PUBLIC HORTICULTURE CONCENTRATION TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION by wuxiangyu

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									                                                                                                                                         College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources           51


PUBLIC HORTICULTURE                                                             TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT                                                                 Technical Electives: Horticulture Tract
                                                                                                                                                                       Agricultural Economics Elective
CONCENTRATION                                                                   CONCENTRATION                                                                          Biosystems Engineering Technology
     The public horticulture concentration is in-                                    The Turfgrass Management Concentra-                                                  212, 452, 462
tended for students interested in professional                                  tion is designed for the student desiring to                                           Botany 310, 412, 431, 451
careers which promote horticulture and em-                                      pursue professions that include growing and                                            Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries 250
phasize people and their education and enjoy-                                   managing turfgrasses used for golf courses,
ment of plants. Such careers include director                                   parks, athletic fields, sports complexes, and                                     LANDSCAPE DESIGN CONCENTRATION
of a botanical garden or park; city or urban                                    residential and commercial lawns. Careful                                           Environmental/Technical Electives:
horticulturist; extension agent, teacher, edu-                                  selection of departmental courses and other                                           Architecture 111, 180, 211, 232, 421
cational director, or program coordinator; pro-                                 electives in consultation with your academic                                          Art 101, 103, 191, 295
fessional garden writer/editor or publication                                   adviser will prepare graduates for the career                                         Art Drawing 211, 212
manager; horticulture therapist; public garden                                  of their choice.                                                                      Biology 250
curator; and plant collections manager.                                                                                                    Hours Credit               Biosystems Engineering Technology
Directed technical electives allow the student                                  Freshman                                                                                 202, 212
to concentrate in an area of their interest while                               Botany 110-120 ......................................................... 8
                                                                                                                                                                      Botany 305, 306, 330, 431
                                                                                Chemistry 100-110 or 120-130 .................................. 8
encouraging the development of good people                                                                                                                            Entomology and Plant Pathology 306,
                                                                                English 101-102 ......................................................... 6
skills. Students are required internship train-                                 Math 119 and (123 or 125) ........................................ 6                     313, 321, 410
ing in the area of their interest.                                              OHLD 110 or IPS 230 ................................................ 3                Environmental and Soil Sciences 324,
                                                         Hours Credit           1
                                                                                  Social Science Elective .......................................... 3                   334
Freshman                                                                        Sophomore                                                                             Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries 211,
Botany 110-120 ......................................................... 8      Select 1 from OHLD 220, 225, 230, 231, or 280 .... 2-3                                   250
Chemistry 100 or 120 ................................................ 4         Agriculture and Natural Resources 290 ..................... 3
English 101-102 ......................................................... 6                                                                                           Geology 201, 202
                                                                                Writing Elective ......................................................... 3
Math 119 and (123 or 125) ........................................ 6                                                                                                  Geography 310, 439
                                                                                1
                                                                                  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3
OHLD 110 .................................................................. 3   1
                                                                                  Social Science Elective .......................................... 4                Urban and Regional Planning 401, 402
1
  Natural Science Elective ......................................... 4          Environmental and Soil Sciences 210 ....................... 4
Sophomore                                                                       Speech 210 or 240 .................................................... 3          PUBLIC HORTICULTURE
Select 2 from OHLD 220, 225, 230, 231 or 280 ..... 5-6                          1
                                                                                  History Elective ....................................................... 3      CONCENTRATION
Agriculture and Natural Resources 290 ..................... 3                   Unrestricted Elective ................................................. 3           Technical Electives:
Select 1 from Educational Psychology 210;                                       Junior                                                                                 Accounting 415
    Public Relations 270; Recreational and                                      IPS 340 ..................................................................... 3
    Tourism Management 201; Forestry Wildlife and                                                                                                                      Art 481
                                                                                OHLD 370 .................................................................. 3
    Fisheries 211, or 250 .......................................... 3                                                                                                 Botany 431
                                                                                IPS 334 ..................................................................... 3
1
  Social Science Elective ....................................... 3-4           Select 3 from OHLD 330, 350, 360, 390, or 391 .... 8-9                                 Educational Psychology 210
Environmental and Soil Sciences 210 ....................... 4                   PSLS 492 .................................................................. 3          Forestry 423
Speech 210 or 240 .................................................... 3        Select 2 from Technical Electives ............................. 6                      Interior Design 200
1
  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3       1
                                                                                  History Elective ....................................................... 3           Philosophy 342
1
  History Elective ....................................................... 3    Senior                                                                                 Environmental and Soil Sciences 413,
Junior                                                                          Select 4 from OHLD 410, 421, 430, 450, 451, 460,                                           414, 415
Select 4 from OHLD 330, 350, 360, 370, 380, 390,                                    494; IPS 431, 433,434, 435, 453,
    391, IPS 334 or 340 ..................................... 11-12                                                                                                    Public Health 410
                                                                                    PSLS 471, 493 ............................................... 5-12
OHLD 326 .................................................................. 3                                                                                          Public Relations 470
                                                                                IPS 440 ..................................................................... 4
Select 1 from Philosophy 342, Agriculture and                                   PSLS 490 .................................................................. 1          Recreation and Tourism Management
    Extension Education 346, or Journalism 310 ...... 3                         Select 2 from Technical Electives ............................. 6                          410, 430
Select 2 from Botany 309, 330; Entomology and                                   Botany 321 ................................................................ 4          Speech 440
    Plant Pathology 313, 321, 410 ............................ 6                1
                                                                                  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3
Select 2 from Technical Electives ............................. 6               Unrestricted Electives ............................................ 2-9           PUBLIC HORTICULTURE AND LAND-
Senior                                                                           __________________________________________
                                                                                __________________________________________
                                                                                                                                                                  SCAPE DESIGN CONCENTRATIONS
Select 4 from OHLD 410, 421, 427, 429, 430,434,                                                                 Total: 124 hours
    436, 446, 450, 451, 460, 480,485, 494,                                      ______________________________________________                                      Natural Science Electives:
    IPS 431, 433, 434, 435, 440, or PSLS 493 .... 8-12                                                                                                                 Chemistry 110, 130
                                                                                1
                                                                                 Lists of appropriate electives are available and
PSLS 490 .................................................................. 1   should be selected in conference with academic                                         Geography 131
PSLS 492 .................................................................. 3   advisor.                                                                               Geology 101, 103
1
  Social Science Elective .......................................... 3
Writing Elective ......................................................... 3                                                                                      TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT
1
  History Elective ....................................................... 3                                                                                      CONCENTRATION
                                                                                ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES LIST:
Select 2 from Technical Electives ............................. 6
__________________________________________
 __________________________________________                                                                                                                         Technical Electives:
                                Total: 124 hours                                BUSINESS MANAGEMENT                                                                   Agricultural Economics elective (3)
______________________________________________                                  CONCENTRATION                                                                         Biosystems Engineering Tech. 202,
1
 Lists of appropriate electives are available and                                 Technical Electives:                                                                   212, 452, 462
should be selected in conference with academic                                       Biosystems Engineering Tech. 202,                                                Environmental and Soil Sciences 310,
advisor.                                                                                212, 452, 462                                                                    311, 315, 432
                                                                                     Environmental and Soil Sciences 324,                                             Entomology and Plant Pathology 313,
                                                                                        334, 462                                                                         321, 410
                                                                                     Entomology and Plant Pathology 313,                                              Engineering 243 and Math 142
                                                                                        321, 410

                                                                                HORTICULTURE AND AGRONOMY
                                                                                CONCENTRATION
                                                                                  Technical Electives: Agronomy Tract
                                                                                     Agricultural Economics Elective
                                                                                     Biosystems Engineering Tech. 212,
                                                                                        452, 462
                                                                                     Botany 310, 330
                                                                                     Environmental and Soil Sciences 324,
                                                                                        355, 434, 442, 444
                                                                                     Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries 250
52       College of Architecture and Design




College of Architecture and Design
Marleen Kay Davis, Dean                              spaces. Students also use a digital class-            not adhering to this size requirement will not
Max A. Robinson, Director, School of                 room, a 24/7 computer lab, and an Image               be reviewed. As a general recommendation,
   Architecture                                      Center with extensive printing capabilities.          use high quality (100% rag) paper and high
Jon Coddington, Head of Graduate                         Throughout the design studios, over 100           quality
   Program in Architecture                           computer ports are provided for students'             drawing pencils (HB or F) or other media. The
Josette Rabun, Coordinator of Interior               laptop computers. The building itself is a model      portfolio must include at least three items:
   Design                                            of how architectural space can promote a                  • a freehand drawing of a stair,
                                                     sense of community among the artists, archi-              • a freehand drawing of a collection of
    The College of Architecture and Design is        tects, and interior designers within the larger       leaves, and
concerned with the design of the physical envi-      University community.                                     • a freehand drawing of a bicycle.
ronment, from the scale of furniture to the scale        Interior Design students work together in             The following guidelines have been estab-
of the region. The study of the physical environ-    design studios, located in the Art and Architec-      lished to assist applicants in selecting addi-
ment includes many inter-disciplinary connec-        ture Building. In their studies, students take        tional samples of personal work for the
tions which the college tries to promote. Within     advantage of the program's computing facili-          portfolio:
the University of Tennessee, all students in the     ties, the Resource Library with extensive                 • Include other examples of drawings,
College of Architecture and Design are part of       material samples and product information,             artwork, photography, or anything else which
a smaller academic community that prides itself      and the well equipped wood shop for furniture         may demonstrate visual abilities. Graphic,
on a faculty dedicated to teaching.                  construction and model building.                      architectural or industrial design work may also
    The College of Architecture and Design                                                                 be included.
includes three basic programs of study, at the                                                                 • Include work for course assignments (if
undergraduate and graduate level:                    FRESHMAN ADMISSION                                    any) as well as work completed independently.
    Bachelor of Architecture: A professionally       REQUIREMENTS                                              • Avoid extensive submissions of mechani-
accredited five year undergraduate first profes-         Due to the limited size of the design studios     cally drafted drawings or computer drawings,
sional degree program of study.                      and College resources, admission to the Col-          unless these are illustrative of a design project.
    Bachelor of Science in Interior Design:          lege of Architecture and Design is selective,         These must be submitted in an 8 1/2 x 11”
A professionally accredited four year under-         based on test scores, high school record, stu-        format.
graduate program of study.                           dent application, and portfolio. The College will         • Submission of the original item is not nec-
    Master of Architecture: A professionally         typically accept applicants with a total of 60 or     essary: inexpensively reproduced drawings,
accredited first professional degree for students    above using the formula of the high school            photographs, reductions, and photocopies are
from any academic background. This three             grade point average times 10, plus the ACT            acceptable. Digital design work must be sub-
year course of study is described in the             composite score (or the ACT equivalent of the         mitted as a hard copy. (Please, no slides or
Graduate Catalog.                                    SAT). The College normally refuses applica-           disks.)
                                                     tions with less than a high school GPA of 2.7 or          • Label all work with name, date when work
                                                     with ACT scores below 23 (or SAT equivalent).         was executed, and any other relevant informa-
FACILITIES                                           In making its decisions, the College also             tion. If the item was a course assignment,
    The award winning Art and Architecture           requires a portfolio from applicants (see infor-      identify the course and summarize the
Building, completed in 1981, provides one of         mation below). Applicants will be informed of         assignment.
the finest facilities in the country for architec-   their status by April 15 of each year.                    • The cover or cover page of the portfolio
ture students. The building is home to art,                                                                should include the student name, address,
architecture, and interior design students who                                                             phone number, and the program to which the
occupy extensive studio space surrounding an         REQUIRED PORTFOLIO                                    application is made (Architecture or Interior
open Commons space, filled with natural light.           All applicants must submit a portfolio of per-    Design).
A cafe, supply store, and three auditoriums          sonally produced graphic or visual work. The              The 8 1/2 x 11” portfolio should be sent,
open onto the Commons as well. Changing art          purpose of the portfolio is to demonstrate visual     with the application, to the Office of Admis-
and architecture exhibits are installed in the       talent and abilities.                                 sions. It will be reviewed by members of the
Ewing Gallery, the Exhibition Wall, the Com-             Aim for quality rather than quantity in select-   College Admissions Committee. In addition,
mons, and the Sculpture Garden. Students in          ing work: An ideal number would be eight to           include a self-addressed stamped mailer for
the College have an extensive woodshop and           ten examples of personal work. All work shall         the return of the portfolio. Otherwise, portfo-
modelmaking shop, darkrooms, experimental            be neatly assembled in an 8 1/2” x 11” portfo-        lios will not be held nor returned.
construction platform, and presentation              lio or organized folder/notebook. Submittals


                                                                            52
                                                                                                             College of Architecture and Design           53


DEADLINES FOR                                        FOR NON-PROFESSIONAL                                 Associate Professors:
                                                                                                          J. Coddington, M. Arch. Pennsylvania; T.K.
APPLICATION                                          MAJORS                                               Davis, M. Arch. Cornell; C.A. Debelius,
    Deadlines for application to the College of          In order to promote interdisciplinary involve-   M.Arch. Harvard; A. Drisin, MDesS, Harvard;
Architecture and Design coincide with those set      ment, students from other disciplines are wel-       D. Fox, M. Arch. Cranbrook Academy of Art;
forth by the University of Tennessee. For full       come to take many classes in the College.            W.E. Martella, B. Arch. California (Berkeley);
consideration, all students, including transfer      Arch 111, “Architecture and the Built Environ-       T. Moir-McClean, M. Arch. Michigan; M.
students, must apply by January 15 for the fall      ment,” is recommended as a good general              Schimmenti, M.Arch. Florida.
semester. Late applications will be reviewed on      introduction. Non-architecture students are
a space-available basis.                             also welcome in the architectural history se-        Assistant Professors:
                                                     quence of Arch 211, 212, and 213. Most of the        M. DeKay, M.Arch. University of Oregon; G.
                                                     400 level electives do not have prerequisites        Dodds, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania;
ADVICE TO HIGH SCHOOL                                and are open to upper level students with an         B. Klinkhammer, M. Arch. RWTH; E. Stach,
STUDENTS                                             interest in the course topic. Arch 425 “Special      M. Arch. RWTH (Aadren); A. Thurlow, M.S.
    High school students are encouraged to           Topics” varies by semester, but is often of          Arch. Columbia; S.M. Ware, M.F.A.
take physics and calculus. Students enrolled in      interest to a broad cross section of the Uni-        Tennessee.
Advanced Placement courses should take the           versity student population. Non-architecture
national AP exam. Students are also strongly         majors should meet with the Director of Stu-
encouraged to take freehand drawing and/or           dent Services in order to register for these up-     THE STUDY OF
art courses as a way to develop visual abili-        per-level courses. Due to space limitations,         ARCHITECTURE
ties. Extensive drafting, mechanical drawing         design studio courses are open only to archi-            Architecture involves the study and transfor-
or architecture courses based on drafting are not    tecture students.                                    mation of the built environment, from the scale
recommended.                                                                                              of furniture to the scale of the city. The goal of
                                                     ACADEMIC POLICIES                                    an architectural education is to develop a
TRANSFER STUDENTS                                                                                         synthetic thought process of critical thinking
                                                                                                          and creative problem solving. Creative thinkers
    It should be noted that due to the strong        ADVISING                                             must address all aspects of the built environ-
sequential character of the curriculum, entry in         Students must plan their schedule in con-        ment, in its cultural, social, and ethical context.
any semester other than fall may be difficult. A     sultation with an assigned faculty advisor. In           As a professional discipline, architecture
course of summer study is usually offered            addition, entering Architecture students will be     spans both the arts and the sciences. Students
which would allow transfer students to proceed       assigned to an upper-class student who will          must have an understanding of the arts and
to the second year course of study for the fall.     serve as a peer advisor. The Director of Stu-        humanities, as well as a technical understand-
Transfer students are required to submit a port-     dent Services is available to answer additional      ing of structures and construction. Skills in
folio and to have at least a 2.3 grade point         questions and to oversee questions related to        communication, both visual and verbal, are
average to be considered. Sophomores and             admissions, advising, and career placement.          essential. While knowledge and skills must be
juniors who are interested in applying to the            All academic policies of the College of          developed, the School strongly emphasizes a
architecture program may want to consider            Architecture and Design are summarized in the        process of critical thinking and creative activity.
finalizing their bachelors courses of study and      Student Handbook, published each year by the
applying to the first professional Master of         College.
Architecture program in the College. Transfer                                                             PROFESSIONAL
students should apply by January 15, and
should discuss their options with the Director of    COURSE LOAD                                          ACCREDITATION
Student Services.                                        The average course load in any semester is           In the United States, most state registration
                                                     17 credit hours. The minimum which may be            boards require a degree from an accredited
                                                     taken by full-time students is 12 hours. The         professional degree program as a prerequisite
FINANCIAL                                            maximum which may be taken without approval          for licensure. The National Architectural
CONSIDERATIONS                                       of the Dean is 19 hours.                             Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole
                                                                                                          agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional
     As the only accredited architecture program
                                                                                                          degree programs in architecture, recognizes
in the State of Tennessee, the Architecture pro-     SATISFACTORY/NO CREDIT                               two types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architec-
gram is fortunate to have many generous              COURSES                                              ture and the Master of Architecture. A program
scholarships funded by alumni and by different
                                                        Courses that are a part of the specific           may be granted a five-year, three-year, or two-
components of the construction industry. As a
                                                     requirements of the College cannot be taken          year term of accreditation, depending on its
result, numerous awards, prizes, scholarships,
                                                     as Satisfactory/No Credit.                           degree of conformance with established educa-
traveling stipends, fellowships and internships
                                                        Credit hours over and above the specific          tional standards.
are available to academically motivated stu-
                                                     graduation requirements may be taken S/NC.               Masters degree programs may consist of a
dents. Alumni actively give support by partici-
                                                     A student who desires to take a course S/NC          pre-professional undergraduate degree and a
pating in activities, by extensive donations to
                                                     should indicate this at the start of registration.   professional graduate degree, which, when
scholarship and enrichment funds, and by
                                                     Courses evaluated as “Satisfactory” will count       earned sequentially, comprise an accredited
developing intern programs for student employ-
                                                     as hours toward graduation but will not be           professional education. However, the pre-pro-
ment. A full listing of available scholarships is
                                                     calculated in the student's GPA.                     fessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as
included in this catalog.
                                                                                                          an accredited degree. The University of Ten-
     The Interior Design Program has a number
                                                                                                          nessee offers both the five year Bachelor of
of generous scholarships funded by alumni and by
different components of the construction industry.
                                                     SCHOOL OF                                            Architecture and a three year Master of Archi-
     The University and the College provide          ARCHITECTURE                                         tecture for students with an unrelated
                                                                                                          bachelor's degree.
many work study opportunities for students to
                                                                                                              The four year pre-professional degree,
earn supplemental income on campus. Self-            Professors:                                          where offered, or other "architectural technol-
disciplined students who are taking a full aca-      M.K. Davis, M. Arch. Harvard; R.M. Kelso,            ogy" degrees are not accredited by NAAB. The
demic load should plan a work schedule not to        M.S. Tennessee; S.A. Kinzy, Ph.D. Suny               pre-professional degree is useful for those
exceed twelve hours per week.                        (Buffalo); P. Lizon, Ph. D. Pennsylvania; M.S.       wishing a foundation in the field of architecture,
     In addition to course textbooks, students       Moffett, Ph.D. M.I.T.; J.S. Rabun, Ph.D. York;       as preparation for either continued education in
are expected to purchase supplies and equip-         M.A. Robinson, M. Arch. Pennsylvania; W.S.           a professional degree program or for employ-
ment for various design projects. In the second      Shell, M.S. Arch. Columbia; J.S. Watson, M.          ment options in architecturally related areas.
year of both the Architecture and Interior           Arch. Pennsylvania.
Design programs, students are very strongly
recommended to purchase a lap top computer
for coursework. Families should factor this into
their educational budget.
54            College of Architecture and Design


CURRICULUM                                                                         grade point average of 2.3. Students may ad-        SPECIAL TOPIC DESIGN STUDIOS
     The curriculum for the Bachelor of Archi-                                     vance to third year design (371) with the               Since 1981, architecture students at the
tecture degree includes a combination of                                           completion of all first and second year             Urban Design Center in Chattanooga have
required and elective courses which offers the                                     courses. For 371 and all subsequent design          had the opportunity to contribute to the evolv-
student both a solid professional program of                                       courses, students must maintain a design            ing urban identity of Chattanooga by working
study and a sound general education. While                                         grade point average of 2.3. Students must re-       with city leaders on various strategic sites for
the majority of courses are designated as                                          peat the previous level design course(s) until      future development in the city. The visionary
required, students may use the available ar-                                       the average is raised to 2.3. Students may          work of the Urban Design Center is recog-
chitecture and general electives to broaden                                        submit a portfolio of design work and petition      nized nationally as a wonderful example of
their education and to expand their knowledge                                      for an exception.                                   how teaching, creative work and community
in areas of personal interest.                                                         300 and 400 level electives are open to all     service can be combined as a meaningful
    All students studying for a Bachelor of                                        students who have the necessary prerequisites.      learning experience for advanced students.
Architecture degree will include the following                                                                                             Interdisciplinary design studios are avail-
requirements in their course of study. For any                                     SPECIAL PROGRAMS                                    able to upper class students. A very popular
                                                                                                                                       studio of Historic Preservation unites Interior
additional specialized requirements, the stu-                                          The School of Architecture is committed
dent should refer to the Student Handbook of                                                                                           Design students with Architecture students who
                                                                                   to providing a variety of meaningful learning
the School of Architecture and the student's                                                                                           collaborate together on projects of historical
                                                                                   opportunities beyond the classroom itself.
faculty advisor.                                                                                                                       significance for different communities.
                                                                                   Lectures, panel discussions, films, symposia,
                                                           Hours Credit                                                                    In 1997, The University of Tennessee
                                                                                   and exhibits are all important components of a
First Year                                                                                                                             College of Architecture and Design and the
                                                                                   lively academic environment. Within the regular
Architecture 101, 102 ................................................ 5                                                               University of Arkansas College of Architecture
Architecture 121, 122 ................................................ 4           course of study, students have an opportunity
                                                                                                                                       have formed the Memphis Center for Architec-
1
  Architecture 171, 172 .............................................. .7          to explore diverse aspects of architecture
                                                                                                                                       ture. This is a spring semester course of study
Architecture 211 ........................................................ 3        related to urbanism, historic preservation, and
                                                                                                                                       for advanced design students in Architecture,
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6         community service. Since its founding, the
4
  Mathematics 125 or Elective .................................... 3                                                                   Landscape Architecture, and Interior Design.
                                                                                   School has always sponsored a foreign studies
2
  Electives .................................................................. 6                                                       One important goal of this Memphis Center for
                                                                                   opportunity.
Second Year                                                                                                                            Architecture is to provide a bridge to the very
Architecture 212, 213 ................................................ 6                                                               strong professional community in Memphis,
Architecture 231 ........................................................ 3        EXHIBITS                                            with opportunities for lectures, exhibits,
Architecture 232 ........................................................ 3            The Ewing Gallery, in the Art and Architec-     reviews, continuing education, and summer
1
  Architecture 271, 272 ............................................. 12                                                               internship arrangements.
                                                                                   ture Building, hosts numerous exhibits related
Physics 101, 135, 137, or 161 .................................. 3
                                                                                   to art and architecture. Adjacent to the Com-           During the summer, students may elect to
2
  Electives .................................................................. 9
Third Year                                                                         mons Space is an Exhibition Wall for more           participate in different programs sponsored by
Architecture 312 ....................................................... .3        informal exhibits of students, faculty, and         the University of Tennessee College of Archi-
Architecture 331, 332 ................................................ 8           visiting artists and architects. In the Commons     tecture and Design. Furthermore, students may
Architecture 341, 342 ............................................... .8           itself are more spontaneous exhibits of current     also participate in summer programs spon-
1
  Architecture 371, 372 ............................................. 12           student work.                                       sored by other accredited architecture schools.
2
  Electives .................................................................. 3                                                       Students will receive appropriate college credit,
Fourth Year                                                                                                                            which may lead to advance standing within the
Architecture 431 ....................................................... 3         FIELD TRIPS                                         program.
1
  Architecture 471, 472 ............................................ 12                Throughout the year, various field trips are
2
  Electives ............................................................... 18     organized by the School. The purpose of the
Fifth Year
                                                                                   field trips is to expose students to major cities   OPPORTUNITIES FOR FOREIGN
Architecture 462 ........................................................ 4
Architecture 480 ........................................................ 3        with important architecture and to works of         STUDY
1,3
    Design Course Option ........................................... 12            architecture that may not normally be open to           Students in their fourth year of study may
2
  Electives ................................................................ 15    the general public.                                 elect to spend one semester studying abroad in
_____________________________________________
                                                                                                                                       a program, organized either by the University of
                                Total: 171 hours                                                                                       Tennessee or by other accredited architecture
_____________________________________________                                      LECTURES, FILMS, AND VIDEOS
                                                                                       The Robert B. Church Memorial Lecture           programs. Since 1988, the School has had a
1
  Students are not allowed to enroll simultaneously in
                                                                                   Series is an annual endowed gift in memory of       very successful exchange agreement with the
two of these design courses.
2
  Electives consists of: 6 hours in Social Sciences, 6                             a former dean of the School. Over the years,        University of Krakow in Poland.
hours in History, 12 hours in Architecture, 15 hours                               the Church lecture series has allowed the               In cooperation with the Danish International
outside School of Architecture, 15 hours open/free                                 School to bring prominent architects to Tennes-     Student Committee, a program is regularly
electives. These may be taken in any order of
                                                                                   see. The regular lecture series features archi-     offered in Copenhagen which attracts architec-
preference.
                                                                                   tects, artists, theorists, planners, and            ture students from around the world. The Uni-
3
  Two courses from the following Design Studio                                                                                         versity of Tennessee is involved in a recently
Options: Architecture 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486,                                historians who discuss their work and ideas.
                                                                                   Films and videos also introduce students to a       established International Studies at the Bau-
or 489. 472 may be taken at any time in the last three
                                                                                   wide range of issues related to architecture,       haus University in Weimar. The University also
semesters.
4
  Students are exempt from Mathematics 125 with a                                  art, urbanism, and culture. Every spring, Gen-      has an exchange agreement with the Royal
score of 25 or higher on the calculus readiness test.                              eral Shale Corporation hosts a lecture as part      Melbourne Institute of Architecture in
                                                                                   of The Annual Architecture Spring Thing             Melbourne, Australia, with Chongquing Insti-
                                                                                   (TAAST), a traditional series of events organized   tute of Architecture and Engineering in
PROGRESSION                                                                        by the students.                                    Sichuan Province, China, and with the Univer-
    Students must maintain an overall 2.3                                                                                              sity of Frankfurt in Germany.
grade point average by the end of 32 hours in                                                                                              During the summer, many different summer
order to maintain “full status” in the program.                                    PUBLICATIONS                                        programs abroad sponsored by other architec-
Delinquent students will be put on “temporary                                         Students in the School periodically publish      ture schools are available to University of
status” for one semester. These students will                                      The University of Tennessee Journal of Archit-      Tennessee students for transfer credit. Stu-
have one semester to raise the overall GPA to                                      ecture. The Journal has a different theme each      dents are encouraged to seek new educational
a 2.3. If the GPA is not brought up to 2.3, the                                    year, but typically includes articles related to    experiences.
student will be dropped from the architecture                                      current thinking in the field, as well as student
program.                                                                           work.
    Exceptions to academic policies may be
made through petition, reviewed by the school
Academic Standards Committee.
    Students may advance to second year
design (271) with satisfactory completion of
the first year program (including math) with a
                                                                                                                                            College of Architecture and Design           55


THE PROFESSION’S                                      PROFESSIONAL                                                                       PROGRESSION
PARTICIPATION IN THE SCHOOL                           ACCREDITATION                                                                          Upon admission to the University of Ten-
    As the only accredited architecture program                                                                                          nessee and the College, students may begin
                                                          Most states require that an individual intending
in the state, the School of Architecture tries to                                                                                        the ID major. Progression into third year oc-
                                                      to become a licensed Interior Designer hold a
maintain a close relationship with the architec-                                                                                         curs after completion of ID 272.
                                                      professionally accredited degree. The Univer-
tural community of the city, state, and region.                                                                                              For progression into third year, students
                                                      sity of Tennessee offers a four year Bachelor
Professionals regularly come to the school to                                                                                            must meet the following criteria:
                                                      of Science in Interior Design. This is a profes-
attend and respond to student presentations,                                                                                                 1. Cumulative grade point average of 2.3 or
                                                      sionally (FIDER) accredited interior design
to conduct workshops, to participate in School                                                                                           greater.
                                                      degree.
events, and to interview graduating students.                                                                                                2. Cumulative grade point average in the
Every spring, the architecture community of                                                                                              major of 3.0 or greater in the following ID
Knoxville attends an exhibit of graduating            CURRICULUM                                                                         courses: 141, 171, 200, 221, 271, 272, 231,
students' work, where students have the                   The Interior Design curriculum is a rigor-                                     261, with no grade below a C.
opportunity to discuss their work with                ous course of study which combines technical                                           3. Portfolio Review accepted by faculty.
practicing architects.                                courses, design studio courses, humanities,                                            4. Successful interview following completion
    Architecture is a broad field of study, with      and a wide choice of electives. Through course                                     of ID 272.
many diverse ways for individuals to become           work and field study experiences, students                                             For retention, student must meet the follow-
involved in the profession. The profession it-        develop specialized problem solving skills and                                     ing criteria:
self is diversifying and changing rapidly, due        knowledge for the analysis, planning and                                               1. Before enrolling in any ID course, a
to changing financial structures, increasing          design of interior architectural environments.                                     grade of C or better must be made in each pre-
specialization, expanding liability, and evolving     They apply the use of lighting, color, mechani-                                    requisite required ID course.
electronic technology. Students are strongly          cal systems, and furnishings as they design                                            2. Cumulative grade point average of 2.3 or
urged to visit and work in different architectural    spaces for both residential and commercial set-                                    greater.
offices, in order to acquire a better sense of the    tings. Beyond the professional core, students                                          3. Grade of I must be removed before regis-
profession and career commitment.                     are encouraged to pursue interests related to                                      tration for next ID course.
                                                      horticulture, theater design, historic preserva-                                       For graduation from the Interior Design pro-
                                                                                                                                         gram, students must meet the following criteria:
INTERIOR DESIGN                                       tion, business, or other personal interests.
                                                                                                                                             1. Grade of C or better in all ID courses.
                                                                                                                 Hours Credit
Professors:                                           First Year
A. DeLong, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State;                  Architecture 101, 121, 122 ........................................ 7              SPECIAL PROGRAMS
J. Rabun, Ph.D. Tennessee.                            Architecture 171, 172 ................................................ 7
                                                      Interior Design 141, 171 ........................................... 5
                                                      Mathematics 119 ....................................................... 3          REQUIRED SUMMER INTERNSHIP
     In 1996, the Interior Design Program moved                                                                                              All interior design students are required to
                                                      English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
from the College of Human Ecology to the Col-         1
                                                        Social Science Elective ............................................ 3           have a professionally based summer intern-
lege of Architecture and Design. The University       Second Year                                                                        ship. The faculty will help students find appro-
of Tennessee has a unique opportunity to offer        Interior Design 271, 272, 231, 261, 200 ................. 20                       priate placement, as well as monitor the
a complementary course of study for both              Interior Design 221 ................................................... 2          student's progress in the internship.
architecture and interior design students. After      Art 172, 173 .............................................................. 6
a unified first year of study, both architecture      Physics 161 and one other
and interior design students pursue separate
                                                         2
                                                          Natural Science ................................................ 6-7           PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITY'S
                                                      Third Year
professional programs. However, students in
                                                      Interior Design 371, 372, 311, 312, 431, 360 ......... 24
                                                                                                                                         INVOLVEMENT
both interior design and architecture can pur-        Architecture 342 ........................................................ 4            As the oldest accredited interior design pro-
sue electives of mutual interest, as well as par-     TS 220 ...................................................................... 3    gram in the state, the Interior Design program
ticipate in an upper level joint studio. In some      1
                                                        Social Science Elective ............................................ 3           tries to maintain a close relationship with the
cases, graduates from the Interior Design pro-        Summer (ID 420) ..................................................... 3            interior design community of the city, state, and
gram may receive advanced standing in the             Fourth Year                                                                        region. Professionals regularly come to the
Master of Architecture program.                       Interior Design 400, 471, 472, 480 ......................... 16                    school to attend and respond to student pre-
                                                      3
                                                        Elective (Art) ............................................................ 3    sentations, to conduct workshops, to participate
                                                      4
                                                        History Elective ........................................................ 3
THE STUDY OF INTERIOR DESIGN                          Elective ..................................................................... 5
                                                                                                                                         in school events, and to interview graduating
    Students interested in Interior Design are        5
                                                        Electives (Business, Ornamental Horticulture,                                    students.
encouraged to learn about the fundamental dif-             Theatre, and Urban Studies) .............................. 3
                                                      6
                                                        Elective (Professional Elective) ............................... 3
ferences between licensed Interior Designers          _______________________________________________                                    FIELD TRIPS
and interior decorators. Interior Designers are                                    Total: 135-136 hours                                      All Interior Design students regularly partici-
qualified to deal with complex design chal-           _______________________________________________                                    pate in a variety of field trips to important works
lenges involving extensive interior construction      1
                                                        Select 3 hours from Psychology, Sociology,                                       of design as well as to Interior Design conven-
and technical considerations related to design        Anthropology, or Economics 201 (if you plan to take                                tions and product shows.
issues. Interior Designers are liable to meet         Business as an elective). Suggested courses:
code issues involving fire, electricity, structure,   Anthropology 110, 130; Sociology 110, 120;
occupancy and materials. Interior Designers           Psychology 110, 210, 370; Economics 201.
are educated to understand how the design of
                                                      2
                                                        Select Physics 161 (required) and one other science,
                                                      such as Astronomy 151, Botany 110, Biology 101,
furnishings and interior space can affect a           Chemistry 120, Geology 101.
general sense of well being. On the other hand,       3
                                                        Select any Art, Art Ceramics, Art Design/Graphic, Art
interior decorators are primarily concerned with      Drawing, Art Media/Photography, Art Painting, Art
finishes and furniture within pre-existing interior   Printmaking, or Art Sculpture.
spaces. Interior decorators typically work as         4
                                                        Select any History course.
consultants in the retail environment. Interior       5
                                                        Select from Business, Ornamental Horticulture and
Designers may have their own design practice,         Landscape Design, or Theatre. Suggested courses:
may work as a part of a design team within an         ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Design 230;
                                                      Theatre 355, 455, 456; International Business 311;
architecture practice, or may work as a de-           Urban Studies 250, 323 (same as Geography 323),
sign consultant for product manufacturers.            401 (same as Planning 401), 402 (same as Planning
                                                      402).
                                                      6
                                                        Select from Interior Design or approved Architecture
                                                      courses.
56      College of Arts and Sciences




College of Arts and Sciences
Lorayne W. Lester, Dean                             government service, it furnishes a broadly           COURSE LOAD
Stuart Riggsby, Associate Dean for Research         useful and well-rounded educational back-               The average course load in the college for
   and Resource Development                         ground. For all, it offers the opportunity to        any semester is 15-16 credit hours. The
Susan Martin, Associate Dean for Personnel          share in a rich intellectual heritage, in the        University defines full-time undergraduate stu-
   Affairs and Affirmative Action                   adventures of the mind, and in the life of the       dents as those who register for a minimum of
Don Richard Cox, Associate Dean for                 educated imagination. A liberally educated           12 hours. The maximum number of hours
   Academic Programs                                person is identified not so much by specific         which may be taken by Arts and Sciences
                                                    knowledge as by quality of mind and by cre-          students is 19, exclusive of elective work in
    The College of Arts and Sciences is home        ative response to the challenges of the times.       ensemble music and physical education.
to a wide array of academic disciplines and             The great universities of the world are so       Exceptions to this rule will require approval by
inter-disciplinary programs. Such diverse ar-       labeled because their faculties have earned          the Director of Student Academic Affairs
eas of study as Computer Science and Clas-          the reputation of being renowned scholars.           (220 Ayres).
sics, Anthropology, Women’s Studies and             The University of Tennessee has earned
Latin American Studies are represented              such a reputation because of the quality of
among the twenty-six departments and                the research and creative activity of its fac-       LOWER DIVISION—UPPER
twelve special programs that compose the            ulty. The student who studies in the College
College.                                            of Arts and Sciences has joined a community
                                                                                                         DIVISION
    The faculty of the College are committed        of scholars. To study with such a talented               Courses numbered at the 100 and 200 lev-
to providing both comprehensive general edu-        faculty is to experience the best education          els are considered lower division and are nor-
cation and concentrated study in a particular       possible.                                            mally taken by students in the freshman and
field to all students enrolled at the University        The faculty of the College of Arts and           sophomore years. Courses numbered 300
of Tennessee. General education offers op-          Sciences provide to all students a general           and above are upper division and are de-
portunities to master the basic learning skills     education and to thousands of students a             signed for students at the junior and senior
necessary to understand a specialized area          year a more specialized education in any one         levels.
of study and is essential for the continuation      of twenty-six disciplines and a dozen or more
of learning throughout life.                        inter-disciplinary programs. The College’s fac-      SATISFACTORY/NO CREDIT
    Arts and Sciences faculty are also com-         ulty help their students prepare for any and all         A few courses in the college are offered
mitted to educating students in a discipline.       careers. Faculty research and creative activ-        only on a Satisfactory/No Credit (S/NC) basis
Education with a disciplinary focus prepares        ity are the foundations on which education in        and students may elect to take others on this
students for further study at the graduate          this College is built. As a result of that faculty   basis, except in areas where the option is
level and for careers in business, public ser-      endeavor the lives of students are enriched          specifically prohibited. Such courses, if suc-
vice, or any other endeavor. As our world be-       and the world’s body of knowledge grows.             cessfully completed, will count as hours for
comes both more specialized and more                That is the basic mission of the College of Arts     graduation although neither S nor NC grades
changeable, the need to find the right balance      and Sciences faculty in a research University.       will be calculated in the student’s grade point
between general and specialized knowledge                                                                average. Satisfactory is defined as C or better
becomes essential.
    The central purposes of a liberal education     PROGRAMS OF STUDY                                    work on the traditional grading scale and No
                                                        Seeking the broad, general goals of a            Credit is defined as less than C. The following
include the encouragement of intellectual tol-                                                           regulations apply:
erance, a dedication to the quest for knowl-        liberal education, students come into the
                                                    college also with a wide variety of specific             1. S/NC courses, except those offered
edge as a worthwhile goal in and of itself, and                                                          only on this basis, may not count for Basic
the cultivation of a responsible, creative, indi-   educational and vocational objectives. Recog-
                                                    nizing this diversity, the college offers a num-     Skills or Distribution requirements or major
vidual mind. These qualities enable one to de-                                                           and minor requirements unless specifically
velop an ability to reason and to express           ber of different programs of study leading to
                                                    the baccalaureate degree and also several            permitted by petition. This restriction applies
oneself clearly, an incentive to absorb emerg-                                                           also to major or minor prerequisites or
ing knowledge, and a competence to confront         pre-professional curricula which prepare the
                                                    student for advanced study but do not lead to        corequisites.
the uncertainties of human experience. For                                                                   2. The maximum number of S/NC elective
the student whose interests and talents lead        a degree from this college.
                                                                                                         hours which may be counted toward gradua-
into research, scholarship, and teaching, a                                                              tion is 20, exclusive of courses offered only S/
liberal education provides an invaluable foun-                                                           NC, physical education courses, and/or satis-
dation. For the individual who enters busi-                                                              factory hours earned by examination, military
ness, industry, the professions, or                                                                      service, etc.
                                                                           56
                                                                                                                 College of Arts and Sciences         57


    3. A student who desires to take a course      second is through group programs conducted           satisfying the requirements for the B.S. degree
S/NC should indicate that intention at the time    abroad by other academic institutions in which       with a major concentration in the college.
of registration. A change from S/NC grading to     UT students with approval may enroll for                 Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (See
regular grading or from regular grading to S/      credit. Assistance in identification of and regis-   Department of Chemistry.)
NC will not be permitted beyond the add dead-      tration in such programs may be obtained
line in each semester. (Exception: Students        through the Programs Abroad Office located           3. BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS
who register for a course S/NC in a restricted     in the University’s Center for International            (See School of Art.)
area will be required to change to regular         Education. A third opportunity is through indi-
grading when the error is discovered.)             vidualized programs under the foreign study          4. BACHELOR OF MUSIC
    4. A transfer student who has more than        number 491. The nature of this work as well             (See School of Music.)
20 S/NC or equivalent hours earned prior to        as credit for it should be negotiated by stu-
admission to the University of Tennessee           dents prior to departure with the appropriate
may count all of these hours toward gradua-        Arts and Sciences departments. Credit will be        REQUIREMENTS FOR
tion but may not elect additional S/NC hours.      awarded only after completion of all agreed          DEGREES
    5. A transfer student with S/NC or equiva-     upon requirements, and may vary from 1-15                 To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
lent credit earned prior to admission to the       hours in any one department. Up to 21 hours          Science degree these requirements must be
University of Tennessee in a course which          of such credit, exclusive of that earned in          completed:
satisfies a Basic Skills or distribution           group programs offered by departments,                   1. All University degree requirements as
requirement may count it for that purpose. In      could apply toward a degree in the college.          described in the section on “Academic Poli-
the case of a course which satisfies a major       Departments may in any of the above forms,           cies and Regulations: General Requirements
or minor requirement, statement (1) applies.       however, limit the hours of credit which can be      for a Bachelor’s Degree;”
    The option of taking courses on a S/NC         applied toward a given major.                            2. A minimum of 124 credit hours;
basis is provided to encourage the able stu-                                                                3. At least 42 credit hours in courses num-
dent to venture beyond the limits of those
courses in which the student does well and,        DEGREES OFFERED                                      bered 300 or above;
                                                                                                            4. Appropriate work to satisfy basic skill
motivated by intellectual curiosity, to explore                                                         and distribution requirements, counting no
subject matter in which performance may be         1. BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                                                                                        course in more than one area. (This is not a
somewhat less outstanding that work in preferred       The Bachelor of Arts represents the attain-
                                                                                                        requirement in the College Scholars Program);
subject fields.                                    ment of a broad knowledge of the arts and
                                                                                                            5. Completion of at least one major (24-40
    Note: Students planning to seek admission      sciences as well as a comprehensive under-
                                                                                                        credits at 200 level or above for B.S. major
to graduate or professional schools (espe-         standing of one or more areas of special
                                                                                                        and 24-37 credits at 200 level or above for
cially in the health sciences) should discuss      interest. Four programs leading to this degree
                                                                                                        B.A. majors); up to 6 hours in the major may
with their advisors possible limitations on ex-    are open to the student.
                                                                                                        be used, where listed, to satisfy basic skills or
ercise of the S/NC option before registering           Basic Program The program appropriate
                                                                                                        divisional distribution requirements. Courses
for courses on this basis.                         for most B.A. students is developed around
                                                                                                        used for the major may not be used to satisfy
                                                   the basic skills and distribution requirements
                                                                                                        upper level distribution requirements.
                                                   plus intensive study in one or more of the
OFF-CAMPUS STUDY                                   specified departmental or interdepartmental
                                                                                                            Students may choose to develop one or
                                                                                                        more minors (minimum 15 hours at the 200
    Recognizing that learning is not restricted    major fields described below.
                                                                                                        level and above); and
to formal classroom situations, the college            Individualized Program Designed for
                                                                                                            Students may take up to 20 hours of
provides for students to earn credit toward        students whose educational goals are best
                                                                                                        courses graded Satisfactory/No Credit in an
graduation for approved off-campus study.          met by a program tailored to their particular
                                                                                                        area outside the major or minor, basic skills or
Such study may be undertaken only with prior       needs, it is the same as the Basic program in
                                                                                                        distribution requirements.
approval of the faculty member and the de-         broad area requirements but permits the stu-
partment concerned. It may include certain         dent to develop an individual concentration in-
kinds of work experiences, community in-           corporating work in two or more departments.         PROGRAMS LEADING TO
volvements, working in political campaigns,            College Scholars Program Intended for a
etc. Credit per semester will vary from 1-15       limited number of students who are especially
                                                                                                        BACHELOR OF ARTS AND
hours. Up to 21 hours of credit earned in this     qualified and motivated and who have been            BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
way may be applied toward a degree in the          selected to undertake this honors program,           DEGREES
college, although individual departments may       the College Scholars Program permits the stu-
limit the number of hours which may be ap-         dents maximum freedom to design a curricu-              The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of
plied toward a specific major.                     lum to meet particular interests and goals.          Science Degrees share the same program of
                                                                                                        Basic Skills and Distribution Requirements
                                                   2. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE                               (except where noted otherwise).
INDEPENDENT STUDY                                        The Bachelor of Science degree, offered
    Certain educational goals may best be met      in selected departments and programs, is             BASIC SKILLS REQUIREMENTS
through independent study done by an indi-         designed for students who wish to pursue a               All students who earn a degree in the Col-
vidual under the direction of a faculty member.    more scientifically or professionally oriented       lege of Arts and Sciences must have demon-
Students who wish to do such independent           program of study. Three programs leading to          strated skill in the use of the English language,
work should obtain the approval of the faculty     this degree are offered:                             the ability to acquire another language, and
members and the departments concerned                   Basic Program The Basic Program for the         the ability to use the tools of quantitative
prior to embarking upon their study. Credit per    B.S. degree contains basic skills and distribution   analysis or formal logic. The specific require-
semester will vary from 1-15 hours. Up to 21       requirements similar to the Basic Program for the    ments are as follows:
hours of credit earned in this way may be          B.A. as well as a unique set of requirements             1. English Composition Skills neces-
applied toward a degree in the college,            for the major including additional study in math-    sary to write persuasive, logical and coherent
although individual departments may limit the      ematics, statistics, or laboratory sciences.         essays in English; to read critically texts from
number of hours which may be applied toward             Pre-Professional Program The Pre-               a variety of media; to evaluate and cite
a specific major.                                  Professional Program is offered for those who        sources in research; and to be aware of how
                                                   wish to participate in the cooperative 3+1           to write for different audiences and purposes.
                                                   curricula in the health sciences (medicine,              Students may meet this requirement in one
STUDY ABROAD AND                                   dentistry, pharmacy, physical therapy, veteri-       of two ways:
FOREIGN STUDY COURSES                              nary medicine, or medical technology). Stu-              a. By completing six credits in English writ-
   Several opportunities for study abroad are      dents taking one of the health sciences              ing courses, either: (a) English 101 and 102
available to students in the college. One          curricula proceed directly to specialized train-     (English Composition); (b) English 118 (Hon-
avenue is through group programs arranged          ing in the chosen area after the third year of       ors: English Composition) and English 102
and supervised by departments of the college       Arts and Sciences study and complete the             (English Composition); (c) English 131 and
on a full-semester or summer term basis. A         first year of professional study in lieu of          132 (Composition for Non-Native Speakers of
                                                                                                        English). [Students who obtain a grade of A or
58      College of Arts and Sciences


