shin guards over her suit. Inside the brochure we see her in her black
Jeep, a grimace on her face, black dog at her side. Her front plate reads: WARRIOR.
It gets worse. There's a black man on a humongous motorsickle. Apart from his tattooed biceps,
he too is dressed all in black: black shoulder pads over his jersey, black gloves with fingers
cutoff, black stocking cap, even one lens of his glasses is black, a menacing variation on the
pirate's eye patch.
The Maryland State Police are demonizing classes of citizens—truckers, Jeep drivers,
motorcyclists—and worse yet, they're exploiting mainstream America's fear of black male
gangbangers, just to make propaganda points for what turns out to be a plain old campaign
against speeders.
To Louis R. Mizell Jr., who maintains a large database of crime reports, "aggressive driving" is
an altogether different matter—"an attempt to injure or kill as the result of a traffic altercation,"
he says. Usually a gun, a ball bat, or some other weapon is involved, although harm may be
inflicted with a vehicle, too. Over a span of six years and nine months, Mizell reported 218
deaths resulting from 10,037 incidents. NHTSA recorded more than 42 million crashes during
the period, which puts road rage at 0.02 percent of all incidents. Each year brings an increase,
Mizell says.
He culls these incidents from 30 major newspapers and the reports of 16 police departments. I
asked him how he could be sure the increase wasn't due to better reporting. "I can't." he said.
It's the only honest statement I've ever heard about road rage.

More and more drivers have started acting out their anger when they get behind the wheel. After
they've been cutoff, tailgated, or slowed down by a vehicle in front of them, these angry drivers
can commit incredible acts of violence –including assault and murder. When the AAA
Foundation for Traffic Safety studied more than 10,000 incidents of violent aggressive driving
committed between 1990 and 1996, it found that at least 218 people were killed and another
12,610 injured when drivers got angry.
Although many drivers involved in these incidents are men between the ages of 18 and
26, anyone can become aggressive if they let their anger take precedence over safe driving.
The AAA Foundation study found that men, women, and people of all ages can drive
aggressively if they are in the wrong mood or circumstances. What's more, when drivers
explained why they became violent the reasons are often incredibly trivial: "She wouldn't let me
pass," "They kept tailgating me," or, as this one driver accused of murder explained, "He
practically ran me off the road what was I supposed to do?"
How can you avoid being the victim of an aggressive driver? While there are no sure techniques,
three basic guiding principles can help:

1. DON‘T OFFEND
When surveys ask drivers what angers them most, the results are remarkably consistent. A few
specific behaviors seem unusually likely to enrage other drivers. You can protect yourself by
avoiding them:

Cutting off
When you merge, make sure you have plenty of room. Use your turn signal to show your
intentions before making a move. If you make a mistake and accidentally cut someone off, try to
apologize to the other driver with an appropriate gesture. If someone cuts you off, slow down
and give them room to merge into your lane.

Driving slowly in the left lane
If you are in the left lane and someone wants to pass, move over and let them by. You may be "in
the right" because you are traveling at the speed limit but you may also be putting yourself in
danger by making drivers behind you angry. In many states and provinces the law requires you
to travel in the right lane and use the far left lane only for passing. Besides, it's simple courtesy to
move over and let other drivers by.


Tailgating
Drivers get angry when they are followed too closely. Allow at least a two-second space
between your car and the car ahead. (When you see the car pass a fixed point, you should be able
to count at least "one-thousand, two-thousand" before you pass that point.)
If you think another car is driving too slowly and you are unable to pass, pull back and allow
more space, not less. That way if the car does something unexpected you will have time to get
out of the way.
You should be able to see the headlights of the car behind you in your rear-view mirror. If
you feel you are being followed too closely, signal and pull over to allow the other driver to
go by.

Gestures
Almost nothing makes another driver angrier than an obscene gesture. Keep your hands on
the wheel. Avoid making any gestures that might anger another driver, even "harmless"
expressions of irritation like shaking your head.
Be a cautious and courteous driver. Signal every time you merge or change lanes, and
whenever you turn. Use your horn rarely, if ever. If you and another driver see a parking space
at the same time, let that person have it. And if another driver seems eager to get in front of
you say, " Be my guest." When you respond this way, after a while "be my guest" becomes your
automatic response and you won't be as offended by other drivers' rudeness.