B in 118 may complete their freshman require-       be given during summer orientation and at                Chemistry 120-130: General Chemistry
ment with 102, or with a sophomore literature       designated times during the fall, spring and             Chemistry 128-138: Honors: General
course in the English Department, or English        summer. Students who place into 200 level            Chemistry
355 Rhetoric and Writing. The sophomore lit-        courses will receive six hours of elementary             Geography 131-132: Geography of the
erature course may (if so listed) also be used      language credit, provided that they do not           Natural Environment
toward the Humanities distribution requirement.]    subsequently enroll and receive credit for any           Geology 101: The Dynamic Earth and
     b. By earning a score of 4 or 5 on the Col-    100 level course in the same language. If            either 102: Earth, Life and Time or 103: The
lege Board Advanced Placement Test in Lit-          they do, elementary placement credit is for-         Earth’s Environments
erature and Composition. (Credit in English         feited and removed from the student's tran-              Geology 107: Honors: The Dynamic Earth
101 is earned with a score of 4 or 5 on the         script. Students who place into 300 level            and 108: Earth, Life, and Time
Advanced Placement Test in Language and             courses will receive six hours of intermediate           [Students who earn an A in 101 or a B or
Composition.)                                       language credit. Under no circumstances may          better in 107 may take 108; all other students
     [ Placement information: Eligibility for       any student earn more than six hours of lan-         should complete the sequence with 102 or 103.]
English 118 (Honors: English Composition)           guage placement examination credit. Stu-                 Physics 135-136: Introduction to Physics
will be determined by ACT or SAT scores and         dents who feel they have been inappropriately        for Physical Science and Mathematics Majors
a placement exam. Selected students will be         placed should consult the appropriate lan-               Physics 137-138: Honors: Fundamentals
placed in English 103 (Writing Workshop)            guage section.]                                      of Physics for Physics Majors
based on ACT or SAT scores and may not                  3. Mathematics, Formal Reasoning,                    Physics 221-222: Elements of Physics
drop this course without departmental               and Logic Skills in Mathematics, formal rea-         List B:
approval. (Details available from the English       soning and computing required for estimation             Anthropology 110: Human Origins and
Department.) NOTE: A student must complete          and calculation, understanding logical pro-          210: Principles of Biological Anthropology
the English Composition requirement prior to        cesses, critical analysis, problem solving and           Astronomy 151-152: Introductory
enrolling in English courses numbered 200 or        decision making.                                     Astronomy
higher.]                                                Students may meet this requirement by                Botany 306: Genetics and Society
     2. Foreign Language Skills necessary to        completion of one of the following courses or        (Same as Anthropology 306) and 309: Biology
learn the basic structures and vocabulary of a      by selecting two math courses under Natural          of Human Affairs or 310: Plant Morphology or
foreign language; to read, write, understand,       Science List B:                                      330 Field Botany
and, for modern languages, speak a foreign              Any course in Mathematics numbered 110               Chemistry 150: Chemistry and Society and
language; to understand how to learn another        or higher                                            Chemistry 160: Chemistry and the Home
language; to better understand one’s own                Computer Science 100: Introduction to                Computer Science 102: Introduction to
native language; and to complement the study        Computers and Computing                              Computer Science and either 140: Data Struc-
of other cultures or civilizations.                     Philosophy 130: Critical Thinking or Phi-        tures or 160: Computer Organization
     Students may meet this requirement in one      losophy 135: Formal Logic.                               Geology 201: Biodiversity: Past, Present,
of three ways:                                                                                           and Future and 202: Earth as an Ecosystem:
     a. Completion of the intermediate level        DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS                            Modern Problems and Solutions; or 201 and
sequence of a foreign language. Any one of the          All of these requirements are designed to        203: Geology of National Parks; or 202 and
following sequences will satisfy the requirement:   enhance the skills of thinking critically and        203
      Asian Languages 231-232 Intermediate          analytically, and of effective communication             Mathematics: Any two Mathematics
Chinese I, II                                       and writing through study and use of different       courses numbered 110 or higher
     Asian Languages 251-252 Intermediate           kinds of human knowledge. The distribution               Microbiology 210: General Microbiology
Japanese I, II                                      requirements are in two parts. Part A: Divi-         and Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biol-
     Asian Studies 221-222 Intermediate Mod-        sional Distribution Requirements, which re-          ogy 230: Human Physiology
ern Standard Arabic I, II                           quire students to take courses in the various            Physics 101-102: How Things Work
     Asian Studies 241-242 Intermediate Mod-        divisions of the College, and Part B: the Up-            Statistics 201: Introduction to Statistics and
ern Hebrew I, II                                    per-Level Distribution Requirements.                 any Mathematics course numbered 110 or
     Asian Studies 261-262 Intermediate Per-                                                             higher except Mathematics 115 (If Mathemat-
sian I, II                                          PART A: DIVISIONAL DISTRIBUTION                      ics 115 is used to satisfy Basic Skills or Natu-
      French 211-212 Intermediate French or         REQUIREMENTS                                         ral Science requirements, Statistics 201 may
217-218 Honors: Intermediate French                                                                      not be selected to meet this requirement.)
     German 201-202 Intermediate German             1. NATURAL SCIENCE
     Greek (Classics) 261 Intermediate Greek:           A two-course laboratory sequence and an          2. SOCIAL SCIENCE
Grammar Review and Readings and 264 In-             additional two-course sequence that will intro-          Courses that will introduce students to the
termediate Readings in Greek                        duce students to the increasingly important          idea of individuals in societies, to perspectives
     Italian 211-212 Intermediate Italian           role of science and technology in all aspects
                                                                                                         and methods used by social scientists, and to
     Latin (Classics) 251 Intermediate Latin:       of modern life. This requirement will introduce
                                                                                                         the uses of these perspectives and methods
Grammar Review and Readings and 252 In-             students to the basic discoveries, knowledge
                                                    and logical organization of scientific disciplines   in thinking about current social, economic and
termediate Latin: Virgil’s Aeneid.                                                                       political issues and problems.
     Portuguese 211-212 Intermediate Portuguese     and to development and testing of hypoth-
                                                    eses. Laboratory courses will develop skills             Bachelor of Arts students may meet this
     Russian 201-202 Intermediate Russian                                                                requirement by completion of four courses
     Spanish 211-212 Intermediate Spanish;          in experimental tests of hypotheses; lectures
                                                    will introduce students to the role of scientific    selected from the list below. These courses
217-218 Honors: Intermediate Spanish.                                                                    must be from two departments. Bachelor of
                                                    methodology and problem-solving in society.
     b. Demonstration of competence on a de-            Students may meet this requirement by            Science students must complete two courses
partmental placement or proficiency examina-        completion of a two-course sequence from list        from at least two departments.
tion or by AP or CLEP credit.                       (A) and an additional two-course sequence or
     c. Students whose native language is not       package from List A or List B.                           African and African-American Studies 201-
English may satisfy the requirement with En-                                                             202: Introduction to African and African-Ameri-
glish 131 and 132 and any two courses from          List A:                                              can Studies
List A: Literature under the Humanities Distri-        Astronomy 161-162: Introductory                       Anthropology 120: Prehistoric Archaeol-
bution Requirement.                                 Astronomy with Laboratory                            ogy; 130: Cultural Anthropology; 362: Prin-
     [Placement information: All students who          Astronomy 217-218: Honors: Introductory
                                                                                                         ciples of Archeology
wish to enroll in a French, German, Latin or        Astronomy
                                                       Biology 101-102: Humankind in a Biotic                Audiology and Speech Pathology 320:
Spanish course, who have completed at least                                                              Speech and Language Development
two years of this language in high school and       World
                                                       Biology 130: Biodiversity and 140:                    Botany 305: Socio-Economic Impact of
who have not yet taken a college course in                                                               Plants
the language must take a UTK placement ex-          Organization and Function of the Cell
                                                       Botany 110-120 General Botany                         Economics 201: Introductory Economics:
amination before enrolling. Placement in the                                                             A Survey Course; 207: Honors Introductory
                                                       Chemistry 100: Principles of Chemistry
appropriate course will be determined by the                                                             Economics
                                                    and 110: Introduction to Organic and
score on the examination. Examinations will         Biochemistry
                                                                                                                    College of Arts and Sciences          59


     Geography 101-102: World Geography;              the Western World I: Ancient, Medieval and          cal decisions and in understanding of self and
320: Cultural Geography: Core Concepts;               Renaissance; 222: Literature of the Western         world; will contribute to skills in explaining
323: Behavioral Geography                             World II: Enlightenment, Romantic and Mod-          change and continuity of human society and
     Human Services 220: Introduction to              ern; 231: American Literature I: Colonial Era to    the interpretation of people, events and trends
Human Services                                        the Civil War; 232: American Literature ii: Civil   in context of the ideas, values, social and po-
     Linguistics 200: Language, Linguistics and       War to the Present; 233: Major Black Writers;       litical conditions that affect them.
Society                                               251: Introduction to Poetry; 252: Introduction           Students may meet this requirement by
     Music History 310: Introduction to African       to Drama; 253: Introduction to Fiction;             completion of one of the following sequences.
American Music (Same as African and Afri-             254: Themes in Literature;                          All courses are writing-emphasis courses.
can-American Studies 310); 290: Introduction              Information Sciences 330: Books and                  African and African-American Studies
to World Music                                        Related Materials for Children                      235-236: Introduction to African Studies
     Political Science 101: United States Gov-            Italian 401: Dante and Medieval Culture;             Asian Studies 101-102: Asian Civilization
ernment and Politics; 102: Introduction to Po-        402: Petrarch and Boccaccio                              History 241-242: Development of Western
litical Science; 107: Honors: United States               Medieval Studies 261: Medieval Culture:         Civilization; 247-248 : Honors: Development of
Government and Politics                               Readings from the Early Middle Ages, 500-           Western Civilization; History 261-262: A His-
     Psychoeducational Studies 210:                   1000; 262: Medieval Culture: Readings from          tory of World Civilization
Psychoeducational Issues in Human Development         the Later Middle Ages, 1000-1500                         Latin American Studies 251-252: Introduc-
     Psychology 110: General Psychology;                  Religious Studies 312: Religious Aspects        tion to Latin American Studies.
117: Honors General Psychology; 220: Be-              of Biblical and Classical Literature; 313: Reli-         Medieval Studies 201-202: Medieval
havior and Experience: Humanistic Psychol-            gious Aspects of Modern Literature                  Civilization
ogy; 360: Social Psychology                               Russian 221: Rebels, Dreamers, and
     Religious Studies 232: Varieties of Reli-        Fools: The Outcast in 19th Century Russian          PART B: UPPER LEVEL DISTRIBUTION
gious Community (Same as Sociology 232);              Literature; 222: Heaven or Hell: Utopias and        REQUIREMENTS
301: Religious Myth, Symbol and Ritual                Dystopias in 20th Century Russian Literature            Courses that use skills and knowledge
     Sociology 110: Social Problems and Social            Spanish 291: Spanish Literature in English      acquired in the Basic Skills and Divisional
Change; 117: Honors Social Problems and               Translation                                         Distribution areas to understand and analyze
Social Change; 120: General Sociology; 127:               Women’s Studies 210: Images of Women            a highly interdependent world system and to
Honors General Sociology; 344: Power in So-           in Literature: Biography and Autobiography;         make informed comparisons among contem-
ciety; 370: Social Psychology                         215: Images of Women in Literature: Fiction,        porary cultures. These courses develop un-
     Speech Communication 100: Introduction           Poetry, Drama                                       derstanding of U.S. society, of national and
to Speech Communication; 220: Interpersonal                                                               international diversity, and of critical issues of
Communication; 260: Communication and                 List B: Philosophical and Religious                 the modern world.
Society; 330: Group Communication                     Thought                                                 Bachelor of Arts students may meet this
     Women’s Studies 220: Women in Society;               Classics 201: Introduction to Classical         requirement by completion of two courses
Women's Studies 375 Gender in Society                 Civilization; 221: Early Greek Mythology;           from one of the lists below and a third course
                                                      222: Classical Greek and Roman Mythology            from either of the other lists. Bachelor of Sci-
3. HUMANITIES                                             Philosophy 110: The Human Condition:            ence students must complete two courses
    Courses that will provide skills to appreci-      Values and Reality; 111: The Human Condi-           from two of the three lists. All courses are
ate and interpret literary, philosophical, or reli-   tion: Knowledge and Reality; 240: Ethics;           writing-emphasis courses.
gious texts, and to participate as an                 342: Business Ethics; 344: Professional
appreciative observer or artist in a discipline       Responsibility (Same as Religious Studies           List A: United States Studies
within the visual, spatial, musical, theatrical, or   344); 345: Bioethcis (Same as Religious Stud-           African and African-American Studies 364:
written arts.                                         ies 345); 346: Environmental Ethics;                Contemporary Issues in African-American
    Bachelor of Arts students may meet this           380: The Concept of Woman (Same as                  Education; 429: History and Philosophy of
requirement by completion of three courses,           Women’s Studies 380); 382: Philosophy of            African-American Education; 480: African-
of which at least one must be selected from           Feminism (Same as Women’s Studies 382)              American Communities in Urban America;
List A and one from List B. Bachelor of Sci-              Religious Studies 101: World Religions          483: African-American Women in American
ence students must complete a minimum of 6            in History; 102: The Comparison of World            Society (Same as Women’s Studies 483)
credits from the courses listed; not more than        Religions; 321: New Testament Origins;                  American Studies 310: Introduction to
3 credits may be taken from List C. All               322: Christian Thought                              American Studies
courses except those involving practice of the                                                                Anthropology 310: North American Indians;
                                                      List C: Study or Practice of the Arts               312: Appalachian Culture; 315: The African
arts are writing-emphasis courses.                       Architecture 111: Architecture and the Built
    Writing emphasis courses require at least                                                             Diaspora (Same as African and African-
                                                      Environment                                         American Studies 315); 320: American Cul-
2,000 words, normally comprising one sus-                Art 191: Introduction to Studio Art: Various
tained essay or report of at least 1,000                                                                  tures; 321: Indians of Northwest North
                                                      Media                                               America; 360: North American Prehistory;
words plus additional writing assignments                Classics 232: Archaeology and Art of
such as in-class essay exams, journals, book                                                              363: Prehistory of Tennessee
                                                      Ancient Greece; 233: Archaeology and Art of             Art History 471: History of North American
reviews, etc. The purpose of the requirement          Etruria and Rome
is to help students (a) learn course materials                                                            Art; 472: History of 20th Century American
                                                         English 263: Introduction to Creative Writing    Art; 473: 19th Century American Painting;
through writing; (b) develop critical thinking           Music History 110: Introduction to Music in
skills; (c) demonstrate the ability to sustain an                                                         483: History of American Sculpture
                                                      Western Culture; 115: Music in the United               Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 305:
argument; and (d) strengthen existing writing         States; 120: History of Rock
skills.                                                                                                   Evolution and Society (Same as Anthropology
                                                         Music Theory 100: Fundamentals of Music          305)
List A: Literature                                       Philosophy 350: Aesthetics; 353: Philoso-            Economics 413: Macroeconomic
    Asian Languages 311: Chinese Literature           phy and Literature                                  Fluctuations; 435: Industrial Organization
in English Translation; 312: Chinese Literature          Speech Communication 280: Introduction           Analysis; 462: Economics of Resources and
in English Translation; 313: Japanese Litera-         to Oral Interpretation                              Environmental Policy; 471: Public Finance:
ture in English Translation; 314: Japanese Lit-          Theatre 100: Introduction to Theatre;            Optimal Government Functions and Expendi-
erature in English Translation                        220: Acting                                         ture Analysis; 472: Public Finance: Taxation
    Classics 253: Greek Literature in English            Women’s Studies 330: Women in Music              and Intergovernmental Relations
Translation                                           (Same as Music History 330)                             English 331: Race and Ethnicity in
    Comparative Literature 202: Crosscultural                                                             American Literature; 332: Women in American
Perspectives in World Literature; 203:                4. NON-U.S. HISTORY                                 Literature (Same as Women’s Studies 332);
Crosscultural Perspectives in World Literature            A course sequence to enhance apprecia-          333: Black American Literature and Aesthet-
    English 201: British Literature I: Beowulf        tion of the diversity of the world’s societies,     ics; 334: Film and American Culture (Same
through Johnson; 202: British Literature II:          their cultures, and histories. This requirement     as American Studies 334)
Wordsworth to the Present; 221: Literature of         will develop understanding of how the past              Geography 361: Regional Geography of
                                                      shapes individuals and communities in practi-       the United States and Canada; 363: Geogra-
60      College of Arts and Sciences


phy of the American South; 365: Geography          African-American Studies 372); 381: History            Russian 325: Russian Film; 371: Martyrs,
of Appalachia; 423: Geography of American          of South Africa (Same as African and African-       Mobs, and Madmen in Russian Culture: 988-
Popular Culture (Same as American Studies          American Studies 381)                               1861; 372: Eros, Death and Resurrection and
423); 425: Historical Geography of the United          Political Science 452: Black African Politics   Modern Russian Culture
States; 441: Urban Geography of the United         (Same as African and African-American
States; 443: Rural Geography of the United         Studies 452)                                        Latin America
States                                                 Religious Studies 373: African Religions            Anthropology 313: Peoples and Cultures of
    Geology 381: Minerals and Energy Resources     (Same as African and African-American               Mesoamerica (Same as Latin American Stud-
    History 351: The American Revolution;          Studies 373 and Anthropology 373)                   ies 313); 316: Peoples and Cultures of South
441: The American West; 442: Indian-White                                                              America (Same as Latin American Studies
Relations in United States History; 446: His-      Asia                                                316); 319: Caribbean Cultures and Societies
tory of American Culture; 451: United States          Art History 411: Art of South and South-         (Same as African and African-American
Military History, 1754 to the Present; 453:        east Asia; 415: Art of China; 419: Art of Japan     Studies 319 and Latin American Studies 319)
Women in American History (Same as                    History 362: History of East Asia;                   Economics 424: Political Economy of
Women’s Studies 453); 454: Cities and Urban-       363: History of East Asia; 364: History of          World Development
ization in American History; 459: Jefferson's      China; 365: History of Japan                            Geography 372: Geography of Middle
America                                               Political Science 454: Government and            America (Same as Latin American Studies
    Music History 350: History of Jazz (Same       Politics of China and Japan.                        372); 373 : Geography of South America
as African and African-American Studies 350)          Religious Studies 374: Philosophy and             (Same as Latin American Studies 373)
    Philosophy 390: Philosophical Founda-          Religion in India (Same as Philosophy 374);             History 360: History of Latin America:
tions of Democracy                                 376: Buddhist Philosophy and Religion (Same         Colonialism and Independence; 361: History
    Political Science 311: Contemporary Is-        as Philosophy 376); 379: Religion and Philoso-      of Latin America: National Development;
sues in American Public Policy; 312: Popular       phy in China (Same as Philosophy 379); 383:         460: History of Brazil; 461: Cuban Revolution
Culture and American Politics (Same as             Religion in Japan; 474: Modern and Contem-          in Historical Perspective; 462: History of
American Studies 312 and Cinema Studies            porary South Asian Religion                         Mexico; 463: Modem Latin American History
312); 330: Law in American Society (Same as                                                            in Film; 475: Studies in Latin American History
                                                   Europe                                                  Political Science 355: Latin American
Legal Studies 330); 374: American Political            Anthropology 462: Early European
Thought                                                                                                Government and Politics
                                                   Pre-history                                             Spanish 331: Introduction to Hispanic
    Psychology 434: Psychology and Gender              Art History 425: Early Christian and Byz-
(Same as Women’s Studies 434).                                                                         Culture (Same as Latin American Studies
                                                   antine Art to 1350; 431: Medieval Art of the        331); 401: Cultural Plurality and Institutional
    Religious Studies 351: Introduction to Reli-   West, 800-1400; 441: Northern European
gion in the United States; 352: African-                                                               Changes in Latin America (Same as Latin
                                                   Painting, 1350-1600; 442: Art of Northern Eu-       American Studies 401); 489: Topics in His-
American Religion in United States (Same as        rope, 1600-1675; 451: Art of Italy, 1250-1450;
African and African-American Studies 352);                                                             panic Civilization
                                                   452: Art of Italy, 1450-1575; 453: Art of South-
355: Religion and Culture in the United States     ern Europe, 1575-1700; 454: Renaissance             Middle East
    Sociology 310: American Society;               and Baroque Theory; 475: History of 19th               Anthropology 463: Rise of Complex
340: Class Structure; 343: Race and Ethnicity      Century Painting and Sculpture in Europe;           Civilizations
(Same as African and African-American              476: History of 20th Century Painting and              History 366: History and Archaeology of
Studies 343); 455: Society and Law                 Sculpture in Europe                                 Mesopotamia; 369: History of the Middle East
    Speech Communication 450: Propaganda;              Classics 331: Archaeology of the Aegean         (Same as Judaic Studies 369); 370: History of
466: Rhetoric of the Women’s Rights Move-          Bronze Age and Early Greece; 334: Cities and        the Middle East (Same as Judaic Studies
ment to 1930 (Same as Women’s Studies              Sanctuaries of the Greek and Roman World;           370); 383: History of Jewish Civilization I
466); 469: Freedom of Speech; 476: Rhetoric        381: Greek Civilization; 382: Roman Civiliza-       (Same as Judaic Studies 383); 384: History of
of the Contemporary Feminist Movement              tion; 383: Women in the Greek and Roman             Jewish Civilization II (Same as Judaic Studies
(Same asWomen’s Studies 476)                       World (Same as Women’s Studies 383)                 384)
    Women’s Studies 310: Emergence of the              English 301: British Culture to 1660;              Religious Studies 311: Ancient Hebraic
Modern American Woman; 340: Women,                 302: British Culture: 1660 to Present;              Religious Traditions (Same as Judaic Studies
Politics, and the Law                              401: Medieval Literature                            311); 332: Classical Islam; 333: Islam in the
List B: Foreign Studies                                French 420: French Cinema; 431: High-           Modern World; 381: Introduction to Judaism
    NOTE: This list is subdivided by geo-          lights of French Civilization; 432: Contempo-       (Same as Judaic Studies 381); 385: Contem-
graphic area and topic. If Western Civilization    rary French Culture                                 porary Jewish Thinkers (Same as Judaic
(History 241-242) or Medieval Civilization             Geography 371: Geography of Europe              Studies 385); 405: Modern Jewish Thought
(Medieval Studies 201-202) is used to satisfy          German 323: German Film; 350: German-           (Same as Judaic Studies 405)
the non-United States History divisional re-       Jewish Topics in Literature and Culture; 363:
                                                   Modern German Culture                               Critical Issues in Foreign Studies
quirement, courses from the European con-                                                                  Economics 323: Economic Development
centration may not be used to satisfy this             History 319: Modern Europe, 1750-1914;
                                                   320: Contemporary Europe, 1900-present;             (Third World)
requirement.                                                                                               Geography 345: Population and
    In addition to the courses listed here this    323: Deviance and Persecution in the Chris-
                                                   tian West, 1100-1700; 429: Medieval Intellec-       Environment; 351: The Global Economy
requirement may be satisfied by literature                                                                 History 374: A History of Imperialism Since
courses taught in Chinese, French, German,         tual History; 432: Women in European History
                                                   (Same as Women’s Studies 432); 490: Intern-         1850; 375: Revolutions in Historical Perspec-
Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Por-                                                          tive; 395: The Crusaders and Medieval Chris-
tuguese, Russian, Sanskrit, or Spanish. Lit-       ship in the Center for the Study of War and
                                                   Society                                             tian-Muslim Relations; 484: Studies in Jewish
erature courses in English translation will not                                                        History (Same as Judaic Studies 484)
meet this requirement.                                 Italian 414: Italian Cultural Studies;
                                                   421: Topics in Italian Literature and Cinema            Political Science 350: Political Change in
Africa                                                 Medieval Studies 403: Seminar in Medieval       Developing Areas; 365: Introduction to Inter-
    African and African-American Studies: 421      Studies                                             national Relations
Comparative Studies in African and African-            Philosophy 320: Ancient Western Philoso-            Religious Studies 371: Eastern Religions
American Societies; Art History 461: Art of        phy; 322: Medieval Philosophy; 324: Seven-          and Western Thought
Southern and Eastern Africa; 462: Art and          teenth- and Eighteenth-Century Philosophy;              Sociology 442: Comparative Patterns of
Archaeology of Ancient Africa; 463: Arts of the    326: Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century              Poverty and Development; 446: The Modern
African Diaspora                                   Philosophy                                          World System
    Geography 379: Geography of Africa                 Political Science 361: Politics in Western          Women’s Studies 360: Women in Cross-
(Same as African and African-American              Democracies; 459: Government and Politics           Cultural Perspective
Studies 379)                                       of Russia and Eastern Europe                        C. Capstone Courses
    History 371: African History (Same as                                                                   These courses are offered within major
African and African-American Studies 371);                                                             fields and are designed to provide an integra-
372: African History (Same as African and                                                              tive experience to broaden comprehension of
                                                                                                               College of Arts and Sciences          61

the major field, to enhance understanding of       ogy, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Classics,     Elective courses should be chosen with care
how the field has and continues to influence       Computer Science, Economics, English,              so that they will truly enhance the student’s
society, and to draw attention to ethical con-     French, Geography, Geology, German, His-           total program and help in the achievement of
siderations applicable to the field. As writing    tory, Interdisciplinary Programs, Italian, Math-   well thought out educational objectives.
emphasis courses the capstones promote             ematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political         Some of the choices which the student
development of written communication skills        Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Rus-       might make in selecting the elective courses are:
used by the major field. It is recommended         sian, Sociology, Spanish, Speech Pathology,            1. Additional courses in the major field;
that this option be satisfied during the senior    Statistics, and Theatre.                               2. A related minor;
year.                                                                                                     3. An area in the arts;
     NOTE: If used to satisfy the major re-        2. Optional Multiple Majors                            4. An off-campus semester.
quirement, these courses may not be used to             After the general requirements of basic           Only the student's imagination and initiative
satisfy the distribution requirement.              skills, distribution and a major have been sat-    and the willingness to conceive and develop a
                                                   isfied, additional majors may be recorded on       meaningful academic program limit the
   African and African-American Studies 431:       the transcript without regard to course overlap    choices of supplementary elective courses.
Research Seminar in African-American Studies       among majors or among the additional majors
   Audiology and Speech Pathology 499:             and Basic Skills and Distribution requirements.
Senior Seminar in Communication Sciences           Students developing multiple majors must           INDIVIDUALIZED PROGRAM
and Disorders                                      declare this intent at the time of application         The Basic Program described above will
   Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular         for graduation. Once a student has graduated,      meet the educational needs of most students
Biology 409: Perspectives in BCMB; 420:            the establishment of additional majors             enrolling in the college. Some, however, come
Advanced Topics in BCMB                            becomes subject to University second degree        with particular strengths in their preparation or
   Botany 471: Senior Seminar                      requirements.                                      with special interests which do not coincide
   Chemistry 405: Topics in the Development             Students who satisfy the requirements of      with the departmental or interdepartmental
of Chemistry                                       a degree in a college other than Arts and Sci-     majors specified in the Basic Program. For
   Computer Science 411: Senior Thesis I;          ences may also major inside the College of         these students the Individualized Program has
412: Senior Thesis II                              Arts and Sciences with the approval of the         been established as a means of attaining a
   Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 409:           degree granting unit. These students need          closer correlation between student needs and
Perspectives in Ecology and Evolutionary Bi-       complete only the major requirements, not the      academic programs.
ology                                              Basic Skills or Distribution requirements for          Students in the Individualized Program
   Economics 499: Analysis of Economic             Arts and Sciences degrees. The Arts and            will satisfy all the Basic Skills and Distribution
Problems                                           Sciences major may also be listed on the           requirements, just as do those in the Basic
   English 499: Senior Seminar                     student’s transcript.                              Program. The point at which the individualiza-
   French 440: Capstone Experience in French                                                          tion takes place is in the area of concentra-
   Geography 499: Proseminar in Geography          3. Optional Minors
                                                       At the time of application for graduation,     tion. The quantitative aspect of the area of
   Geology 440: Field Geology; 475: Physical                                                          concentration is the same as for the major in
and Chemical Systems of the Earth                  single or multiple minors may be recorded on
                                                   the academic record without regard to course       the Basic Program (i.e., a minimum of 24
   History 482: Colloquium in History                                                                 hours in courses numbered above 200), and
   Human Services 430: Working Within the          overlap among minors and major or among
                                                   minors and Basic Skills and Distribution           at least two-thirds of the courses must be se-
System                                                                                                lected from disciplines within the College of
   Mathematics 411: Mathematical Modeling;         requirements. Students who satisfy the re-
                                                   quirements of a degree in a college other than     Arts and Sciences. The student may design a
400: History of Mathematics                                                                           program in consultation with an advisor and
   Microbiology 495: Senior Seminar                Arts and Sciences may also minor inside the
                                                   College of Arts and Sciences with the ap-          submit it for consideration to the Committee on
   Music History 460: Music Aesthetics                                                                the Individualized Program. The proposed
   Physics 401: Background of Physics;             proval of the degree granting unit. The mini-
                                                   mum requirement for a minor is 15 credit           courses of study must have some clear cen-
402: Forefront of Physics                                                                             tral purpose, usually implemented through in-
   Psychology 430: Health Psychology;              hours in courses numbered 200 or above. Mi-
                                                   nors are available in most departments or pro-     tensive work in two or three departments; an
496: Senior Seminar: Great Ideas in Psychology                                                        undirected scattering of courses will not be
   Urban Studies 460: Senior Seminar               grams in which majors are offered, and also in
                                                   Astronomy, Portuguese, and Cinema Studies.         approved. For further information contact Arts
                                                   Minors may be developed in other colleges or       and Sciences Advising Services.
AREAS OF                                           schools of the University, but must be ap-
CONCENTRATION                                      proved by the department head in which the         COLLEGE SCHOLARS
                                                   minor is proposed and by the Associate Dean
1. Required Major                                  for Student Academic Affairs in Arts and Sci-      PROGRAM
     Requirements for specific majors vary by      ences. At least six of the 15 credit hours               A limited number of freshmen and sopho-
program and are discussed under each de-           required for a minor must be completed at the      mores, entering transfer students with fewer
partment or program. A major consists of at        University of Tennessee.                           than 42 credit hours, and resident students
least 24-40 credit hours in courses numbered                                                          with fewer than 62 credit hours are invited
200 or above as specified by the department           Business Minor for Non-Business                 each year to enter this distinguished honors
or program. Up to 6 credit hours taken in the      Students Requirements include the following        curriculum. Selection is based on previous
major may also be used to satisfy basic skills     courses: Accounting 201-202, Business Ad-          academic record, test scores,
or divisional distribution requirements where      ministration 201, Economics 201, Statistics        recommendations, a written essay, and a
listed. In addition, students making A or B in     201, Finance 301, Marketing 300, and Man-          personal interview. Admission is provisional
English 118 may use a 200-level literature         agement 300. All upper division (300 level or      for two semesters; continuation
course in the English Department to satisfy        above) course work must be taken at UT,            depends upon maintenance of a satisfactory
both the second half of their Basic Skills En-     Knoxville. Students are responsible for meet-      record (normally 3.25 or above) and evidence
glish Composition requirement and part of          ing all prerequisites for upper-division courses   of ongoing motivation and interest.
their Humanities requirement if the course is      taken in a particular concentration.                     The College Scholars Program affords the
listed there. A minimum grade of C must be                                                            highest degree of freedom to the student in
                                                   4. Supplementary Elective Courses                  developing a meaningful curriculum. Each
earned in every course counted as part of a
                                                       At least one-fourth of each student’s curri-   program is worked out individually with a spe-
major. Students transferring from other institu-
                                                   culum in the Basic Program will be made up of      cial advisor (mentor) who under ordinary
tions must complete at least 9 credit hours at
                                                   courses selected according to the individual’s     circumstances continues to advise the stu-
UT in each major awarded on this campus.
                                                   interests to supplement and support the work       dent throughout the college career. Together
Students may elect as many courses as de-
                                                   being done in the major and Basic Skills and       they determine what kinds of course work
sired in any department or program. In lieu of
                                                   Distribution requirements. This dimension of       and/or other learning experiences will best ful-
a major, students may develop an Individual-
                                                   the student’s experience in the University         fill the student’s objectives, while at the same
ized Program (described below). Majors avail-
                                                   represents that freedom within which total         time achieving the kind of liberal education
able in the Basic Program for a B.A. or B.S.
                                                   education may be rounded out and enriched.         the college believes is important for every
include: Anthropology, Art, Art History, Audiol-
62            College of Arts and Sciences


student. In the final two years of the program                                     1
                                                                                     Or equivalent honors courses.                                                   6
                                                                                                                                                                      Upper Level Distribution (A) U.S. Studies, (B)
students will be heavily involved in indepen-                                      2
                                                                                     Dental schools require 8 hours of Biology.                                          Foreign Studies or (C) Capstone Experience ...... 6
dent study or research required of all College
                                                                                   3
                                                                                     Math placement depends on high school courses and                               7
                                                                                                                                                                      Electives ................................................................ 16
                                                                                   grades, ACT scores, and BA/BS requirements.                                       ____________________________________________
Scholars. When College Scholars fulfill depart-
                                                                                   Mathematics 130 or any Calculus course is a                                                                       Total: 93 hours
mental requirements for additional majors or                                       prerequisite to Physics. All students must complete                               ____________________________________________
minors, these will be recorded on the Schol-                                       the Math Basic Skills requirements as outlined in the                             Senior
ars’ transcripts. Scholars will not be required                                    Arts and Sciences curriculum.                                                     Completion of major program and B.A./B.S. require-
to meet Basic Skills or Distribution require-                                      4
                                                                                     This requirement assumes a student has had enough                                  ments or completion of one year at UT Health
ments in order to have such majors or minors                                       language background in high school to begin an                                       Science Center, Memphis.
                                                                                                                                                                     _____________________________________________
officially recognized.                                                             intermediate language sequence at UT.
    Further information and applications may
                                                                                   5
                                                                                     BA students must take at least one course from List                                                     Total: 124 minimum hours
                                                                                   A: Literature and at least one course from List B:                                ____________________________________________
be obtained from Arts and Sciences Advising
                                                                                   Philosophical and Religious Thought plus one                                      1
                                                                                                                                                                       Medical schools require 8 hours of General Biology.
Services.                                                                          additional course from List A, B, or C. BS students                               2
                                                                                                                                                                       Math placement depends on high school courses and
                                                                                   must complete a minimum of 6 credits from the three                               grades, ACT scores, and BA/BS requirements.
                                                                                                                                                                     Mathematics 130 or any calculus course is a
PRE-PROFESSIONAL                                                                   lists; not more than 3 credits can be taken in the
                                                                                   Arts.                                                                             prerequisite to Physics. All students must complete
PROGRAMS                                                                           6
                                                                                     BA students must complete a minimum of 12 credits                               the Math Basic Skills requirements as outlined in the
                                                                                                                                                                     Arts and Sciences curriculum.
                                                                                   from at least two areas; BS students must complete a
                                                                                   minimum of 6 credits from at least two areas for the
                                                                                                                                                                     3
                                                                                                                                                                       This requirement assumes a student has had enough
                                                                                                                                                                     language background in high school to begin an
PRE-DENTAL PROGRAM                                                                 Social Science requirement.
                                                                                                                                                                     intermediate language sequence at UT Knoxville.
     The college offers both a three-year pro-
                                                                                   7
                                                                                     BA students must complete a minimum of 6 credits in                             4
                                                                                                                                                                       The College of Medicine at E.T.S.U. requires one
gram leading to a Bachelor of Science degree                                       one of the three areas and 3 credits from one of the                              course in literature. BA students must take at least
                                                                                   remaining two areas. BS students must complete a
and a four-year program leading to a Bachelor                                                                                                                        one course from List A: Literature and one course
                                                                                   minimum of 6 credits in two of the three areas. (Upper                            from List B: Philosophical and Religious Thought plus
of Arts or Science degree for students prepar-                                     Level Distribution).
ing for the study of dentistry. Both programs                                                                                                                        one additional course from List A, B, or C. BS
                                                                                   8
                                                                                     Depending upon course selection, a student may                                  students must complete a minimum of six credits from
are based upon the curriculum outlined below.                                      require less than the listed elective hours to reach the                          the three lists under the Humanities requirement; not
In the three-year program the student must                                         minimum total of 93 hours. Recommended courses in                                 more than 3 credits may be taken in the Arts.
complete at least 93 credit hours while en-                                        biology are genetics, and comparative vertebrate anatomy.                         5
                                                                                                                                                                       BA students must complete a minimum of 12 credits
rolled in the college, and the B.S. degree is                                                                                                                        from at least two areas; BS students must complete a
granted upon satisfactory completion of the                                                                                                                          minimum of 6 credits from at least two areas for the
first year of study at UT Health Science Cen-                                      PRE-MEDICAL PROGRAM                                                               Social Science requirement.
ter, Memphis. In the four-year program the                                             The college offers a three-year program                                       6
                                                                                                                                                                       BA students must complete a minimum of 6 credits in
degree is granted upon completion of 124 or                                        leading to a B.S. degree and a four-year pro-                                     one of the three areas and 3 credits from one of the
                                                                                   gram leading to a Bachelor of Arts or Science                                     remaining two areas. BS students must complete a
more credit hours while enrolled in the college,                                                                                                                     minimum of 6 credits in two of the three areas. (Upper
including a major of 24 or more hours in                                           degree for students preparing for the study of                                    Level Distribution).
addition to the courses listed below. The re-                                      medicine. Both programs are based upon the                                        7
                                                                                                                                                                       Depending upon course selection, a student may
quirement for a major is waived for those                                          program outlined below. In the three-year                                         require less than the listed elective hours to reach the
completing their fourth year at UT Health Sci-                                     program the student must complete at least                                        minimum total of 93 hours. Although not specifically
ence Center, Memphis. Students in either the                                       93 credit hours while enrolled in the college,                                    required by the College of Medicine, the Health
three- or four-year program must complete                                                                                                                            Professions Advisory Committee strongly
                                                                                   and the B.S. degree is granted upon satisfac-                                     recommends that students include additional work in
the last 30 hours of credit in residence at the                                    tory completion of the first year of study at UT                                  upper division Biological Sciences such as
University of Tennessee before entering UT                                         Health Science Center, Memphis. In the four-                                      Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology 410-
Health Science Center, Memphis.                                                    year program the degree is granted upon                                           419, Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology
     Although the B.A. or B.S. degree is not re-                                   completion of 124 or more credit hours while                                      330-331, 420 and Microbiology 310-319.
quired for admission to the College of Den-                                        enrolled in the college, including a major of 24
tistry at Memphis, most of the students
accepted into the study of dentistry have the
                                                                                   or more hours in addition to the courses out-                                     PRE-PHARMACY PROGRAMS
baccalaureate degree before admission.                                             lined below. The requirements for a major are                                          The college offers three programs prepar-
Therefore, pre-dental students are encour-                                         waived for those taking their fourth year at UT                                   ing students for the study of pharmacy at UT
aged to plan to complete all requirements for                                      Health Science Center, Memphis. Students in                                       Health Science Center, Memphis. The Doctor
the B.A. or B.S. degree before enrolling in the                                    either the three- or four-year program must                                       of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is conferred
College of Dentistry.                                                              complete the last 30 hours of credit in resi-                                     by the College of Pharmacy upon completion
                                                            Hours Credit           dence at UT before entering UT Health Sci-                                        of four years of professional study at Mem-
Freshman                                                                           ence Center, Memphis.                                                             phis following any of the three programs. Bul-
1
  English 101-102 or equivalent .................................. 6                   Although the B.A./B.S. degree is not                                          letins describing the three pre-pharmacy
1,2
    Biology 130,140 ..................................................... 8        required for admission to the College of Medi-                                    programs in detail may be obtained from Arts
1
  Chemistry 120-130 ................................................... 8          cine, most students accepted into the study of
1,3
    Mathematics ........................................................ 3-8
                                                                                                                                                                     and Sciences Advising Services, 220 Ayres
                                                                                   medicine have the baccalaureate degree                                            Hall.
Electives ................................................................... 3
Sophomore
                                                                                   before admission. Therefore, pre-medical                                               The two-year program prepares students
Chemistry 350, 360, 369 ........................................... 8              students are encouraged to plan to complete                                       to be admitted to the College of Pharmacy
Physics 221-222 ....................................................... 8          all requirements for the degree before enroll-                                    upon completion of 60 hours of a prescribed
5
  Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3                ing in the College of Medicine.                                                   course of study in the College of Arts and Sci-
Divisional Distribution: Non-U.S. History ................... 6                                                                                                      ences. Further information may be obtained
8
  Electives .................................................................. 3                                                              Hours Credit           from Arts and Sciences Advising Services, 220
4
  Basic Skills (b) Foreign Language (Intermediate                                  Freshman
      Level Sequence) ................................................. 6
                                                                                                                                                                     Ayres Hall.
                                                                                   English 101-102 or equivalent ................................... 6
Junior                                                                             1
                                                                                     Biology 130-140 ....................................................... 8            The three-year program leading to a B.S.
5
  Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3                Chemistry 120-130 .................................................... 8          degree and the four-year program leading to
6
  Divisional Distribution Social Sciences .................... 6                   2
                                                                                     Mathematics .......................................................... 3-8      either a B.A. or B.S. degree from the Univer-
7
  Upper Level Distribution (A) U.S. Studies                                        Electives ................................................................... 3   sity of Tennessee as well as to the profes-
      (B) Foreign Studies or                                                       Sophomore                                                                         sional degree in pharmacy from UT Health
      (C) Capstone Experience .................................... 6               Chemistry 350, 360, 369 ........................................... 8             Science Center, Memphis, are based upon
8
  Electives ................................................................ 16    Physics 221, 222 ...................................................... 8         the program outlined below. In the three-year
____________________________________________                                       4
                                                                                     Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3
                                Total: 93 hours
                                                                                                                                                                     program, the student must complete at least
                                                                                   Divisional Distribution: Non U.S. History ................... 6
____________________________________________
                                                                                   Electives ................................................................... 3   93 credit hours while enrolled in the College of
Senior                                                                             3
                                                                                     Basic Skills: Foreign Language (Intermediate                                    Arts and Sciences, and the B.S. degree is
Completion of major program and B.A./B.S. require-                                      Level Sequence) ................................................. 6          granted upon satisfactory completion of the
   ments or completion of one year at UT Health                                    Junior                                                                            first year of study in Memphis. In the four-year
   Science Center, Memphis.                                                        4
                                                                                     Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3               program the B.A. or B.S. degree is granted
____________________________________________                                       5
                                                                                     Divisional Distribution: Social Sciences .................. 6                   upon completion of 124 or more credit hours
                        Total: 124 minimum hours                                                                                                                     while enrolled in the college, including a major
____________________________________________
                                                                                                                                                                                   College of Arts and Sciences                                 63


of 24 or more hours in addition to the courses                                    PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY                                                              4BA students must select one course from List A,
outlined below. The requirement for a major is                                                                                                                      one course from List B and one additional course from
                                                                                  PROGRAM                                                                           List A, B, or C. BS students must complete a
waived for those taking their fourth year at UT                                       The following program is designed for stu-                                    minimum of 6 credits from the three lists under the
Health Science Center, Memphis. Students in                                       dents who wish to pursue an Arts and Sci-                                         Humanities requirement; not more than 3 credits may
either the three- or four-year program must                                       ences degree while preparing for the study of                                     be taken in the Arts.
complete the last 30 hours of credit in resi-                                     Physical Therapy. Students in this program                                        5
                                                                                                                                                                      BA students must complete a minimum of 12 credits
dence at he University of Tennessee before                                        must complete at least 93 hours credit hours                                      from at least two areas; BS students must complete a
enrolling in the College of Pharmacy.                                             while enrolled in the College of Arts and Sci-                                    minimum of 6 credits from at least two areas for the
                                                                                  ences, must satisfy the Basic Skills and Distri-                                  Social Sciences requirement. Psychology 110 is
                                                            Hours Credit          bution requirements, and must complete the                                        considered a social science.
Freshman                                                                          last 30 hours in residence at UT Knoxville be-
                                                                                                                                                                    6
                                                                                                                                                                      BA students must complete a minimum of 6 credits
1
  English 101-102; or equivalent ................................. 6                                                                                                from one of the three areas and 3 credits from one of
                                                                                  fore enrolling in the College of Allied Health
1
  Chemistry 120-130 ................................................... 8                                                                                           the remaining two areas. BS students must complete
                                                                                  Sciences at the UT Health Sciences Center in                                      a minimum of 6 credits in two of the three areas.
3
  Basic Skills Foreign Language
     (Intermediate Level Sequence) ........................... 6
                                                                                  Memphis, Tennessee. A departmental major                                          7
                                                                                                                                                                      Depending on course selection a student may
1,2
    Mathematics ........................................................ 3-8      is not required. Upon successful completion                                       require less than the listed elective hours to reach the
Divisional Distribution: Non U.S. History ................... 6                   of the first year of the professional physical                                    minimum total of 93 hours. Recommended electives
Sophomore                                                                         therapy curriculum, the Bachelor of Science                                       include: Biomechanics of Human Movement (Exercise
4
  Biology 130-140 ....................................................... 8       degree will be conferred by the College of Arts                                   Science 422 which has a prerequisite of Exercise
Chemistry 350, 360, 369 ........................................... 8             and Sciences.                                                                     Science 332), Animal Development and Embryology
Speech Communication 210 , 220, or 240 ................. 3                            Note: Admission to the College of Allied                                      (BCMB 330-331), Physiology of Exercise (Exercise
5
  Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3               Health Sciences is at the discretion of the Ad-                                   Science 480), Advanced First Aid and Emergency
6
  Divisional Distribution: Social Sciences ................... 3                  missions Committee of that College. Admis-                                        Care (Health 310), Nutrition 100, courses that deal
Electives ................................................................... 3   sion to and successful completion of this                                         with the disabled (special education, abnormal
Junior                                                                            program does not assure admission to the                                          psychology, etc.) and additional coursework in the
Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3                                                                                       social and behavioral sciences.
                                                                                  College of Allied Health Sciences.
Physics 221-222 ....................................................... 8                                                                  Hours Credit
Divisional Distribution: Humanities ............................. 3
Divisional Distribution : Social Sciences ................... 3
                                                                                  Freshman                                                                          NUCLEAR MEDICINE
                                                                                  English 101-102 or equivalent ................................... 6
7
  Upper Level Distribution (A) U.S. Studies,                                      1
                                                                                    Biology 130-140 ....................................................... 8       TECHNOLOGY
     (B) Foreign Studies, or                                                      Chemistry 120-130 .................................................... 8              The Nuclear Medicine Technology Cur-
     (C) Capstone Experience .................................... 6               2
                                                                                    Mathematics .......................................................... 3-4      riculum requires a minimum of 94 hours credit,
8
  Electives ............................................................... 13
______________________________________________                                    Computer Science 100 .............................................. 6             including the College’s basic skills and distri-
                                                                                  5
                                                                                    Psychology 110 ....................................................... 3        bution requirements, prior to application for
                                 Total: 93 hours                                  _______________________________________________
_____________________________________________                                                                                                                       admission to a final year of study at the
                                                                                                                 Total: 31-32 hours                                 University of Tennessee Medical Center,
Senior                                                                            ______________________________________________
Completion of major program and B.A./B.S. require-                                Sophomore
                                                                                                                                                                    Knoxville. Students who complete the Nuclear
ments or completion of one year at UT Health Science                              Biochemistry and Cellular and                                                     Medicine Technology program at UTMCK re-
Center, Memphis                                                                        Molecular Biology 230, Ecology and                                           ceive the B.S. degree in Preprofessional Pro-
______________________________________________
                                                                                       Evolutionary Biology 240 .................................... 9              grams with a concentration in Nuclear
                        Total: 124 minimum hours                                  Physics 221-222 ....................................................... 8         Medicine Technology from the College of Arts
_____________________________________________                                     3
                                                                                    Foreign Language (Intermediate Level                                            and Sciences.
1
  Or equivalent honors courses.                                                        Sequence) .......................................................... 6
2
  Math placement depends on high school courses and                                                                                                                     NOTE: Admission to the Nuclear Medical
                                                                                  4
                                                                                    Humanities ................................................................ 3   Technology Program at UTMCK is at the
grades, ACT scores, and BA/BS requirements. The                                   Non-US History .......................................................... 6
College of Pharmacy requires one Calculus course.                                 _______________________________________________                                   discretion of the admissions committee of that
Math 125, Math 141, or Math 152 will fulfill this                                                                  Total: 32 hours                                  department; successful completion of the
requirement. If a student is considering a major in a                             ______________________________________________                                    three year curriculum noted below does not
biological or physical science, he/she should consult                             Junior                                                                            assure admission to the program.
with an advisor on the selection of the appropriate                               4
                                                                                    Humanities ............................................................... 3                                                                Hours Credit
math sequence.                                                                    5
                                                                                    Social Sciences ...................................................... 3        Freshman
3
  This requirement assumes a student has had enough                               6
                                                                                    Upper Level Distribution ........................................... 6          1
                                                                                                                                                                      English 101-102 ....................................................... 6
language background in high school to begin an                                    Psychology 220 or 300 ............................................. 3             1
                                                                                                                                                                      Chemistry 120-130 ................................................... 8
intermediate language sequence at UT.                                             Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3     1,2
                                                                                                                                                                        Mathematics ........................................................ 6-8
4
  The College of Pharmacy requires 8 hours of General                             7
                                                                                    Electives ................................................................ 16   3
                                                                                                                                                                      Basic Skills: Foreign Language (Intermediate
Biology.                                                                          _______________________________________________                                        Level Sequence) ................................................. 6
5
  The College of Pharmacy requires a minimum of six
                                                                                                                    Total: 31 hours                                 Divisional Distribution: Non-U.S. History ................... 6
hours of English or foreign language in addition to                               ______________________________________________                                    Sophomore
English 101-102. BA students must take at least one                               _______________________________________________                                   4
                                                                                                                                                                      Biology 130-140 ....................................................... 8
course from List A: Literature and one course from
                                                                                                            Total: 93 hours minimum                                 Chemistry 350, 360, 369 ........................................... 8
List B: Philosophical and Religious Thought plus one                              ______________________________________________                                    Speech Communication 210 ...................................... 3
additional course from List A, B, or C. BS students                                                                                                                 5
                                                                                                                                                                      Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3
must complete a minimum of 6 credits from the three
                                                                                  Senior
                                                                                                                                                                    6
                                                                                                                                                                      Divisional Distribution: Social Sciences ................... 6
lists under the Humanities requirements; not more
                                                                                  Completion of major program and BA/BS requirements                                Computer Science 100 or 102 ................................ 3-4
than 3 credits may be taken from List C.
                                                                                     or completion of one year at UT Health Science                                 Junior
6
  BA students must complete a minimum of 12 credits
from at least two areas; BS students must complete a                                 Center in Memphis                                                              Biochemistry and Cellular and
                                                                                  _______________________________________________                                        Molecular Biology 230 and Ecology and
minimum of 6 credits from at least two areas for the
Social Science requirement.                                                                               Total: 124 hours minimum                                       Evolutionary Biology 240 ..................................... 9
                                                                                  ______________________________________________                                    Physics 221-222 ....................................................... 8
7
  BA students must complete a minimum of 6 credits in
one of the three areas and 3 credits from one of the                              1
                                                                                    Biology 130 Biodiversity and Biology 140
                                                                                                                                                                    5
                                                                                                                                                                      Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3
remaining two areas. BS students must complete a                                  Organization and Function of the Cell are highly
                                                                                                                                                                    7
                                                                                                                                                                      Upper Level Distribution (A) U.S. Studies,
minimum of 6 credits in two of the three areas.                                   recommended as foundational courses for students                                       (B) Foreign Studies, or
8
  Depending upon course selection, a student may                                  interested in pursuing careers in the health                                           (C) Capstone Experience .................................... 6
require less than the listed elective hours to reach the                          professions; however, students who have previously
                                                                                                                                                                    8
                                                                                                                                                                      Electives .................................................................. 4
                                                                                                                                                                    ____________________________________________
minimum total of 93 hours. Recommended electives                                  completed Biology 101 and 102 may substitute this
include courses in computer science, and business                                 sequence for Biology 130.                                                                                         Total: 94 hours
                                                                                                                                                                    ____________________________________________
administration, particularly accounting, economics,                               2
                                                                                    Math 130 or any calculus course is required as a
and marketing.                                                                    prerequisite for Physics 221-222. Math placement                                  Senior
                                                                                  depends on high school courses and grades, ACT                                    Completion of Nuclear Medicine Technology program
                                                                                  scores, the Math Department’s Mathematics                                            at UTMCK (12 month program) or completion of
                                                                                  Placement Exam, and BA/BS requirements.                                              major program and BA or BS requirements.
                                                                                                                                                                    _____________________________________________
                                                                                  3This requirement assumes a student has had enough
                                                                                  language background in high school to begin an                                                            Total: 124 minimum hours
                                                                                                                                                                    ____________________________________________
                                                                                  intermediate language sequence at UTK.
64           College of Arts and Sciences

1
  Or equivalent honors courses.                                               PRE-TEACHING SCIENCE AND                           +Course has prerequisite other than courses
2
  Mathematics placement depends on high school                                                                                   prerequisite to this major. See catalog for details.
courses and grades, ACT scores, and BA/BS                                     MATHEMATICS OPTIONS:
requirements. All students must complete the                                  BACHELOR OF SCIENCE                                B. Physical-Chemical Sciences Track
Mathematics Basic Skills requirements as outlined in
the Arts and Sciences curriculum. Mathematics 130 or                          1. Environmental Science                              Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular
any calculus course is a prerequisite to Physics.                                 This concentration should develop the             Biology 310: Physiological Chemistry (4);
3
  This requirement presumes the student has sufficient                        knowledge and understanding of the environ-           Chemistry 350-360-369: Organic
high school background in a language to begin an                              mental sciences appropriate to the needs of           Chemistry and Lab (3,3,2); Ecology and
intermediate language sequence at UT Knoxville.                               the teacher in grades K-8. The prerequisite           Evolutionary Biology 446: Introduction to
4
  A total of 8 hours of biology is required.                                  courses assure that the student has an ad-            Oceanography (4); Geography 334:
5
  BS students must complete a minimum of 6 credit                                                                                   Meteorology (3); Geography 433: The
                                                                              equate background in the biological, chemi-
hours from the three lists under the Humanities
                                                                              cal, and physical sciences to proceed to              Land-Surface System (3); Geography 434:
requirement; not more than 3 hours may be taken in
the arts.                                                                     upper division courses in either of the chosen        Climatology (3); Geography 436: Water
6
  BS students must complete a minimum of 6 credit                             areas of concentration. The two tracks be-            Resources (3); Geology 450: Process
hours from at least two areas.                                                yond the core stress the two major emphases           Geomorphology (3); +Geology 455: Basic
7
  BS students must complete a minimum of 6 hours in                           of the ecological sciences--the biological and        Environmental Geology; Geology 485:
two of the three areas.                                                       the physical-chemical. The student choosing           Principles of Geohydrology (3).
8
  Depending upon course selection, a student may                              to emphasize the biological track should be        +Course has prerequisite other than courses
require fewer than the listed number of electives to                          prepared to teach courses in biological sci-       prerequisite to this major. See catalog for details.
reach the minimum total of 94 hours. Recommended                              ence through the middle school years. The
electives include courses in computer science and
                                                                              student choosing to emphasize the physical-        Total (core + track concentration) = 29 hours
business administration.
                                                                              chemical track should be prepared to teach
                                                                              general and earth science through the middle       2. Science
SENIOR YEAR PROGRAM OUTLINE                                                   school years.                                          This concentration should develop the
                                                       Hours Credit                                                              knowledge and understanding of the sciences
Fall Semester                                                                     Prerequisite courses: NB: One mathemat-        appropriate to the needs of the teacher in
Physics For Nuclear Medicine I ................................. 3            ics and one science sequence or two science        grades K-8. The curricular requirement that
Nuclear Instrumentation ............................................ 3                                                           the student take courses in both biological sci-
Radiopharmacy/Radiochemistry ................................ 2
                                                                              sequences (14-16 hours) may be used to
                                                                              satisfy general education requirements.            ence (anthropology, biochemistry and cellular
Clinical Nuclear Medicine I ........................................ 4
Clinical Practicum I .................................................... 4                                                      and molecular biology, biology, botany, ecol-
Spring Semester
                                                                              1. Mathematics                                     ogy and evolutionary biology, microbiology,
Physics for Nuclear Medicine II ................................ 3            115, 123 (3,3) or Mathematics 123, 125 (3,3)       psychology) and in physical science (chemis-
Computer Applications ............................................... 3          or Mathematics 141-142 (4,4) or                 try, geography, geology, physics) is designed
Clinical Nuclear Medicine II ....................................... 4           Mathematics 151-152 (3,3)                       to fulfill the state competencies for I General
Clinical Practicum II .................................................. 6    2. Chemistry 120, 130 (4,4)
Summer Semester                                                                                                                  Science and Physical Science and II Biology.
                                                                              3. Biology 130, 140 (4,4) or Botany 110-120
Registry Review ......................................................... 2      (4,4)
Clinical Nuclear Medicine III ...................................... 4                                                               Prerequisite courses: NB: One mathemat-
Clinical Practicum III ................................................. 6    4. Geology 101-102 (4,4) or Geography 131-         ics and one science sequence or two science
____________________________________________                                     132 (4,4) or Physics 221-222 (4,4)
                                                                                                                                 sequences (14-16 hours) may be used to sat-
                                Total: 44 hours                                                                                  isfy general education requirements.
____________________________________________                                  Core courses: (11 hours)
                                                                              1. Biology 240: General Genetics (4)
                                                                                                                                 1. Mathematics 115, 123 (3,3) or Mathematics
                                                                              2. Biology 250: General Ecology (4)
                                                                              3. Geology 203: Geology of National Parks (3)          123, 125 (3,3) or Mathematics 141-142
PRE-TEACHING PROGRAMS                                                                                                                (4,4) or Mathematics 151-152 (3,3)
    Students planning careers in K-12 teaching                                     Beyond the core curriculum, the student       2. Chemistry 120, 130 (4,4)
must complete an Arts and Sciences major in                                   must choose 18 hours from the two tracks           3. Biology 130, 140 (4,4) or Botany 110-120
a department, in one of the Interdisciplinary or                              listed below: 15 hours from one track and 3            (4,4)
Pre-Teaching programs or, if eligible, in the                                 hours from the other track.                        4. One sequence from among the following:
College Scholars Program. Prospective                                                                                                Astronomy 161-162 (4,4) or Geography
secondary teachers must fulfill the require-                                  A. Biological Sciences Track                           131-132 (4,4) or Geology 101-102 (4,4) or
ments of appropriate content majors; pro-                                        Botany 305: Socio-Economic Impact of                Physics 221-222 Elements of Physics
spective elementary teachers may choose                                          Plants (3); Botany 310: Plant Morphology            (4,4).
either a departmental major or one of the four                                   (4); Botany 330: Field Botany (3); Botany
options described below. All pre-teaching stu-                                   431: Plant Ecology (3); Ecology and             Core courses (14 hours):
dents should consult appropriate materials in                                    Evolutionary Biology 350: Comparative           1. Biology 240: General Genetics (4); Biology
Arts and Sciences Advising Services before                                       Vertebrate Biology (4); Ecology and                 250: General Ecology (4)
making final choices of majors.                                                  Evolutionary Biology 360: Comparative           2. Two of the following three courses:
    To be licensed for teaching, students must                                   Invertebrate Biology (4); Ecology and               Geology 201: Biodiversity: Past, Present,
also gain formal admission to the Teacher                                        Evolutionary Biology: 380 General                   and Future (3); Geology 202: Earth as an
Education Program in the College of Educa-                                       Entomology (3); Ecology and Evolutionary            Ecosystem: Modern Problems and
tion. The process involves successful                                            Biology 402: Practicum in Ecology and               Solutions (3); Geology 203: Geology of
completion of a series of requirements includ-                                   Evolutionary Biology (2); Ecology and               National Parks (3)
ing presentation of satisfactory scores on cer-                                  Evolutionary Biology 450-459:
tain tests, completing professional courses in                                   Comparative Animal Behavior and Lab                 Beyond the core curriculum, the student
the College of Education, maintenance of a 2.7                                   (3,3); Ecology and Evolutionary Biology         must take 18 hours from the two tracks listed
or higher GPA, and completing a fifth year                                       470: Aquatic Ecology (3); Ecology and           below: 15 hours from one track and 3 hours
program emphasizing practical application.                                       Evolutionary Biology 474: Ichthyology (3);      from the other track. At least 15 of the 18
For details, see The College of Education                                        Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 475:           hours must be at the 300 or 400 level.
section of the Undergraduate Catalog and                                         Field Ornithology (2); Ecology and
contact the Education Advising Center,                                           Evolutionary Biology 484: Conservation          A. Biological Sciences
Claxton Complex 332.                                                             Biology (3); Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries   +Anthropology 210: Principles of Biological
                                                                                 311: Dendrology and Silvics of North               Anthropology (3); +Anthropology 464:
                                                                                 American Trees (3); Geography 435:                 Principles of Zooarcheology (3);
                                                                                 Biogeography (3); Geography 439: Plant             +Anthropology 480: Human Osteology (3);
                                                                                 Geography of North America (3); Geology            +Anthropology 490: Primate Evolution (3);
                                                                                 320: Paleobiology (3); Geology 420:                +Anthropology 495: Human Paleontology
                                                                                 Paleoecology (4); Microbiology 310-19:             (3); Anthropology 496: Biology of Human
                                                                                 Introduction to Microbiology and Lab (3,1);        Variability (3); Biochemistry and Cellular
                                                                                 +Microbiology 470: Microbial Ecology (3).          and Molecular Biology 230: Human
                                                                                                                 College of Arts and Sciences         65

    Physiology (5); Biochemistry and Cellular             Mathematics 130: Precalculus I (4);              Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 380:
    and Molecular Biology 310: Physiological              Mathematics 141-142: Calculus I and II           General Entomology (3); Ecology and
    Chemistry (4); Biochemistry and Cellular              (4,4); Mathematics 241: Calculus III (4);        Evolutionary Biology 450-459:
    and Molecular Biology 330-331:                        Mathematics 251: Matrix Algebra I (3);           Comparative Animal Behavior and Lab
    Mechanisms of Development and Lab                     Mathematics 300: Introduction to Abstract        (3,3); Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
    (3,2); Of the following three Botany                  Mathematics (3); Mathematics 323:                470: Aquatic Ecology (3); Ecology and
    courses, choose only one: Botany 305:                 Probability and Statistics (3); Mathematics      Evolutionary Biology 474: Ichthyology (3);
    Socio-Economic Impact of Plants (3);                  400: History of Mathematics (3);                 Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 484:
    Botany 306: Genetics and Society (3);                 Mathematics 401: Mathematics and                 Conservation Biology (3); Geography 435:
    Botany 309: Biology of Human Affairs (3).             Microcomputers (3); Mathematics 460:             Biogeography (3); Microbiology 310:
    Botany 310: Plant Morphology (4); Botany              Geometry (3).                                    Introduction to Microbiology (3);
    321: Introductory Plant Physiology (4);                                           Total: 36 hours      +Microbiology 470: Microbial Ecology (3);
    Botany 330: Field Botany (3); Ecology and                                                              +Psychology 410: Sensory Processes and
    Evolutionary Biology 240: Human Anatomy            4. Mathematics and Science                          Perception (3); +Psychology 461:
    (4); Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 350:             This concentration should develop the           Physiological Psychology (3)
    Comparative Vertebrate Biology (4);                knowledge and understanding of the natural       +Course has prerequisite other than
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 360:              sciences and mathematics appropriate to the         prerequisite to this major. See catalog for
    Comparative Invertebrate Biology (4);              needs of the teacher in grades K-8 and is in-       details.
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 380:              tended to provide the student with the minimal   * Some of these courses may require
    General Entomology (3); Ecology and                competence to teach in either or both disci-        additional prerequisites. See catalog for
    Evolutionary Biology 450-459:                      plinary areas. Of necessity, depth in any par-      details.
    Comparative Animal Behavior and Lab                ticular discipline is secondary to obtaining
    (3,3); Ecology and Evolutionary Biology            breadth from an array of natural science and     B. Physical Sciences (6-8 hours)
    470: Aquatic Ecology (3); Ecology and              mathematics areas. Courses included in the        Chemistry 350-360-369: Organic Chemistry
    Evolutionary Biology 474: Ichthyology (3);         major have been selected to maximize the
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 475:                                                                  and Lab (3,3,2); Ecology and Evolutionary
                                                       number of upper division courses that can be        Biology 446: Introduction to Oceanography
    Field Ornithology (2); Ecology and                 taken without prerequisites.
    Evolutionary Biology 484: Conservation                                                                 (4); Geography 334: Meteorology (3);
    Biology (3); Geography 435: Biogeography                                                               Geography 433: The Land-Surface
                                                       Prerequisite courses: (32 hours)                    System (3); Geography 434: Climatology
    (3); Geography 436: Water Resources (3);           1. Mathematics 141-142 (4,4)
    Geography 439: Plant Geography of North                                                                (3); Geography 436: Water Resources (3);
                                                       2. Chemistry 120, 130 (4,4)                         +Geography 445: Geography of
    America (3); Geology 320: Paleobiology             3. Biology 130, 140 (4,4) or Botany 110-120
    (3); Geology 420: Paleoecology (4);                                                                    Resources (3); Geology 310: Mineralogy
                                                          (4,4)                                            (3); Geology 320: Paleobiology (3);
    Microbiology 310-319: Introduction to              4. One sequence from among the following:
    Microbiology and Lab (3,1); +Microbiology                                                              Geology 330: Igneous and Metamorphic
                                                          Astronomy 161-162 (4,4) or Geography             Petrology (3); Geology 340: Stratigraphy
    470: Microbial Ecology (3); Psychology                131-132 (4,4) or Geology 101-102 (4,4) or
    210: Biological Basis of Behavior (3);                                                                 and Sedimentation (3); Geology 370:
                                                          Physics 221-222 (4,4)                            Structural Geology (4); Geology 381:
    +Psychology 410: Sensory Processes and
    Perception (3); +Psychology 461:                                                                       Minerals and Energy Resources: Geologic
                                                           NB: One mathematics and one science             Constraints and Environmental Impacts
    Physiological Psychology (3)
                                                       sequence or two science sequences (14-16            (3); Geology 420: Paleoecology (4)
+Course has prerequisite other than prerequi-
                                                       hours) may be used to satisfy general educa-     +Course has prerequisite other than courses
site to this major. See catalog for details.
                                                       tion requirements.                                  prerequisite to this major. See catalog for
B. Physical Sciences                                                                                       details.
                                                       Core courses: (17 hours)
 Chemistry 350-360-369: Organic Chemistry
    and Lab (3,3,2); Ecology and Evolutionary          1. Biology 240: General Genetics (4); Biology    C. Mathematics (6 hours)
    Biology 446: Introduction to Oceanography             250: General Ecology (4) or Biochemistry       Mathematics 400: History of Mathematics (3);
    (4); Geography 334: Meteorology (3);                  and Cellular and Molecular Biology 230:          Mathematics 401: Mathematics and
    Geography 433: The Land-Surface                       Human Physiology (5); and Ecology and            Microcomputers (3); Math 405: Models in
    System (3); Geography 434: Climatology                Evolutionary Biology 240: Human Anatomy (4)      Biology (3); Mathematics 460: Geometry
    (3); Geography 436: Water Resources (3);           2. Choose two of the following three courses:       (3)
    *Geology 201: Biodiversity: Past, Present,            Geology 201: Biodiversity: Past, Present,
    and Future (3); *Geology 202: Earth as an             and Future (3); Geology 202: Earth as an      Total (core + areas A, B, and C) = 35 hours
    Ecosystem: Modern Problems and                        Ecosystem: Modern Problems and
    Solutions (3); Geology 203: *Geology of               Solutions (3); Geology 203: Geology of
    National Parks (3); Geology 310:                      National Parks (3)                            PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE
    Mineralogy (4); Geology 330: Igneous and           3. Mathematics 300: Introduction to Abstract     PROGRAM
    Metamorphic Petrology (3); Geology 340:               Mathematics (3) Beyond the core                   The following program is designed for
    Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (3);                   curriculum, the student must take two         students who wish to pursue an Arts and Sci-
    Geology 370: Structural Geology (4);                  courses from each of these three areas:
    Geology 381: Minerals and Energy                                                                    ences degree while preparing for the study of
    Resources: Geologic Constraints and                                                                 Veterinary Medicine. Students in this program
                                                       A. *Biological Sciences (6-8 hours)              must complete at least 93 credit hours while
    Environmental Impacts (3).
 +Course has prerequisite other than courses           +Anthropology 496: Biology of Human              enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences,
prerequisite to this major. See catalog for details.      Variability (3); Biochemistry and Cellular    must satisfy the Basic Skills and Distribution
 *This course may only be used toward satis-              and Molecular Biology 310: Physiological      requirements, and must complete the last 30
fying Part B requirements if it has not been              Chemistry (4); Biochemistry and Cellular      hours in residence at UT Knoxville before
used to satisfy part of the core requirements.            and Molecular Biology 330: Mechanisms of      enrolling in the College of Veterinary Medicine.
                                                          Development (3); Of the following three       A departmental major is not required. Upon
Total (core + track concentration) =32 hours              Botany courses you may choose only one:       successful completion of the first year (two
                                                          Botany 305: Socio-Economic Impact of          semesters) of the professional veterinary
3.  Mathematics                                           Plants (3); Botany 306: Genetics and          medicine curriculum, the Bachelor of Science
   This concentration aims at developing a                Society (3); Botany 309: Biology of Human     degree will be conferred by the College of Arts
fundamental understanding of some of the                  Affairs (3). Botany 310: Plant Morphology     and Sciences.
primary avenues of mathematical thought                   (4); Botany 321: Introductory Plant               Note: Admission to the College of Veteri-
appropriate to the needs of the teacher in                Physiology (4); Botany 330: Field Botany      nary Medicine is at the discretion of the Ad-
grades K-8, Topics include algebra, calculus,             (3); Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 350:    missions Committee of that College;
computing, geometry, history of mathematics,              Comparative Vertebrate Biology (4);           admission to and successful completion of
probability, and statistics.                              Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 360:         this program does not assure admission to
Mathematics 115: Statistical Reasoning (3);               Comparative Invertebrate Biology (4);         the College of Veterinary Medicine.
66           College of Arts and Sciences

                                                            Hours Credit                                                                   Hours Credit           Associate Professors:
Freshman                                                                         Freshman                                                                         I. Harrison (Emeritus), Ph.D. Syracuse; A.
1
  English 101-102 ....................................................... 6      1
                                                                                   English 101, 102 ...................................................... 6      Kramer (Head), Ph.D. Michigan; M. Marks,
1
  Chemistry 120-130 ................................................... 8        2
                                                                                   Biology 130, 140 ...................................................... 8
                                                                                 1
                                                                                   Chemistry 120-130 ................................................... 8        Ph.D Tennessee.
Biology 130-140 ......................................................... 8
2
  Basic Skills (B) Foreign Language
                                                                                 4
                                                                                   Mathematics ............................................................. 6
                                                                                 Sophomore
                                                                                                                                                                  Assistant Professor:
     (Intermediate Level Sequence) ............................ 6                                                                                                 M. Ferreira, Ph.D. California (Berkeley); H.N.
1,3
    Mathematics ........................................................ 4-8
                                                                                 3
                                                                                   Basic Skills: Foreign Language (Intermediate
Sophomore                                                                             Level Sequence) ................................................. 6         Qirko, Ph.D. Tennessee.
                                                                                 BCMB 230 ................................................................ 5
Biology 240 ................................................................ 4                                                                                    Research Associate Professor:
                                                                                 Biology 240 ................................................................ 4
Chemistry 350, 360, 369 ........................................... 8                                                                                             J. Chapman (Director, F.H. McClung
                                                                                 Microbiology 310, 319 ............................................... 4
Physics 221-222 ....................................................... 8          Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3
Divisional Distribution: Non U.S. History ................... 6
                                                                                 6
                                                                                                                                                                  Museum), Ph.D. North Carolina.
                                                                                 Divisional Distribution : Non-U.S. History .................. 6
4
  Divisional Distribution: Social Sciences ................... 3                 Junior                                                                           Research Assistant Professor and
Junior                                                                           Microbiology 420, 429 ............................................... 5          Curator:
Biochemistry and Cellular and                                                    5
                                                                                   Chemistry 110 and Biochemistry and Cellular and
      Molecular Biology 410 or 401 and 402 ............. 4-6                                                                                                      S. Frankenberg, Ph.D. Northwestern.
                                                                                      Molecular Biology 310 ......................................... 7
4
  Divisional Distribution: Social Science ..................... 3                Chemistry 310, 319 ................................................... 7         Research Assistant Professor:
5
  Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 6              Microbiology 430 ....................................................... 3
6
  Upper Level Distribution (A) U.S. Studies,                                     6
                                                                                   Divisional Distribution: Humanities ........................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                  M. Elam, Ph.D. Missouri.
      (B) Foreign Studies, or                                                    Divisional Distribution: Social Sciences ................... 6                   Instructor and Coordinator, Forensic
      (C) Capstone Experience .................................... 6             Upper Level Distribution (A) U.S. Studies,
                                                                                      (B) Foreign Studies, or                                                     Center
7
  Electives ............................................................. 7-12
_____________________________________________                                         (C) Capstone Experience .................................... 6              L.M. Jantz, Ph.D. Tennessee.
                                                                                 _____________________________________________
                                Total: 93 hours                                                                                                                   Adjunct Professor:
____________________________________________                                                                     Total: 93 hours
Senior
                                                                                 ____________________________________________                                     R. Dunnell, Ph.D. Yale.
Completion of major program and B. A./B.S.                                       Senior
                                                                                                                                                                  Adjunct Associate Professor:
   requirements or completion of one year at UT                                  Medical Technology course of study at UTMCK
                                                                                     (12 month program)                                                           L.P. Sullivan, Ph.D. Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
   College of Veterinary Medicine                                                _____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
                        Total: 124 minimum hours
______________________________________________
                                                                                                         Total: 124 minimum hours
                                                                                 ____________________________________________                                     PROGRESSION
1
  Or equivalent honors courses.
                                                                                 1
                                                                                 2
                                                                                   Or equivalent honors courses.
                                                                                   Students who have had considerable background in
                                                                                                                                                                  STANDARDS
2
  This requirement assumes a student has had enough                                                                                                                   Progression into the Anthropology major is
language background in high school to begin an                                   biology in high school (e.g., two years of biology or an
                                                                                 unusually good one-year course) and have completed                               based on performance in the three prerequi-
intermediate language sequence at UT.
3
  Math placement depends on high school courses and                              general chemistry may be eligible to go directly into                            site courses: 110, 120 and 130. Students
                                                                                 Biology 140, 240. Consult the coordinator of the                                 must maintain a grade point average of at
grades, ACT scores, and BA/BS requirements. Math-                                biology program for more information. Such students
ematics 130 or a calculus course is a prerequisite for                                                                                                            least 3.0 for the three introductory courses,
                                                                                 must include at least eight hours in biological science
Physics. All students must complete the Math Basic                               in their electives to satisfy the requirement for                                with none of the three grades below a C. Upon
Skills requirement as outlined in the Arts and                                   admission to the medical technology course of study.                             satisfactory completion of the prerequisites,
Sciences curriculum.                                                             3
                                                                                   This requirement assumes a student has had enough                              the student may apply for progression into the
4
  B.A. students must complete a minimum of 12 credits                            language background in high school to begin an                                   Anthropology major by: (1) completing a for-
from at least two areas; B.S. students must complete                             intermediate language sequence at UT Knoxville.                                  mal application for progression in the Anthro-
a minimum of 6 credits from at least two areas for the                           4
                                                                                   Math placement depends on high school courses and
Social Science requirements.                                                     grades, ACT scores, and BA/BS requirements. All                                  pology Department and (2) including with that
5
  B.A. students must take at least one course from                               students must complete the Math Basic Skills                                     application an academic history demonstrating
List A: Literature and at least one course from List B:                          requirement as outlined in the Arts and Sciences                                 satisfactory completion of the progression
Philosophical and Religious Thought plus one                                     curriculum. Mathematics 115-125 or Mathematics 123-                              requirements. The Undergraduate Committee
additional course from List A, B, or C. B.S. students                            125 are required for pre-medical technology students.                            of the Anthropology Department will meet
must complete a minimum of 6 credits from the three
                                                                                 5
                                                                                   Chemistry 350, 360, and 369 may be substituted for
                                                                                 Chemistry 110 and Biochemistry and Cellular and                                  regularly to determine the status of these
lists; not more than 3 credits may be taken from List                                                                                                             applications. Upon progression to the major, a
                                                                                 Molecular Biology 310.
C: Arts.                                                                         6
                                                                                   B.S. students must complete a minimum of 6 credits                             department advisor will be assigned in consul-
6
  B.A. students must complete a minimum of 6 credits                             from the three lists under the Humanities requirement;
in one of the three areas and 3 credits from one of                                                                                                               tation with the student.
                                                                                 not more than 3 credits may be taken from List C (Arts).                             The anthropology major consists of 450 or
the remaining two areas. B.S. students must complete
a minimum of 6 credits in two of the three areas.                                                                                                                 357 and 27 additional hours of upper division
7
  Depending upon course selection, a student may
require less than the listed elective hours to reach the
                                                                                 AFRICAN AND                                                                      course work in Anthropology. This course
                                                                                                                                                                  work shall be distributed as follows:
minimum total of 93 hours.                                                       AFRICAN-AMERICAN                                                                     1. One course from categories (a), (b),
                                                                                                                                                                  (c), and (d); and two courses from category
SCIENCE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY                                                       STUDIES                                                                          (e).
                                                                                 See Interdisciplinary Programs.                                                      a. archaeological method and theory: 361,
CURRICULUM                                                                                                                                                        362, 440, 464
    Students who complete the Science-Medi-                                                                                                                           b. archaeological area: 360, 363, 462, 463
cal Technology Curriculum receive the B.S.                                       AMERICAN STUDIES                                                                     c. cultural area: 310, 311, 312, 313, 315,
degree with a major in medical technology                                        See Interdisciplinary Programs.                                                  316, 319, 320
from the College of Arts and Sciences. The                                                                                                                            d. cultural method and theory: 410, 411,
curriculum requires a minimum of 94 hours of                                                                                                                      412, 413, 414, 416, 431
credit which includes the Basic Skills and Dis-                                  ANTHROPOLOGY                                                                         e. biological anthropology: 480, 485, 490,
                                                                                                                                                                  494, 495, 496
tribution requirements of the college prior to
application for admission to a final year of                                     Professors:                                                                          2. Remaining hours may be selected from
study at The University of Tennessee Medical                                     W.M. Bass (Emeritus, Alumni Distinguished                                        any upper division Anthropology courses.
Center, Knoxville (UTMCK). After the course                                      Service Professor), Ph.D. Pennsylvania; C.H.                                         Students with senior standing are encour-
of study is completed, UTMCK, awards the                                         Faulkner (Distinguished Professor), Ph.D.                                        aged to substitute appropriate 500 level
student a Certificate of Laboratory Training.                                    Indiana; Faye V. Harrison, Ph.D. Stanford;                                       courses (with permission of the instructor of
Students are then eligible for examination by                                    B.J. Howell, Ph.D. Kentucky; R.L. Jantz,                                         the course and approval of the Department
the Board of Registry of the American Society                                    Ph.D. Kansas; W.E. Klippel, Ph.D. Missouri; L.                                   Head) for any portion of (1) or (2) above.
                                                                                 Konigsberg, Ph.D. Northwestern; M.H. Logan,                                          The Department of Anthropology offers
of Clinical Pathologists to earn certification as
                                                                                 Ph.D. Pennsylvania State; P.W. Parmalee                                          honors seminars for juniors and seniors, lead-
registered medical technologists.
                                                                                 (Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas A&M; G.F. Schroedl,                                      ing to an honors major. The honors major
                                                                                 Ph.D. Washington State; J.F. Simek                                               consists of 357 and 457 plus 24 additional
                                                                                 (Distinguished Professor), Ph.D. SUNY-                                           hours of upper division course work in Anthro-
                                                                                 Binghamton; M.C. Wheeler (Emerita), Ph.D.                                        pology distributed as specified above for the
                                                                                 Yale.                                                                            major.
                                                                                                                                                            College of Arts and Sciences                             67


    To enroll in Anthropology 357, the student             average as space allows. The overall record                                        Studio Electives
must have fulfilled the progression require-               will be evaluated for quality and seriousness                                      Additional hours in studio courses to be completed in
ments necessary to declare a major in An-                  of purpose. Excessive absences, withdraw-                                             the School of Art or our affiliated facility,
                                                                                                                                                 Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. Students
thropology and must have an overall GPA of                 als, incompletes or repeated courses may re-
                                                                                                                                                 may also apply a maximum of 6 hours of approved
3.2. To enroll and receive honors credit for               sult in denial of progression. Progression into                                       studio courses from Architecture, Art Education,
Anthropology 457, the student must complete                the School of Art does not guarantee progres-                                         Broadcasting, Journalism, Computer Science,
357 with a grade of B or better, maintain a 3.5            sion into a chosen concentration. Progres-                                            Human Resource Development, Interior Design or
GPA in all Anthropology courses, and maintain              sion into a concentration will follow successful                                      Theatre. Students electing an additional major in
a 3.2 GPA overall.                                         completion of a Concentration Portfolio Review.                                       Art Education and licensure to teach in schools K-
    Continuation in the anthropology major                                                                                                       12 may apply 13 hours in undergraduate Art
requires maintenance of a 2.5 GPA or better                B. F. A. IN STUDIO ART                                                                Education courses ............................................ 18
                                                               The B.F.A. in Studio Art is a professionally                                   _____________________________________________
in all anthropology courses. Students failing to
meet this standard will be notified in writing             oriented degree especially intended for those                                                                        Sub-Total: 18
that they are on probation and their records               students planning careers or graduate study                                        _____________________________________________
will be reviewed. Those who continue in pro-               in the visual arts. All students seeking studio
                                                           degrees (B.A. Studio, B.F.A. Studio and Art                                        General Curriculum
bationary status for two consecutive semes-                                                                                                   English Composition .............................................. .. 6
ters will be dropped from the major.                       Education) must present and pass the appro-
                                                                                                                                              Non U.S. History/Social Science ............................... 6
    Anthropology 110, 120, 130 are prerequi-               priate Portfolio Review for their area of study                                    Natural Science/Mathematics ................................. 6-8
site to a minor in Anthropology, consisting of 15          in order to be admitted into advanced                                              Arts and Sciences Non-Art Electives. ................ 14-16
                                                           courses. Contact specific program area fac-                                        _____________________________________________
hours of upper division Anthropology courses,
                                                           ulty for review of schedules and details. It
chosen in consultation with an Anthropology                should not be assumed that a high grade point                                                                        Sub-Total: 34
advisor.                                                   average in the major itself assures passing                                        _____________________________________________
                                                           Portfolio Review. The Portfolio Review is                                          Concentrations
ART                                                        recommended in the Sophomore year and is
                                                           intended to provide students with an overview
                                                                                                                                              Ceramics:
                                                                                                                                              Ceramics 222 ............................................................ 3
                                                           assessment of their potential for success in                                       Art Ceramics Portfolio Review 320 (S/NC)
Professors:                                                                                                                                   Ceramics 321, 322 (prerequisite for all 400 level ........
                                                           the intended area of study early enough to al-
 S.J. Blain, M.F.A. Wisconsin; M. Brakke,                  low a student to make a program change                                                 Ceramics courses ................................................ 6
M.F.A. Yale; J. Darrow (Emeritus), Ed.D.                   should that be advisable. Before choosing a                                        Ceramics 421, 422, 429, 493, or 494 ...................... 14
Illinois; J.S. Falsetti (Emeritus), M.S. Ohio                                                                                                 Approved Concentration Electives:
                                                           concentration, students should contact their                                           (9 hours from the following)
State; M.B. Goldenstein, M.F.A. Nebraska; D.               intended area to see what options are offered                                          Ceramics 424, 429
M. Habel, Ph.D. Michigan; W.C. Kennedy                     in the event they do not pass portfolio review.                                        Drawing 212
(Emeritus), M.F.A. Wisconsin; B. Lee, M.F.A.               All studio courses require 3 hours per week                                            Sculpture 241, 242, 243, 245, 246
Yale; W.E. Leland, M.F.A. Tennessee; B.                    attendance for each credit hour earned. Com-                                           Printmaking 262, 263
Lyons, M.F.A. Arizona State; N. Magden,                    pleting the B.F.A. program may take more                                               Painting 213, 214, 215
Ph.D. Case Western Reserve; F.H. Martinson                 than 8 semesters. Students are urged to seek                                           Arrowmont Ceramics 420 ..................................... 9
                                                           departmental advisement each semester to                                           _____________________________________________
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Chicago; F.C. Moffatt, Ph.D.
Chicago; D. Peacock (Emeritus), M.F.A. Iowa;               ensure proper scheduling. Students seeking                                                                           Sub-Total: 32
T.J. Riesing, M.F.A. Nebraska; C. Staples,                 the B.F.A. Degree in Studio Art should also                                        _____________________________________________
M.F.A Michigan State; F.C. Stewart, M.F.A.                 consider pursuing a minor in Art History.
Claremont; D. Wilson, M.F.A. Wisconsin; S.A.                   Transfer students are advised that a mini-
                                                                                                                                              Drawing:
Yates, M.F.A. North Carolina (Greensboro).                 mum of 21 hours in studio courses, and 6                                           Art Drawing 212 (may be repeated) ........................... 3
                                                           upper division hours in art history, must be                                       Art Drawing Portfolio Review 312 (S/NC)
Associate Professors:                                      earned at UT. Transfer students must have a                                        Art Drawing 311 (for two semesters) ......................... 8
Sally Brogden, M.F.A. New York State College               minimum overall GPA of 3.00 in Art and Art                                         Art Drawing 411 (for two semesters) ....................... 12
of Ceramics at Alfred; T. W. Hiles, Ph.D.                  History courses and may be required to                                             Approved Concentration Electives:
Pennsylvania State; A.L. Neff, Ph.D.                       present a portfolio. Those students who have                                           (9 hours from the following)
                                                           not taken any art courses must take the se-                                            Art Drawing 219/419 (maximum 6 hours)
Pennsylvania.                                                                                                                                     Art Painting 213, 214, 215, 216
                                                           quence of courses required of freshmen (see
                                                                                                                                                  Art Media Arts 231
Assistant Professors:                                      section on Progression into the School of Art).                                        Art Printmaking 262, 263 ..................................... 9
Jason Brown, M.F.A. Rhode Island School of                 Students should be cautioned that art courses                                      _____________________________________________
Design; William Dewey, Ph.D. Indiana; Kevin                taken at another institution may not apply to-
Everson, M.F.A. Ohio; Anita Jung, M.F.A.                   ward their concentration. Art Design 252,                                                                            Sub-Total: 32
Wisconsin; Wade Lough, M.F.A. Temple;                      Drawing 212, and Painting 214 must be taken                                        _____________________________________________
Sarah Lowe, M.G.D. North Carolina; Frank                   at the University of Tennessee. Courses not                                        Painting:
Martin, M.F.A. Cranbrook; Jennifer Odem,                   accepted for application toward a concentra-                                       Painting 214 (may be repeated) ................................ 3
M.F.A. Florida State; Suzanne Wright, Ph.D.                tion may be counted as studio electives.                                           Art Painting Portfolio Review 314 (S/NC)
                                                               No grade below “C” in art courses may be                                       Painting 313 (for two semesters) .............................. 8
Stanford.                                                                                                                                     Painting 413 (for two semesters) ............................ 12
                                                           applied to the B.F.A. major. A minimum of 42
                                                           credit hours, 300 level or above, must be                                          Approved Concentration Electives:
                                                                                                                                                  (9 hours from the following)
PROGRESSION                                                earned prior to graduation.
                                                                                                                                                  Art Drawing 219/419 (maximum 6 hours)
                                                               Students may be accepted into advanced
REQUIREMENTS                                               media concentrations in Ceramics, Drawing,
                                                                                                                                                  Art Painting 214, 215
                                                                                                                                                  Art Media Arts 231
    The following core courses must be com-                Painting, Media Arts, Printmaking, Sculpture,                                          Art Drawing 212 .................................................... 9
pleted before students can progress into the               and Watercolor after passing the appropriate                                       _____________________________________________
program as art majors and before further art               portfolio course.
classes may be taken:*                                                                                                                                                          Sub-Total: 32
    Art 101                                                Basic Requirements                                                                 _____________________________________________
    Art 103                                                (All Concentrations Except Media Arts)                                             Printmaking:
    Art History 162, 172, 173, or 183 (choose                                                                          Hours Credit           Printmaking 200 level course .................................... 3
one)                                                       Core                                                                               Art Printmaking Portfolio Review 360 (S/NC)
                                                           Art 101,103 ................................................................ 4     Printmaking 300 and 400 level courses .................. 20
                                                           Art 295 ...................................................................... 3   Approved Concentration Electives:
*See section on transfer students. Students have
                                                           Art History 172 and 173 and 162 or 183 ................... 9                           (9 hours from the following)
the right to petition the School in the event of unusual                                                                                          Art Drawing 212 (maximum 6 hours)
                                                           Art History Electives ................................................. 9
enrollment circumstances.                                                                                                                         Art Drawing 311
                                                           One course from each of the following 6 areas:
                                                               Art Ceramics, Art Drawing, Art Media Arts, Art                                     Art Drawing 419 (maximum 6 hours)
   Students entering the major must have                       Painting/Watercolor, Art Printmaking, and Art                                      Art Media Arts 231
earned a minimum 3.00 cumulative average in                    Sculpture ........................................................... 18           Art Printmaking 469 (3 hours) .............................. 9
the above courses to be considered for pro-                ____________________________________________                                       _____________________________________________
gression into the School of Art. Those apply-                                                Sub-Total: 43                                                                      Sub-Total: 32
                                                           _____________________________________________
ing will progress in rank order of cumulative                                                                                                 _____________________________________________
68            College of Arts and Sciences