2. DON‘T ENGAGE
One angry driver can't start a fight unless another driver is willing to join in. You can protect
yourself against aggressive drivers by refusing to become angry at them. Orator Robert Ingersoll
said, "Anger blows out the lamp of the mind." A person who is angry can do things they may
later regret and that includes you. If you‘re tempted to retaliate against another driver, think:
"Would I want to fly in an airplane whose pilot was acting like this?" Think about what kind of
a crash your angry actions could cause. Then cool down and continue your trip.

Steer clear
Give angry drivers lots of room. A driver you may have offended can "snap" and become truly
dangerous. If the other driver tries to pick a fight, put as much distance as possible between
your vehicle and the other car, and then get away as quickly as possible. Do not under any
circumstances pull off to the side of the road and try to settle things "man to man."

Avoid eye contact
If another driver is acting angry with you, don't make eye contact. Looking or staring at another
driver can turn an impersonal encounter between two vehicles into a personal duel. And once
things get personal, the situation can get out of hand fast.

Get help
If you believe the other driver is following you or is trying to start a fight, get help. If you have a
cellular phone, use it to call the police. Otherwise, drive to a place where there are people
around, such as a police station, convenience store, shopping center, or even a hospital. Use your
horn to get someone's attention. This will usually discourage an aggressor. Do not get out of your
car. Do not go home.

3. ADJUST YOUR ATTITUDE
The most important actions you can take to avoid aggressive driving take place inside your head.
By changing your approach to driving, you can make every trip more pleasant. Try these ideas
for a pleasant change:

Forget winning
For too many motorists, driving becomes a contest. Are you one of those drivers who allows the
shortest possible time for a trip and then races the clock? If something happens to slow you down
do you get angry? The solution: Allow more time for your trip. You'll be amazed at how much
more relaxed you feel when you have a few extra minutes. So instead of trying to "make good
time," try to "make time good." Listen to soothing music or a book on tape. Practice relaxation
techniques, such as deep breathing. You'll arrive much calmer, fresher, and in a less stressed-out
frame of mind.

Put yourself in the other driver's shoes
Instead of judging the other driver, try to imagine why he or she is driving that way. Someone
speeding and constantly changing lanes may be a volunteer fireman, or a physician rushing to a
hospital. Someone who jerks from one lane to another may have a bee in the car, or a crying
baby. Whatever their reason, it has nothing to do with you. Stay cool and don't take other drivers'
actions personally.

If you think you have a problem, ask for help.
Courses in anger management have been shown to reduce heart attacks. These same techniques
can also help angry drivers. Drivers who successfully "reinvent" their approach to the road report
dramatic changes in attitude and behavior. Look for anger management courses in your area.
Self-help books on stress reduction and anger management can also be helpful.
Violent aggressive driving is clearly on the rise. But you can avoid becoming a victim by using
the tips in this brochure. In the process you may find that driving has become a completely new
and more enjoyable experience.
   1.    I often mutter to myself about other drivers.
   2.    I get irritated a lot while driving.
   3.    When I'm in a traffic jam I tend to get angry or frustrated.
   4.    When I'm in a hurry I sometimes tailgate.
   5.    I often honk at other vehicles to express my anger.
   6.    When I'm angry, I sometimes drive in a rude manner.
   7.    I often give "the finger" to others when driving.
   8.    I often take risks on the road when I'm angry.
   9.    When I get mad all rules "go out the window."
   10.   I have fought with another motorist.


DRIVING TIPS

On the road, small incidents sometimes escalate into serious altercations between drivers. Crowded traffic
conditions and high-speed freeway driving often cause stress. Being slowed down by traffic when you're in a hurry
produces tension. Drivers can become frustrated and upset to the point where they may behave in uncharacteristic
ways.

Aggressive driving behaviour may lead to incidents of road rage where motorists are threatened and/or subjected
to retaliatory actions by angry motorists. Law enforcement and road safety organizations recommend the following
tips on how to keep your cool behind the wheel and avoid getting into confrontations with other drivers.