Sculpture:                                                                         General Curriculum                                                             Design and Professional Electives
Sculpture 200 level course ........................................ 3              English Composition .................................................. 6       Art Graphic Design 254, 256, 259, 354, 396,
Art Sculpture Portfolio Review 340 (S/NC)                                          Social Science ........................................................... 6       405, 453, 454, 459; Art Media Arts 235,
    Prerequisite to 300 and 400 level courses                                      Natural Science/Mathematics ............................. 12-14                    236, 331, 435, 436; Art 491, 492;
Sculpture 300 and 400 level courses ...................... 20                      Arts and Sciences Non-Art Electives ..................... 6-9                      Advertising 250, 350, 490 ................................. 12
Approved Concentration Electives:                                                  _____________________________________________                                  _____________________________________________
    (9 hours from the following)                                                                                  Sub-Total: 32-33                                                                   Sub-Total: 12
    Art Drawing 212 (maximum 6 hours)                                              _____________________________________________                                  ______________________________________________
    Art Drawing 311                                                                                            Total: 125-126 hours                               Studio Electives
    Art Drawing 419 (maximum 6 hours)                                              _____________________________________________                                  Students must choose a total of 9 hours from a
    Art Media Arts 231                                                                                                                                               minimum of 2 categories:
    Art Printmaking 469 (3 hours) .............................. 9                 B.F.A. IN STUDIO ART WITH ADDITIONAL                                              (1) Art Printmaking; (2) Art Ceramics; (3) Art
_____________________________________________                                      COURSES IN ART EDUCATION                                                          Sculpture; or (4) Art Media Arts .......................... 9
                                                                                                                                                                  _____________________________________________
                                  Sub-Total: 32                                        Students who wish to obtain licensure to
                                                                                                                                                                                                      Sub-Total: 9
_____________________________________________                                      teach art in schools K-12 can pursue the                                       ______________________________________________
                                                                                   B.F.A. degree in studio with additional courses                                General Curriculum
Watercolor:
Painting 216 (may be repeated) ................................ 3                  in Art Education. Up to 13 credit hours of Art                                 English Composition .................................................. 6
Art Painting Portfolio Review 316 (S/NC)                                           Education courses may be used as studio                                        Non U.S. History/Social Science ............................... 6
Art Painting 315 (for two semesters) ......................... 8                   electives. Students who wish to pursue licen-                                  Natural Science/Mathematics ................................. 6-8
Art Painting 415 (for two semesters) ....................... 12                    sure to teach should be aware that General                                     Arts and Sciences Non-Art Electives ................. 13-15
                                                                                                                                                                  _____________________________________________
Approved Concentration Electives:                                                  Curriculum requirements are different. For
    (9 hours from the following)                                                                                                                                                                    Sub-Total: 33
                                                                                   details, see Art Education listings in the Col-                                _____________________________________________
    Art Drawing 219/419 (maximum 6 hours)                                          lege of Education section of this catalog.                                     _____________________________________________
    Art Painting 213, 214
    Art Media Arts 231                                                                                                                                                              Total Semester Hours: 127 hours
                                                                                   B.F.A. IN GRAPHIC DESIGN                                                       _____________________________________________
    Art Drawing 212 .................................................... 9
_____________________________________________                                          The Graphic Design major is specifically
                                  Sub-Total: 32                                    designed to provide the basic visual education                                 B.A. MAJORS IN ART HISTORY
_____________________________________________                                      for students who wish to pursue careers in                                                                                           Hours Credit
_____________________________________________
                                                                                   graphic design-related fields such as advertis-                                Prerequisite: Art History 172 , 173 and 183
                                     Total: 127                                    ing, art direction, three-dimensional design,                                      or 162 (or their Honors equivalents) .................... 9
_____________________________________________                                                                                                                     Art History courses numbered 300 and above ........ 21
                                                                                   publications, or electronic media.                                                 Students are required to take at least one course
                                                                                       Transfer students are advised that a mini-                                     in four of the following areas: Medieval/Early
B. F. A. IN STUDIO ART—MEDIA ARTS                                                  mum of 21 hours in studio courses, and 6 up-                                       Renaissance—Art History 425, 431, 441, 451;
CONCENTRATION                                                                      per division hours in art history must be                                          Renaissance/Baroque—Art History 442, 452, 453;
                                                                                   earned at UT. Transfer students who expect                                         American—Art History 471, 472, 473, 483; 19th/
Basic Requirements                                                                                                                                                    20th Century—Art History 403, 472, 474, 475,
                                                            Hours Credit           to enroll in 300 (junior level) courses must                                       476, Art Media Arts 433; Asian—Art History 411,
Core                                                                               present a portfolio of 10-15 works, the major-                                     415, 419; 9 Art History elective hours or from
Art 101, 103 .............................................................. 4      ity of which must be in graphic design.                                            courses in the Departments of Classics, Religious
Art 295 ...................................................................... 3       No grade below “C” in art courses may be                                       Studies, or School of Architecture in consultation
Art History 172 and 173 and 183 or 162 ................... 9                       applied to the B.F.A. major. A minimum of 42                                       with departmental advisor.
Art History Electives ................................................. 6                                                                                         Art 481 (Museology I: Museums, Purpose,
                                                                                   credit hours, 300 level or above, must be                                          and Function ....................................................... 3
Media Arts 231, 235, 236 .......................................... 9
One course from each of the following 5 areas: Art
                                                                                   earned prior to graduation.                                                    Art History 376 (Seminar in Art History) .................... 3
    Drawing, Art Painting/Watercolor, Art Ceramics,                                    A minimum of 127 credit hours are re-                                      Studio courses numbered 200 and above ................. 3
                                                                                   quired for graduation. Students are advised                                    ______________________________________________
    Art Sculpture, Art Printmaking ........................... 15
____________________________________________                                       that courses in Graphic Design must be taken                                                                    Total: 39 hours
                                                                                                                                                                  ______________________________________________
                                  Sub-Total: 46                                    in sequence, and that successful completion
_____________________________________________                                                                                                                        Undergraduate work in Art History is
                                                                                   of Art 350 (Portfolio Review, S/NC) is prereq-
Concentration                                                                      uisite to all upper division courses.                                          enhanced by knowledge of at least one for-
Media Arts 330 (Portfolio Review)                                                      Students must complete 351 and 356 with                                    eign language and by additional studio art ex-
    (Prerequisite to 300 and 400 level courses)
                                                                                   a grade of C or better by the end of the sec-                                  perience. Graduate work normally requires
    (S/NC) ................................................................. 0                                                                                    reading knowledge of German, French, and
Art History 403 (History of Photography) .................. 3                      ond fall semester following successful
                                                                                                                                                                  any other language appropriate to an area
Art Media 433 (History of Modern Art and Film) ......... 3                         completion of Portfolio Review (350). If 351                                   specialization.
Art Media 435 (Cinematography as Art) .................... 6                       and 356 are not successfully completed in this                                    Students anticipating possible careers in
Art Media 436 (Video Art) .......................................... 6             time, the student must resubmit a portfolio to                                 the museum or gallery field are advised that
Art Media 331 (Photography II) or Art Media 341                                    regain entrance into the junior program.                                       elective hours in Art 482, Museology II, should
    (Digital                                                                       Resubmission of the portfolio must occur dur-
    Photography I) .................................................... 4
                                                                                                                                                                  be considered.
                                                                                   ing the scheduled spring portfolio review.
Art Media 431 (Photography III) or
                                                                                                                                         Hours Credit             MAJOR IN STUDIO
    Art Media 441 (Digital Photography II) ................ 4
                                                                                   Art Core                                                                                                                            Hours Credit
300 and 400 Level Electives in Media Arts ............... 6
_____________________________________________                                      Art 101, 103, 295 ...................................................... 7     Prerequisite: Art 101, 103, 295 ................................. 7
                                                                                   Art History 172, 173 .................................................. 6      Art History 162, 172, 173, 183 (any two) and
                                  Sub-Total: 32
_____________________________________________                                      Art History electives .................................................. 9         3 additional hours ................................................ 9
                                                                                   Art Drawing 211, 212; Art Painting 213 (or 215);                               Major:
Studio Electives
                                                                                       Art Media Arts 231 ............................................ 12         Studio courses numbered 200 and above,
Additional hours in studio courses to be completed in                              _____________________________________________
   the School of Art or our affiliated facility,                                                                                                                      including a minimum of 15 hours in
                                                                                                                      Sub-Total: 34                                   300-400 level courses ....................................... 24
   Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. Students                                   ______________________________________________                                 ____________________________________________
   may also apply a maximum of 6 hours of approved
                                                                                   Graphic Design                                                                                                  Total: 40 hours
   studio courses from Architecture, Art Education,                                                                                                               _____________________________________________
                                                                                   Art Graphic Design 151 ............................................. 3
   Broadcasting, Journalism, Computer Science,
                                                                                   Art Graphic Design 251, 252, 351, 352, 356, 451,
   Human Resource Development, Interior Design, or                                                                                                                   In addition to the general B.A. require-
                                                                                       452, 455 (in sequence) ..................................... 24
   Theatre. Students electing an additional major in
                                                                                   Art Graphic Design 350                                                         ments, the following are required for minors in
   Art Education and licensure to teach may apply                                                                                                                 the School of Art:
                                                                                       Portfolio Review (S/NC) ....................................... 0
   13 hours in undergraduate Art Education courses.
                                                                                   Art Graphic Design 444 (maximum 6 hours)
   15                                                                                                                                                             MINOR IN ART HISTORY
_____________________________________________                                          and/or 456 ......................................................... 12
                                                                                   ______________________________________________                                                                            Hours Credit
                                  Sub-Total: 15
_____________________________________________                                                                        Sub-Total: 39                                Prerequisite: Art History 172, 173, 183 ..................... 9
                                                                                   _____________________________________________                                      (or their Honors equivalents)
                                                                                                                                                                  Minor:
                                                                                                                                                                  Art History courses numbered 200 and above ........ 15
                                                                                                                                                                  ______________________________________________
                                                                                                                                                                                                   Total: 24 hours
                                                                                                                                                                  _____________________________________________
                                                                                                                                   College of Arts and Sciences         69


MINOR IN STUDIO
                                              Hours Credit
                                                                     Assistant Professors:
                                                                     M. L. Erickson, Ph.D. Southern California; P.
                                                                                                                          BACTERIOLOGY
Prerequisites: Art 101, 103, 295 ............................... 7   Flipsen, Ph.D. Wisconsin; A. Harkrider, Ph.D.        See Microbiology.
Art History 172, 173, 183 (any two) .......................... 6     Texas; RaMonda Ikard, Ph.D. Wisconsin;
Studio courses which include a minimum of
    8 additional upper-division hours.
                                                                     Maria Munoz, Ph.D. Texas.                            BIOCHEMISTRY AND
    Concentration may be Ceramics, Drawing,
    Media Arts, Painting-Watercolor, Printmaking,
                                                                     Instructor:
                                                                     T.R. Singletary, M.S. Colorado State.
                                                                                                                          CELLULAR AND
    Sculpture or a combination from these areas ... 15
______________________________________________
                                                                     Research Professor:                                  MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
                                 Total: 28 hours                     A. K. Nabelek (Emerita), Ph.D. Polish
_____________________________________________                                                                             Professors:
                                                                     Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.                 R.M. Bagby, Ph.D. Illinois; J.M. Becker,
PI BETA PHI ARROWMONT SCHOOL OF                                      Research Coordinator:                                Ph.D. Cincinnati; J. G. Carlson (Emeritus;
ARTS AND CRAFTS                                                      Polly Alfonso, M.A. Southwest Missouri State.        Distinguished Professor), Ph.D. Pennsylvania;
                                                                                                                          M.A. Handel (Distinguished Professor), Ph.D.
Director:                                                            Clinical Director:                                   Kansas State; B. Hochman (Emeritus), Ph.D.
S.J. Blain, M.F.A. Wisconsin                                         Ann Michael, Ph.D. Vanderbilt                        California; E.E. Howell, Ph.D, Lehigh; K.W.
                                                                                                                          Jeon, Ph.D. London; J.G. Joshi, Ph.D. Poona;
    Arrowmont, located 40 miles from the UT                              The Department of Audiology and Speech           D.C. Joy (Distinguished Scientist), Ph.D.
Knoxville campus, is a visual arts complex                           Pathology offers course work in the scientific       Oxford (UK); J.R. Kennedy, Ph.D. Iowa; J.W.
which functions as a regional and national                           study of human communication sciences and            Koontz, Ph.D. Kentucky; J.N. Liles (Emeritus),
cultural center. In 1954, Pi Beta Phi Fraternity                     disorders. The two undergraduate majors              Ph.D. Ohio State; J.A. MacCabe, Ph.D.
established an affiliation with the University of                    (audiology and speech pathology) are prepa-          California (Davis); B.D. McKee (Head), Ph.D.
Tennessee, and with the School of Art in                             ratory to graduate work and to professional          Michigan State; K.J. Monty, Ph.D. Rochester;
1978. The program currently includes spring                          certification in some aspect of speech, lan-         D. M. Roberts, Ph.D. California (Davis); L.E.
and summer one and two week media work-                              guage, and hearing disorders. The master’s           Roth (Emeritus), Ph.D. Chicago; T.P. Salo
shops, special weekend conferences, and                              degree is required for professional certificates     (Emeritus), Ph.D. Michigan; E.H. Serpersu,
community classes. Media offerings include:                          and employment positions. Information about          Ph.D. Hateceppe; C.A. Shivers (Emeritus),
clay, fiber, fabric, metal, wood, stained glass,                     the audiology and speech pathology programs          Ph.D. Michigan State; H.G. Welch (Emeritus),
leather, papermaking, drawing, painting,                             may be obtained from the departmental office,        Ph.D. Florida; G. L. Whitson (Emeritus), Ph.D.
graphics and photography. Students may                               457 South Stadium Hall, and students are             Iowa; W.D. Wicks, Ph.D. Harvard.
receive audit, undergraduate, or graduate                            strongly encouraged to consult with the un-
credit for spring and summer classes through                         dergraduate advisors in the department as            Associate Professors:
the University of Tennessee School of Art.                           early as possible in their programs. Sug-            B. Bruce, Ph.D. California (Berkeley); R.
Facilities include well equipped studios, on                         gested elective courses for students not ma-         Ganguly, Ph.D. Nebraska; J.C. Hall, Ph.D.
campus book and supply store, a large audi-                          joring in Audiology and Speech Pathology             Illinois; C.B. Peterson, Ph.D. LSU; R.A.
torium, art library, and resident accommoda-                         include 300, 302, 303, 305, 306, 320, and 473.       Prosser, Ph.D. Illinois.
tions. The Arrowmont Gallery presents                                     The B.A. Major in Speech Pathology              Assistant Professors:
changing juried, invitational, theme or media                        consists of Audiology and Speech Pathology           C. Dealwis, Ph.D. London; R. H. Feinberg
oriented exhibitions. The Gallery and                                300, 302, 303, 305, 306, 320, 433, 435, 461,         (Emeritus), Ph.D. California (Berkeley); E.
library are open to the public Monday-                               473, and 494; and one course from the follow-        Fernandez, Ph.D. Loyola; J. Park, Ph.D.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Arrowmont                            ing courses: Linguistics 200, 371, 372, 411,         Texas.
receives financial support from chapters of                          471, or 472.
the Pi Beta Phi Fraternity, alumnae clubs, and                           The B.A. Major in Audiology consists of          Research Professors:
individual members.                                                  Audiology and Speech Pathology 300, 302,             F. Hartman, Ph.D. Tennessee; P. Mazur,
     Courses are offered periodically at the Pi                      303, 305, 306, 320, 433, 435, 461, 473, and          Ph.D. Harvard; D.P. Allison, M.S. Tennessee.
Beta Phi Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts,                        494.
Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Content varies with                               Applicants for enrollment in clinical practice   Students wishing to emphasize study in this
faculty. Students should check specific                              must submit an application to the departmental       area elect to major in Biology with a concen-
course content as printed in the Arrowmont                           Director of Clinical Services. Requirements for      tration in Biochemistry and Cellular and Mo-
timetable published each spring.                                     enrollment in practicum courses (434 in              lecular Biology. See the description of the
                                                                     Speech Pathology or 445 in Audiology) include        Biology Major under “Division of Biology" for
                                                                     a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 (or 3.0 in           requirements.
ASIAN STUDIES                                                        the last 30 hours of enrollments), a minimum
See Interdisciplinary Programs.                                      of “C” in all courses taken within the depart-
                                                                     ment, successful completion of 433, and a            DIVISION OF BIOLOGY
                                                                     minimum GPA of 2.75 within the major.
ASTRONOMY                                                                Students who fail to satisfy the above pre-      Director:
See Physics and Astronomy.                                           requisites for clinical practicum experience         John Koontz, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular
                                                                     may graduate with a degree from the depart-          and Molecular Biology.
                                                                     ment, but will not be recommended for gradu-
AUDIOLOGY AND                                                        ate study at UTK. Requests for exceptions to
                                                                                                                          Basic Faculty:
                                                                                                                          C.C. Amundsen, Ph.D. Ecology and
SPEECH PATHOLOGY                                                     this rule may be submitted to the departmental
                                                                     Admissions Committee.
                                                                                                                          Evolutionary Biology; R.M. Bagby, Ph.D.
                                                                                                                          Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular
Professors:                                                              Additional requirements for professional         Biology; J.M. Becker, Ph.D. Microbiology;
Ilsa Schwarz (Head), Ph.D. Oregon; C.W.                              certification include courses in biological/         C.R.B. Boake, Ph.D. Ecology and
Asp, Ph.D. Ohio State; P.J. Carney, Ph.D.                            physical sciences, mathematics, and at least         Evolutionary Biology; D. Brian, Ph.D.
Iowa; S. Handel (Adjunct), Ph.D. Johns                               six semester hours in behavioral and/or social       Microbiology; B. Bruce, Ph.D. Biochemistry
Hopkins; D.M. Lipscomb (Adjunct), Ph.D.                              sciences which pertain to the understanding          and Cellular and Molecular Biology; D.L.
Washington; I.V. Nabelek (Emeritus), Ph.D.                           of normal/abnormal behavior. Students major-         Bunting, Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary
Czech Technical (Prague); H.A. Peterson                              ing in Audiology and Speech Pathology are            Biology; M. Butler, Ph.D. Ecology and
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Illinois; B. Silverstein                           strongly encouraged to consult with their            Evolutionary Biology; J.D. Caponetti, Ph.D.
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Purdue.                                            advisors before selecting elective courses.          Botany; P.B. Cox, Ph.D. Biology; C. Dealwis,
                                                                                                                          Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular
Associate Professors:                                                                                                     Biology; H. Delcourt, Ph.D. Ecology and
S.B. Burchfield, Ph.D. Michigan State; M.                                                                                 Evolutionary Biology; P. Delcourt, Ph.D.
Hedrick, Ph.D. Vanderbilt; P. Payne, Ph.D.                                                                                Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; J. Drake,
Tennessee; Lori Swanson, Ph.D. Purdue; J.                                                                                 Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; A.C.
Thelin, Ph.D. Iowa.
70      College of Arts and Sciences


Echternacht, Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary      B. Progression Requirement                              Evolution
Biology; D.A. Etnier, Ph.D. Ecology and              A cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 in prereq-           EEB 460 Evolution
Evolutionary Biology; D.J. Fox, Ph.D. Ecology    uisite science and math courses is required             Ecology
and Evolutionary Biology; R. Ganguly, Ph.D.      both to declare and to continue as a Biological           EEB 446 Oceanography
Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular          Sciences major. Students wishing to declare a             EEB 470 Aquatic Ecology
Biology; S. Gavrilets, Ph.D. Ecology and         major in Biological Sciences will be assigned a           EEB 484 Conservation Biology
Evolutionary Biology; N. Greenberg, Ph.D.        faculty advisor in one of the biological sci-             EEB 431 Plant Ecology
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; L.J. Gross,    ences departments in consultation with the                MICRO 470 Microbial Ecology
Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; D.L.     student. Declaration of a Biological Sciences           Organismal Biology
                                                 major should occur as soon as the student
Hacker, Ph.D. Microbiology; J.C. Hall, Ph.D.                                                               EEB 350 Vertebrate Biology
                                                 decides on this course of study but not later
Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular          than three semesters before the expected                  EEB 360 Invertebrate Biology
Biology; T.G. Hallam, Ph.D. Ecology and          graduation date. This is necessary in order to            EEB 380 Entomology
Evolutionary Biology; M.A. Handel, Ph.D.         ensure that requirements can be met in a                  EEB 450 Comparative Animal Behavior
Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular          timely manner as not all courses are taught               EEB 474 Ichthyology
Biology; L.G. Hickok, Ph.D. Botany; E.E.         every year.                                               EEB 461 Special Topics in
Howell, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and                                                                  Organismal Biology
Molecular Biology; K.W. Hughes, Ph.D.            C. Honors Major                                           BOT 310 Plant Morphology
Botany; K.W. Jeon, Ph.D. Biochemistry and             An honors option is presently available in           BOT 330 Field Botany
Cellular and Molecular Biology; D.C. Joy,        Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biol-             MICRO 310/319 Introduction to
Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular    ogy; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Micro-               Microbiology/ Introductory Lab
Biology; J.R. Kennedy, Ph.D. Biochemistry        biology; and Plant Biology concentration                Physiology
and Cellular and Molecular Biology; J. Koontz,   areas. Requirements for honors options are                BOT 321 Introduction to Plant Physiology
Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular    listed with the appropriate concentration areas.          BCMB 440 General Physiology
Biology; P. Kover, Ph.D. Ecology and             D. Concentration Area Requirements                        BCMB 415 Neurobiology
Evolutionary Biology; J.A. MacCabe, Ph.D.            Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecu-                 MICRO 310 General Microbiology
Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular          lar Biology (BCMB) Additional prerequisite:             4. The remaining hours for the EEB con-
Biology; J.F. McCormick (Emeritus), Ph.D.        Computer Science 100. The concentration             centration can include any of the remaining
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; G.             consists of Chemistry 350-360-369, BCMB             EEB courses on these lists, other Upper
McCracken, Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary        401-402, and at least 18 additional credit          Division Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Biology; K.D. McFarland, Ph.D. Botany; B.D.      hours selected from BCMB courses num-               courses, or appropriate Upper
McKee, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and       bered 300 or above (except BCMB 310 and             Division courses offered by the following
Molecular Biology; B.C. Mullin, Ph.D. Botany;    410), or from the following courses in other        departments: Anthropology; Botany; Forestry,
A. Nebenfuhr, Ph.D. Botany; M.L. Pan, Ph.D.      departments: Microbiology 310-319, 410, 411,        Wildlife and Fisheries; Geography; Geology;
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; J. Park,       420-429, 430, 440; Botany 321, 404; EEB 350,        Microbiology; Plant and Soil Sciences. A list of
Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular    360, 460. At least two of the 18 credit hours       approved appropriate courses may be ob-
Biology; R.H. Petersen, Ph.D. Botany; C.B.       must be selected from the following laboratory      tained from the office of either the Division of
Peterson, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and    courses: BCMB 403, 416, 419, 429 and 452,           Biology or Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Molecular Biology; Massimo Pigliucci, Ph.D.      and Biology 401. At least three of the 18           or from the Department of Ecology and Evolu-
Botany; R.A. Prosser, Ph.D. Biochemistry and     credit hours must be selected from the follow-      tionary Biology's webpage. Other courses,
Cellular and Molecular Biology; N.B. Quigley,    ing physiology courses: BCMB 440, Botany            related to the student’s determined interests,
Ph.D. Microbiology; S.E. Riechert, Ph.D.         321, and Microbiology 310. No more than 9 of        may be approved by petition to the depart-
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; W.S.           the 18 credit hours may be in non-BCMB              ment and the Division. Courses applied to the
Riggsby, Ph.D. Microbiology; D.M. Roberts,       courses.                                            major must include at least 4 hours at the 400-
Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular        An honors option is offered to students         level and one laboratory course.
Biology; B. Rouse, Ph.D. Microbiology; G.S.      with a cumulative GPA in Biological Sciences            Requirements for the honors option are as
Sayler, Ph.D. Microbiology; E.E. Schilling,      prerequisite courses of 3.5 or above and who        follows: (a) fulfill all requirements for the Bio-
Ph.D. Botany; E.H. Serpersu, Ph.D.               have completed Biology 130-140-240-250.             logical Sciences: Ecology and Evolutionary Bi-
Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular          The honors option also requires a substantive       ology major; (b) maintain a GPA of 3.5 in all
Biology; O.J. Schwarz, Ph.D. Botany; C.A.        research project carried out under the super-       the 300-level and above courses from the
Schivers, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and    vision of a BCMB faculty member and a thesis        concentration and an overall GPA of 3.2; (c)
Molecular Biology; D. Simberloff, Ph.D.          describing the results of that project. The the-    pass a minimum of 4 hours of EEB 400, Un-
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; P. Small,      sis must be approved by the faculty supervisor.     dergraduate Research, during the junior and
Ph.D. Microbiology; R. L. Small, Ph.D. Botany;                                                       senior years; (d) pass EEB 407, Senior The-
D.K. Smith, Ph.D. Botany; E. Urbach, Ph.D.       Ecology and Evolutionary Biology                    sis; and (e) pass EEB 490, Undergraduate
Microbiology; Albrecht von Arnim, Ph.D.              The concentration consists of:                  Seminar.
Botany; D.C. White, Ph.D. Microbiology; W.D.         1. Chemistry 350-360-369 or 350, 310-
Wicks, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cellular and                   319 or Chemistry 310-319 and            Microbiology
Molecular Biology; S. Wilhelm, Ph.D.                         BCMB 310.                                  The microbiology concentration consists of
Microbiology; B.E. Wofford, Ph.D. Botany; J.         2. Quantitative Requirement: One course         Chemistry 350-360-369, BCMB 410, Microbi-
Wolf, Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology;                from (note math prerequisites):         ology 310-319, 320-329, and 12 additional
H. Zaghouani, Ph.D. Microbiology.                            Math 231 Differential Equations (3)     hours of 400-level Microbiology courses.
                                                             (Prereq. 141-142)                          An honors option is offered to selected
     The Biological Sciences major offers four       Math 251 Matrix Algebra I (3) (Prereq.          students who have completed the required
areas of concentration: Biochemistry and Cel-                141-142)                                300-level Microbiology courses with a mini-
lular and Molecular Biology; Ecology and Evo-        Math 405 Models in Biology (3) (Prereq.         mum grade point average of 3.5 in Microbiol-
lutionary Biology; Microbiology; and Plant                   141-142 or 151-152)                     ogy courses and 3.2 for all courses. In
Biology. (See section C. below for information       Statistics 201 Introduction to Statistics (3)   addition to these 300-level courses, an honors
on honors options.) The name of the major will       Note that Math 141-142 is recommended           major requires successful completion of 15
be Biological Sciences: [Concentration Name].    for students with a strong interest in quantita-    additional hours of 400-level Microbiology
The requirements are as follows:                 tive ecology and is prerequisite to several         courses, including 401 and 402.
                                                 courses that satisfy the Ecology and Evolu-         Plant Biology
A. Prerequisites to All Concentrations           tionary Biology Quantitative Requirement.
   1. Chemistry 120-130                                                                                 The Plant Biology concentration may be
                                                     3. Upper Division courses: A total of 24        obtained by completing the Biological Sci-
   2. Physics 221-222                            additional hours is required at the 300 level or
   3. Math 141-142 or 151-152                                                                        ences prerequisites and Chemistry 350- 360-
                                                 above to include at least 15 hours from             369 or 350, 310-319 or 310-319, BCMB 310,
   4. Biology 130 or Botany 110-120              Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and at least
   5. Biology 140-240-250                                                                            and the following Botany courses:
                                                 one course from each of the following four             Botany 310 (4)
                                                 categories:                                            Botany 321 (4)
                                                                                                                                             College of Arts and Sciences                                71


    Botany 330 (3)
    Botany 404 or 431 (3) or (4)
                                                   CHEMISTRY                                                                  1
                                                                                                                                Foreign Language (intermediate
                                                                                                                                   level sequence) .............................................. 6-10
    Botany 400, 441, or 442 (2)
                                                                                                                              2
                                                                                                                                Distribution ............................................................... 3
                                                   Professors:                                                                Sophomore
    plus 9 additional hours of other Upper         M.J. Sepaniak (Head), Ph.D. Iowa State;                                    Chemistry 240 ........................................................... 2
    Division courses offered by Botany or          J.L. Adcock, Ph.D. Texas; S.D. Alexandratos,                               Chemistry 230 ........................................................... 3
other life science departments (except Botany      Ph.D. California (Berkeley); D.C. Baker, Ph.D.                             Chemistry 350-360 .................................................... 6
305, 306, or 309). A list of approved courses      Ohio State; C.E. Barnes, Ph.D. Stanford; J.E.                              Chemistry 369 ........................................................... 2
from other life science departments is avail-      Bartmess, Ph.D. Northwestern; J.E. Bloor                                   Mathematics 241 and either 231 or 251 .................... 7
able in the Division of Biology office.            (Emeritus), Ph.D. Manchester (England); W.E.                               Physics 135-136 or 137-138 ................................ 8-10
    Requirements for an honors option are                                                                                     2
                                                                                                                                Distribution ............................................................... 3
                                                   Bull (Emeritus), Ph.D. Illinois; J. Q. Chambers,                           Junior
as follows: a) Maintain a GPA of 3.5 in all the    Ph.D. Kansas; R.N. Compton, Ph.D.                                          Chemistry 310-320 .................................................... 6
300-level and above courses from the con-          Tennessee; K.D. Cook, Ph.D. Wisconsin; J.F.                                Chemistry 319-329 .................................................... 3
centration and an overall GPA of 3.2; b) Pass      Eastham (Emeritus), Ph.D. California                                       Chemistry 473-483 .................................................... 6
a minimum of 4 hours of Botany 441-442 (un-        (Berkeley); C.S. Feigerle, Ph.D. Colorado;                                 Chemistry 479-489 .................................................... 4
dergraduate research) during the junior and        W.H. Fletcher (Emeritus), Ph.D. Minnesota;                                 2
                                                                                                                                Distribution ............................................................... 9
senior year; and c) Write a senior thesis that     F.A. Grimm (Emeritus), Ph.D. Cornell; G.A.
                                                                                                                              3
                                                                                                                                Electives .................................................................. 3
is acceptable to the student’s committee. Stu-     Guiochon (Distinguished Scientist, Science                                 Senior
dents interested in pursuing an honors option                                                                                 Chemistry 430 ........................................................... 3
                                                   Alliance Center of Excellence), Ph.D.                                      Chemistry 439 ........................................................... 1
should contact the Botany office for details.      Université de Paris (France); G.W. Kabalka                                 Chemistry 406 ........................................................... 1
    A minor includes the following prerequi-       (Robert H. Cole Professor, Alumni                                          Chemistry 400 ........................................................... 3
sites and requirements: Prerequisites are          Distinguished Service Professor), Ph.D.                                    BCMB 410 or 401 ................................................... 3-4
Botany 110-120 or Biology 130-140; and             Purdue; D.C. Kleinfelter (Emeritus), Ph.D.                                 4
                                                                                                                                Chemistry Electives ................................................. 3
Chemistry 120-130. Requirements are Biology        Princeton; J.D. Kovac, Ph.D. Yale; J.D.                                    2
                                                                                                                                Distribution ............................................................... 9
240 and 250; and at least 8 hours chosen           Larese, Ph.D. Wesleyan; M.H. Lietzke
                                                                                                                              3
                                                                                                                                Electives .................................................................. 9
                                                                                                                              ___________________________________________________
from 300- and 400-level courses in Biochem-        (Emeritus), Ph.D. Wisconsin; L.J. Magid,
istry, Cellular and Molecular Biology; Botany;                                                                                                            Total: 125-132 hours
                                                   Ph.D. Tennessee; R.M. Magid, Ph.D. Yale;                                   ___________________________________________
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; and Micro-       J.W. Mays (Distinguished Scientist, Science                                1
                                                                                                                                Preferably chosen from German, French, Russian or
biology. In meeting the upper-division mini-       Alliance Center of Excellence), Ph.D. Akron;                               Japanese; the College of Arts and Sciences requires
mum requirement, not more than 6 hours may         R.M. Pagni, Ph.D. Wisconsin; J.R. Peterson                                 that a student demonstrate intermediate-level
be credited from any one biological science        (Emeritus), Ph.D. California (Berkeley); G.K.                              competence in whatever foreign language is chosen.
department, and not more than 3 hours of un-       Schweitzer (Alumni Distinguished Service                                   2
                                                                                                                                The distribution requirements of the College of Arts
dergraduate research may be credited.              Professor), Ph.D. Illinois; W.A. Van Hook,                                 and Sciences are satisfied by taking: Non-U. S.
                                                   Ph.D. Johns Hopkins; E.L. Wehry (Emeritus),                                History (6 hours), Social Science (6 hours),
                                                                                                                              Humanities (6 hours), and Upper Level Distribution
BOTANY                                             Ph.D. Purdue; T.F. Williams (Alumni
                                                   Distinguished Service Professor), Ph.D.
                                                                                                                              (3 hours in either U.S. Studies or Foreign Studies and
                                                                                                                              3 hours Capstone Experience). The number of credit
Professors:                                        London (England); C. Woods, III, Ph.D. North                               hours shown in each year of the curriculum are merely
E. E. Schilling (Head), Ph.D. Indiana; J. D.       Carolina State; B. Wunderlich (Distinguished                               intended as guidelines.
Caponetti (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard; E. E. C.      Scientist, Emeritus), Ph.D. Northwestern; Z.B.                             3
                                                                                                                                It is recommended that a portion of these elective
                                                   Xue, Ph.D. UCLA.                                                           hours be applied to advanced courses in biochemistry
Clebsch (Emeritus), Ph.D. Duke; H. R.                                                                                         and cellular and molecular biology, mathematics,
DeSelm (Retired), Ph.D. Ohio State; A. M.          Associate Professors:                                                      physics, or chemical, metallurgical, and polymer
Evans (Emeritus), Ph.D. Michigan; W. R.            M.D. Dadmun, Ph.D. Massachusetts; R.J.                                     engineering.
Herndon (Emeritus, Alumni Distinguished            Hinde, Ph.D. Chicago; C.A. Lane (Emeritus),                                4
                                                                                                                                To be chosen from Chemistry 400, 401, 408, 420,
Service Professor), Ph.D. Vanderbilt; L. G.        Ph.D. California (Berkeley); F.M. Schell, Ph.D.                            450, and 490.
Hickok, Ph.D. Massachusetts; R. W. Holton          Indiana.
(Emeritus), Ph.D., Michigan; K. W. Hughes,                                                                                    B.S. Degree and Chemistry Major
Ph.D. Utah; B. C. Mullin, Ph.D. North Carolina     Assistant Professors:                                                           For students wishing to major in chemistry
State; R. H. Petersen (Distinguished               S.D. Gilman, Ph.D. Penn State; J.L. Musfeldt,                              but desiring a more flexible course of study
Professor), Ph.D. Columbia; O.J. Schwarz,          Ph.D. Florida; J.F.C. Turner, Ph.D. Oxford;                                than the B.S. in Chemistry, there is the regular
Ph.D. North Carolina State; P. L. Walne            D.G. Young, Ph.D. Ohio State; X.P. Zhang,                                  B.S. degree. Because these two programs
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas.                           Ph.D. Pennsylvania.                                                        are designed for students with different career
                                                                                                                              goals, the following paragraphs should be
Associate Professors:                              Bachelor of Science in Chemistry                                           carefully considered before selecting courses.
C.C. Amundsen, Ph.D. Colorado; A.S.                    Students who desire to major in chemistry                              A student who decides to major in chemistry
Heilman (Emeritus), Ph.D. Ohio State; M.           may select from either of two courses of                                   should ask the Arts and Sciences Advising
Pigliucci, Ph.D. Connecticut; D.K. Smith, Ph.D.    study: Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Sci-                             Center for assignment of a faculty advisor in
Tennessee; B.E. Wofford (Curator of                ence in Chemistry. Only the latter program is                              the Department of Chemistry. For further in-
Herbarium), Ph.D. Tennessee.                       approved by the Committee on Professional                                  formation, contact the Head of the Department
                                                   Training of the American Chemical Society. It                              of Chemistry, 552 Buehler Hall.
Assistant Professors:                              is designed to train students to go directly into                               The B.S. degree is intended primarily for
M. B. Cruzan, Ph.D. SUNY (Stony Brook); A.         positions in the chemical industry or to enter                             students who may have career objectives in
Nebenfuhr, Ph.D. Oregon State; A. von Arnim,       graduate study leading to positions in re-                                 fields other than chemistry, but in fields where
Ph.D. East Anglia, United Kingdom: R.L. Small,     search and college teaching. A student in the                              chemistry has direct application such as
Ph.D. Iowa State.                                  B.S. in Chemistry program should, at the earli-                            medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, business, and
Lecturer:                                          est opportunity, ask the Arts and Sciences                                 ecology. The B.S. in Chemistry degree is
K.D. McFarland, Ph.D. Tennessee.                   Advising Center for assignment of a faculty                                recommended for students planning a career
                                                   advisor in the Department of Chemistry. For                                in chemistry. However, with the proper choice
    Students wishing to emphasize study in         further information, contact the Head of De-                               of physics, mathematics, and physical chem-
this area elect to major in Biology with a con-    partment of Chemistry, 575 Buehler Hall. For                               istry courses, the regular B.S. program is also
centration in Plant Biology. See the description   information concerning the Cooperative Pro-                                suitable for such students.
of the Biology Major under “Division of Biol-      gram in chemistry, see description of the B.S.                                 Prerequisites to the major are Chemistry
ogy" for requirements.                             program below.                                                             120-130 or 128-138 and Mathematics 141-
                                                                                                                              142 or 151-152. Corequisite to the major is
                                                   CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS                                                    Physics 221-222, 135-136, or 137-38.
                                                                                                       Hours Credit               The major consists of Chemistry 240,
                                                   Freshman                                                                   310, 319, 350-360, 369, 471-481 or 473-483,
                                                   Chemistry 120-130 or (preferably) 128-138 ............... 8                479 and 10 hours of additional work in chem-
                                                   Mathematics 141-142 ................................................ 8
                                                   English Composition .................................................. 6   istry at the 200-level or above that includes at
                                                                                                                              least one laboratory course or lecture/labora-
72      College of Arts and Sciences


tory course; up to 6 hours of Biochemistry         who finds a need to complete the 120-130          consists of 18 hours including Classics 201
and Cellular and Molecular Biology 410-420 or      series after having completed 100 may substi-     plus any 6 hours drawn from the following:
401-402 or Geology 460 may be applied to the       tute 100 for 120 with approval of the Depart-     Classics 221-222; 232-233; 253. The remain-
10-hour requirement.                               ment of Chemistry and may then take 130.          ing 9 hours may be drawn from Greek 261-
    For students planning careers in Chemis-       Credit may be received for only one of the        264, Latin 251-252, or any Classics course
try, the recommended courses (from the list        courses 100, 120, or 128.                         numbered 300 or above, or from History 310,
above) are Mathematics 141-42, Physics                  In any chemistry course above the fresh-     311, 366, or Philosophy 320.
135-136 or 137-138, and Chemistry 473-483;         man level which has Chemistry 130 as a pre-           The B.A. Major Concentration in Greek
although not required, certain additional          requisite, 110 may be used as a prerequisite      consists of 27 hours including 18 hours of
courses are strongly suggested for students        with approval of the Department of Chemistry.     Greek language courses numbered above
planning to become chemists: Mathematics                Chemistry 128-138 is an honors course        200 plus 9 hours to be drawn from the follow-
241 and Chemistry 230, 320, 329, and 406.          designed for the student who has already          ing: any courses in the Classics Department
Because professional chemists need a read-         made considerable progress in science.            (other than Greek 121-122, Classics 201,
ing knowledge of foreign languages, intermedi-     Class size is limited to promote faculty-stu-     Classics 273) or History 310-311.
ate level competency should be acquired in         dent interaction. Selection is based on ACT            The Greek Minor consists of 18 hours
German, French, Russian or Japanese. Stu-          scores, high school chemistry grade, and, if      including 12 hours of Greek language courses
dents who are undecided about their career         necessary, performance on a placement ex-         numbered above 200, and 6 hours chosen
goals should consult the Head of the Depart-       amination to be given during the first class      from Classics 221-222, 331, 334.
ment at the earliest opportunity. Unlike the       meeting. A student receiving a passing grade           The B.A. Major Concentration in Latin
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, the regular      below B in 128 will complete the year’s work      consists of 27 hours including 18 hours of
B.S. degree is not approved by the Committee       by taking 130.                                    Latin language courses numbered above 200
on Professional Training of the American                Beginning students who have had high         plus 9 hours to be drawn from the following:
Chemical Society.                                  school chemistry and who have had additional      any courses in the Classics Department
                                                                                                     (other than Latin 111-112, Latin 150, Classics
     A Minor in Chemistry shall consist of the     experience (e.g. summer institute study, spe-
                                                                                                     201, Classics 273) or History 310-311.
successful completion of 15 hours of chemis-       cial research projects, home laboratory) are
                                                                                                          The Latin Minor consists of 18 hours
try courses numbered 200 and above includ-         invited to apply during the summer to the head
                                                                                                     including 12 hours of Latin language courses
ing 310, 319 (4 hours) and at least one of the     of the department for permission to take a
                                                                                                     numbered above 200, and 6 hours chosen
following sequences: 350-360, 369 (8 hours);       proficiency examination in one or more se-
                                                                                                     from Classics 221-222, 331, 334.
or 471-481, 479 (8 hours); or 473-483, 479         mesters of general chemistry. If a satisfactory
(8 hours).                                         grade is made on the examination, credit will       Placement Examination
                                                   be allowed for the semester (or course) for           Students who transfer to UT from other
Honors B.S. Major                                  which the exam was taken. The Department          colleges and students who enter with high
    Candidates for an Honors degree in             of Chemistry gives credit in general chemistry    school units in Latin should register for the
Chemistry must fulfill all of the requirements     to students who present satisfactory scores       courses in which they would normally be
for either the B.S. in Chemistry or the regular    on the Chemistry Advanced Placement Ex-           placed on the basis of such credits. During
B.S. degree and must also satisfy the follow-      amination.                                        freshman orientation a placement test will be
ing stipulations: they must complete with
                                                                                                     given, and students will be advised if a change
grades of C or better Mathematics 141-142,
                                                                                                     in registration is indicated by the results.
Physics 135-136 or 137-138, and Chemistry          CHINESE
473-483, 400, and 408; and they must have          See Interdisciplinary Programs (Modern             Proficiency Examinations
an overall university GPA of at least 3.0 with a   Foreign Languages and Literatures).                   Students who have acquired a knowledge
GPA in chemistry courses of at least 3.3.                                                            of Latin through private study or tutoring
                                                                                                     should request from the Department a profi-
Cooperative Program
     A cooperative program is available to         CLASSICS                                          ciency test. A student who earns a grade of B
                                                                                                     or better in this examination is eligible for
students who are Chemistry majors. After the       Professors:                                       credit toward graduation. A student who omits
freshman year, the student alternates a se-        D.W. Tandy (Head; Distinguished Professor         any course in a sequence may receive credit
mester in school with a semester in a job in       of Humanities), Ph.D. Yale; G.C. Gesell           for it by passing the appropriate proficiency
the chemical industry. The program normally        (Lindsay Young Professor), Ph.D. North            examination.
requires five years and involves a total of four   Carolina (Chapel Hill); S.D. Martin, Ph.D.
work semesters and eight school semesters.         Michigan; H.C. Rutledge (Emeritus), Ph.D.
Students are required to have at least a 2.5
average to enter and remain in the program.
                                                   Ohio State.                                       COMPARATIVE
Some opportunity exists for students to enter      Associate Professors:                             LITERATURE
the program later than the end of the fresh-       C.P. Craig, Ph.D. North Carolina (Chapel Hill);   See Interdisciplinary Programs.
man year. Interested students should make          J.E. Shelton, Ph.D. Vanderbilt.
application to the head of the department at
least one semester in advance of the begin-        Assistant Professor:
                                                   E.H. Sutherland, Ph.D. U.C. Berkeley.
                                                                                                     COMPUTER SCIENCE
ning of the first work period. Further informa-
tion will be supplied on request.                  Adjunct Professor:                                Professors:
                                                   D.W. Jones, Ph.D. Chicago.                        Robert C. Ward (Head), Ph.D. Virginia; Jack
Placement in General Chemistry                                                                       Dongarra, PH.D. New Mexico; M.A. Langston,
Sequences                                          Adjunct Assistant Professors:                     Ph.D. Texas A&M; J.H. Poore, Ph.D. Georgia
     The sequences which meet all of the           J.P. Dessel, Ph.D. Arizona; M. Kulikowski,        Tech; G.R. Sherman (Emeritus), Ph.D.
requirements of a year of General Chemistry        Ph.D. Toronto.                                    Purdue; Michael G. Thomason, Ph.D. Duke.
and which serve as prerequisite for upper-
division courses are 120-130 and 128-138;              The B.A. Major Concentration in               Associate Professors:
chemistry majors are strongly urged to take        Classical Civilization consists of 27 hours.      M.W. Berry, Ph.D. Illinois; J. Gregor, Ph.D.
the latter sequence. Courses 100 and 110           The required core of the major is Classics 201    Aalborg (DK); B.J. MacLennan, Ph.D. Purdue;
emphasize organic and biochemistry, and            plus any 9 hours drawn from the following:        J.S. Plank, Ph.D. Princeton; Padma
may not be used as prerequisite for other          Classics 221-222 (3-3), Classics 232-233 (3-      Raghavan, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State; M.D.
chemistry courses. Chemistry 150 and 160           3), Classics 253 (3). The remaining 15 hours      Vose, Ph.D. Texas; B.T. Vander Zanden,
are designed to increase the chemistry lit-        may be drawn from Greek 261-264, Latin            Ph.D. Cornell.
eracy and consumer knowledge of students           251-252, or any Classics course numbered          Assistant Professors:
and may not be used as prerequisites for any       above 300, or from History 310, History 311,      D.W. Straight, Ph.D. Texas; R. M. Wolski,
other chemistry course.                            History 366, or Philosophy 320. Students are      Ph.D. U.C. Davis.
     It is possible to move from one sequence      encouraged to satisfy the foreign language re-
to another if permission for substitution is       quirement with Greek or Latin.                    Instructor:
obtained in advance. For example, a student            A Minor Track in Classical Civilization       J. Wallace Mayo, M.S. Tennessee.
                                                                                                              College of Arts and Sciences         73


    Major Prerequisites to the major include      Appeals                                            division level. Minors are encouraged to
Computer Science 102, 140, 160; Mathemat-             Those students denied progression may          include Economics 311 and 313.
ics 141-142; and a two semester laboratory        appeal to the Undergraduate Committee of the
science sequence (Physics 135-136 or Biol-        Computer Science Department. Information           Honors The Department of Economics offers
ogy or Chemistry or a sequence approved by        on the appeals process can be obtained by          an honors B.A. degree. Candidates for the
the Computer Science Department). The ma-         calling the Computer Science Department,           honors degree must complete 311, 313, 499,
jor consists of 302, 311, 365, and 380; two of    974-5067, the Undergraduate Programs Of-           and 18 additional upper division hours,
the three courses 340, 360, and 370; Math-        fice, 974-5096, or by contacting an advisor in     including registering for three hours of 493
ematics 241, 251, and 300; English 360, and       that office.                                       Independent Study, which should lead to the
either an additional 9 hours of upper division                                                       writing of an honors thesis. Students
Computer Science or an additional 6 hours                                                            interested in the honors degree should
of upper division Computer Science and            ECOLOGY AND                                        contact the department for details.
                                                                                                         In addition, certification to teach economics
Mathematics 231.
     It is highly recommended that all Com-
                                                  EVOLUTIONARY                                       in secondary schools is available. Students
puter Science majors own a personal com-          BIOLOGY                                            with such interest should consult the Certifica-
                                                                                                     tion Clerk, Room 212, Claxton Education
puter with communications capability.
    Minor An undergraduate minor consists of      Professors:                                        Building as early in their program as possible
Computer Science 140 and 160, plus 15             T.G. Hallam (Head), Ph.D. Missouri; C.R.B.         to determine the appropriate requirements.
hours of 300 and 400 level courses.               Boake, Ph.D. Cornell; D.L. Bunting, II, Ph.D.
Progression Standards
                                                  Oklahoma State; G.M. Burghardt Ph.D.
                                                  Chicago; H. Delcourt, Ph.D. Minnesota; P.A.        ENGLISH
     Progression into the Computer Science        Delcourt, Ph.D. Minnesota; A.C. Echternacht,
major is based on the availability of space in                                                       Professors:
                                                  Ph.D. Kansas; D.A. Etnier, Ph.D. Minnesota;
the laboratories and other resources. Pro-        N.B. Greenberg, Ph.D. Rutgers; L.J. Gross,         D.A. Carroll (Head), Ph.D. North Carolina;
gression requirements are adjusted periodi-       Ph.D. Cornell; W.F. Harris, III, Ph.D.             P.G. Adams (Young Professor Emeritus),
cally and current requirements can be             Tennessee; J.F. McCormick (Emeritus),              Ph.D. Texas; E.W. Bratton (Emeritus), Ph.D.
determined by consulting with an advisor in       Ph.D. Emory; G.F. McCracken, Ph.D. Cornell;        Illinois; D.R. Cox (Associate Head, Young
the Undergraduate Programs office or by con-      M.L. Pan, Ph.D. Pennsylvania; S.E. Riechert,       Professor), Ph.D. Missouri; R.Y. Drake, Jr.
tacting the Computer Science Department di-       Ph.D. Wisconsin; G.S Sayler, Ph.D. Idaho;          (Emeritus), Ph.D. Yale; A.R. Dunn, Ph.D.
rectly. Students who enter the College of Arts    T.W. Schultz, Ph.D. Tennessee; D. Simberloff       Washington; A.R. Ensor, Ph.D. Indiana; R.J.
and Sciences as freshmen or sophomores            (Gore Hunger Chair of Excellence), Ph.D.           Finneran (John C. Hodges Professor), Ph.D.
are expected to apply for the major immedi-       Harvard; G. Stacey, Ph.D. Texas (Austin);          North Carolina; J.H. Fisher (John C. Hodges
ately after attempting 12 hours in Computer       G.L. Vaughan (Emeritus), Ph.D. Duke.               Professor Emeritus), Ph.D. Pennsylvania;
Science.                                                                                             S.B. Garner, Jr., Ph.D. Princeton; J.E. Gill
                                                  Associate Professors:                              (Emeritus), Ph.D. North Carolina; D.F.
                                                  Amundsen, C.C., Ph.D. Colorado; J.A. Drake,        Goslee, Ph.D. Yale; N.M. Goslee (Alumni
    Recent progression standards were:            Ph.D. Purdue; D.J. Fox, Ph.D. Johns
    1. Has completed at least the following                                                          Distinguished and Young Professor), Ph.D.
                                                  Hopkins; S. Gavrilets, Ph.D. Moscow State;         Yale; T.J.A. Heffernan (Curry Professor),
three courses at UTK with an average of 3.0       M. Pigliucci, Ph.D. Connecticut.
or better: CS 102, 140, and 160 for UTK stu-                                                         Ph.D. Cambridge; M. Kallet, Ph.D. Rutgers;
dents. Transfer students' course work will be     Assistant Professors:                              M.L. Keene, Ph.D. Texas; R.M. Kelly (Young
evaluated individually.                           M. Butler, Ph.D. Washington (St. Louis); P.        Professor), Ph.D. Duke; B.J. Leggett (Human-
    2. Has achieved an average of 2.5 or bet-     Kover, Ph.D. Indiana; J. Weltzin, Ph.D.            ities Professor), Ph.D. Florida; I. Leki, Ph.D.
ter in all Compuer Science courses taken at       Arizona; J. Wolf, Ph.D. Kenucky (Lexington).       Illinois; M.A. Lofaro, Ph.D. Maryland; C.
UT that apply to the major. All grades received                                                      Maland (Young Professor), Ph.D. Michigan;
for these courses are averaged.                   Students wishing to emphasize study in this        A.R. Penner (Emeritus), Ph.D. Colorado; J.E.
    3. Has received at most one W or re-          area elect to major in Biology with a concen-      Reese (Emeritus), Ph.D. Kentucky; N.J.
peated grade in a Computer Science course.        tration in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.       Sanders (Young Professor Emeritus), Ph.D.
    4. Has not been disciplined for academic      See the description of the Biology Major under     Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-on-Avon;
dishonesty in a Computer Science course or        “Division of Biology" for requirements.            D.J. Schneider (J. Douglas Bruce Professor
for abuse of university computing privileges.                                                        Emeritus), Ph.D. Northwestern; D.M. Scura
                                                                                                     (Emeritus), Ph.D. North Carolina; W.R. Shurr
   Progression standards are subject to           ECONOMICS                                          (Humanities Professor, Emeritus), Ph.D.
change; current standards are available in        See faculty listing the College of Business        North Carolina; B.T. Stewart (Emeritus), Ph.D.
the Undergraduate Programs Office and the         Administration.                                    Northwestern; R.E. Stillman, Ph.D.
Computer Science Department office, 203                                                              Pennsylvania; J.B. Trahern, Jr. (Alumni
Claxton Complex.                                      The program in economics combines a            Distinguished Professor), Ph.D. Princeton;
                                                  broad liberal education with the rigorous study    T.V. Wheeler (Emeritus), Ph.D. North
Transfers from Other UTK Programs                 of current issues of the day such as employ-       Carolina; J.M. White (Young Professor
   Students in other colleges or majors at UT     ment, inflation, poverty, wealth, and the ben-     Emeritus), M.A. Cambridge; A. Wier
must apply for progression to the major at the    efits and costs of economic growth.                (Distinguished Teaching Chair), M.F.A.
earliest possible date but ideally prior to 75        Courses offered in the Department of           Bowling Green; N. Wright (Emerita), Ph.D.
hours. As a minimum, all students must be         Economics of the College of business               Yale; J.P. Zomchick, Ph.D. Columbia.
admitted to the Computer Science major for at     Administration provide opportunity for a major
least the last 30 hours of work.                                                                     Associate Professors:
                                                  or minor in economics in the College of Arts and   J.M. Atwill, Ph.D. Purdue; L.D. Bensel-
Transfers from other Institutions                 Sciences.                                          Meyers, Ph.D. Oregon; B.K. Dumas, Ph.D.
    Transfers from other institutions are gen-        Requirements for a B.A. Major in               Arkansas; P.G. Hammontree, M.A.
erally handled the same as transfers from         Economics consist of (1) Economics 201 or          Tennessee; R. Hirst, Ph.D. Rensselaer
other UTK programs. However, a prospective        equivalent honors courses as a prerequisite        Polytechnic; L.L. Howes, Ph.D. Columbia; L.D.
transfer student should consult with an advi-     to the major and (2) Economics 311, 313, and       Jennings, Ph.D. North Carolina; M.E. Papke,
sor in the Computer Science Department to         499 plus 18 additional hours in upper division     Ph.D. McGill; A. Smith, Ph.D. Houston.
determine which courses can be accepted to-       economics courses. Majors are encouraged
ward the Computer Science major. It should        to satisfy List B of the Natural Science           Assistant Professors:
not be assumed that courses with similar          Distribution Requirement with one of the           M.G. Anderson, Ph.D. Vanderbilt; A.C. Billone,
names to UT courses can be accepted to-           mathematics packages Mathematics 115-123,          Ph.D. Princeton; J.L. Black, Ph.D. Toronto;
ward the major.                                   123-125, or 141-142. Students planning             T.F. Haddox, Ph.D. Vanderbilt; H.A.
                                                  graduate work in Economics should elect            Hirschfeld, Ph.D. Duke; M. Knight, M.F.A.
                                                  Mathematics 141-142.                               Virginia; M.J. Reiff, Ph.D. Kansas.
                                                      A minor consists of (1) Economics 201;
                                                  and (2) 12 additional hours at the upper-
74       College of Arts and Sciences


Instructors:                                                 An English Minor with Technical Com-            372, 373, 375, or 379; and 9 additional credits,
G. Albrightson, Ph.D. North Dakota; E. Bailey,           munication Emphasis consists of at least 15         at least 6 of which must be taken at the 400
Central Arkansas; L. Berry, M.A. Tennessee;              semester hours of English courses chosen            level. No more than 3 hours of Geography
J. Burton, Ph.D. SUNY; P.A. Tschantz, M.A.               from the following: (1) at least three courses in   490 may be counted toward the major.
New Mexico State.                                        technical communication (chosen from 360,               Students who enter the major with more
                                                         460, 462, 466, or any special topics course         than 60 hours of credit, and who have com-
     Prerequisites and Corequisites One                  being offered in technical communication);          pleted a laboratory science sequence other
two-semester sequence chosen from the fol-               (2) one course in expository writing, argumen-      than Geography, may petition the department
lowing groups: English 201-202 (British Litera-          tative writing, language, rhetoric, or another      to substitute certain upper division physical
ture); 221-222 (Literature of the Western                technical communication course (chosen from         geography courses for 131 and/or 132.
World); 231-232-233 (American Literature);               355, 360, 371, 372, 455, 460, 462, 466, 470,            Minor The Minor in Geography consists of
251-252-253 (Introduction to literary genres).           471, 472, 484, 485, 495, 496; and (3) one           15 semester hours of Geography courses at
     Major Requirements The English major                other 300 or 400 level English course.              the 300 level or above. Geography 490, 491,
consists of ten courses at the 300-400 level in              Certification for Teaching Students plan-       492, 493 may not be counted toward the mi-
one of the following concentrations:                     ning to teach English in public schools should      nor without departmental permission.
     Creative Writing (1) a two-course sequence          consult the Certification Clerk, Room 212,              Honors Students who have an overall
in creative writing; (2) three other writing courses;    Claxton Education Building.                         GPA of 3.2 may elect to participate in an
(3) four courses in literature, two of which                 Graduate Study Students wishing to enter        enrichment program that involves the suc-
must be before 1900, and at least one of                 a graduate program in English should address        cessful completion of Geography 497 and
those before 1800; (4) one course in lan-                inquiries to the Dean of the Graduate School.       498. Honors: Senior Thesis under the direc-
guage, theory, cultural, ethnic, or gender studies.      To be accepted for graduate study in English,       tion of a faculty mentor. An approved written
     Literature (1) English 376 (Colloquium in           the student should in general have had at           copy of the thesis must be submitted to the
Literature), to be taken, if possible, near the          least eighteen semester hours in English            Department of Geography. Interested stu-
beginning of the student’s major program;                courses above the freshman and sophomore            dents should consult their advisor for details
(2) four courses in literature before 1900,              level with a better than B average and a B av-      about participation.
including at least two courses before1800;               erage in all other undergraduate courses. Stu-
(3) one course in American literature; (4) one           dents who lack eighteen semester hours of
course in twentieth-century literature; (5) one          undergraduate English may be required to            GEOLOGICAL
course in language, theory, cultural, ethnic, or
gender studies; (6) two or more courses from
                                                         take and pass with a grade of B or better a
                                                         designated number of undergraduate courses
                                                                                                             SCIENCES
any of the department’s offerings, including             at the University of Tennessee before being         Professors:
criticism, film, folklore, language, literature,         admitted to graduate study. Admission is also       W.M. Dunne (Head), Ph.D. Bristol; T.W.
rhetoric, and writing. Courses may count in              dependent on satisfactory GRE scores.               Broadhead, Ph.D. Iowa; D.W. Byerly
more than one category.                                  Consult the Graduate Catalog for specific           (Emeritus), Ph.D. Tennessee; S.G. Driese,
     Rhetoric and Writing (1) a three-course             requirements.                                       Ph.D. Wisconsin; R.D. Hatcher (UT Knoxville/
package in rhetoric and writing; (2) one other                                                               ORNL Distinguished Scientist), Ph.D.
course in rhetoric or writing; (3) four courses
in literature, two of which must be before               FRENCH                                              Tennessee; O.C. Kopp (Emeritus), Ph.D.
                                                                                                             Columbia; T.C. Labotka, Ph.D. Caltech; M. L.
1900, and at least one of those before 1800;             See Modern Foreign Languages and                    McKinney, Ph.D. Yale; H.Y. McSween
(4) one course in language, theory, cultural,            Literatures.                                        (Distinguished Professor of Science), Ph.D.
ethnic, or gender studies; (5) one course from                                                               Harvard; K.C. Misra, Ph.D. Western Ontario;
any of the department’s offerings, including
criticism, film, folklore, language, literature,         GEOGRAPHY                                           C.I. Mora (Carden Professor), Ph.D.
                                                                                                             Wisconsin; L.A. Taylor, Ph.D. Lehigh; K.R.
rhetoric, and writing.                                                                                       Walker (Emeritus), Ph.D. Yale.
     Technical Communications (1) a three-               Professors:
course package in technical communications;              C.S. Aiken, Ph.D. Georgia; T.L. Bell, Ph.D.         Associate Professors:
(2) one other course in rhetoric or writing;             Iowa; R.A. Foresta, Ph.D. Rutgers; E.H.             G. M. Clark, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State; L.D.
(3) four courses in literature, two of which             Hammond (Emeritus), Ph.D. California                McKay, Ph.D. Waterloo; R.T. Williams, Ph.D.
must be before 1900, and at least one of                 (Berkeley); C.P. Harden, Ph.D. Colorado             V.P.I.
those before 1800; (4) one course in lan-                (Boulder); S.P. Horn, Ph.D. California
                                                         (Berkeley); S.R. Jumper (Emeritus), Ph.D.           Assistant Professors:
guage, theory, cultural, ethnic, or gender stud-
                                                         Tennessee; R.G. Long (Emeritus), Ph.D.              L.C. Kah, Ph.D. Harvard; Edmund Perfect,
ies; (5) one course from any of the
                                                         Northwestern; L.M. Pulsipher, Ph.D. Southern        Ph.D. Cornell; Maria Uhle, Ph.D. Virginia.
department’s offerings, including criticism, film,
folklore, language, literature, rhetoric, and writing.   Illinois; B.A. Ralston (Head), Ph.D.
                                                         Northwestern; J.B. Rehder, Ph.D. Louisiana              Prerequisites to a B.S. Major are Geol-
     See departmental brochure, Undergradu-
                                                         State; T.H. Schmudde (Emeritus), Ph.D.              ogy 101-102; Chemistry 120-130; Mathemat-
ate Study in English, for a list of courses that
                                                         Wisconsin; T.J. Wilbanks (Adjunct), Ph.D.           ics 141-142 or 147-148; plus one
satisfy the distribution, package, and se-
                                                         Syracuse.                                           two-semester sequence and one additional
quence requirements for the various areas.
                                                                                                             course from Physics 135-136 and Biology
      Individualized Program The Director of             Associate Professors:                               130-140.
Undergraduate Studies is empowered to                    T.J. Blasing (Adjunct), Ph.D. Wisconsin; L.W.
approve individualized programs developed                                                                        Major Requirements Geology 310, 320,
                                                         Brinkman (Emeritus), Jr., Ph.D. Wisconsin;          330, 340, 370, and 440 (22 hours); plus 12
by students in consultation with their advisors.         M.A. Brown (Adjunct), Ph.D. Ohio State; M.M.
These programs should be designed to                                                                         additional hours of geology courses at the 400
                                                         Gripshover (Adjunct), Ph.D. Tennessee;              level. Geology majors must attend the UT field
achieve academically sound objectives that
                                                         Cheng Liu (Adjunct), Ph.D. Tennessee; R.            camp or an approved equivalent elsewhere.
are not addressed by the above requirements.
                                                         McKeown (Adjunct), Ph.D. Oregon; Kenneth            (For equivalent camps, prior approval by the
     Honors For students who qualify, the
English Department offers specially designed             Orvis, Ph.D. California (Berkeley); S.L. Shaw,      Department on an individual-case basis is
courses at the freshman, sophomore, junior               Ph.D. Ohio State.                                   required.)
and senior levels. The freshman and sopho-               Assistant Professors:                                   Minor Requirement Consists of
more honors courses are enriched versions                Henri Grissino-Mayer, Ph.D. Arizona; Glen           Prerequsites: Geology 101 and 102 or 103.
of regular sections in composition, and in               Harrison (Adjunct), Ph.D. Tennessee.                Geology courses: at least 16 hours of
American and British literatures. To be given                                                                courses numbered 300 or higher, excluding
“Honors” in English on the transcript, a stu-                                                                401. A maximum of 3 hours of 493 may be
                                                            B.A. Major Geography 131 and 132 are
dent must have achieved a 3.0 or better GPA,                                                                 counted toward the minor.
                                                         prerequisite to a major in Geography, which
a 3.5 or better grade point in English courses,                                                                  Concentration in Engineering Geology
and grades of A or B in English 398 and 498.             consists of Geography 310 and 499; either
                                                         320, 421, or 423; either 340 or 351; one            Students wishing to prepare for a career in
     An English Minor consists of at least 15                                                                environmental/engineering geology, where
semester hours of English courses at the                 course from among 410, 411 412, 413 or 415;
                                                                                                             communication with engineers is important,
300-400 level.                                           one course from among 361, 363, 365, 371,           may elect this multidisciplinary concentration.
                                                                                                                 College of Arts and Sciences         75

Electives in the major and some of the
courses necessary to satisfy the Arts and
                                                   Bradley, Ph.; T.E. Burman, Ph.D. Toronto;
                                                   C.G. Fleming, Ph.D. Duke; L. Glover, Ph.D.
                                                                                                        INTERDISCIPLINARY
Sciences College Distribution requirements
are specified. Required coursework includes:
                                                   Kentucky; C.A. Higgs, Ph.D. Yale; V.G.               PROGRAMS
                                                   Liulevicius, Ph.D. Pennsylvania; G.K. Piehler,
Geology 310, 320, 330, 340, 370, 440, 450,         Ph.D. Rutgers; P.J. Pinckney, Ph.D.                  Director:
455, 460, 470 and 485; Mathematics 141, 142,       Vanderbilt.                                          Don Richard Cox
(or equivalent honors courses) and 231 (or                                                              College of Arts and Sciences
substitution of Geology 401 for Math 231);         Assistant Professors:
Physics 231; Basic Engineering 101, 121, and       K. Brosnan, Ph.D. Chicago; J.P. Dessel,                  In keeping with the philosophy that integra-
131; Civil Engineering 330, 435 and any one of     Ph.D. Arizona; H. DeWeerdt, Ph.D. Harvard;           tion of knowledge is as important as profi-
the following: 390, 440, 530, 532 or Environ-      M. Kulikowski, Ph.D. Toronto; L. Liu, Ph.D.
mental Engineering 535; Environmental and                                                               ciency in a given field, the College of Arts and
                                                   California (San Diego); J. Sahadeo, Ph.D.            Sciences has combined the resources of sev-
Soil Sciences 210; and Speech Communica-           Illinois; G. White, Ph.D. Temple.
tion 240. Courses from the College’s                                                                    eral departments to offer a series of interdisci-
approved lists for satisfying the Social Sci-                                                           plinary majors and minors. These programs
                                                       The department’s program is designed to          are as follows: African and African-American
ences, Humanities and Upper Level Distribu-
                                                   provide students with a knowledge of their           Studies, American Studies, Asian Studies,
tion requirements will be recommended and
                                                   cultural traditions and of their world, past and     Cinema Studies, Comparative Literature,
approved by the student’s advisor.
    Honors Students who have completed five        present, and thus to prepare them for the            Environmental Studies, Judaic Studies, Latin
upper division courses in the major and have       responsibilities of citizenship in today’s com-      American Studies, Legal Studies, Linguistics,
an overall GPA of 3.0 may elect to participate     plex society. Students take history courses to       Medieval Studies, Urban Studies, and
in an enrichment program involving research        develop their skills in thinking, reading, writing   Women’s Studies. See individual program
in the geological sciences. Research, in the       and speaking; to understand the links be-            descriptions below for the major and/or minor
form of an approved senior thesis, will be ac-     tween past, present and future; and to assist        requirements.
complished by successful completion of 3 se-       them in their search for personal identity.
mester hours beyond the normal                         B.A. Major Majors in history should pre-
requirements of Geology 491, 492, or 493 un-       pare their programs in consultation with a de-       AFRICAN AND AFRICAN-
der the direction of a faculty member. The re-
sults of the research must be formally presented
                                                   partment faculty advisor. A student may not
                                                   declare a history major until he/she has com-
                                                                                                        AMERICAN STUDIES
to the Department’s Seminar (Geology 595), the     pleted both semesters, with a grade of C+ or         Chair:
Tennessee Academy of Science, or other ac-         better in each course, of a survey chosen            John O. Hodges, Religious Studies.
ceptable professional organization. Also, an       from the following: 221-222, 227-228, 241-
approved written copy of the thesis must be        242, 247-248, 261-262; or any two one se-            Associate Professor:
submitted to the Department of Geological          mester courses from any of these                     Asafa Jalata, Sociology, Ph.D. State Univer-
Sciences. A GPA of 3.0 must be maintained                                                               sity of New York (Binghamton); George White,
                                                   sequences. AP (with a score of 4 or 5) or
throughout matriculation. Interested students                                                           Jr., Ph.D. Temple.
should consult their advisor for details about     transfer credit is acceptable to fulfill this re-
participation.                                     quirement. History 241-242 (or honors
                                                   equivalent) or 261-262 are prerequisites to a             Major Concentration African-American
                                                   major which consists of 30 hours, including          Studies 201-202 are required in the concen-
GERMAN                                             (1) 6 hours of History 221-222 (or the honors        tration which consists of 24 hours from the
                                                                                                        African-American Studies curriculum. At least
See Modern Foreign Languages and                   equivalent); and (2) 24 upper-division hours,
                                                   including: (a) one course in European history;       15 hours must represent upper division cred-
Literatures.                                                                                            its. Majors are required to take AAAS 431,
                                                   (b) one course in United States history; (c)
                                                   two courses in the history of Latin America,         preferably in their senior year. A maximum of
GREEK                                              Asia, or Africa, at least one of which must be       6 hours in AAAS 492 and 493 combined can
                                                                                                        be applied toward the AAAS major. In planning
See Classics.                                      in Asia or Africa; and (d) one additional course
                                                   dealing predominantly with a period prior to         their program majors must include courses
                                                   1750.                                                from at least 2 other departments which
HEBREW                                                 Minor History 241-242 or 261-262 (or             crosslist courses with African and African-
                                                                                                        American Studies in addition to the AAAS core
See Religious Studies.                             honors equivalents) are prerequisites to a
                                                   minor which consists of 15 hours of courses          course offerings.
                                                   numbered 200 or above, including at least:                Minor African-American Studies 201-202
HISTORY                                            (1) 6 hours in United States history; and (2) 9      are required in the minor which consists of 15
                                                                                                        hours at least 9 of which must be upper divi-
                                                   upper-division hours.
Professors:                                            History for Non-Majors The department            sion credits. A maximum of 3 hours in AAAS
P.H. Bergeron (Emeritus), Ph.D. Vanderbilt;        welcomes non-majors in its courses. Few              492 and 493 combined can be applied to a mi-
D.P. Brummett, Ph.D. Chicago; E.V.                 history courses have formal prerequisites.           nor. In planning their programs minors must
Chmielewski (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard; W.              Honors Program The Department of                 include courses from at least 2 other depart-
Cutler, Ph.D. Texas; W.W. Farris, Ph.D.            History offers honors sections of the Western        ments which crosslist courses with African
Harvard; J.R. Finger (Emeritus), Ph.D.             Civilization and United States history survey        and African-American Studies in addition to
Washington; A.G. Haas, Ph.D. Chicago; Y.P.         courses. Some entering freshmen are invited          the AAAS core course offerings.
Hao (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard; R.W. Haskins        to participate; other interested students may
                                                   apply. These survey courses are open to
(Emeritus), Ph.D. California (Berkeley); M.M.
Klein (Alumni Distinguished Service Professor,     non-majors. A grade of C+ or less in any part        AMERICAN STUDIES
Lindsay Young Professor and Emeritus),             of the freshman-sophomore honors sequence            Chair:
Ph.D. Columbia; A. Mayhew (Interim Vice            will render the student ineligible for further
                                                                                                        Benita J. Howell, Anthropology.
Provost), Ph.D. Texas; H. Moser, Ph.D.             honors work in history. An honors major re-
Wisconsin; R.J. Norrell (Bernadotte Schmitt        quires successful completion of 307 and a se-
                                                   nior thesis (407-408) with a grade of B or               Major Concentration English 231 and
Professor), Ph.D. Virginia; L.A. Ratner                                                                 either 232 or 233 are prerequisite to a major
                                                   above. Altogether the honors major consists
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Cornell; J.G. Utley              of 33 hours, including 30 hours as outlined in       concentration in American Studies which
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Illinois; W.B. Wheeler, Ph.D.    the B.A. Major above, plus 307. All juniors who      consists of 27 upper-division semester hours
Virginia.                                          are declared history majors with an overall          including American Studies 310; at least two
                                                   GPA of at least 3.0 are invited to join the Jun-     approved American History courses; and six
Associate Professors:
                                                   ior-Senior Honors Program. Students inter-           hours of approved courses chosen from the
T.A. Diacon (Head), Ph.D. Wisconsin; J.
                                                   ested in honors work at any level should             following disciplines: anthropology, econom-
Appier, Ph.D. California (Riverside); S.V. Ash,
                                                   consult the depart-ment’s honors coordinator.        ics, political science, or sociology. Courses in
Ph.D. Tennessee; S.D. Becker (Emeritus),
                                                                                                        the major will be chosen in consultation with
Ph.D. Case Western Reserve; J.D. Bing
                                                                                                        an American Studies advisor, from a list ap-
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Indiana; R. J. Bast, Ph.D.
                                                                                                        proved by the program, in such a way that at
Arizona; J. Bohstedt, Ph.D. Harvard; O.
76      College of Arts and Sciences


least 3 courses help the student achieve a fo-      Program. Courses related to Cinema Studies             vironmental and Soil Sciences 462.The spe-
cus within the field. One course in the             and not listed above may be applied to the             cialty is satisfied by meeting the course re-
student’s curriculum must specifically focus        minor with the approval of the chair of the program.   quirements listed for a minor in any one of the
upon one or more American ethnic minority                                                                  environmentally related curricula offered by
cultures. An additional 3-6 hours of American                                                              the various colleges of the University with a
Studies 493 (Independent Study) are recom-          COMPARATIVE                                            grade of ”C” or better. The specialty will
mended for majors in their senior year. A list      LITERATURE                                             require 15-18 hours as specified by the cho-
of approved elective courses is published                                                                  sen department. Curricula that would be
annually.                                           Chair:                                                 suited for an Environmental Studies major
    All majors and prospective majors should        Carolyn R. Hodges, Modern Foreign                      include, but are not limited to: Biosystems
contact the Chair of the program.                   Languages and Literatures.                             Engineering and Environmental Science, Plant
    The American Studies Minor consists of                                                                 Sciences and Landscape Systems, Wildlife
at least 15 hours of coursework chosen from             A Major Concentration in Comparative               and Fisheries Science, Forestry, Chemistry,
the program’s list of electives, including Ameri-   Literature consists of 27 hours including              Geography, Geology, Biology, Sociology.
can Studies 310, American Studies 410, and          Comparative Literature 202 and 401-402, and            Economics, Political Science, Communica-
nine additional hours from at least two different   9 hours of literature in a foreign language in         tions, or Business Administration .
disciplines.                                        courses numbered 300 or above. The remain-
                                                    ing 9 hours should include literature courses,
                                                    either in English or in a foreign language, num-       JUDAIC STUDIES
ASIAN STUDIES                                       bered 300 or above, from at least two of the
                                                                                                           Chair:
                                                    following departments: Classics, English,
Chair:                                                                                                     Gilya Gerda Schmidt, Religious Studies
                                                    Modern Foreign Languages and Literature,
Miriam L. Levering, Religious Studies.
                                                    and Religious Studies. Certain courses in
                                                                                                               The Major Concentration in Judaic
                                                    Philosophy, Theatre, and Interdisciplinary Pro-
    The Asian Studies Major Concentration                                                                  Studies offers a course of study that treats
                                                    grams may be substituted with the approval of
consists of 26 credit hours from the upper-                                                                Judaism as a historically evolving and cultur-
                                                    the chairperson of the Comparative Literature
division courses of Asian Studies and ap-                                                                  ally specific enterprise. The concentration ex-
                                                    Program. Students concentrating in compara-
proved departmental offerings. Twelve of the                                                               plores Jewish culture, religion and heritage
                                                    tive literature are strongly encouraged to ac-
hours must be taken from courses listed                                                                    through literature, philosophy and history. A
                                                    quire a working knowledge of a second
within one of the four geographical-cultural ar-                                                           multi-disciplinary combination of courses per-
                                                    foreign language, especially if they hope to
eas (Islamic World; South Asia; China; Ja-                                                                 mits critical reflection about topics and issues
                                                    pursue comparative literature on the graduate
pan), and 6 of those 12 hours must come                                                                    in a world civilization and cross-cultural con-
                                                    level.
from Subdivision A and 6 from Subdivision B.                                                               text.
                                                         A Minor in Comparative Literature con-
Subdivision A includes Art, Literature, Music,                                                                 A Major Concentration consists of at
                                                    sists of 18 hours including Comparative Lit-
Philosophy, and Religious Studies; Subdivision                                                             least 27 hours at the 300 level or above, dis-
                                                    erature 202 and either Comparative Literature
B includes Anthropology, Economics, Geogra-                                                                tributed as follows: (a) Religious Studies 381,
                                                    401 or 402, 6 hours of literature in a foreign
phy, History, Political Science, and Sociology.                                                            History 383, and 12 hours from Religious
                                                    language in courses numbered 300 or above,
    Six of the 26 hours must be taken from                                                                 Studies 311, 312, 320, 385, 386, 405, History
                                                    and 6 hours of literature courses numbered
courses listed for other geographical-cultural                                                             370, 384; (b) 9 hours selected from Art His-
                                                    300 or above in a different department. These
areas.                                                                                                     tory 425, 431, 475, German 350, History 369,
                                                    6 hours may be either in English or in a foreign
    Prerequisite to the concentration is Asian                                                             395, 484, Philosophy 322.
                                                    language and should be chosen from the fol-
Studies 101-102. Corequisite to the major                                                                      Students should contact the program advi-
                                                    lowing departments: English, Modern Foreign
concentration is competence in a major Asian                                                               sor early in planning a Judaic Studies major.
                                                    Languages and Literatures, and Religious
language of the chosen geographical-cultural                                                                   The Judaic Studies Minor consists of
                                                    Studies. Certain courses in Philosophy, The-
area. Competence is defined as the success-                                                                Religious Studies 381, History 370, and
                                                    atre, and Interdisciplinary Programs may be
ful completion of the 200-level sequence of                                                                9 hours selected from the Judaic Studies
                                                    substituted with the approval of the chairper-
that language, or by demonstration of equiva-                                                              Major Concentration. It is recommended that
                                                    son of the Comparative Literature Program.
lent mastery.                                                                                              students minoring in Judaic Studies discuss
                                                    Minors in comparative literature are strongly
    The Asian Studies Minor consists of                                                                    their program with a member of the Judaic
                                                    encouraged to continue study of a foreign lan-
Asian Studies 101-102 and 15 credit hours at                                                               Studies Committee.
                                                    guage beyond the minimum requirement.
the 200 level and above. Twelve credit hours
must be taken from courses within one of the
four geographical-cultural areas. Six credit        ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES                                  LANGUAGE AND WORLD
hours must come from Subdivision A and 6                                                                   BUSINESS
from Subdivision B. Three hours must be             Chair:                                                 For a complete list of requirements, see
taken from courses in another geographical-         Michael McKinney, Geological Sciences.                 Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures.
cultural area.
                                                        The Major Concentration in Environmen-
                                                    tal Studies provides sound scientific, socio-          LATIN-AMERICAN STUDIES
CINEMA STUDIES                                      economic, and philosophical background for
                                                    understanding the earth’s environment with an          Chair:
Chair:                                              opportunity to minor in one of the many                Michael Handelsman, Modern Foreign
Christine Holmlund, Modern Foreign                  environmentally related curricula offered by           Languages and Literatures.
Languages and Literatures.                          the various colleges within the University.
                                                        Prerequisites to a B.A. Major in Envi-                 The Major Concentration consists of two
    The Cinema Studies Minor consists of                                                                   optional tracks: (1) General Studies or
                                                    ronmental Studies are: Biology 130-140 or
15 hours, including Cinema Studies 281; 3                                                                  (2) Brazilian Studies. Each program requires
hours chosen from Cinema Studies 235, 236,          Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130; Geology
                                                    101; Geography 131; Mathematics 123-125 or             27 hours, of which 12 are in core courses,
or Broadcasting 330; and 9 additional hours                                                                including Latin American Studies 401 and 402,
from any courses in Cinema Studies,                 141-142 or 151-152; Economics 201; and Bi-
                                                    ology 250.                                             three hours of either History 360 or 361, and
courses cross-listed with Cinema Studies, or
                                                        The Major Concentration consists of a              three hours of an approved Spanish or Portu-
from the following list of approved courses:
Broadcasting 275 Introduction to Broadcasting       core and a specialty. The core includes Geol-          guese literature/culture course at either the
(3); Broadcasting 330 Audio/Video Production        ogy 202 plus: a) 12 hours from: History 346;           300 or 400 level. In addition to the core
(3); Broadcasting 430 Electronic Field Produc-      Sociology 360; Philosophy 346; Economics               courses, the General Studies track will con-
tion (3). It is strongly recommended that Cin-      462; Agriculture and Natural Resources 333;            sist of fifteen hours selected from courses of-
ema Studies 281 Introduction to Film Studies        Journalism 451; Geology 490; b) 3 hours                fered by three different participating
be taken before any other courses in the minor.     from: Geology 455, Geography 433, Geogra-              departments. The Brazilian Studies track will
    For further information about the minor,        phy 436 or Ecology/Evolution 484; c) 3 hours           consist of fifteen hours beyond the core
consult the chairperson of the Cinema Studies       from: Geography 334, Geography 434, or En-             courses including a minimum of six hours in
                                                                                                                 College of Arts and Sciences           77


UTK’s Summer Study Program in Fortaleza,                Students should contact program advisors       English 371 (3) or 372 (3); French, German,
Brazil (or other programs in Brazil approved        early in planning a Legal Studies major. It is     Russian or Spanish 425 (3) or 426 (3); and
by the director of Latin American Studies) and      strongly recommended that Sociology 455            Linguistics 423 (3).
up to nine hours of approved courses that fo-       Society and Law, be taken before selecting             Note: In addition to the above listed
cus on Brazil. Majors are strongly urged to         electives. Other law-related courses consis-       courses for the concentration and the minor
take as a prerequisite Latin American Studies       tent with the purposes and objectives of the       there are occasional offerings in the Honors
251-252.                                            major may be approved through consultation         Series or in graduate seminars which may be
    The minor consists of 18 hours including        with the Chair of the Legal Studies Committee.     substituted for certain requirements subject to
Latin American Studies 251-252, three hours                                                            written approval of the Linguistics Committee
of an approved Spanish or Portuguese litera-                                                           and the Office of the Dean.
ture/culture course at either the 300 or 400        LINGUISTICS
level, and nine additional hours selected from
courses offered by three different participating
                                                    Chair:                                             MEDIEVAL STUDIES
                                                    Bethany K. Dumas, English.
departments.                                                                                           Chair:
    A practical working knowledge of Spanish             This Major Concentration offers a             Laura L. Howes, English.
or Portuguese is a prerequisite for majors and      broad exposure to the various fields of
minors. All students are strongly encouraged        linguistics (including historical, descriptive,         A Major Concentration in Medieval
to earn credit hours through UT’s Latin Ameri-      theoretical and applied linguistics) along with    Studies consists of Medieval Studies 201 and
can Studies Abroad Program at the Federal           an opportunity to study areas where linguis-       403 and 21 hours of upper-division courses
University of Ceara in Fortaleza, Brazil. Other     tics overlaps with other disciplines such as       concerned primarily with the medieval experi-
foreign study programs are also available for       psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and           ence, divided among the following three
Brazil and Spanish-speaking Latin America.          speech pathology. The program of study is          categories: (1) history, philosophy, political
    For further information, consult the Chair-     designed to prepare a student for graduate         science, and religious studies; (2) language
person of the Latin American Studies Program.       work in linguistics or related areas or to serve   and literature; (3) the arts: history of art, archi-
                                                    as a general survey of language and linguis-       tecture, music, and speech and theatre.
LEGAL STUDIES                                       tics. The program of study provides the addi-      Courses should either from a related pattern
                                                    tional possibility of emphasizing the teaching     (for example, courses in the literature and
Chair:                                              of English as a second language for the stu-       history of Medieval England or Italy), or should
James A. Black, Sociology.                          dent interested in language-related employ-        revolve around a particular discipline or two
                                                    ment at the B.A. level.                            closely related disciplines (for example,
     The major in Legal Studies places the                 Students should consult program advisors    courses in the history of art and architecture).
study of law within the context of a liberal arts   early in planning a Linguistics major or minor.         A concentration in Medieval Studies
education. This major offers a course of study      Linguistics 200 is highly recommended. Audi-       focuses upon culture and society from the
that treats law as a historically evolving and      ology and Speech Pathology 305 should be           collapse of the Roman Empire to the 16th cen-
culturally specific enterprise. The concentra-      taken as soon as possible. Other 300-level         tury. Such a concentration offers the opportu-
tion seeks to attract students interested in        courses should, if possible, be completed          nity to deepen one’s self-awareness and
exploring the ways in which law and legal insti-    before 400-level courses are begun.                broaden one’s view of the range of human
tutions shape and are shaped by values, be-              Corequisites (a) Completion of a third        possibilities by studying a very different and
havior, communication patterns, and                 year of foreign language study (literature)        remote culture, its conditions of life, social and
organization of social, economic, and political     which satisfies the Foreign Studies option to      political institutions, values and ideals, and
systems. A multidisciplinary combination of         fulfill the upper-level distribution requirement   modes of perception and expression.
courses permits critical reflection about how       (required). (b) A two-semester sequence of a            Latin is the most appropriate language for
law and social life are interconnected history      non-Indo-European language to be selected          students in the Medieval Studies concentra-
and culturally. The program is designed to          from the following: Asian Studies 121-122          tion and is essential for those who plan to con-
provide education about law and legal culture.      (5,5) (Arabic); Asian Studies 131-132 (5,5)        tinue their studies in graduate school. In
It should not be viewed as a preferred avenue       (Chinese); Asian Studies 141-142 (4,4) (He-        addition, students planning to go on to gradu-
for admission to law school.                        brew); Asian Studies 151-152 (5,5) (Japa-          ate school are strongly advised to supplement
     Specific objectives of the program are to:     nese); Religious Studies 309-310 (3,3)             their Medieval Studies concentration with
     1. Foster an appreciation for the larger       (Hebrew); other non-Indo-European language         extensive work in one of the traditional
                                                                                                       disciplines.
context within which law-based phenomena            sequences approved by the Linguistics Com-
                                                                                                            A Minor in Medieval Studies consists of
are developed and nourished.                        mittee (required).                                 Medieval Studies 201 and 403 and 12 addi-
     2. Comprehend the connections between               Concentration 30 hours distributed as         tional hours distributed among the categories
law and other components of society.                follows: (a) 21 hours composed of Audiology        listed above for the major. Each student’s pro-
     3. Promote an interest in studying how law     and Speech Pathology 305; English 371, 372,        gram, major or minor, must be approved in
shapes, and is shaped by the larger social,         and 471; French, German, Russian or Span-          advance by the Medieval Studies Coordinating
behavioral, political, historical, and cultural     ish 425-426; Linguistics 423; and (b) 9 hours      Committee chairperson.
context.                                            of the following, selected in consultation with         Category #1 History, Philosophy, and
     4. Present an interdisciplinary program that   the Linguistics Committee: Anthropology 413,       Political Science: History 312 Medieval His-
speaks to the need to address problems              496; Audiology and Speech Pathology 320,           tory: 300-1100 (3); History 313 Medieval His-
about law that will face us in the next century.    579; Educational Curriculum and Instruction        tory: 1100-1400 (3); History 330 History of
     5. Offer an integrated program drawn from      457; Special Education and Rehabilitation 522;     England to 1688 (3); History 334 History of
existing curriculum and faculty.                    English/Linguistics 472, 474, 475, 476, 485,       Germany to 1815 (3); History 369 History of
     The concentration consists of 27 hours,        490, 508-509, 680; French 421, 422, 429,           the Middle East (3); History 474 Studies in
including Sociology 455 Society and Law and         521-522; German 435-436, 571-572; Holistic         Medieval and Early European History (3); Phi-
24 hours of upper division courses distributed      Teaching/Learning 504; Language, Communi-          losophy 322 Medieval Philosophy (3); and Po-
among five categories: (1) analysis - 3 hours       cation, and Humanities Education 455, 587;
from Communications 300, English 496, Soci-                                                            litical Science 475 Ancient and Medieval
                                                    Linguistics 400; Philosophy 310, 428; Psy-         Political Thought (3).
ology 331; (2) processes - Sociology 451, and
                                                    chology 400, 450, 480, 482, 543; Spanish 421,           Category #2 Language and Literature:
3 hours from Political Science 430, 442; (3)
perspectives - 3 hours from English 490, Po-        422, 531-532; Speech Communication 300,            Classics 435 Medieval Latin (3); English 371
litical Science 330, Philosophy 392; (4) histori-   320; Theatre 426. Other hours may be sub-          Foundations of the English Language (3);
cal and global dynamics - 3 hours from              stituted in (b) by approval of the Linguistics     English 401 Medieval Literature (3); English
Classics 362, Political Science 470; (5) issues     Committee.                                         402 Chaucer (3); French 410 Medieval
- 6 hours from Communications 400, Philoso-              A Minor in Linguistics shall consist of 15    French Literature (3); Italian 401 Dante and
phy 344, Political Science 431, Speech Com-         credit hours composed of (1) either English        Medieval Culture (3); and Italian 402 Petrarch
munication 469, Women’s Studies 340. The            471 (3) or 3 hours from section (b) of the ma-     and Boccaccio (3).
remaining three hours are to be chosen from         jor, selected in consultation with the Linguis-         Category #3 The Arts: Architecture 415
one of the five categories or an approved           tics Committee; and (2) 15 hours as follows:       Seminar in Medieval Architecture (3); Art His-
elective.                                           Audiology and Speech Pathology 305 (3);            tory 425 Early Christian and Byzantine Art to
78      College of Arts and Sciences