How to keep your cool behind the wheel


        Plan your route in advance. Some of the most erratic and inconsiderate driving occurs when motorists are
         lost.
        Allow yourself plenty of time. Being in a hurry can cause you to become angry or frustrated. Realize that if
         you leave late, you'll arrive late.
        Make a conscious decision not to take your problems with you when driving. Take a couple of moments to
         calm yourself down and leave your problems behind before you start to drive. If you can't focus, don't get
         behind the wheel.
        Listen to relaxing music.
        Don't take other drivers' mistakes personally. Remember everyone makes mistakes sometimes.
        Say "Sorry" if you make a mistake. An apology can reduce the risk of conflict.
        Be polite and courteous, even if the other driver is not. Avoid all conflict if possible.
        Put yourself in the other driver's shoes. Instead of judging the other driver, try to imagine why he or she is
         driving that way. Someone speeding may be a physician rushing to a hospital. Someone who jerks from
         one lane to another may have a bee in the car or a crying baby.
        Don't compete or retaliate. If someone's driving annoys you, don't try to "educate them". Leave traffic
         enforcement to the police.
        Forget winning. For many motorists, driving is a contest. Instead of trying to "make good time", try to
         "make time good" by listening to music or an audio book.

How to avoid making other drivers mad
In surveys asking drivers what makes them mad, a few specific behaviours consistently top the list. Avoiding these
can reduce confrontations between drivers.


        Don't cut people off, leave plenty of room when merging and signal your intentions before making a move.
        If someone cuts you off, give them room to merge into your lane.
        Don't drive slowly in the left (fast) lane. If someone wants to pass you, move over and let them by. You
          may be "in the right" because you are traveling at the speed limit, but you may also be putting yourself in
          danger by making drivers behind you mad.
        Don't tailgate. Many drivers get angry when being followed too closely. Allow at least a two-second space
          between your car and the car ahead.
       Don't make gestures to other drivers. Almost nothing makes other drivers angrier than an obscene gesture.
        Keep your hands on the wheel. Even "harmless" expressions of irritation like shaking your head can incense
        another driver.
       Avoid honking your horn unless absolutely necessary and, if you must, tap on it lightly.
       Many incidents are sparked by disputes over parking spaces. If you and another driver see a parking space
        at the same time, let that person take the space.

What to do when faced with an angry driver


       Don't engage. If another driver challenges you, take a deep breath and move out of the way. Never
         underestimate the other driver's capacity for mayhem.
       Control your anger; remember it takes two to start a fight.
       Avoid eye contact with an angry driver.
       If another driver is following you or trying to start a fight, call police or drive to a place where there are
         people around, such as a police station, shopping mall or hospital. Use your horn to get attention. Do not
         get out of your car. Do not go home.
       If you are being physically threatened, stay in your car and lock the doors. Don't pull over to the side of the
         road to settle things "face to face".
       Don't carry a defensive weapon; it might provoke a potential assailant.
       Forget about winning. No one wins in a highway crash.



Road rage

Aggressive driving is made up of the syndrome of habits that stick together with plenty of individual
variation.


Young drivers are more aggressive in all driving behaviors than older drivers; senior drivers are the least
aggressive. Men are more aggressive than women when the drive sports cars and light trucks (S-10,
Pick-up, Ram, Ranger, F-150, Silverado, Dakota, etc.), women are more aggressive than men when the
drive SUVs and luxury cars. For economy and family cars, it depends on the specific behavior. The
overall lesser aggressiveness of women drivers contribute a tremendous benefit to society. Thank you
all women drivers! This should also be an encouragement for men to reduce their aggressiveness.

It is important to discover what are the motives of drivers to maintain an attitude of aggressiveness of
behind the wheel. Differences in aggressiveness between young drivers and older drivers is a cultural
norm about how we change our behavior as we get older.

Men who drive cars to see themselves as less aggressive than the women who drive family cars.
Similarly both the amen and the women who drive light trucks see themselves as more aggressive than
other drivers.

Aggressiveness syndrome is made of the following a driver behaviors:

                1.   Feeling more stress
                2.   Swearing more often
                3.   Acting on more frequently in a hostile manner
                4.   Speeding on a regular basis
                5.   Driving through red lights
               6. Yelling more at other drivers
               7. Honking more at other drivers
               8. Making more insulting of gestures
               9. Tailgating more often
               10. Cutting off more often
               11. Expressing road rage behavior more often
               12. Feeling enraged more often
               13. More often indulging in violent fantasies
               14. Feeling more competitive with other drivers
               15. Rushing on more of the time
               16. More often feeling the desire to drive dangerously
               17. Feeling less calm and levelheaded behind the wheel

These 17 driving behaviors defy the aggressive driver syndrome. They are all significantly inter
correlated. This means that if you do one of them are regularly, you will also do the other sixteen on a
regular basis. The fact that aggressive driving behaviors occur together as a syndrome is evidence for
my theory that aggressive driving the styles are cultural norms we learn from parents, television, and
one‘s natural tendency when unchecked or disciplined.

				
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