1350 (3); Art 441 Northern European Painting,      of Independent Study (493), and at least one       Simpson, Ph.D. California Institute of Tech-
1350-1600 (3); Art History 431 Medieval Art of     course from each of the three major areas:         nology; K. Soni (Emeritus), Ph.D. Oregon
the West, 800-1450 (3); Art History 451 The        Women’s Heritage (383, 432, 453, 466, 483),        State; R.P. Soni, Ph.D. Oregon State; F.W.
Art of Italy, 1250-1400 (3); and Music History     Contemporary Issues (375, 382, 410, 425,           Stallmann (Emeritus), Ph.D. Giessen
210 History of Music to 1750 (3).                  434), and Literature and the Arts (330, 332,       (Germany); K.R. Stephenson, Ph.D.
                                                   422). As its content varies, 400 may be in-        Wisconsin; C. Sundberg, Ph.D. Wisconsin; M.
                                                   cluded in any of these areas. Students are en-     Thistlethwaite, Ph.D. University of Manchester
URBAN STUDIES                                      couraged to take at least nine hours in one of     (England); W.R. Wade, Ph.D. California
Chair:                                             these areas.                                       (Riverside); C.G. Wagner, Ph.D. Duke.
James A. Spencer, Urban and Regional                   The Women’s Studies Minor consists of
                                                   one of the Images of Women in Literature           Associate Professors:
Planning                                                                                              C. Collins, Ph.D. Minnesota; X. Feng, Ph.D.
                                                   courses (either 210 or 215), Women in Soci-
                                                   ety (220), and an additional 12 hours of upper-    Purdue; A. Freire, Ph.D. Princeton; S.
    Urban studies involves the interdisciplinary                                                      Gavrilets, Ph.D. Moscow State; Bo Guan,
study of cities and their regions. Faculty from    division Women’s Studies courses. Approved
                                                   special topics courses related to Women’s          Ph.D. Massachusettes; K. R. Kimble (Space
Planning, Architecture, Geography, History,                                                           Institute, Tullahoma), Ph.D. Ohio State; Y.
Political Science, Sociology, History, Business    Studies may also be applied toward a major or
                                                   a minor.                                           Kuo, Ph.D. Cincinnati; B. K. Soni (Space
participate in the program which has variable                                                         Institute, Tullahoma), Ph.D. Texas; J. Xiong,
emphases from the relationship of the indi-                                                           Ph.D. North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
vidual to the environment, the process of
problem solving in an urban context, or the
                                                   ITALIAN                                            Assistant Professors:
nature of current urban issues.                    See Modern Foreign Languages and                   X. Chen, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve; R.
    Prerequisites to the program are Econom-       Literatures.                                       Davis, Ph.D. Tennessee; J. Denzler, Ph.D.
ics 201 or 207, Political Science 101 or 102 or                                                       ETH (Zurich); J. Dwyer, Ph.D. Ireland; Y.
107, and Sociology 110 or 120. Courses
required for the major are Urban Studies 250,
                                                   JAPANESE                                           Kachi, Ph.D. Tokyo; T. Schulze, Ph.D.
                                                                                                      Northwestern; G.H. Tordova, Ph.D. Moscow
350 and 460, plus 3 hours from each of these       See Modern Foreign Languages and                   State; P. Tzermias, Ph.D. California (Berkely).
groups:                                            Literatures.
                                                                                                      Instructors:
    Group 1–History and Theory: Architecture                                                          Kenneth Bonee, M.S. Tennessee; Tony
410, Urban Studies 363, 401, 454
    Group 2–Physical Issues and Design:
                                                   JUDAIC STUDIES                                     Campbell, M.M. Tennessee; Jennifer Fowler,
                                                   See Interdisciplinary Programs.                    M.A. Kentucky; J. Long, Ph.D. Michigan; Linda
Urban Studies 323, 441, 464                                                                           Mahoney, M.Ed. Maryland; Rita Reagan, M.M.
    Group 3–Planning and Policy: Planning                                                             Tennessee.
446, Urban Studies 321, 402
    To complete the 30 hours required for the
                                                   LATIN
                                                   See Classics.                                          All entering freshman and all other stu-
major, an additional 12 hours should be com-                                                          dents who have not completed a college level
pleted from any of the three groups or from                                                           mathematics course, except students who
the following list of approved courses: African
and African-American Studies 480; Architec-
                                                   LATIN AMERICAN                                     have received AP calculus credit, must take
                                                                                                      the UT mathematics placement exam before
ture 403, 404, 405; Classics 334; Economics        STUDIES                                            enrolling in a mathematics course. Placement
323, 361, 462, 471, 472; Geography 310, 411,       See Interdisciplinary Programs.                    in the appropriate course will be determined
412, 449; Marketing 310, 320; Political Sci-                                                          by the score on the exam. Ordinarily a stu-
ence 340; Sociology 340, 343, 344, 345, 360,                                                          dent will not be allowed to enroll in a course at
442, 462; Speech Communication 420; Statis-        LEGAL STUDIES                                      a level above that determined by his or her
tics 201; Urban Studies 450, 481, 482, 493.        See Interdisciplinary Programs.                    placement exam score. In exceptional circum-
    A Minor in Urban Studies consists of 18                                                           stances, students will have the right to appeal
semester hours, including Urban Studies 250                                                           their placement to the Mathematics Depart-
and 350, plus additional semester hours from       LINGUISTICS                                        ment. The exam will be administered during
Group 1, 2, or 3 above. For more information       See Interdisciplinary Programs.                    summer orientation and at designated times
contact the chairperson of Urban Studies.                                                             during the Fall, Spring, and Summer registration.
                                                                                                          B.S. Major The undergraduate Mathemat-
WOMEN’S STUDIES                                    MATHEMATICS                                        ics major is designed to provide a broad intro-
                                                                                                      duction to mathematics which serves as
                                                   Professors:
Chair:                                                                                                preparation for a wide variety of careers. The
                                                   J.B. Conway (Head), Ph.D. Louisiana State;
Cheryl Brown Travis, Psychology.                                                                      requirements below, which provide a solid
                                                   V. Alexiades, Ph.D. Delaware; D.F. Anderson,
                                                                                                      introduction to four of the core components of
                                                   Ph.D. Chicago; J.S. Bradley (Emeritus), Ph.D.
    Women’s Studies encourages inquiry into                                                           mathematics, should be regarded as minimal
                                                   Iowa; J.A. Carruth (Emeritus), Ph.D. Louisiana
the full range of the human experience by                                                             preparation for careers in mathematics or
                                                   State; C.E. Clark (Emeritus), Ph.D. Louisiana
raising new questions and opening new areas                                                           closely related mathematical fields. Students
                                                   State; R.J. Daverman, Ph.D. Wisconsin; D.E.
of research concerning women. The discipline                                                          with special interests and talents are encour-
                                                   Dobbs, Ph.D. Cornell; J. Dydak, Ph.D.
enriches the traditional Arts and Sciences                                                            aged to take as many other mathematics
                                                   Warsaw (Poland); H. Frandsen (Emeritus),
curriculum by adding new perspectives on                                                              courses as their schedule permits.
                                                   Ph.D. Illinois; L.J. Gross, Ph.D. Cornell; T.G.
women’s lives and accomplishments.                                                                        Prerequisites to the Major are Math-
                                                   Hallam, Ph.D. Missouri; D.B. Hinton, Ph.D.
Women’s Studies can broaden the education                                                             ematics 141-142 (or Honors version: 147-
                                                   Tennessee; L.S. Husch, Ph.D. Florida State;
of both male and female students by helping                                                           148) and 171 or CS 102.
                                                   K. Johannson, Ph.D. Bielefeld, Germany; G.
them to understand the limitations placed on                                                              Major Requirements consists of 37 se-
                                                   Samuel Jordan, Ph.D. Wisconsin; Ohannes
both sexes by narrowly defined sex roles.                                                             mester hours of mathematics courses includ-
                                                   Karakashian, Ph.D. Harvard; B.A.
Wherever there is a need to understand                                                                ing(1) Math 231, 241 (or 247), 251 (257), 300,
                                                   Kuperschmidt (UTSI), Ph.D. M.I.T.; Suzanne
women and an interest in the new roles they                                                           and (2) eight additional courses at the 300-
                                                   Lenhart, Ph.D. Kentucky, Robert M.
are playing in society, Women’s Studies can                                                           400 level (except 399, 400, 401, 405, 411 and
                                                   McConnel (Emeritus), Ph.D. Duke; Balram S
enhance a student’s career preparation and                                                            490)satisfying the following conditions:
                                                   Rajput, Ph.D. Illinois; H.T. Mathews
opportunities.                                                                                            1. At least one course must be taken from
                                                   (Emeritus), Ph.D. Tulane; S. Mulay, Ph.D.
    The Major Concentration in Women’s                                                                each of the following categories:
                                                   Purdue; C. P. Plaut, Ph.D. Maryland; S.
Studies consists of 30 semester hours in-                                                                 Algebra: 351, 455-56 (457-58)
                                                   Richter, Ph.D. Michigan; K.C. Reddy (Space
cluding one of the Images of Women in Litera-                                                             Analysis: 341, 445-46 (447-48)
                                                   Institute, Tullahoma), Ph.D. Indian Institute of
ture courses (either 210 or 215), Women in                                                                Numerical Analysis: 371 or CS 370, 471-72
                                                   Technology; J. Rosinski, Ph.D. Wroclaw
Society (220), Emergence of the Modern                                                                    Probability Statistics: 323, 423-24 (423-25)
                                                   University; P.W. Schaefer, Ph.D. Maryland;
American Woman (310), at least three hours         S.M. Serbin (Emeritus), Ph.D. Cornell; Henry
                                                                                                                                                                               College of Arts and Sciences        79


    2. At least one 400 level two-semester se-
quence must be taken from the list above.
                                                                                   Non-US History Distribution Requirement .................. 6
                                                                                   Social Science Distribution Requirement ................... 3                      MICROBIOLOGY
    3. CS 311 and CS 380 may be used as up-                                        Foreign Language (completion of
                                                                                      secondary level) ............................................... 6-8            Professors:
per division math electives in part (2).                                                                                                                              R.N. Moore (Head), Ph.D. Texas (Austin);
                                                                                   Elective ..................................................................... 3
    There are many careers one can pursue                                          Junior                                                                             R.W. Beck (Emeritus), Ph.D. Wisconsin; J.M.
with a mathematics major. Sample programs                                          Mathematics 323, 351, 341, 371 ............................. 12                    Becker, Ph.D. Cincinnati; D. Bemis, Ph.D.
for three different goals are listed below. Addi-                                      Humanities Distribution Requirement ................... 6                      Cornell; D.A. Brian, Ph.D. D.V.M. Michigan
tional information is available in the Mathemat-                                       Social Science Distribution Requirement ............. 3                        State; T.C. Montie (Emeritus), Ph.D.
ics Department Office.                                                                 Psychoeducational Studies 210 .......................... 3                     Maryland; W.S. Riggsby, Ph.D. Yale; B.T.
                                                                                   Electives .................................................................. 8
                                                                                   Senior
                                                                                                                                                                      Rouse, Ph.D. Guelph (Canada), B.V.Sc.,
INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT                                                                                                                                                 Bristol (England); Dwayne C. Savage
                                                            Hours Credit           Mathematics 445-446, 460, 421 (or 431) ................. 12
                                                                                       Upper Level Distribution Requirement ...................                       (Emeritus), Ph.D. California (Berkeley); G.S.
Freshman
Mathematics 141-142 (or 147-148) and 171 ............ 11                               (strongly recommended: Math 400) ..................... 6                       Sayler, Ph.D. Idaho; Gary Stacey, Ph.D.
English Composition .................................................. 6           Education 400, 401, 403 ........................................... 7              Texas (Austin); D.C. White (Distinguished
Foreign Language (beginning level, preferably French,                              Education in the Sciences, Math, Research                                          Scientist), M.D. Tufts, Ph.D. Rockefeller; J.M.
    German, or Russian) ........................................ 6-8                   and Technology 304, 352, 355 ........................... 5                     Woodward (Emeritus), Ph.D. Kansas.
                                                                                   ___________________________________________
Lab Science Distribution Requirement ....................... 8
Sophomore                                                                                                  Total: 124 minimum hours                                   Associate Professors:
                                                                                   ___________________________________________
Mathematics 231, 241 (or 247), 251 (or 257),                                                                                                                          D.L. Hacker, Ph.D. Michigan State; Pam
    and 300 ............................................................ 13                                                                                           Small, Ph.D. Stanford; H. Zaghouani, Ph.D.
Non-US History Distribution Requirement .................. 6                           Honors B.S. Major Candidates for an                                            University of Paris.
Social Science Distribution Requirement ................... 3                      honors degree in Mathematics must fulfill all of
Foreign Language (completion of                                                    the requirements for the B.S. degree in Mathe-                                     Assistant Professors:
    secondary level) ............................................... 6-8           matics, but take nine courses (rather than                                         E. Urbach, Ph.D. M.I.T.; S. Wilhelm, Ph.D.
Elective ..................................................................... 3   eight) at the 300-400 level and take two 400                                       University of Western Ontario.
Junior                                                                             level two-semester sequences (rather than
Mathematics 351, 431 (or 435), 341, 371 ............... 12                                                                                                                Students wishing to emphasize study in
                                                                                   one). The grade point average computed on
Humanities Distribution Requirement ......................... 6
                                                                                   the nine 300-400 level courses mentioned                                           this area elect to major in Biology with a con-
Social Science Distribution Requirement ................... 3
Electives ................................................................ 12      above will determine the honors category:                                          centration in Microbiology. See the description
Senior .........................................................................   GPA at least 3.4 —Honors; GPA at least                                             of the Biology Major under “Division of Biol-
Mathematics 471-472, 423, 475 .............................. 12                    3.6—High Honors; GPA at least 3.8—Highest                                          ogy” for requirements.
Upper Level Distribution Requirement                                               Honors. Students with more than nine
    (may include Math 400 or 411) ........................... 6                    courses at the 300-400 level may designate
Electives (must include at least 7                                                 which courses will be used to compute these
                                                                                                                                                                      MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
    upper division hours.) ........................................ 11
___________________________________________                                        GPA’s.                                                                                  Courses in this major are open only to
                                                                                       Minor Prerequisite to a minor is Mathemat-                                     qualified students who have completed the
                        Total: 124 minimum hours                                                                                                                      first three years of the Science-Medical Tech-
___________________________________________                                        ics 141-142 (or 147-148). The minor consists
                                                                                   of (1) Math 231, 241, 251, 300 and (2) nine                                        nology Curriculum, described in the College of
                                                                                   additional hours at the 300-400 level (except                                      Arts and Sciences curricula section of this
PREPARATION FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL
                                                                                   399, 401, 405, and 490). CS 370 may be sub-                                        catalog, and who have been approved by the
                                                          Hours Credit
Freshman                                                                           stituted for three of those hours. The grade in                                    Medical Technology Admissions Committee.
Mathematics 141-142 (or 147-148) and 171 ............ 11                           each of these courses must be at least C.
English Composition .................................................. 6
    Foreign Language (beginning level, preferably                                                                                                                     MODERN FOREIGN
         French, German, or Russian) .................... 6-8
Lab Science Distribution Requirement ....................... 8
                                                                                   MEDIEVAL STUDIES                                                                   LANGUAGES AND
                                                                                   See Interdisciplinary Programs.
Sophomore
Mathematics 231, 241 (or 247), 251 or (257),
                                                                                                                                                                      LITERATURES
    and 300 ............................................................ 13
Non-US History Distribution Requirement .................. 6                       MEDICAL BIOLOGY/                                                                   Professors:
                                                                                                                                                                      C. R. Hodges (Head), Ph.D. Chicago;
    Social Science Distribution Requirement ............. 3
    Foreign Language (completion of                                                MEMORIAL RESEARCH                                                                  P.E. Barrette, Ph.D. California (Berkeley);
        secondary level) ......................................... 6-8
    Elective ............................................................... 3
                                                                                   CENTER                                                                             P. Brady (Shumway Chair of Excellence),
                                                                                                                                                                      Ph.D. Universite de Paris (Sorbonne);
Junior                                                                                                                                                                E.J. Campion, Ph.D. Yale; C.W. Cobb
Mathematics 323 (or 423), 431 (or 421), 371,                                           The Department of Medical Biology of The                                       (Emeritus), Ph.D. Tulane; B. Creel, Ph.D.
    435 (or 461) ...................................................... 12         University of Tennessee College of Medicine-                                       California; S. DiMaria, Ph.D. Wisconsin; J.C.
Humanities Distribution Requirement ......................... 6                    Knoxville Unit was formed from the faculty of                                      Elliott (Emeritus), M.A. Illinois; J.E. Fallen
    Social Science Distribution Requirement ............. 3                        The University Memorial Research Center
    Electives ........................................................... 12                                                                                          (Emeritus), Ph.D. Pennsylvania; D.M. Fiene
                                                                                   and Hospital in 1978. The Research Center                                          (Emeritus), Ph.D. Indiana; M.H. Handelsman,
Senior
Mathematics 445-46 (or 447-48) and 455-55                                          was established in 1956. The faculty has re-                                       Ph.D. Florida; W.H. Heflin (Emeritus), Jr.,
    (or 457-58) ......................................................... 12       search, education, and service interests in                                        Ph.D. Florida State; T.B. Irving (Emeritus),
Upper Level Distribution Requirement                                               cancer, blood diseases, metabolism, neuro-                                         Ph.D. Princeton; H. Kratz (Emeritus), Ph.D.
     (may include Math 400 or 411) ........................... 6                   science, birth defects, cytogenetics and clini-                                    Ohio State; K.D. Levy, Ph.D. Kentucky; F.D.
Electives (must include at least 7 upper                                           cal genetics. Courses in these areas are                                           Maurino (Emeritus), Ph.D. Columbia; C. J.
    division hours) ................................................... 11
___________________________________________                                        offered to students at the graduate and                                            Mellor, Ph.D. Chicago; J.C. Osborne
                                                                                   undergraduate levels. Elective courses are                                         (Emeritus), Ph.D. Northwestern; C. Pinsky
                        Total: 124 minimum hours                                                                                                                      (Emeritus), Ph.D. California (Berkeley); U.C.
___________________________________________                                        also available to students in the College of
                                                                                   Medicine.                                                                          Ritzenhoff (Emerita), Ph.D. Connecticut;
                                                                                       The faculty with the College of Veterinary                                     Oscar Rivera-Rodas, Ph.D. California; J.B.
SECONDARY EDUCATION                                                                                                                                                   Romeiser, Ph.D. Vanderbilt; A.M. Vazquez-
                                                         Hours Credit              Medicine participates in the graduate program
                                                                                   leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in                                               Bigi(Emeritus), Ph.D. Minnesota; A.H. Wallace
Freshman                                                                                                                                                              (Emeritus), Ph.D. North Carolina; Yulan
Mathematics 141-142 (or 147-148) and 171 ............ 11                           Comparative and Experimental Medicine.
                                                                                                                                                                      Washburn (Emeritus), Ph.D. North Carolina;
English Composition .................................................. 6           Other advanced degree students can do the-
                                                                                                                                                                      D.J. Young, Ph.D. Texas.
Foreign Language (beginning level,                                                 sis research in the department by arrange-
  preferably French, German, or Russian) ............ 6-8                          ment with other life science departments at                                        Associate Professors:
Lab Science Distribution Requirement ...................... 8                      the University.                                                                    M. Beauvois, Ph.D. Texas; S. Blackwell, Ph.D.
Sophomore                                                                                                                                                             Indiana; F. Brizio-Skov, Ph.D. Washington; L.
Mathematics 231, 241 (or 247), 251 or (257),
                                                                                                                                                                      Essif Ph.D. Brown; P. Hoeyng, Ph.D.
    and 300 ............................................................. 13
                                                                                                                                                                      Wisconsin; C. Holmlund, Ph.D. Wisconsin;
80      College of Arts and Sciences


G. Kaplan, Ph.D. Pennsylvania; J. LaCure,           311-312 and 401-402. The major with literary       director of the program, History 360 or 361,
Ph.D. Indiana; N.A. Lauckner (Emeritus),            emphasis also requires Russian 301-302,            three hours of an approved Latin American
Ph.D. Wisconsin; D. Lee, Ph.D. Stanford;            451-452, and 6 hours from Russian 221, 222,        Studies course.
C. Nakuma, Ph.D. Universite de Paris                371, 372, or other courses numbered above              7. The Russian Major consists of 30
(Sorbonne); S. Ohnesorg, Ph.D. McGill;              300. The additional requirements for the area      hours. The following are required: Russian
N. Pervukhina, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr; E. Silva-           studies major are Russian 371-372; 3 or more       301-302, 311-312, 401-402, 451-452, 490 or
Filho, Ph.D. North Carolina; .                      credits chosen from Russian 221, 222, and          491, and 3 hours from the following: 221, 222,
                                                    Russian courses numbered 300 and above;            371, 372, 430, or any 400-level courses.
Assistant Professors:                               and 6 or more credits chosen from Geogra-              8. The Spanish Major consists of 33
A. Ayo, Ph.D. Arizona; O. Berwald, Ph.D.            phy 375, History 340-341, and Political Sci-       hours. The following are required: 323, 330,
North Carolina; L. Cano, Ph.D. Pennsylvania         ence 459.                                          331, 345, 346, at least one 300-level literature
State; N. Cruz-Camara, Ph.D. SUNY                       The Spanish Major consists of 30 hours         survey course, three hours of 490 or 491, and
(Buffalo); C. Cox (Emerita), M.A. Tennessee;        in courses numbered 323 and above in one of        any four courses in language, literature or cul-
E. Johnson, Ph.D. Tennessee; H. Maxim,              two concentrations. All majors must have the       ture, at least two of which must be from the
Ph.D. Texas; M. McAlpin, Ph.D. Columbia; J.         following courses: 323, 330 and 331. Litera-       400 level while the remaining two may be se-
Williams, Ph.D. Ohio State; P. Wilson               ture concentration: (1) 332, 333, 334;             lected from courses numbered above 300.
(Emerita), M.A. Tufts.                              (2) four additional 400-level courses, at least    Students whose level of proficiency in Spanish
                                                    two of which must be in literature. Hispanic       is superior as defined by the ACTFL Profi-
    The French Major consists of 30 hours in        Studies concentration: 1) one course from          ciency Guidelines may substitute a 400-level
courses numbered 333 and above. (French             332, 333 or 334 2) 6 additional courses in         course for 323 with consent of the department.
300 does not count toward the major, but is         language, literature or culture, at least 4 of
recommended for students needing grammar            which must be from the 400 level. Students         B. PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS
review). All majors must have the following         whose level of proficiency in Spanish is supe-         1. International Business students will take
courses (or their equivalent with consent of        rior as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency           24 hours beyond the prerequisite courses
the department): 333-334; 351-352; 421; 422;        Guidelines may substitute a 400-level course       specified next under “C. PRACTICAL EXPE-
440. Literature concentration students must         for 323 with consent of the department.            RIENCE.” The following are required:
also have 6 hours of literature at the 400 level,       Major in French, German, Italian,                  Accounting 201-202 (5 hours), Business
plus a 3-hour language-oriented or civilization     Russian, or Spanish with a Concentration           Administration 201 (4 hours), Finance 301 (3
course. Language concentration students             in Language and World Business or a Ma-            hours), Marketing 300 (3 hours), and Man-
must also have 6 hours of language-oriented         jor Concentration in Language and World            agement 300 (3hours). Students then choose
or civilization course, plus a 3-hour literature    Business with Chinese, Japanese, or                two from the following recommended list: Busi-
course at the 400 level. Exceptional students       Portuguese Students who wish to prepare for        ness Law 301, Management 471, Marketing
may substitute a 400-level course for either        careers in international business may com-         310, 440, Economics 321, Business Adminis-
333 or 334, with consent of the department.         plete (a) a special major in Chinese, French,      tration 371. Other business courses num-
    German Major Majors or minors in Ger-           German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Rus-        bered 300 or higher may be used to fulfill this
man should carefully prepare their programs         sian, or Spanish; (b) a professional emphasis      requirement with the consent of the student’s
in consultation with a departmental faculty         in International Business, International Retail    faculty advisor.
advisor. German 201-202 or the equivalent is        Merchandising, or International Agricultural           2. International Retail Merchandising
a prerequisite to the major. The major shall        Economics, and (c) some form of practical          Students will take 25 hours. The following are
consist of at least 30 hours of German in           experience related to the concentration.           required: Accounting 201, 202, Marketing 300,
courses numbered above 300, including Ger-          Admission is by permission of the program          Retail and Consumer Sciences 210, 310, 321,
man 363 and usually including German 301-           director.                                          421, and three additional credit hours from the
302. Courses in English translation or German                                                          following: Retail and Consumer Sciences 350,
331-332 do not count toward the major. In or-       A. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS                           410, 411, 412, 415, 450, or 493.
der to graduate, majors will be required to take         1. The Chinese Concentration consists             3. International Agricultural Economics
a proficiency test in German. It is recom-          of 30 hours. The following are required: Chi-      students will complete 24 hours. The following
mended that German majors also take History         nese 231, 232, 331, 332, three hours of Asian      are required: Accounting 201, Agricultural
241-242 or 334-335 and 6 hours of 200-level         Languages 490 or 491, and 9 hours of               Economics 210, 320, 342, 350, 420, 430, and
English courses. Majors are also strongly           courses from the following: Asian Studies 102,     three credit hours from the following: Market-
urged to consider a minor in some other area        History 362, 363, 364, 476, Political Science      ing 300, Management 301, Finance 301.
of the humanities.                                  454, Religious Studies/Philosophy 376, 379
    B.A. Honors in German The Honors B.A.           (or other course approved by the Asian Studies     C. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
consists of at least 32 hours of German in          Advisor).                                              Through Asian Languages 490, French
courses numbered above 300, including                    2. The French Major consists of 33 hours.     490, German 490, Italian 490, Portuguese
completion of German 477 or 478 with a grade        The following are required: French 333, 345,       490, Russian 490, or Spanish 490, each Lan-
of A or B+. To be admitted to the Honors            351, 352, 400, 422, 432, 440, 445, a 400 level     guage and World Business student must un-
Program, students must present a cumulative         literature elective, and three hours of 491, 490   dertake study abroad, an internship, or a
grade point average in German major courses         or 493.                                            relevant research project for a minimum of 3
of at least 3.5 and have an overall GPA of not           3. The German Major consists of 30            hours (included in major requirements).
less than 3.2. Students should apply for ad-        hours. The following are required: German              Additionally, Language and World Business
mission to the B.A. Honors Program at the           301-302, 311-312, 323 or 363, 485, three           students must consult an advisor in the De-
end of their junior year. Application forms are     credit hours of 490, 491 or 493, and three         partment in selecting relevant courses under
available in the department office. Since           courses numbered 320 or above.                     the Basic Skills and Distribution requirements
courses taken abroad are not calculated in               4. The Italian Major consists of 30 hours.    for the College.
the overall average, the department reserves        The following are required: Italian 314, 341,          Students interested in the Language and
the right to make a judgment on the appropri-       342, 401, 490 or 491, and 12 hours of any          World Business Program should contact the
ateness of a study-abroad curriculum for            400-level literature courses.                      Director for advising as early as possible in
acceptance as honors work and to require                 5. The Japanese Concentration consists        their college careers. The academic record
other 400-level courses as a condition for the      of 30 hours. The following are required: Japa-     presented will be assessed by the Director of
degree.                                             nese 251, 252, 351, 352, three hours of Asian      Language and World Business. Minimum
    The Italian Major consists of 30 hours in       Languages 490 or 491, and 9 hours of               requirements for progression to the concen-
courses numbered 311 and above.                     courses from the following: Asian Studies 102      tration are a 2.75 cumulative average in the
    The Russian Major has two options, a tra-       or 471 (if related to Japan), History 365, Japa-   courses specifically required by the College of
ditional major with a literary emphasis and an      nese 313 or 314, Religious Studies 383.            Arts and Sciences in Basic Skills and Distribu-
area studies major. Russian 201-202 is a pre-            6. The Portuguese Concentration con-          tion and in the Language and World Business
requisite for both. Majors should prepare their     sists of 33 hours. The following are required:     plan of studies, and a 3.0 average in language
programs in consultation with the departmen-        Portuguese 301, 302, 309, 315, 316, 409, 431,      courses. Course prerequisites for the pro-
tal faculty advisor. Both options consist of 30     six hours of 490 or 491 as approved by the         gram include Asian Languages, French, Ger-
hours of courses, and both require Russian                                                             man, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish
                                                                                                                 College of Arts and Sciences         81


199, Economics 201 (under Social Sciences                 The French Minor consists of 18 hours in      (Stonybrook); E. Powell, M.M. Cincinnati;
electives) and Math 125 and Statistics 201            courses numbered 333 and above, distributed       Jorge Richter, M.M. Andrews University; D.
(under Part II of the Natural Science elec-           as follows: 333 or 334; 351-352; 421; plus six    Ryder, D.M.A. Iowa; C. Walters, D.M. Florida
tives). Progression is based on availability of       hours of electives at the 300 or 400 level.       State.
space in the program. Program standards are           French 300 does not count toward the minor,
adjusted periodically, and current require-           but is recommended for students needing           BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE
ments are available from the Director of the          grammar review.                                        The School of Music offers curricula
Language and World Business Program.                      The German Minor consists of German           leading to the Bachelor of Music degree with
    For further information, inquire in 701           201-202 or its equivalent as a prerequisite to    concentrations in music theory/composition,
McClung Tower.                                        the minor. The minor shall consist of at least    music education, and applied music (voice;
                                                      18 hours of German courses numbered               piano; organ; sacred music-organ or piano;
Placement Examination                                 above 300, which normally include German          sacred music-voice; piano pedagogy; strings;
    Students who have had previous work               301-302 and 12 additional hours of courses        woodwind, brass, and percussion instru-
(either two or more years in high school or           numbered above 300 (excluding 331-332 and         ments; studio music and jazz). This study
one year in college) in Chinese, French, Ger-         courses in English translation).                  prepares students for graduate music study
man, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian,              The Italian Minor consists of 18 hours in     or for positions in music for which a profes-
or Spanish should take a placement test to            courses numbered 311 or above. Students           sional music degree is required.
determine the appropriate level course for            pursuing a minor must consult with a depart-          The General Education (6 hours foreign
which to register. Placement tests are given          mental advisor.                                   language requirement) is in addition to the
for incoming students during summer orienta-              The Japanese Minor consists of Asian          University admission requirement. Students
tion and throughout the year. Please contact          Languages 251-252 or its equivalent is a pre-     may continue at the 200 level in a language
the department for further details.                   requisite to the minor. The minor shall consist   begun in high school or elect to begin a new
Proficiency Examinations                              of at least 17 hours of Japanese courses, in-     language at the 100 level. Students majoring
    Students who have acquired a knowledge            cluding Asian Languages 351-352; 451; and 6       in vocal performance must complete one year
of French, German, Italian, Russian, or Span-         hours from Asian Languages 313-314 or other       each of two languages chosen from French,
ish should request a proficiency test. A stu-         Japanese courses above 300.                       German and Italian.
dent earning a grade of C or better will receive          The Portuguese Minor consists of 18
credit for an appropriate number of courses.          hours in courses numbered 300 or above.           PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS
Superior students are encouraged to proceed           Students pursuing a minor must consult with a         All new music students (freshman and
as rapidly as their achievement permits.              departmental advisor.                             transfer) must perform an audition in applied
                                                          The Russian Minor Russian 201-202 is a        music and take a music theory examination,
Study Abroad                                          prerequisite to the minor. The minor in Rus-      the results of which will determine his or her
     Five summer study abroad opportunities           sian shall consist of at least 18 hours of Rus-   placement in applied music and theory. Both
are available to students through the Depart-         sian courses, including Russian 301-302;          the audition and theory exam should be com-
ment. The department sponsors programs in             311-312; and 6 hours from Russian 221-222         pleted during a visit to the University prior to
Brazil, France, Italy, Mexico, and Spain. Stu-        or other Russian courses numbered above           final arrival to begin classes. Applicants are
dents can earn up to six credit hours by par-         300.                                              urged to contact the School to schedule
ticipating in these programs. In most cases,              The Spanish Minor consists of 18 hours        appointments for satisfying both requirements
the courses will fulfill part or all of the foreign   in courses numbered 323 or above, distrib-        as early as possible, but certainly no later
language requirement (completion of the el-           uted as follows: 323, 330 and 331; one course     than the Summer Orientation period.
ementary or intermediate level). Upper divi-          from 332, 333 or 334; two additional courses.         No student officially progresses to a Major
sion classes in literature, culture, and              Students pursuing a minor are strongly ad-        in Music until both the audition and entrance
language are also available for major and             vised to consult with a departmental advisor.     examination have been successfully completed.
minor credit. Participation in these programs
will satisfy the foreign study requirements for                                                         MINIMUM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
the Language and World Business degree. A             MUSIC                                                 Potential performance and music educa-
faculty member accompanies students on the                                                              tion majors not meeting minimum performance
program. In addition to formal classes held at        Professors:                                       standards, but showing potential, will be
a major university in the city, group excur-          R. Stephens (Director), M.M. East Carolina;       allowed to register for applied music (Music
sions to cultural and historical sites are an in-     G.C. Bitzas, M.M. Converse; J.P. Brock,           140—Fundamentals of Performance) in order
tegral part of the programs. For more                 M.M. Alabama; J. Coker, M.A. Sam Houston;         to attain the desired level. Such students are
information concerning prerequisites, lodging         F.M. Combs, M.A. Missouri; K.A. Jacobs,           normally expected to demonstrate sufficient
arrangements, costs, and dates of an indi-            D.M.A. Texas; C.F. Leach, D.M.                    progress by the end of the first academic year
vidual program, contact the Department of             Northwestern; W.S. MacMorran, M.M.                to perform on a level commensurate with a
Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures,             Wisconsin; D.K. MCClelland, M.A. Columbia;        freshman student accepted without reserva-
701 McClung Tower.                                    M.C. Moore, Ph.D. Michigan; D.B.                  tion by the School. The addition of the extra
     Students are also encouraged to study            Northington, D.M.A. Yale; D.M. Pederson,          semesters of study usually results in length-
abroad, particularly through participation in the     Ph.D. Iowa; G.D. Sousa, Ph.D. Ohio State;         ening the period needed to satisfy require-
University’s International Student Exchange           D.D. Stutzenberger, D.M.A. Maryland.              ments for advanced standing (300 level).
Program (ISEP). The department is also pre-                                                                 Students entering any one of the three
                                                      Associate Professors:
pared to recommend summer study programs                                                                emphases in music education must complete
                                                      F. Adams, M.M. Tennessee; S. Binder, D.M.         the same audition procedures as those of per-
and year abroad programs for students who             Florida State; M. Boling, M.M. Tennessee;
are interested in foreign study. Credits from                                                           formance majors. At the end of the second
                                                      D. Brown, Memphis State; D. Brunell, D.M.         year or after having completed the required
recognized foreign study programs can                 Indiana; P.Z. Carter, M.M. Colorado; D.C.
readily be transferred to UT. For qualified stu-                                                        courses, students will participate in an inter-
                                                      Davis (Interim Head), Ph.D. Iowa; C.              view with an appointed Admissions Board.
dents, the department also offers Asian Lan-          Freeman, M.P.A. Oklahoma City; L.C. Gay,
guages 491 Foreign Study, German 491                                                                    Upon receiving the positive recommendation
                                                      Ph.D. Columbia University; D.H. Hough, M.M.       from this board, students are admitted to the
Foreign Study, and Russian 491 Foreign                Tennessee; B.A. Murphy, Ph.D. Ohio State;
Study. Students should consult the                                                                      teacher education program and permitted to
                                                      D. Royse, Ph.D. Kent State; S.R. Searle, M.M.     take required upper division education courses.
department before registering for the foreign         Tennessee; C. Smith, B.M. SUNY; G.R. Sperl,
study course.                                                                                               Students who pursue the music education
                                                      M.M. Indiana; M.B. Stephens, M.A, M.M. Ohio       curriculum are subject to all rules and regula-
     The Chinese Minor consists of Asian              State; A.N. Wentzel, M.M. Southern California;
Languages 231-232 or its equivalent is a pre-                                                           tions of the Teacher Education Program,
                                                      M. Zelmanovitch.                                  which is housed in the College of Education,
requisite to the minor. The minor shall consist
                                                                                                        notwithstanding the fact that their degree will
of at least 17 hours of Chinese courses, in-          Assistant Professors:
                                                                                                        be awarded from the College of Arts and
cluding Asian Languages 331-332; 431; and             A.L. Batey, D.M.A. South Carolina; W.
                                                                                                        Sciences.
six hours from Asian Languages 311-312 or             Baldwin, D.M.A. Maryland; W.W. Hawthorne,
other Chinese courses above 300.                      Ph.D. Cincinnati; E. Keathley, Ph.D. SUNY
82      College of Arts and Sciences


ENSEMBLES                                            graduation. Specific recital attendance re-       B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—
     Ensemble participation during each se-          quirements are listed in the School of Music      Wind/Percussion Emphasis (5-year
mester of residence is required of all students      Undergraduate Student Handbook.                   option)
studying applied music. Students are required                                                                                                                      Hours Credit
to participate in ensembles appropriate to their     BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC                        Freshman
specific degree program as approved by the           EDUCATION                                         English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
                                                                                                       Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
faculty of the department. Ensemble require-              Students seeking licensure to teach music
                                                                                                       Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
ments vary among the concentrations and are          in the public schools should pursue one of the    Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
listed in the School of Music Undergraduate          options within this degree program. Four-year     Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Handbook, which is available in Room 211,            and five-year options are available to prepare    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Building. Enrollment in all ensembles is       teachers for instrumental teaching or for the     Music Education 230 ................................................. 1
by audition or consent of instructor.                teaching of vocal and general music. The four     Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
                                                     year program leads to the degree and to           Music Keyboard 110, 120 ....................................... 1,1
APPLIED MUSIC                                        teaching licensure. The five year program         Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
                                                                                                       Sophomore
    Applied study is classified as Principle or      provides for the granting of the degree at the
                                                                                                       Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Secondary.                                           end of four years, with teacher licensure being   Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
    Students studying their principle (major)        awarded after a fifth-year, graduate level in-    Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
instrument register for credit appropriate to        ternship. Students choosing the five year pro-    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
their program, 2-4 credit hours; students            gram earn twenty-four hours which may be          Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
studying a secondary instrument register for         applied to the Master’s degree.                   Music Education 210 ................................................. 1
1 hour of credit. Study at the principal level                                                         Music Education 211 ................................................. 1
receives one hour of private instruction per         BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE                           Music Education 220 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                       Music Education 221 ................................................. 1
week or a one-hour class lesson plus a half-             The School of Music offers curricula lead-
                                                                                                       Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
hour private lesson. Determination of the            ing to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major   Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3
mode of instruction rests with the department.       and minor in Music, designed for those stu-       Social Science ........................................................... 3
Study at the secondary level receives one-           dents who have a strong interest in music,        Math 115 ................................................................... 3
half hour private instruction per week or its        but desire a comprehensive liberal studies        Junior
equivalent in class instruction. Applied music       program.                                          Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
courses do not permit non-credit registration                                                          Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2
nor may students elect non-conventional              THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE—                      Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
                                                                                                       Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
grading.                                             MUSIC MAJOR
                                                                                                       Music Education 350 ................................................. 2
    Area study guides for all sections of the            Music Course Requirements Prerequi-           Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
examination are available in the Music Office.       sites: Music Theory 110,120 (6); Music            Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
    All music majors are required to register        Theory 130, 140 (2); Music Performance 100        Music Education 200 ................................................. 1
for Music General 200—Solo Class every fall          Level (2). Courses toward the major: Music        Music Education 310, 320 ......................................... 5
and spring semester with the exception of the        Theory 210,220 (6); Music Theory 230, 240         Music Education 212 ................................................. 1
semester in which they are student teaching.         (2); Music History 200 (3); Music History 210,    Natural Science ......................................................... 3
The requirements for this course are to attend       220 (6); Music Performance 200 level or           Non-US History .......................................................... 3
scheduled concerts, recitals, master classes,        above (four semester minimum) (8); Music          Senior
repertoire, and solo classes, and to perform at                                                        Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
                                                     General 200 (4 semester minimum) (0); Music       Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
least once each semester as partial fulfillment      Ensemble (4); Music Theory 310 (3) 3 hours
of applied music credit requirements.                                                                  Music General 301 .................................................... 0
                                                     selected from: Music History 350, 380, 390.       Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
    Applied Music Fees: $80 per semester for
half-hour lesson (1 credit hour) $160 per            Music electives (0-3 hours) selected from:        Music Education 240 or 241 ...................................... 1
semester for hour lesson (2-4 credit hours).         Music History 460 (3); Music General 301 (0);     Music Education 340 ................................................. 3
                                                     Music Theory 493 (3) or Music History 493         Music Education 420 ................................................. 3
    Computer registration and applied music                                                            Music Education 430 ................................................. 3
fee payment must be verified in the School of        (3); Music General 411 (0). Total of 45-48
                                                                                                       Music Education 440 ................................................. 2
Music office no later than the end of the            hours.
                                                                                                       Education 400 ........................................................... 2
second day of classes of the fall, and spring            1. Students must complete a minimum of        Education 401 ........................................................... 3
semesters and the first day of the summer            four semesters of Music Performance, major        Instructional Technology, Curriculum
terms in order to be accepted for applied            instrument/voice at the 200 level or above.           and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3
music study.                                             2. Music General 200 must be completed a      Non-US History .......................................................... 3
    Applied music fees are not refundable after      minimum of four semesters.                        Elective ..................................................................... 1
lessons have been scheduled.                             Degree requires a minimum of 124 hours.       Internship Year
                                                     Remainder of hours to be structured per re-       Music Education 575 ............................................... 12
KEYBOARD SKILLS PROFICIENCY                                                                            Music Education 574 ................................................. 2
                                                     quirements as outlined in the catalog section
                                                                                                       Music Education 591 ................................................. 4
EXAMINATION                                          “Requirements for Degrees” in the general         Electives in Music Education or Music ...................... 6
    Proficiency in keyboard skills is required of    section of the College of Arts and Sciences       _______________________________________________
all music majors and is usually acquired in the      catalog entry.                                                Total: 124 hours plus 24 graduate hours
four-semester series of Class Piano I, II, III, IV       Music Minor (a) Concentration in Applied      ______________________________________________
(Mus Kbd 110, 120, 210, 220). Students who           Music—consists of 17 hours in courses num-
already possess keyboard skills may pass a           bered 200 and above, distributed as follows:      B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—
proficiency examination in lieu of these courses.    Music History 200, 8 hours in applied music,      Wind/Percussion Emphasis (4-year
                                                     and 6 hours in music electives. Prerequisites     alternative)
RECITAL ATTENDANCE POLICY                                                                                                                                      Hours Credit
                                                     are Music Theory 100 or equivalent and two        Freshman
    The faculty of the School of Music believes      semesters of applied music study (Music           English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
that exposure to a variety of live musical per-      Performance) at the 103-190 levels. (b) Con-      Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
formances is an important part of the educa-         centration in Music History and Literature—       Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
tion of students studying music at the               consists of 17 hours in courses numbered          Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
University level. As a result, the faculty has       200 and above, distributed as follows: Music      Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
put in place a recital attendance requirement        History 200, 9 hours in Music History and Lit-    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
for undergraduate music students. Regular            erature courses, and 5 hours in music elec-       Music Education 240 or 241 ...................................... 1
recital attendance helps students become                                                               Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
                                                     tives. Prerequisites are Music Theory 100 or      Music Keyboard 110, 120 ....................................... 1,1
acquainted with accepted norms of recital            equivalent and two semesters of applied mu-       Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
presentation, furnishes them with opportuni-         sic study at the 103-190 levels.                  Social Science ........................................................... 3
ties to get to know and respect the talents of                                                         Sophomore
other students and faculty in the School of                                                            Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Music, and helps them establish the habit of                                                           Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
attending musical performances after                                                                   Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
                                                                                                                                                                                   College of Arts and Sciences                               83

Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Senior                                                                             B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6           Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2                       Vocal/General Concentration/Keyboard
Music Education 210 ................................................. 1          Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0            Emphasis (5-year option)
Music Education 211 ................................................. 1          Music General 301 .................................................... 0                                                                     Hours Credit
Music Education 220 ................................................. 1          Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1           Freshman
Music Education 221 ................................................. 1          Music Education 420 ................................................. 3            English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music Education 430 ................................................. 3            Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3               Music Education 441 ................................................. 2            Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
Math 115 ................................................................... 3   Education 400 ........................................................... 2        Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2
Non-US History .......................................................... 3      Education 401 ........................................................... 3        Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 1,1
Junior                                                                           Instructional Technology, Curriculum                                               Music Education 240 or 241 ..................................... 1
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3            and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3             Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2        Non-US History .......................................................... 3        Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2                     Social Science ........................................................... 3       Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Elective ..................................................................... 1   Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
Music Education 350 ................................................. 2          Internship Year                                                                    Sophomore Year
Music History 380 ...................................................... 3       Music Education 575 ............................................... 12             Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music Education 574 ................................................. 2            Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
Music Education 200 ................................................. 1          Music Education 591 ................................................. 4            Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2
Music Education 310,320 .......................................... 5             Electives in Music Education or Music ...................... 6                     Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 1,1
Music Education 340 ................................................. 3          _______________________________________________
                                                                                                                                                                    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Education 212 ................................................. 1                      Total: 124 hours plus 24 graduate hours                                Music Ensemble ........................................................ 2
Music Education 420 ................................................. 3          ______________________________________________
                                                                                                                                                                    Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
Music Education 430 ................................................. 3                                                                                             Music Education 260 ................................................. 1
Natural Science ......................................................... 3      B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 201 ................................................. 1
Senior                                                                           String Emphasis (4-year alternative)                                               Music Education 200 ................................................. 1
Music Performance (major instrument) ...................... 2                                                                              Hours Credit
                                                                                                                                                                    Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3
Music General 200 .................................................... 0         Freshman
                                                                                                                                                                    Natural Science ......................................................... 3
Music General 301 .................................................... 0         English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
                                                                                                                                                                    Math 115 ................................................................... 3
Music Ensemble ........................................................ 1        Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
                                                                                                                                                                    Junior Year
Music Education 230 ................................................. 1          Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
Music Education 400 ............................................... 12           Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2
Music Education 401 ................................................. 0          Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2
Music Education 440 ................................................. 2          Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
                                                                                                                                                                    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Education 400 ........................................................... 2      Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Education 401 ........................................................... 3      Music Keyboard 110, 120 ....................................... 1,1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 250 ................................................. 1
Instructional Technology, Curriculum                                             Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 210 or 211 ...................................... 1
    and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3           Social Science ........................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 200 ................................................. 1
Non-US History .......................................................... 3      Sophomore
_______________________________________________                                                                                                                     Music Education 310, 320 ...................................... 3,2
                                                                                 Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1
                                Total: 132 hours                                 Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
______________________________________________                                                                                                                      Music Theory 450 ...................................................... 2
                                                                                 Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
                                                                                                                                                                    Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
                                                                                 Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—                                                                                                                                 Non-US History .......................................................... 3
                                                                                 Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
                                                                                                                                                                    Social Sciences ......................................................... 3
String Emphasis (5-year option)                                                  Music Education 210 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Senior Year
                                                          Hours Credit           Music Education 220 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2
Freshman                                                                         Music Education 240 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6       Music Education 241 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6           Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music General 301* ................................................... 0
Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2           Chamber Ensemble ................................................. 1,1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 330 ................................................. 3
Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2                     Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 350 ................................................. 1
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Math 115 ................................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 420 ................................................. 3
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Non-US History .......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 430 ................................................. 3
Music History 200 ...................................................... 3       Junior
                                                                                                                                                                    Education 400 ........................................................... 2
Music Keyboard 110, 120 ....................................... 1,1              Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Education 401 ........................................................... 3
Foreign Language ...................................................... 6        Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2
                                                                                                                                                                    Instructional Technology, Curriculum
Sophomore                                                                        Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2
                                                                                                                                                                        and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3
Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6           Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
                                                                                                                                                                    Non-US History .......................................................... 3
Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2           Music Education 350 ................................................. 2
Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2                     Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    *Optional Full Recital with approval of major area
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6           Music Education 200 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Internship Year
Music Education 210 ................................................. 1          Music Education 230 ................................................. 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 575 ............................................... 12
Music Education 220 ................................................. 1          Music Education 310, 320 ......................................... 5
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 574 ................................................. 2
Music Education 240 ................................................. 1          Music Education 340 ................................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Education 591 ................................................. 4
Music Education 241 ................................................. 1          Music Education 420 ................................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Electives in Music Education or Music ...................... 6
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music Education 430 ................................................. 3            _______________________________________________
Chamber Ensemble ................................................. 1,1           Natural Science ......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                                Total: 125 hours plus 24 graduate hours
Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3               Senior                                                                             ______________________________________________
Math 115 ................................................................... 3   Music Performance (major instrument) ...................... 2
Junior                                                                           Music General 200 .................................................... 0           B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3        Music General 301 .................................................... 0           Vocal/General Concentration/Keyboard
Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2        Music Ensemble ........................................................ 1
                                                                                                                                                                    Emphasis (4-year alternative)
Music Performance (major instrument) ................... 2,2                     Music Education 400 ............................................... 12
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Hours Credit
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Music Education 401 ................................................. 0
                                                                                                                                                                    Freshman
Music Education 350 ................................................. 2          Music Education 441 ................................................. 2
                                                                                                                                                                    English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
Music History 380 ...................................................... 3       Education 400 ........................................................... 2
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Education 401 ........................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
Music Education 200 ................................................. 1          Instructional Technology, Curriculum
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2
Music Education 310, 320 ......................................... 5                 and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 1,1
Music Education 230 ................................................. 1          Non-US History .......................................................... 3
                                                                                 _______________________________________________                                    Music Education 240 or 241 ..................................... 1
Music Education 340 ................................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Natural Science ......................................................... 3                                      Total: 132 hours
                                                                                 ______________________________________________                                     Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Non-US History .......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
                                                                                                                                                                    Social Science ........................................................... 3
84           College of Arts and Sciences

Sophomore Year                                                                   Music Theory 450 ...................................................... 2        Music Education 200 ................................................. 1
Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6           Music History 380 ...................................................... 3       Music Education 400 ............................................... 12
Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2           Non-US History .......................................................... 3      Music Education 401 ................................................. 0
Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2                 Social Sciences ......................................................... 3      Education 400 ........................................................... 2
Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 1,1              Senior Year                                                                      Education 401 ........................................................... 3
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2              Non-US History .......................................................... 3
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6           Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         *Optional Full Recital with approval of major area
Music Education 200 ................................................. 1          Music General 301* ................................................... 0         _______________________________________________
Music Education 260 ................................................. 1          Music Education 200 ................................................. 1                                          Total: 135 hours
Music Education 201 ................................................. 1          Music Education 330 ................................................. 3          ______________________________________________
Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3               Music Education 350 ................................................. 1
Natural Science ......................................................... 3      Music Education 420 ................................................. 3          B.M. Curriculum in Organ
Math 115 ................................................................... 3   Music Education 430 ................................................. 3                                                                     Hours Credit
Non-US History .......................................................... 3      Music Voice 450 ........................................................ 2       Freshman
Junior Year                                                                      Education 400 ........................................................... 2      English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3        Education 401 ........................................................... 3      Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2        Instructional Technology, Curriculum                                             Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
Music Performance (keyboard) ............................... 2,2                     and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3           Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Non-US History .......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                  1
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Performance ............................................... 4,4
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1                                                                                          Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Education 250 ................................................. 1          *Optional Full Recital with approval of major area                               Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
Music Education 210 or 211 ...................................... 1                                                                                               Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Education 310, 320 ...................................... 3,2              Internship Year                                                                  Sophomore
Music Education 330 ................................................. 3          Music Education 575 ............................................... 12           Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Music Education 350 ................................................. 1          Music Education 574 ................................................. 2          Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
Music Education 420 ................................................. 3          Music Education 591 ................................................. 4          Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
Music Education 430 ................................................. 3          Electives in Music Education or Music ...................... 6                   Music Performance 290 .......................................... 4,4
Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1            _______________________________________________                                  Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Instructional Technology, Curriculum                                                         Total: 126 hours plus 24 graduate hours                              Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
    and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3           ______________________________________________                                   Electives ................................................................... 3
Senior Year                                                                                                                                                       Non-US History .......................................................... 6
Music Performance (keyboard) .................................. 2                B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—                                              Junior
Music General 200 .................................................... 0         Vocal/General Concentration/Vocal                                                Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
Music Ensemble ........................................................ 1        Emphasis                                                                         Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
Music General 301* ................................................... 0         (4-year alternative)                                                             Music Performance 390 .......................................... 4,4
Music Education 200 ................................................. 1                                                                    Hours Credit           Music Keyboard 230 .................................................. 1
Music Theory 450 ...................................................... 2        Freshman                                                                         Music Keyboard 240 .................................................. 1
Music History 380 ...................................................... 3       English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6       Music Theory 430 ...................................................... 3
Music Education 400 ............................................... 12           Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6           Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Education 401 ................................................. 0          Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2           Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Education 400 ........................................................... 2      Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2              Music General 301 .................................................... 0
Education 401 ........................................................... 3      Music Keyboard 110, 120 ....................................... 1,1              Social Science ........................................................... 6
Non-US History .......................................................... 3      Music Education 240 or 241 ..................................... 1               Electives ................................................................... 3
                                                                                 Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Senior
*Optional Full Recital with approval of major area                               Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music Education 310 ................................................. 3
_______________________________________________                                                                                                                   Music Keyboard 310, 320 .......................................... 2
                                                                                 Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
                                Total: 134 hours                                 Foreign Language ...................................................... 6        Electives ................................................................... 6
______________________________________________                                                                                                                    Music Performance 490 .......................................... 4,4
                                                                                 Social Science ........................................................... 3
                                                                                 Sophomore Year                                                                   Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
B.M. Curriculum in Music Education—                                              Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6           Natural Science ......................................................... 6
Vocal/General Concentration/Vocal                                                Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2           Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Emphasis (5-year option)                                                         Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2              Music General 401 .................................................... 0
                                                          Hours Credit           Music Keyboard 210, 220 ....................................... 1,1              Music Keyboard 460, 470 .......................................... 6
                                                                                                                                                                  _______________________________________________
Freshman                                                                         Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6       Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1                                         Total: 129 hours
                                                                                                                                                                  ______________________________________________
Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6           Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2           Music Education 200 ................................................. 1
Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2
                                                                                                                                                                  B.M. Curriculum in Piano
                                                                                 Music Education 260 ................................................. 1                                                                     Hours Credit
Music Performance (keyboard)110-120 .................. 1,1                       Music Education 201 ................................................. 1          Freshman
Music Education 240 or 241 ..................................... 1               Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3               English 101,102 ......................................................... 6
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Natural Science ......................................................... 3      Music Theory 110,120 ............................................... 6
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Math 115 ................................................................... 3   Music Theory 130,140 ............................................... 2
Music History 200 ...................................................... 3       Non-US History .......................................................... 3      Music Performance 180 .......................................... 4,4
Foreign Language ...................................................... 6        Junior Year                                                                      Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Sophomore Year                                                                   Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3        Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6           Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2        Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2           Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2              Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2              Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Sophomore
Music Keyboard 210, 220 ....................................... 1,1              Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Music Education 250 ................................................. 2          Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1         Music Education 210 or 211 ...................................... 1              Music Performance 280 .......................................... 4,4
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6           Music Education 310, 320 ...................................... 3,2              Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Education 260 ................................................. 1          Music Education 330 ................................................. 3          Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
Music Education 201 ................................................. 1          Music Education 350 ................................................. 1          Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1
Music Education 200 ................................................. 1          Music Education 420 ................................................. 3          Natural Science ......................................................... 6
Educational Psychology 210 ..................................... 3               Music Education 430 ................................................. 3          Music Electives ......................................................... 3
Natural Science ......................................................... 3      Music History 380 ...................................................... 3       Junior
Math 115 ................................................................... 3   Music Voice 450 ........................................................ 2       Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
Junior Year                                                                      Instructional Technology, Curriculum                                             Music Keyboard 420,430 ........................................... 6
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3            and Evaluation 486 ............................................. 3           Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2        Senior Year                                                                      Music Performance 380 .......................................... 4,4
Music Performance (voice) ..................................... 2,2              Music Performance (voice) ........................................ 2             Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0          Music General 200 .................................................... 0         Music General 301 .................................................... 0
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1                                                                                          Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1
                                                                                 Music Ensemble ........................................................ 1
Music Education 250 ................................................. 2                                                                                           Music Education 310 ................................................. 3
                                                                                 Music General 301* ................................................... 0
Music Education 210 or 211 ...................................... 1                                                                                               Social Science ........................................................... 6
                                                                                 Music Theory 450 ...................................................... 2
Music Education 310, 320 ...................................... 3,2                                                                                               Electives ................................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                                   College of Arts and Sciences                               85

Senior                                                                            Music Performance 355 or 390 ............................... 3,3                  Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Keyboard 230 .................................................. 1           Music Performance ................................................. 1,1           Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Keyboard 340 .................................................. 3           Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
Music Performance 480 .......................................... 4,4              Music General 301 .................................................... 0          Music History 350 ...................................................... 3
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          Music Jazz 130, 140 ................................................. 2
Music General 401 .................................................... 0          Music Education 200 ................................................. 1           Sophomore
Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             Music Education 310, 320 ......................................... 5              Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Non-US History .......................................................... 6       Senior                                                                            Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
Electives ................................................................. 10    3
                                                                                    Area Studies ......................................................... 6-8      Music Jazz 120 ......................................................... 2
_______________________________________________                                   4
                                                                                    Religious Studies ...................................................... 3      Music Jazz 210, 220 ................................................. 4
                                Total: 130 hours                                  Music Performance 455 or 490 ............................... 3,3                  Music Performance .................................................... 6
______________________________________________                                    Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
                                                                                  Music General 401 .................................................... 0          Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
B.M. Curriculum in Piano Pedagogy                                                 Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
                                                           Hours Credit           Non-US History .......................................................... 6       Social Science Electives ........................................... 6
Freshman                                                                          Electives ................................................................... 8   Junior
English 101,102 ......................................................... 6       _______________________________________________                                   Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
Music Theory 110,120 ............................................... 6                                              Total: 132 hours                                Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
Music Theory 130,140 ............................................... 2            ________________________________________________                                  Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2
Music Performance 180 .......................................... 3,3              1
                                                                                    Organ majors take Class Voice (Music Voc 110-120)                               Music Jazz 310, 320 ................................................. 4
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          and/or Voice (Music Performance 155). Voice majors                                Music Performance .................................................... 6
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           take Class Piano (Music Kbd 110-120, 210-220) or                                  Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music History 200 ...................................................... 3        Organ (Music Performance 190).                                                    Music General 301 .................................................... 0
Foreign Language ...................................................... 6         2
                                                                                    Organ majors take Keyboard Harmony (Music Kbd                                   Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Electives ................................................................... 3   230) 1; Church Service Playing I (Music Kbd 240) 1.                               Natural Science ......................................................... 6
Sophomore                                                                         Voice majors take Functional Diction for Singers                                  Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
Music Theory 210,220 ............................................... 6            (Music Voc 425) 3.                                                                Senior
Music Theory 230,240 ............................................... 2            3
                                                                                    Organ majors take Church Service Playing II-III                                 Music Jazz 410 ......................................................... 3
Music Performance 280 .......................................... 3,3              (Music Kbd 310-320) 1,1 and The Organ and Its                                     Music Jazz 420 ......................................................... 1
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Literature I-II (Music Kbd 460-470) 3,3. Voice majors                             Music Technology 290 or 340 ................................... 3
Music History 210,220 ............................................... 6           take Vocal Pedagogy I-II (Music Voc 450-460) 2,1                                  Music Performance .................................................... 6
Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             and Choral Literature (Music Voc 580-585) 2,2.                                    Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Natural Science ......................................................... 6       4
                                                                                    To be chosen from Religious Studies 101, 102, 232,                              Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Keyboard 340,350 ........................................... 6              305, 311, 321, 322, 326, 351, 352, 355, 370, 425,                                 Music General 401 .................................................... 0
Junior                                                                            430.                                                                              Non-US History .......................................................... 6
Music History 380 ...................................................... 3                                                                                          Electives ................................................................. 12
Psychology 110 ......................................................... 3        B.M. Curriculum in Strings                                                        _______________________________________________
Social Science ........................................................... 3                                                                 Hours Credit                                           Total: 131 hours
Music Keyboard 360,370 ........................................... 6              Freshman                                                                          _____________________________________________
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3         English 101,102 ......................................................... 6
Music Performance 380 .......................................... 3,3              Music Theory 110,120 ............................................... 6            B.M. Curriculum in Theory/Composition
Music Keyboard 480 .................................................. 3           Music Theory 130,140 ............................................... 2
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Music Performance (100 level) ............................... 4,4                                                                            Hours Credit
Music General 301 .................................................... 0          Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          Freshman
Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
Music Education 310 ................................................. 3           Music History 200 ...................................................... 3        Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
Electives ................................................................... 3   Natural Science ......................................................... 3       Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
Senior                                                                            Music Keyboard 110,120 ........................................... 2              Music History 200 ...................................................... 3
Music Keyboard 230 .................................................. 1           Sophomore                                                                         Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Keyboard 420,430 ........................................... 6              Music Theory 210,220 ............................................... 6            Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Performance 480 .......................................... 3,3              Music Theory 230,240 ............................................... 2            Music Keyboard 110, 120 .......................................... 2
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Music Performance (200 level) ............................... 4,4                 Foreign Language ...................................................... 6
Music General 401 .................................................... 0          Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Arts and Sciences Electives ..................................... 3
Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             Music History 210,220 ............................................... 6           Sophomore Year
Non-US History .......................................................... 6       Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Music Electives ......................................................... 2       Music Keyboard 210,220 ........................................... 2              Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
Music Keyboard 490-491 Internship .......................... 4                    Foreign Language ...................................................... 6         Music Performance 294 .......................................... 2,2
_______________________________________________                                   Junior                                                                            Music Technology 290 ............................................... 3
                                Total: 130 hours                                  Music History 380 ...................................................... 3        Music Technology 390 ............................................... 3
_____________________________________________                                     Social Science ........................................................... 6      Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6
                                                                                  Music Theory 310, 320 .............................................. 5            Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
B.M. Curriculum in Sacred Music                                                   Music Performance (300 level) ............................... 4,4                 Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
                                                         Hours Credit             Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Music Keyboard 210, 220 .......................................... 2
Freshman                                                                          Music General 301 .................................................... 0          Non-U.S. History ....................................................... 6
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6        Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             Junior Year
Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6            Music Education 310 ................................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3
Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2            Music Electives ......................................................... 2
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Theory 420 ...................................................... 3
Music Performance 155 or 190 ............................... 3,3                  Natural Science ......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Music History 380 ...................................................... 3
1
  Music Performance ............................................... 1,1           Senior
                                                                                                                                                                    Music Performance .................................................... 2
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          Music Performance (400 level) ............................... 4,4
                                                                                  Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Area Study** ............................................................. 6
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0                                                                                             Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music History 200 ...................................................... 3        Music General 401 .................................................... 0
                                                                                  Music Ensemble 399 .............................................. 1,1             Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Foreign Language ...................................................... 6                                                                                           Electives ................................................................... 6
                                                                                  Music Instrument 340,350 ......................................... 6
Sophomore                                                                                                                                                           Natural Science ......................................................... 6
                                                                                  Non-US History .......................................................... 6
Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6                                                                                              Senior Year
                                                                                  Electives ................................................................. 12
Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2            _______________________________________________                                   Music Theory 430, 440 .............................................. 6
Music Performance 255 or 290 ............................... 3,3                                                                                                    Music Performance .................................................... 2
                                                                                                                    Total: 130 hours
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           ________________________________________________                                  Area Study** ............................................................. 6
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6                                                                                              Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          B.M. Curriculum in Studio Music and Jazz                                          Music Education 310 ................................................. 3
Music Performance ................................................. 1,1                                                                                             Arts and Sciences Electives ..................................... 6
Natural Science ......................................................... 6                                                             Hours Credit                Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
2
  Area Studies ......................................................... 2-4      Freshman                                                                          Social Science ........................................................... 6
Junior                                                                            English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6        Electives ................................................................... 6
Social Science ........................................................... 6                                                                                        _______________________________________________
                                                                                  Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6
Music History 380, 480 ............................................. 6            Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2                                              Total: 129 hours
Music Voice 490 ........................................................ 3                                                                                          ________________________________________________
                                                                                  Music Performance .................................................... 6
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3         Music Jazz 110 ......................................................... 2
86            College of Arts and Sciences

**Areas of Study                                                                  Junior                                                                            Elston, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts;
Option A: Composition: Music Performance 394,                                     Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3         S. Georghiou, Ph.D. Manchester (England);
Music Performance 494, Lecture Recital Music                                      Music Theory 320 ...................................................... 2         M.W. Guidry, Ph.D. Tennessee; T. Handler,
General 411                                                                       Music Performance (300 level or above) ................ 4,4
                                                                                                                                                                    Ph.D. Rutgers; E.L. Hart, Ph.D. Cornell; I.
Option B: Electronic Composition: Music Performance                               Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
395, Music Performance 495, Lecture Recital Music                                 Music History 380 ...................................................... 3        Kamychkov, Ph.D. ITEP (Russia); J.W.L.
General 411                                                                       Area Literature and Pedagogy ................................... 3                Lewis (Distinguished Professor, UTSI), Ph.D.
Option C: Music Theory: Music Performance 394 or                                  Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Mississippi; Ph.D. Michigan; J. Macek
395, Independent Study in Music Theory 493, Music                                 Music General 301 .................................................... 0          (Distinguished Scientist), Ph.D. Rensselaer
History Elective (300 level and above).                                           Electives ................................................................... 4   Polytechnic Institute; G.D. Mahan
***Humanities–Arts (Non–Music), Literature,                                       Natural Science ......................................................... 6       (Distinguished Scientist), Ph.D. University of
Philosophical Perspectives, Interdisciplinary Studies                             Senior                                                                            California (Berkeley); W. Nazarewicz, Ph.D.
                                                                                  Music Education 310 ................................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Warsaw; L.R. Painter, Ph.D. Tennessee; D.J.
                                                                                  Music Electives ......................................................... 4
B.M. Curriculum in Voice                                                          Music Performance (400 level) ............................... 4,4                 Pegg, Ph.D. New Hampshire; E.W. Plummer
                                                           Hours Credit           Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          (Distinguished Scientist), Ph.D. Cornell; J.J.
Freshman                                                                          Music General 200 .................................................... 0          Quinn (Lincoln Chair), Ph.D. Maryland; L.L.
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6        Music General 401 ................................................. 0,0           Riedinger, Ph.D. Vanderbilt; C.C. Shih
Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6            Non-US History .......................................................... 6       (Liason), Cornell; M.R. Strayer, Ph.D.
Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2            Electives ................................................................... 6   Massachusetts Institute of Technology; J.R.
Music History 200 ...................................................... 3        _______________________________________________
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
                                                                                                                                                                    Thompson, Ph.D. Duke; B.F.L. Ward, Ph.D.
                                                                                                                    Total: 127 hours
Music Performance 155 .......................................... 4,4              ________________________________________________                                  Princeton; H.H. Weitering, Ph.D. Groningen.
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
                                                                                                                                                                    Associate Professors:
Music Keyboard 110, 120 .......................................... 2
                                                                                                                                                                    P. Dai, Ph.D. Missouri; L. Davis (UTSI), Ph.D.
Foreign Language * ................................................... 6
Sophomore
                                                                                  ORGANIZATIONAL                                                                    Auckand; T.L. Ferrell, Ph.D. Clemson; J.C.
Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6
Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2
                                                                                  PSYCHOLOGY                                                                        Levin, Ph.D. Oregon; D.G. Mandrus, Ph.D.
                                                                                                                                                                    SUNY (Stony Brook); C. Parigger (UTSI),
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6            PROGRAM                                                                           Ph.D. New Zealand; K.F. Read (Collaborating
Music Performance 255 .......................................... 4,4              See Graduate School.                                                              Scientist), Ph.D. Cornell; S.Y. Shieh, Ph.D.
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1                                                                                            Maryland; G. Siopsis, Ph.D. California Institute
Music Keyboard 210, 220 .......................................... 2
                                                                                                                                                                    of Technology.
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music Vocal 230 ........................................................ 1
                                                                                  PHILOSOPHY                                                                        Assistant Professors:
Music Vocal 240, 250 ................................................ 4                                                                                             S.J. Daunt, Ph.D. Queens (Kingston, Ontario,
Electives ** ............................................................... 3    Professors:
Junior                                                                            J.R. Hardwig (Head), Ph.D. Texas; R.E.                                            Canada); D.J. Dean (Collaborating Scientist),
Music History 380 ...................................................... 3        Aquila, Ph.D. Northwestern; L.B. Cebik                                            Ph.D. Vanderbilt; A.J. Sanders, Ph.D. Tufts.
Foreign Language ...................................................... 6         (Emeritus), Ph.D. Nebraska; S.M. Cohen,                                           Research Professors:
Social Science ........................................................... 3      Ph.D. Northwestern; J.W. Davis (Emeritus),                                        H.O. Cohn, Ph.D. Indiana; L.A. Pinnaduwage,
Music Theory 310 ...................................................... 3         Ph.D. Emory; R.B. Edwards (Emeritus), Ph.D.
Music Performance 355 .......................................... 4,4                                                                                                Ph.D. Pittsburgh; N. Thonnard, Ph.D.
                                                                                  Emory; G.C. Graber, Ph.D. Michigan; J.E.                                          Kentucky; J. Zhang, Ph.D. Lanzhou.
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1
                                                                                  Nolt, Ph.D. Ohio State; B.C. Postow, Ph.D.
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0
Music General 301 .................................................... 0          Yale; D. Van de Vate (Emeritus), Ph.D. Yale.                                      Research Associate Professor:
Natural Science ......................................................... 6                                                                                         P.E. Datskos, Ph.D. Tennessee.
                                                                                  Associate Professors:
Music Education 310 ................................................. 3
Senior
                                                                                  K.A. Bohstedt, Ph.D. Ohio State; J.O. Bennett,                                    Research Assistant Professors:
Electives ................................................................... 3   Ph.D. Tulane; H.P. Hamlin, Ph.D. Georgia;                                         Y.Y. Efremenko, Ph.D. ITEP (Russia);
Music Vocal 410, 420 ................................................ 4           M.L. Osborne (Emeritus), Ph.D. Tennessee.                                         S.A. Yost, Ph.D. Princeton.
Music Vocal 450, 460 ............................................. 2,1
Music Performance 455 .......................................... 4,4
                                                                                  Assistant Professors:                                                             Director of Undergraduate Laboratories:
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          J.M. Kaplan, Ph.D., Stanford; D.A. Reidy, J.D.,                                   J.E. Parks, Ph.D. Kentucky.
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Ph.D. Kansas.
Music General 401 .................................................... 0
                                                                                                                                                                    Instructor:
Non-US History .......................................................... 6           Major Prerequisite Three hours of logic,                                      T. Riedinger, M.S. Vanderbilt.
Social Science ........................................................... 3      normally 130 or 135. Requirements: 24 hours
_______________________________________________
                                  Total: 132 hours
                                                                                  of courses numbered 200 or above, including                                       PHYSICS
________________________________________________                                  three hours of ethics, normally 240 or 440,                                            B. S. Major The undergraduate physics
1
  Must take 1 year of two languages from French,
                                                                                  and six hours in the history of philosophy,                                       major provides a thorough introduction to all of
German or Italian.                                                                three in ancient, normally 320, and three in                                      the core areas of physics. At the same time it
2
  Humanities-Arts (Non-music) Literature, Philosophical                           modern, normally 324. Majors are required to                                      allows students with special interests to pur-
Perspectives, Interdisciplinary Studies.                                          discuss their programs with a member of the                                       sue different concentrations.
                                                                                  Philosophy faculty.                                                                    The Department offers three concentra-
B.M. Curriculum in Woodwind, Brass and                                                The minor consists of 18 hours in
Percussion Instruments                                                                                                                                              tions: Academic, Applied, and General. The Aca-
                                                                                  courses 200 or above. Minors should discuss                                       demic Concentration is intended for students
                                                        Hours Credit
Freshman
                                                                                  their program with a member of the Philoso-                                       interested in professional employment or
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6        phy faculty.                                                                      graduate work in physics or closely related
Music Theory 110, 120 .............................................. 6                                                                                              fields such as astronomy, engineering, laser
Music Theory 130, 140 .............................................. 2
Music History 200 ...................................................... 3        PHYSICS AND                                                                       technology, or computational science. The
                                                                                                                                                                    Applied Concentration introduces students to
Music Performance (100 level) ............................... 4,4
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1          ASTRONOMY                                                                         the physics and technology of today and to-
Music Keyboard 110, 120 .......................................... 2                                                                                                morrow. Such a broad physics background is
Foreign Language ...................................................... 6         Professors:                                                                       increasingly useful in technological and indus-
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           S.P. Sorensen (Head), Ph.D. Copenhagen                                            trial fields outside of physics. The General
Sophomore                                                                         (Denmark); F.E. Barnes (Collaborating                                             Concentration is intended for students who
Music Theory 210, 220 .............................................. 6            Scientist), Ph.D. California; C.R. Bingham,                                       wish to apply a substantial knowledge of
Music Theory 230, 240 .............................................. 2            Ph.D. Tennessee; W.E. Blass, Ph.D. Michigan                                       physics to fields such as secondary educa-
Music History 210, 220 ............................................. 6            State; M.J. Breinig, Ph.D. Oregon; W.W. Bugg,                                     tion, medicine, law, journalism, business, or
Music Performance (200 level) ............................... 4,4                 Ph.D. Tennessee; T.A. Callcott, Ph.D. Purdue;
Music Ensemble ..................................................... 1,1                                                                                            any field of their choice.
Music Keyboard 210, 220 .......................................... 2
                                                                                  R.W. Childers, Ph.D. Vanderbilt; H.W. Crater                                           Prerequisites of the Major are Physics
Social Science ........................................................... 6      (UTSI), Ph.D. Yale; K.E. Duckett, Ph.D.                                           137-138 or Physics 135-136, Mathematics
Music General 200 ................................................. 0,0           Tennessee; A.G. Eguiluz, Ph.D. Brown; S.B.                                        141-142 and Computer Science 102.
                                                                                                                College of Arts and Sciences        87


    The Major with an Academic Concen-             and more rigorous preparation in the disci-         tional Psychology courses at the 300 level or
tration consists of: Mathematics 231 and           pline. Admission is selective. The Honors           higher; (4) Two additional Psychology
241; Physics 240, 311-312, 321, 361, 411-          concentration is normally a two year program.       courses at the 400 level.
412, 421, 431-432, and 461. Physics 401 is         Political Science 101 or 107, and 102 are pre-            NOTE: No more than six hours of 399,
recommended. Total Major hours: 41.                requisites to the major. The major consists of      489, 491, 492, 493 may be used in this major.
    The Major with an Applied Concentra-           27 hours of courses numbered 300 or above,          Continuation in the Psychology Major requires
tion consists of: Mathematics 241; Physics         including 387, 388, 487, and 488. These 27          maintenance of a GPA of 2.00. Students
240, 311-312, 321, 361, 401, 421, 441-442,         hours must include at least one course in           placed on Academic Review will be informed
453-454 and 461. Total Major hours: 41             each of the four areas of the discipline: Politi-   in writing that they are on probation and their
    The Major with a General Concentra-            cal Science 387 and 388 may be used to sat-         records will be reviewed. Students who con-
tion consists of Mathematics 241, Physics          isfy this requirement in the appropriate area.      tinue on Academic Review will be dropped
240, 311, 321 and 361, one lab course, cho-             To graduate with Honors in Political Sci-      from the major.
sen from 421, 453, and 461, and three core         ence, the student must have a minimum GPA               Minor Consists of 110 or equivalent; and
courses, chosen from 312, 411, 412, 431,           of 3.3 in Political Science, and a minimum          15 additional hours at the 300 level and above.
432, 441, 442. In addition, 12 coordinated         cumulative GPA of 3.0.                              NOTE: 399, 489,491, 492, 493 cannot be
hours in an area of the student’s special inter-        Major in Political Science with a              used in this minor.
est are to be chosen by the student in consul-     Concentration in Public Administration                  Honors Program The Psychology De-
tation with a departmental advisor. Total          Students majoring in Political Science who          partment offers an Honors Concentration that
Major hours: 40-41 including 28-29 in physics      wish to prepare for a career in the public ser-     is a specially designed individualized
and 12 in chosen concentration.                    vice may select to follow the concentration in      mentorship program. University Honors stu-
    A Physics Minor consists of Physics 137-       Public Administration. Political Science 101 or     dents and psychology majors with ACT
138, 240, or 135-136, 240 and twelve hours         107, 102 and Economics 201 are prerequi-            scores of 29 or higher (or SAT equivalent)
from Physics and Astronomy courses numbered        sites to the major in Political Science with a      may apply. Admission to the program will be
300 and above.                                     concentration in Public Administration. The         on the basis of the review of the candidate’s
    An Astronomy Minor consists of one             concentration consists of course work in Po-        application and interview by the Psychology
year of introductory astronomy, Astronomy          litical Science, Economics, and Accounting.         Honors Faculty, normally in the student’s sec-
411, 490 (3), Physics 311-12, and 421.             Students must complete Political Science 340,       ond year. Any semester with a GPA below 3.2
                                                   401, two of the following: Political Science 440,   will lead to consideration of a student’s dis-
                                                   441 or 442; and two of the following: Econom-       missal from the program by the program fac-
POLITICAL SCIENCE                                  ics 471, 472 or Accounting 201. Students            ulty. The honors concentration includes all the
                                                   must also include one course in each of the         requirements of the Psychology Major and at
Professors:                                        three remaining fields of Political Science:        least ten hours of upper division psychology
Patricia K. Freeland (Head), Ph.D. Wisconsin;      Comparative Government and Politics, Inter-         honors courses including at least four hours
Robert B. Cunningham, Ph.D. Indiana; Michael       national Relations, and Political Theory.           of Psychology 347 (continuous registration is
M. Gant, Ph.D. Michigan State; Michael R.                                                              preferred), three hours of Psychology 367
Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Oklahoma; Robert Gorman,                                                             and three hours of Psychology 467.
Ph.D. New York; William Lyons, Ph.D.               PSYCHOLOGY
Oklahoma; Hyrum Plaas, Ph.D. Utah; John M.
Scheb, Ph.D. Florida; Thomas A. Smith, Ph.D.       Professors:
                                                   James E. Lawler (Head), Ph.D. North
                                                                                                       RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Ohio State; Otis H. Stephens, Jr. (Alumni
Distinguished Service Professor), Ph.D.            Carolina; G.M. Burghardt (Alumni                    Professors:
Johns Hopkins; Thomas D. Ungs (Emeritus),          Distinguished Professor), Ph.D. Chicago;            J.L. Fitzgerald (Interim Head), Ph.D. Chicago;
Ph.D. Iowa.                                        W.H. Calhoun, Ph.D. California (Berkeley);          F.S. Lusby (Emeritus), M.Div. Colgate
                                                   H.J. Fine (Emeritus), Ph.D. Syracuse; S.J.          (Rochester); D.L. Dungan (Emeritus), Th.D.
Associate Professors:                              Handel, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins; L. Handler,            Harvard; R.I.J. Hackett, Ph.D. Aberdeen; W.L.
David H. Folz, Ph.D. Tennessee; Janet Kelly,       Ph.D. Michigan State; Warren H. Jones, Ph.D.        Humphreys (Emeritus), Ph.D. Union; M.L.
Ph.D. Wayne State; Anthony J. Nownes,              Oklahoma State University; K.A. Lawler, Ph.D.
                                                                                                       Levering, Ph.D. Harvard; D.E. Linge
Ph.D. Kansas; David J. Houston, Ph.D.              North Carolina; J.W. Lounsbury, Ph.D.
                                                   Michigan State; J.F. Lubar, Ph.D. Chicago;          (Emeritus), Ph.D. Vanderbilt.; R.V. Norman,
SUNY-Binghamton; Robert L. Peterson, Ph.D.                                                             Jr., Ph.D. Yale; C.H. Reynolds, Ph.D.
Yale; Lilliard E. Richardson, Ph.D. Texas;         J.C. Malone, Ph.D. Duke; K.R. Newton
                                                   (Emeritus), Ph.D. Tennessee; H.R. Pollio            Harvard; Gilya Schmidt, Ph.D. Pittsburgh.
Yang Zhong, Ph.D. Kentucky.
                                                   (Alumni Distinguished Service Professor),           Associate Professors:
Assistant Professors:                              Ph.D. Michigan; F. Samejima, Ph.D. Kejo             R.W. Gwynne, Ph.D. Washington; J.O.
Mary Caprioli, Ph.D. Connecticut; Martin           (Japan); R.A. Saudargas, Ph.D. Florida State;
                                                                                                       Hodges, Ph.D. Chicago; Mark Hulsether,
Carcieri, Ph.D. California (Santa Barbara);        R.S. Shrader (Emeritus), Ph.D. Tennessee;
                                                   E.D. Sundstrom, Ph.D. Utah; C.B. Travis,            Ph.D. Minnesota.
Daniel Lipinski, Ph.D. Duke; Donna Van Cott,
Ph.D. Georgetown.                                  Ph.D. California (Davis); R.G. Wahler, Ph.D.        Adjunct:
                                                   Washington; J.A. Wiberley (Emeritus), Ph.D.         T.J.A. Heffernan, Ph.D. Cambridge; L.M.
    B.A. Major Political Science 101 or 107,       Syracuse.                                           Tober, Ph.D. Vanderbilt.
and 102 are prerequisites to the major. The        Associate Professors:
major consists of 24 hours of courses num-         D. Baldwin, Ph.D. Kent State; M.G. Johnson,             Major The basic concentration consists of
bered 300 or above. These 24 hours must            Ph.D. Johns Hopkins; A. McIntyre, Ph.D.             at least 27 hours, all of which must be at the
include at least one course in each of the four    Yale; W.G. Morgan, Jr., Ph.D. Tennessee;            300 level or above, including one course from
areas of the discipline:                           M.R. Nash, Ph.D. Ohio; Deborah P. Welsh,            each of the first six categories and two
    United States Government and Politics/         Ph.D. University of Massachusetts.                  courses from category seven, one of which
Public Administration 311, 312, 315, 320,                                                              must be RS 499. Majors are strongly urged to
321, 330, 340, 401, 410, 411, 412, 420, 421,       Assistant Professor:                                take RS 300, and to do so as soon as pos-
430, 431, 440, 441, and 442.                       Kristina Gordon, Ph.D. University of North          sible after declaring their major. The remaining
    Comparative Government and Politics            Carolina.                                           three hours, which complete this major, shall
350, 361, 452, 454, 455, 459, 461, 463.                                                                not include related language courses.
    International Relations 365, 366, 470,             Major Prerequisites are: one year of a bio-         1. Methods and Issues in Religious Stud-
471, and 472.                                      logical science (e.g. Biology 101-102), Psy-        ies: 300, 301, 305, 313, 320, 342.
    Political Theory 300, 374, 475 and 476.        chology 110 with a grade of C or better, and a          2. Religions and Cultures of South Asia:
    Minor Prerequisites to the minor are Politi-   GPA of at least 2.00. The major requires 24         374, 376.
cal Science 101 or 107 and 102. The minor          Psychology hours at the 200 level or higher:            3. Religions and Cultures of East Asia:
consists of 15 hours of courses numbered           (1) Either Psychology 295 or Psychology 395         379, 383, 384.
300 and above.                                     (prerequisites to Psychology 395 are Psy-               4. Religions and Cultures of West Asia and
    Honors in Political Science The Honors         chology 385 or Statistics 201 or Math 115);         Europe: 311, 321, 322, 332, 381, 385.
concentration encourages highly motivated          (2) Three courses from Psychology 210, 220,             5. Religions and Cultures of Africa: 373.
students to obtain a superior liberal education    300, 310, 320, 330, 360, 370; (3) Two addi-
88      College of Arts and Sciences


    6. Relgions and Cultures of the Americas:
351, 352, 355.
                                                    ciology as follows: 350, 351, 451, either 455,
                                                    459, or 492, and two courses selected in con-
                                                                                                          THEATRE
    7. Two 400-level courses including 499.         sultation with advisor.                               Professors:
    As an alternative to the basic concentra-           Concentration in Environment and So-              B. Robison (Head), M.F.A. North Carolina;
tion, a student-initiated concentration is          ciety All prerequisites required for the major        W.R. Black, M.F.A. Illinois; M. Custer, M.F.A.
available for students with special educational     are required for this concentration. The Con-         Wisconsin; L.W. Lester, Ed.D. Tennessee.
needs, such as those who intend to enter a          centration in Environment and Society con-
graduate or professional school (seminary,          sists of Sociology 321 and 331 and eighteen           Associate Professors:
law, medicine) which recommends a specific          hours of upper-division sociology courses as          E. Craven, M.A. Tennessee; L.J. DeCuir,
course of undergraduate study. A faculty            follows: 360, 464, either 344 or 345, either 442      M.F.A. Tulane; B.K.A. Gould, M.F.A. Catholic;
member in Religious Studies will assist a stu-      or 446, and two courses selected in consulta-         T. Weber, M.F.A. Alabama.
dent to formulate this major consisting of at       tion with advisor.
                                                                                                          Assistant Professor:
least 27 hours of credit at the 300 level or            Minor with Concentration in Environ-
                                                                                                          D. Gabriel, M.F.A. Ohio State; Michael Heil,
above, including 499. Up to 9 hours in this ma-     ment and Society The minor consists of So-
                                                                                                          M.F.A. Texas; B. Speas, M.F.A. Virginia
jor may be taken in approved courses from           ciology 321, 331, 360 and two courses from
                                                                                                          Commonwealth; K. van den Barg, Ph.D.
other programs or departments in the College        344, 345, 442, 446, and 464. Prerequisites to
                                                                                                          Indiana; K. Yeager, B.F.A. Penn State.
of Arts and Sciences. Students whose voca-          the minor either Sociology 110 or 120.
tional goals would best be served by such a
                                                                                                             Major Theatre 100 is a prerequisite to a
major must discuss this option with a faculty
member in the department, who will submit           COLLEGE SCHOLARS                                      major which consists of 200, 220, 300, 411,
                                                                                                          412, 430, 1 from 340, 345, 355, 362, and 12
any specific proposal to the faculty in religious
studies for approval.
                                                    HONORS                                                additional hours of Theatre courses numbered
                                                                                                          200 and above, 3 of which may be in cognate
    Further details on the major and on depart-     Director:                                             areas approved by the Department..
ment courses are available in the department        David Tandy, Professor of Classics.                      Minor Theatre 100 is a prerequisite to a
office, located in 501 McClung Tower, or from
                                                                                                          minor which consists of 15 hours of Theatre
any member of the religious studies faculty.           College Scholars is a major with selective         courses, 6 of which must be in upper division.
    Minor Fifteen hours of courses at the 300       admission. For details contact the director. All         General requirements for the master's
level or above, not including related language      Scholars must enroll in one of the College            degree are given in the Graduate Catalog.
courses. It is recommended that students            Scholars Seminars 317-318 each term. They
minoring in religious studies discuss their         are encouraged to complete work in College
program with a member of the department
faculty.
                                                    Scholars Honors 491-492-493. Each student             URBAN AND REGIONAL
                                                    must complete a substantial piece of re-
                                                    search, scholarship or creative imagination.          PLANNING
RUSSIAN                                             College Scholars 498 is the appropriate
                                                    course to use to receive credit for this work.
                                                                                                          Professors:
See Modern Foreign Languages and                                                                          C.W. Minkel (Head) Ph.D. Cornell; D.A.
Literatures.                                                                                              Johnson (Emeritus), Ph.D. Cornell; K.B.
                                                    SPANISH                                               Kenney (Emeritus), Ph.D. North Carolina; J.M.
                                                                                                          Prochaska (Emeritus), M.U.P. Michigan State;
SOCIOLOGY                                           See Modern Foreign Languages and
                                                    Literatures.
                                                                                                          W.L. Shouse (Emeritus), M.C.P. Harvard; J.A.
                                                                                                          Spencer, M.C.P. Ohio State; B.E. Tonn, Ph.D.
Professors:                                                                                               Northwestern.
J.A. Black (Emeritus), Ph.D. Iowa; D.W.
Hastings, Ph.D. Massachusetts; T.C. Hood,
                                                    STATISTICS                                            Assistant Professors:
Ph.D. Duke; R.G. Perrin, Ph.D. British              See faculty list in the College of Business           E. Jepson, Ph.D. Wisconsin; T. Shupp, M.S.P.
Columbia; N.E. Shover, Ph.D. Illinois               Administration.                                       Tennessee; C. Zanetta, Ph.D. Ohio State.
(Urbana); S.E. Wallace, Ph.D. Minnesota.
                                                        Arts and Sciences students may major or              Urban and Regional Planning offers a pro-
Associate Professor:                                minor in statistics under the supervision of the      gram of studies leading to the professional de-
S. Kurth (Head), Ph.D. Illinois (Chicago); S.       faculty of the Statistics Department in the Col-      gree of Master of Science in Planning. For
Cable, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State; A. Jalata,         lege of Business Administration. The major is         complete information, refer to the Graduate
Ph.D. SUNY-Binghamton; R.E. Jones, Ph.D.            designed to prepare students for graduate             Catalog.
Washington State.                                   studies in statistics or for professional work in        The Department also directs the Urban
                                                    various applications of statistical methods,          Studies program in the College of Arts and
Assistant Professors:                               including applications in the natural and social
H. Bui, Ph.D. Michigan State; J. Shefner,                                                                 Sciences.
                                                    sciences, business and industry. Contact the
Ph.D. California (Davis).                           Statistics Department for further information
    Major Before applying to the Sociology
                                                    on careers in statistics and appropriate
                                                    courses to take. It is highly recommended that
                                                                                                          URBAN STUDIES
Department for admission to the major a stu-        a student majoring in statistics have a minor in      See Interdisciplinary Programs.
dent must complete either Sociology 110 or          an area of application.
120 or their honors equivalent with a grade of          Major The major requires 33 semester
C+ or above. Upon granting admission to the         hours including (a) Statistics 201 or 251; (b)        WOMEN'S STUDIES
major, the department will assign the student       Statistics 320, 330, 365, 471; (c) two courses        See Interdisciplinary Programs.
an academic advisor who will help the student       selected from Statistics 472, 473, 475, Math
plan a program of study for the major. The          423, 424, 425; (d) Math141-142 and 241-251,
major consists of 24 upper-division hours in        or upper division Math*; (e) two technical elec-
sociology and must include 321 and 331. Stu-        tives to be selected from upper division
dents should complete 321 and 331 by the            courses in Mathematics, Computer Science,
end of their junior year.                           Engineering, Physics, or Chemistry, with the ap-
    Minor The minor consists of 15 upper-           proval of the student's advisor in the Department
division hours in Sociology and must include        of Statistics.
321 and 331. Prerequisite to the minor is three
                                                    *Students who have completed Mathematics123-125
lower-division hours in Sociology (either 110       should see an advisor to select courses to complete
or 120 or their honors equivalent).                 this requirement.
    Concentration in Criminal Justice All
prerequisites and upper-division courses               Minor The minor consists of Statistics 201
required for general majors are required for        or Statistics 251; an additional 12 hours from
this concentration. In addition, the concentra-     Statistics 320, 330, 365, 471, 472, 473, 475;
tion consists of 18 hours of upper-division so-     and Math 423, 424, 425.
                                                                                                         College of Business Administration          89




College of Business Administration
                                                  environment, and the functions of contempo-         College of Business Administration strives for
Jan R. Williams, Dean                             rary business practices.                            excellence in all endeavors.
David W. Schumann, Associate Dean for                 Building on the pre-business core founda-            On the undergraduate level, the UT ac-
    Research and Technology                       tion, the business core consists of integrated      counting program ranked 20 in the nation and
Sarah F. Gardial, Assistant Dean,                 contemporary business management mod-               was one of the first three to be accredited at
   MBA Program                                    ules in supply chain management, demand             all possible degree levels. The College’s lo-
Patricia D. Postma, Assistant Dean,               management, lean operations, information            gistics and transportation program has been
    Center for Executive Education                management, the marketplace, and organiza-          ranked number one in the nation and contin-
Mary C. Holcomb, Interim Dean for                 tional behavior; discipline-specific courses in     ues to entice recruiters from local and national
    Undergraduate Business Program                financial management and business strategy;         businesses. The College has also been a na-
Fred A. Pierce, III, Director, Undergraduate      and coursework on global and legal issues.          tional leader in bringing the concepts of indus-
    Business Advising and Services Office         As business management perspectives                 trial statistics and total quality management
                                                  change, the topics in the business core will,       methods into the classroom.
    It’s everywhere. Business. College of         by design, adapt.                                        At the graduate level, the College of Busi-
Business Administration graduates will one            Simultaneously, students are completing         ness Administration offers nine masters
day audit tax returns, practice law, create       the coursework required by their chosen ma-         programs, including the newly restructured
public policy, start an international business,   jor. The College of Business Administration         17-month MBA program, and eight Ph.D.
manage portfolios, or research consumer use       offers nine majors, including accounting, busi-     programs.
of potato chips and aspirin. These graduates      ness studies, economics, finance, logistics              In addition to challenging students in the
will enter today’s broad business environment     and transportation, management, marketing,          classroom, faculty also devote their energies
fully prepared by the College of Business         public administration, and statistics.              to professional growth and commitment to the
Administration’s innovative curriculum,               Upon the completion of this curriculum,         community by participating in other College of
renown faculty and programs, and advanced         students are awarded a Bachelor of Science          Business Administration programs, like these
technology.                                       in Business Administration.                         listed below.
                                                      Business Minor. The College of Busi-                 Global Business Institute. The College
                                                  ness Administration also offers a Business Mi-      of Business Administration’s response to the
THE CURRICULUM                                    nor for students pursuing majors in colleges        changes brought about by the internationaliza-
    The UT College of Business Administration     other than the College of Business Administra-      tion of business and higher education, the
is widely recognized for its leadership role in   tion. Those students must successfully com-         Global Business Institute serves as the pri-
implementing some of the most innovative and      plete the following requirements: Accounting        mary catalyst for international awareness and
exciting curriculum changes occurring during      201-202, Economics 201, Statistics 201, Busi-       change. By offering internships and career
the last forty years of management education.     ness Administration 201, Finance 301, Mar-          consultation, speakers and event planning,
In May of 2000, the faculty adopted a new         keting 300, and Management 300. All upper           partnership coordination, and program and
curriculum structure for the undergraduate        division (300 level or above) course work           curricula facilitation, the Global Business Insti-
program, and that new structure is being          must be taken at UT. Students are respon-           tute helps students, faculty, managers, and
practiced today.                                  sible for meeting the listed prerequisites of any   public policy makers meet the challenges of a
    The new curriculum coursework is divided      upper division courses taken. [For instance,        global marketplace.
into four components: general education, pre-     Math 125 or 141 is a prerequisite to Statistics          Center for Executive Education. Provid-
business core, business core, and major.          201.] Engineering students may substitute           ing public and custom executive development
    The 62 hours of general education focuses     Chemical Engineering 301 for Statistics 201.        programming and four executive MBA pro-
on all aspects of human endeavor: written and                                                         grams, the Center for Executive Education
oral communications; mathematics; social,                                                             works with thousands of individuals and doz-
behavioral, and natural sciences; humanities;     FACULTY AND PROGRAMS                                ens of organizations such as Delta Airlines,
foreign language; ethics; and the arts. Gen-          Students in the College of Business Admin-      Federal Express, and General Electric to
eral education courses span the student’s         istration will benefit from the countless faculty   broaden and improve the skills of working indi-
entire academic career.                           recognized for excellence in teaching, re-          viduals. The Center for Executive Education
    The pre-business core courses (17             search, and public service and from the out-        is a member of UNICON, an international
hours) are taken during the student’s sopho-      standing programs operating throughout the          organization of leading business schools
more year. The pre-business component             College. One of the first in the South to be ac-    committed to management and executive
provides students with the fundamentals of        credited by the Association to Advance Colle-       education.
business education, introducing the tools, the    giate Schools of Business International, UT’s

                                                                         89
90      College of Business Administration


    Center for Business and Economic Re-                 • Math 125, 123, or 141-142 (6 or 8 hours);   HOW TO PROCEED
search. With three research faculty, numer-              • Written Communications (3 hours from            Course Load. The normal course load for
ous staff, and College of Business                   English 263, 295, 355, or 360);                   a semester is 15-18 hours. In unusual circum-
Administration students, the Center for Busi-            • Accounting 201-202 (5 hours);               stances, permission to take a course load in
ness and Economic Research conducts re-                  • Economics 201 (4 hours);                    excess of 19 hours may be granted by an ad-
search on national and state economic trends             • Statistics 201 (3 hours); and               visor in the Undergraduate Business Advising
for UT, state agencies, and public and private           • Business Administration 201 (4 hours).      and Services Office at 52 Glocker.
organizations. By collecting, analyzing, and             Students will progress to a major provided        Satisfactory/No Credit. A maximum of
disseminating economic and demographic               they have earned a 2.75 cumulative GPA (3.0       20 credit hours of satisfactory/no credit (S/
data, the Center for Business and Economic           in Accounting) in the coursework listed above.    NC) may be used toward degree require-
Research offers Tennessee businesses the                 If denied progression, the student may        ments for a Bachelor of Science in Business
ability to compete and to make sound fiscal          pursue majors in a college other than Busi-       Administration. Such credit hours may be
and managerial decisions.                            ness Administration.                              used to meet only the requirements identified
                                                         Appeals. Students who have been denied        in the curriculum as “electives,” plus any busi-
                                                     progression to a major within the College of
TECHNOLOGY                                           Business Administration may appeal to the
                                                                                                       ness courses specifically designated as being
    Success in today’s business environment                                                            available for S/NC grading.
                                                     Undergraduate Admissions Appeals Commit-              Executive Undergraduate Program.
is largely a function of accessibility to, and in-   tee. Information on procedures may be ob-
terpretation of, information. This information                                                         Top students are invited into the Executive
                                                     tained in the Undergraduate Business              Undergraduate Program, a professional en-
provides the knowledge that allows employ-           Advising and Services Office, 52 Glocker.
ees and employers to make smart business                                                               richment experience. Members meet with ex-
                                                         Transfer Students within UT. Students         ecutives who present small group workshops
decisions. Because today’s business world            in other colleges at UT should apply for pro-
demands that employees be able to effectively                                                          and luncheons and share experiences with
                                                     gression to the College of Business Adminis-      students who have similar goals and interests.
use personal computers and diverse software          tration at the earliest possible date—no later
applications, the College of Business Adminis-                                                             Executive in Residence. A senior-level
                                                     than the completion of 75 hours. Only in ex-      Executive in Residence course brings distin-
tration intertwines technology with its curricu-     ceptional cases will application be considered
lum at all levels.                                                                                     guished business and industrial leaders to
                                                     after 75 hours of coursework (at UT or else-      campus for lectures with small groups of stu-
    In order to take advantage of these unique       where) have been attempted. The following
learning tools, all business students will be re-                                                      dents. In these sessions, students have the
                                                     minimum requirements must be met in order         opportunity to ask questions of some of the
quired to have their own laptop computers            to be considered for admission to a major:
when they start the business core courses.                                                             nation’s business leaders regarding domestic
                                                         The student must have earned a minimum        and international strategic planning and other
With the new wireless network at UT, a stu-          2.75 cumulative average, in the courses re-
dent will be able to use their laptop almost                                                           hot business topics.
                                                     quired for progression (3.0 for an accounting         Scholarships. A limited number of schol-
anywhere on campus. Additionally, the Col-           major).
lege of Business Administration maintains two                                                          arships are available for highly qualified stu-
                                                         Progression standards are subject to          dents. Students are invited to apply for a
computer labs containing 50 IBM-compatible           change; current standards are available in the
computers to support classroom work.                                                                   College of Business Administration scholar-
                                                     Undergraduate Business Advising and Ser-          ship. Selection criteria considered for scholar-
                                                     vices Center, Glocker 52.                         ships include: academic merit, financial need,
WHERE TO BEGIN                                           Transfer Students from Other Institu-
                                                     tions. The following minimum requirements
                                                                                                       and leadership.
    Undergraduate Business Advising and                                                                    To be considered for a scholarship, stu-
                                                     must be met in order to be considered for ad-     dents must meet the following criteria:
Services. The mission of the Undergraduate           mission to the major:
Business Advising and Services Office is to                                                                1. Unweighted grade point average of 3.0;
                                                         Out-of-State community college or four-           2. ACT composite score of 23 or SAT
provide excellent academic and educational           year institution: The student must have a cu-
program planning services to undergraduate                                                             combined score of 1050.
                                                     mulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. If this standard       Students must complete either the Entering
students in the College of Business Adminis-         is not met, the student shall be denied admis-
tration. The Undergraduate Business Advis-                                                             Freshman Academic Scholarship Application
                                                     sion to the College.                              or the Returning and Transfer Student Under-
ing and Services Office, at 52 Glocker,                  In-State community college or four year in-
maintains a full-time staff of academic advi-                                                          graduate Scholarship Application, both of
                                                     stitution: The student must have a cumulative     which can be obtained from UT’s Office of Fi-
sors to answer students’ questions concern-          GPA of 2.75 or higher. If this standard is not
ing majors, curriculum, and elective options. It                                                       nancial Aid and Scholarships, 115 Student
                                                     met, the student shall be denied admission to     Services Building, and submit it by the date
serves entering freshman, transfers, interna-        the College.
tional students, and students not yet admitted                                                         printed on the application, with the following in-
                                                         Only in exceptional cases will application    formation:
to their major. After being admitted to a major      be considered after 75 hours of coursework
(junior and senior years), students will confer                                                            1. A current high school transcript and a
                                                     have been attempted.                              current college transcript, if the student is a
with a departmental advisor regarding career             Articulation Agreements. The College of
goals and opportunities.                                                                               transfer student;
                                                     Business has special transfer articulation            2. ACT or SAT scores.
    In addition to advising, the Business Advis-     agreements with some Tennessee community
ing and Services Office provides individual                                                                For a complete list of scholarships avail-
                                                     colleges, leading to admission with junior        able to undergraduate students, please see
and group educational program planning,              standing in particular majors at UT. Students
management of student data and enrollment                                                              the “Honors and Awards” section of this
                                                     are awarded an associate’s degree by the          catalog.
information for the College, undergraduate           specified community college and a baccalau-
student recruiting, administration of the under-                                                           Foreign Study. Several opportunities for
                                                     reate degree by UT, provided the student          study abroad are available to UT College of
graduate scholarship program, coordination of        successfully completes all the courses re-        Business Administration students, such as 1)
progression procedures to business majors,           quired in a particular program and meets the      group programs arranged and supervised by
and career counseling.                               progression standards. All other academic         the College’s departments on a full semester
    Progression Standards. Acceptance to             regulations of the degree-granting institutions   or summer term, 2) direct exchange, summer
the College of Business Administration does          must also be satisfied.                           study, and semester programs organized by
not guarantee acceptance to a specific major.            Details on specific programs and require-     the Programs Abroad division of the Center
Students are admitted to the College as pre-         ments are available from the Office of Under-     for International Education, and 3) individual-
majors and should progress to a major prior to       graduate Admissions at UT or from the             ized programs.
the completion of 75 hours of coursework.            specified community college.                          Students planning foreign study must meet
Application to a major is a one time only event          Residency Requirement. Students               with their academic advisor to discuss cur-
and occurs as part of the student’s advising         transferring from other institutions must com-    ricular issues.
session in the Undergraduate Business Ad-            plete at least nine credit hours in their major       Off-Campus Study. Recognizing that
vising and Services Office the semester a            and the last 30 hours at UT.                      learning is not restricted to formal classroom
student completes the following coursework:                                                            situations, students may earn credit towards
                                                                                                       graduation for approved off-campus study. It
                                                                                                                                                College of Business Administration                                      91


may include certain types of work experi-           initial programs in the nation to receive this                                        6
                                                                                                                                            Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology
ences or community involvement. Such study          accreditation.                                                                        110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;
may be undertaken only with prior approval of            Since 1993, the state of Tennessee has                                           Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,
                                                                                                                                          220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,
a faculty member and the department granting        required anyone wishing to take the Uniform                                           310, 370, 415, 459.
credit.                                             Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examina-                                            7
                                                                                                                                            Written Communications—One course from: English
    Student Organizations. Business stu-            tion to complete 150 semester hours of study.                                         263, 295, 355, 360.
dents at UT have the opportunity to belong to       Therefore, students are encouraged to con-
                                                                                                                                          8
                                                                                                                                            Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or
several honorary and professional societies,        tinue their formal education in UT’s one-year                                         344.
                                                                                                                                          9
                                                                                                                                            Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,
often specific to the business environment.         Master of Accountancy program.                                                        173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,
For a complete listing of these organizations                                                                      Hours Credit           330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;
and the related participation or entrance re-       Freshman                                                                              Women’s Studies 330.
quirements, please see the College of Busi-
                                                    1,2
                                                        English 101,102 ...................................................... 6          10
                                                                                                                                             Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages
                                                    3
                                                      Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8                    311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative
ness Administration heading under the                                                                                                     Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,
                                                    4
                                                      Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6
“Honors and Awards” section of this catalog.        5
                                                      Natural Science ........................................................ 8          232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level
                                                    6
                                                      Social Science ......................................................... 6          Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language
                                                                                                                                          courses whose content is literature including foreign
ACCOUNTING AND                                      Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1
                                                    Sophomore                                                                             literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,
                                                                                                                                          262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies
BUSINESS LAW                                        Accounting 201,202 ................................................. 5
                                                    Economics 201 .......................................................... 4            210, 215.
                                                                                                                                          11
                                                                                                                                             Oral Communications—One course from: Speech
                                                    7
                                                      Written Communications ........................................... 3
                                                                                                                                          210, 240.
Professors:
                                                    8
                                                      Ethics ....................................................................... 3    12
                                                                                                                                             Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:
K.G. Stanga (Head and Andersen Professor
                                                    9
                                                      Arts .......................................................................... 3   African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-
                                                    Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3         102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-
of Accounting), Ph.D. Louisiana State, CPA;         Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4                   American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.
K.E. Anderson (Distinguished Professor of           10,2
                                                         Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3             International students who have not taken U.S.
Taxation), Ph.D. Indiana, CPA; N.E. Dittrich        11
                                                       Oral Communications .............................................. 3               History in high school may fulfill this requirement with
(Emeritus), Ph.D. Ohio State, CPA; B.D.             Junior                                                                                a United States History sequence.
Fisher, L.L.M. George Washington; J.E. Kiger        Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4
(Warren L. Slagle Professor of Accounting),         Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4
Ph.D. Missouri, CPA; J.M. Reeve (Deloitte &         Finance 301 ............................................................... 3
                                                    Accounting 311 ......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                          BUSINESS STUDIES
Touche Professor), Ph.D. Oklahoma State,                                                                                                      The Business Studies Program offers a
                                                    Accounting 341 ......................................................... 3
CPA; H.P. Roth, Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic          Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3                      broader education that allows students to gain
Institute, CPA, CMA; J.R. Williams (Ernst &         Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3                   in-depth knowledge of a particular area of
Young Professor), Ph.D. Arkansas, CPA.              Accounting 321 ......................................................... 3            business while retaining an overall perspec-
                                                    Accounting 411 ......................................................... 3            tive. After completing the core requirements
Associate Professors:                               Electives ................................................................... 3       for a business degree, Business Studies ma-
B.K. Behn, Ph.D Arizona State, CPA; J.V.            Senior Year                                                                           jors complete twenty-four additional hours in
Carcello, Ph.D. Georgia State, CPA, CMA,            Accounting 414 ......................................................... 3            upper-division business courses.
CIA; D. P. Murphy, Ph.D. North Carolina,            Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3
                                                    12
                                                       Non-US History ....................................................... 6
                                                                                                                                              The wide range of business and arts and
CPA; I.A. Posey (Emeritus), M.S. Tennessee,         Accounting 431 ......................................................... 3            science courses required by this curriculum
CPA, CMA; R.L. Townsend, Ph.D. Texas,               Management 401 ....................................................... 3              provides a solid base knowledge well suited
CPA; J.B. Woodroof, Ph.D. Texas Tech, CPA.          Electives ............................................................ 10-12          for entry-level positions in many organiza-
                                                    _____________________________________________                                         tions. Graduates of the Business Studies
Assistant Professors:                                                               Total: 126 hours                                      program begin their careers as management
                                                    _____________________________________________
D.D. DeVries, Ph.D. Arizona State, CPA,                                                                                                   trainees in sales, banking, insurance, and
CISA; M.C. Letsinger (Emeritus), M.S.
                                                    1
                                                      Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.                                  marketing. The curriculum is also ideal for
                                                    2
                                                      Students who complete English 118, Honors English
Tennessee, CPA; A.S. Rose, Ph.D. Texas              Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their                               students interested in pre-law, particularly with
A&M, CPA; J.M. Rose, Ph.D. Texas A&M.               English Composition requirement by choosing English                                   specialization in corporate law.
                                                    102 or a sophomore literature course in the English                                                                                                  Hours Credit
Lecturers:                                          Department. If the sophomore literature course                                        Freshman
E.B. Anderson, MACC Tennessee, CPA; A. R.           appears on the list for the Humanities Literature                                     1,2
                                                                                                                                              English 101,102 ...................................................... 6
                                                    requirement, the course may also be counted toward                                    3
                                                                                                                                            Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8
Bryant, MACC Tennessee, CPA; L.W.                   the Humanities requirement.                                                           4
                                                                                                                                            Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6
Hendrick, M.B.A. Houston, J.D., CPA; H.N.           3
                                                      Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are                                              5
                                                                                                                                            Natural Science ........................................................ 8
Hughes, B.S. Tennessee; C.M. Pfeifer, MACC          prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during                               6
                                                                                                                                            Social Science ......................................................... 6
Tennessee, CPA; L.M. Reeves, MACC                   the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a                                       Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1
Tennessee, CPA.                                     result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be
                                                                                                                                          Sophomore
                                                    completed by the end of the first semester of the
                                                    Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics                                     Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5
    The Accounting Program at UT has estab-         100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses                                     Economics 201 .......................................................... 4
lished itself as one of the nation’s top account-   during their Freshman Year to ensure that
                                                                                                                                          7
                                                                                                                                            Written Communications ........................................... 3
ing schools. Modern society demands much            Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the
                                                                                                                                          8
                                                                                                                                            Ethics ....................................................................... 3
                                                    first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who
                                                                                                                                          9
                                                                                                                                            Arts .......................................................................... 3
from professional accountants. They are re-
                                                    have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of                                      Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3
sponsible for preparing and analyzing financial     their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in                                    Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4
data and for consulting in many specialized         the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to                                  10,2
                                                                                                                                               Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3
areas such as tax planning and compliance,          taking Mathematics 123.                                                               11
                                                                                                                                             Oral Communications .............................................. 3
auditing (examining and verifying financial         4
                                                      Foreign Language—Students must complete the                                         Junior
records), information systems, and manage-          intermediate sequence of a foreign language.                                          Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4
                                                    Students may either continue the Foreign Language                                     Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4
ment advisory services.                             begun in high school or start a new sequence.
    After completing the core requirements for                                                                                            Finance 301 ............................................................... 3
                                                    Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are                                12
                                                                                                                                             Non-US History ....................................................... 6
a business education (including courses in          treated as non-business electives. Students whose                                     13
                                                                                                                                             Business Studies Electives .................................... 6
statistics, economics, marketing, finance,          native language is not English may meet this
                                                    requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by                                     Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3
business law, and management), the account-                                                                                               Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3
                                                    passing two English language literature courses
ing major begins extensive work in financial        taught by the English Department at the 200-level.                                    Electives ................................................................... 3
and managerial accounting. The student then         5
                                                      Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from                                        Senior Year
completes advanced work in specialized ar-          those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may
                                                                                                                                          13
                                                                                                                                             Business Studies Electives .................................. 12
eas such as tax, auditing, and systems. The         apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See                                 Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3
use of computers in accounting is also              individual course descriptions or advisor for details.                                Management 401 ....................................................... 3
                                                    Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;                                       Electives ............................................................ 10-12
stressed.                                           Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;                                        _____________________________________________
    UT’s Accounting Programs are accredited         Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or                                                                    Total: 126 hours
by AACSB International and are among the            107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.                                     _____________________________________________
92       College of Business Administration

  Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.
                                                           ECONOMICS                                                                                Non-US History ....................................................... 6
1                                                                                                                                                12
2
  Students who complete English 118, Honors English                                                                                              13
                                                                                                                                                    Economics Electives ............................................... 3
Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their                                                                                          Senior Year
English Composition requirement by choosing English        Professors:                                                                           13
                                                                                                                                                    Economics Electives ............................................... 6
102 or a sophomore literature course in the English        M.N. Murray (Head; Douglas and Brenda                                                 Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3
Department. If the sophomore literature course                                                                                                   Economics 499 .......................................................... 3
                                                           Horne Professor), Ph.D. Syracuse; R.A.                                                Management 401 ....................................................... 3
appears on the list for the Humanities Literature
                                                           Bohm, Ph.D. Washington (St. Louis); R.L.                                              Electives ............................................................ 13-15
requirement, the course may also be counted toward                                                                                               ______________________________________________
the Humanities requirement.                                Bowlby (Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas; S.L. Carroll,
3
  Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are                   Ph.D. Harvard; H.S. Chang, Ph.D. Vanderbilt;                                                                            Total: 126 hours
                                                           D.P. Clark, Ph.D. Michigan State; W.E. Cole                                           ________________________________________________
prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during
the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a            (Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas; P. Davidson                                                  1
                                                                                                                                                   Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.
result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be              (Emeritus), Ph.D. Pennsylvania; W.F. Fox
                                                                                                                                                 2
                                                                                                                                                   Students who complete English 118, Honors English
completed by the end of the first semester of the          (William B. Stokely Distinguished Professor of                                        Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their
Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics                                                                                                English Composition requirement by choosing English
                                                           Business), Ph.D. Ohio State; H.W. Herzog,                                             102 or a sophomore literature course in the English
100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses
                                                           Jr., Ph.D. Maryland; H.E. Jensen (Emeritus),                                          Department. If the sophomore literature course
during their Freshman Year to ensure that
Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the         Ph.D. Texas; F.Y. Lee (Emeritus), Ph.D.                                               appears on the list for the Humanities Literature
first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who         Michigan State; J.R. Moore (Emeritus, Alumni                                          requirement, the course may also be counted toward
have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of           Distinguished Service Professor), Ph.D.                                               the Humanities requirement.
their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in         Cornell; W.C. Neale (Emeritus), Ph.D. London                                          3
                                                                                                                                                   Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are
the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to       School of Economics; M. Russell (Emeritus),                                           prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during
taking Mathematics 123.                                    Ph.D. Oklahoma; G.A. Spiva, Jr. (Emeritus),                                           the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a
4
  Foreign Language—Students must complete the                                                                                                    result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be
                                                           Ph.D. Texas.                                                                          completed by the end of the first semester of the
intermediate sequence of a foreign language.
Students may either continue the Foreign Language                                                                                                Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics
begun in high school or start a new sequence.              Associate Professor:                                                                  100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses
Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are     J.A. Gauger, Ph.D. Iowa State.                                                        during their Freshman Year to ensure that
treated as non-business electives. Students whose                                                                                                Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the
native language is not English may meet this               Assistant Professors:                                                                 first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who
requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by          J. Barkoulas, Ph.D. Boston College;                                                   have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of
passing two English language literature courses            D. Fallaschetti, Ph.D. Washington (St. Louis);                                        their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in
taught by the English Department at the 200-level.                                                                                               the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to
                                                           M. Mohsin, Ph.D. York University (Canada);                                            taking Mathematics 123.
5
  Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from
                                                           M. Munkin, Ph.D. Indiana; R. Santore, Ph.D.                                           4
                                                                                                                                                   Foreign Language—Students must complete the
those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may
apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See      Ohio State; S. Stewart, Ph.D. University of                                           intermediate sequence of a foreign language.
individual course descriptions or advisor for details.     New Mexico.                                                                           Students may either continue the Foreign Language
Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;                                                                                                  begun in high school or start a new sequence.
Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;             Research Assistant Professor:                                                         Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are
Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or         D. Bruce, Ph.D. Syracuse University.                                                  treated as non-business electives. Students whose
107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.                                                                                                native language is not English may meet this
6
  Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology                                                                                                  requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by
                                                               The economics major thoroughly exam-
110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;                                                                                                 passing two English language literature courses
                                                           ines the economic processes of society, fo-                                           taught by the English Department at the 200-level.
Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,      cusing on the production, distribution, and
220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,
                                                                                                                                                 5
                                                                                                                                                   Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from
                                                           consumption of goods and services. Students                                           those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may
310, 370, 415, 459.
7
  Written Communications—One course from: English
                                                           in economics may select courses from the                                              apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See
263, 295, 355, 360.                                        fields of economic development, industrial or-                                        individual course descriptions or advisor for details.
8
  Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or          ganization, labor economics, international eco-                                       Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;
344.                                                       nomics, economic history, regional                                                    Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;
9
  Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,          economics, public finance, and quantitative                                           Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or
173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,       methods. All students majoring in economics                                           107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.
330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;               take courses in economic theory. In addition,                                         6
                                                                                                                                                   Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology
Women’s Studies 330.                                       the student gains a knowledge of our culture                                          110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;
10
   Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages             and society as well as the world of business                                          Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,
311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative              by completing courses in arts and sciences                                            220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,
Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,      and in the functional areas of business.                                              310, 370, 415, 459.
232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level            Graduates in economics are in demand in
                                                                                                                                                 7
                                                                                                                                                   Written Communications—One course from: English
Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language                                                                                                  263, 295, 355, 360.
                                                           many sectors including industry, commerce,
courses whose content is literature including foreign                                                                                            8
                                                                                                                                                   Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or
literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,   finance, trade associations, and government                                           344.
262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies           offices at all levels.                                                                9
                                                                                                                                                   Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,
210, 215.                                                                                                                 Hours Credit           173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,
11
   Oral Communications—One course from: Speech             Freshman                                                                              330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;
210, 240.                                                  1,2
                                                               English 101,102 ...................................................... 6          Women’s Studies 330.
12
   Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:            3
                                                             Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8                    10
                                                                                                                                                    Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages
African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-       4
                                                             Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6                    311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative
102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-             5
                                                             Natural Science ........................................................ 8
American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.                                                                                              Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,
                                                           6
                                                             Social Science ......................................................... 6          232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level
International students who have not taken U.S.             Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1
History in high school may fulfill this requirement with                                                                                         Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language
                                                           Sophomore                                                                             courses whose content is literature including foreign
a United States History sequence.                          Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5
13
   Choose from 300 level or above, including one                                                                                                 literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,
                                                           Economics 201 .......................................................... 4            262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies
course in at least four of the following areas:            7
                                                             Written Communications ........................................... 3                210, 215.
Accounting, Business Administration, Economics,
Finance, Logistics & Transportation, Management,
                                                           8
                                                             Ethics ....................................................................... 3    11
                                                                                                                                                    Oral Communications—One course from: Speech
Marketing, Statistics.
                                                           9
                                                             Arts .......................................................................... 3   210, 240.
                                                           Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3         12
                                                                                                                                                    Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:
                                                           Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4                   African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-
                                                           10,2
                                                                Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3             102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-
                                                           11
                                                              Oral Communications .............................................. 3               American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.
                                                           Junior                                                                                International students who have not taken U.S.
                                                           Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4                      History in high school may fulfill this requirement with
                                                           Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4                      a United States History sequence.
                                                           Finance 301 ............................................................... 3         13
                                                                                                                                                    Choose from any upper division Economics courses.
                                                           Economics 311 .......................................................... 3
                                                           Economics 313 .......................................................... 3
                                                           Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3
                                                           Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                              College of Business Administration                                     93


FINANCE                                                                               Finance 430 ............................................................... 3
                                                                                      Electives ................................................................... 3   MANAGEMENT
                                                                                      Senior Year
Professors:                                                                           Finance 450 ............................................................... 3     Professors:
J.W. Wansley (Head and Clayton Homes                                                  12
                                                                                         Non-US History ....................................................... 6       R.W. Boling (Emeritus), Ph.D. Stanford; H.D.
Chair of Excellence), Ph.D. South Carolina;
                                                                                      13
                                                                                         Finance Electives .................................................... 9       Dewhirst (Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas; K.C.
                                                                                      Management 401 ....................................................... 3
H.A. Black (James F. Smith Professor), Ph.D.                                                                                                                            Gilbert, Ph.D. Tennessee; L.R. James, Ph.D.
                                                                                      Electives ................................................................ 7-9
Ohio State; T.P. Boehm (AmSouth Scholar),                                             ______________________________________________                                    Utah; A.H. Keally (Emeritus), M.B.A.
Ph.D. Washington University (St. Louis); R.P.                                                                         Total: 126 hours                                  Pennsylvania; R.T. Ladd, Ph.D. Georgia; J.M.
DeGennaro (SunTrust Professor), Ph.D. Ohio                                            ______________________________________________                                    Larsen, Jr., (Emeritus), Ph.D. Purdue; A.
State; W.W. Dotterweich (Emeritus), Ph.D.                                             1
                                                                                        Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.                              Miller (William B. Stokely Professor of
Pennsylvania; M.C. Ehrhardt (Castagna                                                 2
                                                                                        Students who complete English 118, Honors English                               Management), Ph.D. Washington; C.W. Neel,
Professor), Ph.D. Georgia Tech; G.C.                                                  Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their                           Ph.D. Alabama; C.E. Noon, Ph.D. Michigan; D.
Philippatos (Distinguished Chaired Professor                                          English Composition requirement by choosing English                               Reese (Emeritus), Ph.D. Iowa; M.C. Rush,
                                                                                      102 or a sophomore literature course in the English
of Banking and Finance), Ph.D. New York;                                                                                                                                Ph.D. Akron; M.M. Srinivasan (The Ball
                                                                                      Department. If the sophomore literature course
R.E. Shrieves (Voigt Professor), Ph.D.                                                appears on the list for the Humanities Literature                                 Corporation Professor of Management), Ph.D.
California (Los Angeles); J.M. Wachowicz, Jr.                                         requirement, the course may also be counted toward                                Northwestern; M.J. Stahl (Distinguished
(AmSouth Scholar), Ph.D. Illinois.                                                    the Humanities requirement.                                                       Professor of Management), Ph.D.
                                                                                      3
                                                                                        Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are                                          Rensselaer; S.C. Vance (William B. Stokely
Associate Professors:                                                                 prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during                           Professor of Management, Emeritus), Ph.D.
A.L. Auxier, Ph.D. Iowa; M.C. Collins (Home                                           the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a                                   Pennsylvania; G.H. Whitlock (Emeritus and
Federal Faculty Fellow), Ph.D. Georgia; P.R.                                          result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be                                     Alumni Distinguished Service Professor),
                                                                                      completed by the end of the first semester of the
Daves, Ph.D. North Carolina; D. Murphy,                                                                                                                                 Ph.D. Tennessee.
                                                                                      Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics
Ph.D. Florida.                                                                        100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses
                                                                                      during their Freshman Year to ensure that                                         Associate Professors:
Instructors:                                                                          Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the                                O.S. Fowler (Head), Ph.D. Georgia; M.R.
S. Murphy, MBA, Loyola University.                                                    first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who                                Bowers, Ph.D. Clemson; C.P. Edirisinghe,
                                                                                      have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of                                  Ph.D. British Columbia; Usha C.V. Haley,
     The finance major gives students the flex-                                       their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in                                Ph.D. New York University; W.Q. Judge,
ibility to tailor their programs to fit their particu-                                the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to                              Ph.D. North Carolina; R.C. Maddox
                                                                                      taking Mathematics 123.
lar career goals and to prepare for one (or                                                                                                                             (Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas; J.R. Rentsch, Ph.D.
                                                                                      4
                                                                                        Foreign Language—Students must complete the
more) of the following specialty areas:                                               intermediate sequence of a foreign language.                                      Maryland; D.J. Woehr, Ph.D. Georgia Institute
Courses in Investments lead to career oppor-                                          Students may either continue the Foreign Language                                 of Technology.
tunities in investment analysis, commercial                                           begun in high school or start a new sequence.
and investment banking, and insurance com-                                            Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are                            Lecturers:
panies. Courses in Real Estate are designed                                           treated as non-business electives. Students whose                                 E.K.P. Atchley, Ph.D. Tennessee; R.L.
for students who are interested in real estate                                        native language is not English may meet this                                      Nubert, Ph.D. Tennessee; A.K. Van Cleave,
brokerage, appraising, taxation, law, property                                        requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by                                 Jr., Ph.D. Tennessee.
                                                                                      passing two English language literature courses
management, real estate development, mort-
                                                                                      taught by the English Department at the 200-level.
gage lending and banking, construction, gov-                                          5
                                                                                        Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from                                    Instructors:
ernment loan guarantees, and insurance.                                               those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may                                J.C. Anderson, Master of International
Courses in Corporate Finance lead to oppor-                                           apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See                             Management, Arizona; W.L. Ilic, M.A.
tunities in corporate forecasting, planning, and                                      individual course descriptions or advisor for details.                            Tennessee.
control; cash management; and capital and                                             Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;
financial analysis positions. Courses in Finan-                                       Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;                                        Management majors at UT may choose
cial Institutions and Markets prepare students                                        Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or                                from several different areas of emphasis.
                                                                                      107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.                                 Operations management and personnel man-
for opportunities in the management of finan-                                         6
                                                                                        Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology
cial institutions, as well as within the govern-                                      110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;
                                                                                                                                                                        agement are the most specified, but an indi-
ment organizations related to the industry.                                           Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,                             vidualized program may be developed. The
Courses in Insurance and Risk Management                                              220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,                                 foundation is provided by studies of organiza-
prepare students for opportunities in insur-                                          310, 370, 415, 459.                                                               tional structure and process, human behavior
ance, business, and public risk management.                                           7
                                                                                        Written Communications—One course from: English                                 in organizations, and business strategy.
                                                                                      263, 295, 355, 360.                                                               Building on that foundation and the core
                                                               Hours Credit
                                                                                      8
                                                                                        Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or                                 courses in accounting, economics, marketing,
Freshman                                                                              344.                                                                              and finance, the management major selects
1,2
    English 101,102 ...................................................... 6
                                                                                      9
                                                                                        Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,
                                                                                      173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,
                                                                                                                                                                        from the following four areas of emphasis:
3
  Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8                                                                                                      General Management, Operations Manage-
4
  Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6                    330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;
                                                                                      Women’s Studies 330.                                                              ment, Human Resource Management, or
5
  Natural Science ........................................................ 8
6
  Social Science ......................................................... 6
                                                                                      10
                                                                                         Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages                                    International Management.
Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1                   311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative                                         Career opportunities include staff positions
Sophomore                                                                             Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,                             in production planning, inventory manage-
Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5               232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level                                   ment, employment, training, and recruiting. In
Economics 201 .......................................................... 4            Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language                                   addition, line management positions in all
7
  Written Communications ........................................... 3                courses whose content is literature including foreign
                                                                                      literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,
                                                                                                                                                                        types of industries, such as manufacturing,
8
  Ethics ....................................................................... 3                                                                                      retailing, banking, transportation, and hospital-
9
  Arts .......................................................................... 3   262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies
                                                                                      210, 215.                                                                         ity are all available to management majors.
Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3
Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4
                                                                                      11
                                                                                         Oral Communications—One course from: Speech
10,2
     Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3             210, 240.                                                                                                                                       Hours Credit
11
   Oral Communications .............................................. 3
                                                                                      12
                                                                                         Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:                                   Freshman
Junior                                                                                African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-                              1,2
                                                                                                                                                                            English 101,102 ...................................................... 6
Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4                      102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-                                    3
                                                                                                                                                                          Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8
Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4                      American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.                               4
                                                                                                                                                                          Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6
Finance 301 ............................................................... 3         International students who have not taken U.S.                                    5
                                                                                                                                                                          Natural Science ........................................................ 8
Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3              History in high school may fulfill this requirement with                          6
                                                                                                                                                                          Social Science ......................................................... 6
Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3                      a United States History sequence.                                                 Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1
Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3
                                                                                      13
                                                                                         Finance Electives—choose from the following                                    Sophomore
Accounting 311,Statistics 320 or                                                      courses: Finance 402, 422, 431, 460, 470, 471, 481,                               Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5
      13
         Finance Elective ............................................... 3           482, and 493.                                                                     Economics 201 .......................................................... 4
Finance 421 ............................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                        7
                                                                                                                                                                          Written Communications ........................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                        8
                                                                                                                                                                          Ethics ....................................................................... 3
94            College of Business Administration

9
  Arts .......................................................................... 3   11
                                                                                         Oral Communications—One course from: Speech           in the right place at the right time is critical for
Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3         210, 240.                                                success in any business, logistics plays a
Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4                   12
                                                                                         Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from           critical role in a firm’s comprehensive supply
10,2
     Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3             courses listed below: African-American Studies 235-
                                                                                                                                               chain. A career in logistics offers students the
11
   Oral Communications .............................................. 3               236; Asian Studies 101-102; History 241-242, 247-
Junior                                                                                248, 261-262; Latin-American Studies 251-252;            opportunity to make a significant contribution
Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4                      Medieval Studies 201-202. International students who     to corporate effectiveness in this area. Stu-
Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4                      have not taken U.S. History in high school may fulfill   dents interested in transportation will typically
Finance 301 ............................................................... 3         this requirement with a United States History            accept employment with a carrier (motor, rail,
Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3                      sequence.                                                water, and air) or with the logistics and trans-
Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3                   13
                                                                                         Management Electives—Students should choose           portation department of a business that pur-
Management 321 ....................................................... 3              electives based on whether they want to focus on         chases transportation services from carriers.
Management 341 ....................................................... 3              general management, human resources management,
                                                                                                                                                    The internationally recognized logistics and
12
   Non-US History ....................................................... 6           international management, or operations management.
Electives ................................................................... 3       Students must complete four courses in one of the        transportation program at UT is currently re-
Senior Year                                                                           following areas: General—Management 431 and any          garded as one of the most comprehensive
13
   Management Electives .......................................... 12                 three upper division Management courses approved         and contemporary programs in the nation.
Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3              by faculty advisor; Human Resources Management—          The program offers a fundamental yet innova-
Management 401 ....................................................... 3              Management 431, 432 and any two upper division           tive curriculum. Students develop important
Electives ............................................................ 10-12          Management courses approved by faculty advisor;          skills required of logistics professionals, as
_____________________________________________                                         International Management—Management 471,                 well as learn how logistics helps solve busi-
                                Total: 126 hours                                      Logistics and Transportation 441, marketing 440 and
______________________________________________                                                                                                 ness supply chain management problems.
                                                                                      any upper division Management course approved by
1
  Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.                                  faculty advisor; Operations Management—
2
  Students who complete English 118, Honors English                                   Management 431,441, Statistics 365 and either                                                                           Hours Credit
Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their                               Industrial Engineering 305 or Management Science         Freshman
English Composition requirement by choosing English                                   410.
                                                                                                                                               1,2
                                                                                                                                                   English 101,102 ...................................................... 6
102 or a sophomore literature course in the English
                                                                                                                                               3
                                                                                                                                                 Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8
Department. If the sophomore literature course
                                                                                                                                               4
                                                                                                                                                 Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6
appears on the list for the Humanities Literature                                     MANAGEMENT                                               5
                                                                                                                                               6
                                                                                                                                                 Natural Science ........................................................ 8
                                                                                                                                                 Social Science ......................................................... 6
requirement, the course may also be counted toward
the Humanities requirement.                                                           SCIENCE PROGRAMS                                         Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1
                                                                                                                                               Sophomore
3
  Mathematics 125 or 141 are prerequisites for
Statistics 201, which is taken during the second                                                                                               Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5
                                                                                      (GRADUATE PROGRAMS ONLY)                                 Economics 201 .......................................................... 4
semester of the Sophomore Year. As a result, either
Mathematics 125 or 141 must be completed by the
                                                                                                                                               7
                                                                                                                                                 Written Communications ........................................... 3
end of the first semester of the Sophomore Year.                                      Professor:                                               8
                                                                                                                                                 Ethics ....................................................................... 3
Students testing into Mathematics 100, 110, 115, or                                   K.C. Gilbert, Ph.D. Tennessee; C.E. Noon,                9
                                                                                                                                                 Arts .......................................................................... 3
119 must complete these courses during their                                          Ph.D. Michigan; M.M. Srinivasan (The Ball                Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3
                                                                                                                                               Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4
Freshman Year to ensure that Mathematics 125 or                                       Corporation Professor of Management), Ph.D.
141 can be completed during the first semester of the
                                                                                                                                               10,2
                                                                                                                                                    Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3
                                                                                      Northwestern.                                            11
                                                                                                                                                  Oral Communications .............................................. 3
Sophomore Year. Students who have not completed
Mathematics 125 by the end of their Freshman Year                                                                                              Junior
                                                                                      Associate Professors:                                    Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4
should take Mathematics 125 in the first semester of
their Sophomore Year, prior to taking Mathematics                                     M.R. Bowers, Ph.D. Clemson; C.P.                         Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4
123.                                                                                  Edirlsinghe, Ph.D. British Columbia.                     Finance 301 ............................................................... 3
4
  Foreign Language—Students must complete the                                                                                                  Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3
intermediate sequence of a foreign language.                                                                                                   Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3
Students may either continue the Foreign Language
                                                                                      GRADUATE                                                 Logistics and Transportation 302
begun in high school or start a new sequence.                                         Consult the Graduate Catalog for information                   (400 if taken Fall 2002-Spring 2003) ................... 3
Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are                                on graduate programs.
                                                                                                                                               12
                                                                                                                                                  Non-US History ....................................................... 6
treated as non-business electives. Students whose                                                                                              Statistics 365 ............................................................ 3
native language is not English may meet this                                                                                                   Electives ................................................................... 3
requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by                                     MARKETING,                                               Senior Year
                                                                                                                                               Logistics and Transportation 411 .............................. 3
passing two English language literature courses
taught by the English Department at the 200-level.                                    LOGISTICS, AND                                           Logistics and Transportation 460 .............................. 3
                                                                                                                                               Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3
  Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from
                                                                                      TRANSPORTATION
5

those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may
                                                                                                                                               13
                                                                                                                                                  Logistics and Transportation Electives ................... 9
apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See                                                                                          Management 401 ....................................................... 3
individual course descriptions or advisor for details.                                                                                         Electives ................................................................ 7-9
                                                                                                                                               _____________________________________________
Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;                                       LOGISTICS AND                                                                             Total: 126 hours
Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;
Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or
                                                                                      TRANSPORTATION                                           _______________________________________________

107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.
                                                                                                                                               1
                                                                                                                                                 Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.
6
  Social Science—Public Administration majors must                                    Professors:
                                                                                                                                               2
                                                                                                                                                 Students who complete English 118, Honors English
                                                                                                                                               Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their
complete either Political Science 101 or 107;                                         F.W. Davis, Jr., Ph.D. Michigan State; G.N.
Anthropology 110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101,                                                                                                 English Composition requirement by choosing English
                                                                                      Dicer, D.B.A. Indiana; J.T. Mentzer, Ph.D.               102 or a sophomore literature course in the English
102, 320, 323; Political Science 101, 102, 107;                                       Michigan State.
Psychology 110, 117, 220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology                                                                                             Department. If the sophomore literature course
110, 117, 120, 127, 310, 370, 415, 459.                                                                                                        appears on the list for the Humanities Literature
7
  Written Communications—One course from: English                                     Associate Professors:                                    requirement, the course may also be counted toward
263, 295, 355, 360.                                                                   J.H. Foggin, Ph.D. Indiana; M.C. Holcomb,                the Humanities requirement.
8
  Ethics—Choose one course from: Philosophy 242,                                      Ph.D. Tennessee; L.M. Rinehart, Ph.D.                    3
                                                                                                                                                 Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are
342, or 344.                                                                          Michigan State.                                          prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during
9
  Arts—One course from the courses listed below: Art                                                                                           the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a
191; Art History 172, 173, 183; Classics 232, 233;                                                                                             result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be
                                                                                      Assistant Professor:                                     completed by the end of the first semester of the
Music History 110, 120, 330; Speech 280, Theatre                                      M.E. Rozicka, Ph.D. Arizona State.
100, 220, 221, 260; Women’s Studies 330.                                                                                                       Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics
10
   Humanities—Three hours from courses listed below:                                                                                           100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses
Asian Languages 311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253;                                         Logistics has responsibility for the move-           during their Freshman Year to ensure that
Comparative Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202,                                    ment of raw materials and component parts                Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the
221, 222, 231, 232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or                                  into and within a business firm, and the distri-         first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who
200-level Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign                                      bution of finished products and services to              have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of
                                                                                                                                               their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in
language courses whose content is literature including                                customers. A major component of logistics,
foreign literature in English translation; Medieval                                                                                            the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to
                                                                                      transportation refers to the physical move-              taking Mathematics 123.
Studies 261, 262; Religious Studies 312, 313;                                         ment of goods between two geographic points.
Women’s Studies 210, 215.
                                                                                                                                               4
                                                                                                                                                 Foreign Language—Students must complete the
                                                                                          Because having products and/or services              intermediate sequence of a foreign language.
                                                                                                                                                     College of Business Administration              95

Students may either continue the Foreign Language          superior value to them. Marketing profession-                                         first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who
begun in high school or start a new sequence.              als use strategy tools to target customers,                                           have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of
Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are     create value propositions and positioning for                                         their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in
treated as non-business electives. Students whose                                                                                                the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to
                                                           each target, and deliver and communicate
native language is not English may meet this                                                                                                     taking Mathematics 123.
requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by          value to these customers through product de-                                          4
                                                                                                                                                   Foreign Language—Students must complete the
passing two English language literature courses            sign, pricing, advertising, personal selling, pro-                                    intermediate sequence of a foreign language.
taught by the English Department at the 200-level.         motion, and distribution.                                                             Students may either continue the Foreign Language
5
  Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from                 Marketing education enables one to pur-                                           begun in high school or start a new sequence.
those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may         sue varied career opportunities critical to or-                                       Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are
apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See      ganizations. Typically, a career in marketing                                         treated as non-business electives. Students whose
individual course descriptions or advisor for details.     begins in either consumer or industrial sales                                         native language is not English may meet this
Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;                                                                                                  requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by
                                                           or retailing, which eventually may lead to man-
Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;                                                                                                   passing two English language literature courses
Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or         agement positions in any of several areas.                                            taught by the English Department at the 200-level.
107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.          For example, marketing professionals may                                              5
                                                                                                                                                   Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from
6
  Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology            hold positions in advertising, brand manage-                                          those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may
110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;           ment, sales management, promotion manage-                                             apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See
Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,      ment, marketing research, distribution, and                                           individual course descriptions or advisor for details.
220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,          other related areas.                                                                  Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;
310, 370, 415, 459.                                            Students interested in a marketing career                                         Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;
7
  Written Communications—One course from: English                                                                                                Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or
                                                           should have a broad-based business educa-
263, 295, 355, 360.                                                                                                                              107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.
8
  Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or          tion, which includes financial management, lo-                                        6
                                                                                                                                                   Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology
344.                                                       gistics and transportation, operations, human                                         110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;
9
  Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,          resources, business strategy, economics,                                              Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,
173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,       and statistics. In addition to a broad array of                                       220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,
330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;               courses in arts and sciences, marketing stu-                                          310, 370, 415, 459.
Women’s Studies 330.                                       dents should obtain a strong grounding in the                                         7
                                                                                                                                                   Written Communications—One course from: English
10
   Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages             social sciences to better understand the                                              263, 295, 355, 360.
311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative                                                                                                    8
                                                                                                                                                   Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or
                                                           forces that shape customer preferences.
Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,                                                                                            344.
232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level                                                                                                  9
                                                                                                                                                   Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,
Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language                                                                           Hours Credit           173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,
courses whose content is literature including foreign      Freshman                                                                              330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;
literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,
                                                           1,2
                                                              English 101,1026                                                                   Women’s Studies 330.
262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies
                                                           3
                                                             Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8                    10
                                                                                                                                                    Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages
210, 215.
                                                           4
                                                             Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6                    311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative
11
   Oral Communications—One course from: Speech
                                                           5
                                                             Natural Science ........................................................ 8          Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,
210, 240.
                                                           6
                                                             Social Science ......................................................... 6          232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level
12
   Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:            Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1                   Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language
African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-       Sophomore                                                                             courses whose content is literature including foreign
102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-             Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5               literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,
American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.        Economics 201 .......................................................... 4            262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies
International students who have not taken U.S.
                                                           7
                                                             Written Communications ........................................... 3                210, 215.
History in high school may fulfill this requirement with
                                                           8
                                                             Ethics ....................................................................... 3    11
                                                                                                                                                    Oral Communications—One course from: Speech
a United States History sequence.
                                                           9
                                                             Arts .......................................................................... 3   210, 240.
13
   Logistics and Transportation Electives—Choose           Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3         12
                                                                                                                                                    Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:
from: Business Administration 311, 467; Civil              Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4                   African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-
Engineering 595; Economics 311, 341, 361; English
                                                           10,2
                                                                Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3             102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-
455; Finance 470; Geography 340, 411, 449;
                                                           11
                                                              Oral Communications .............................................. 3               American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.
Information Science 310; Management 311, 341;              Junior                                                                                International students who have not taken U.S.
Marketing 310, 320, 420; Speech 310, 330; Logistics        Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4                      History in high school may fulfill this requirement with
and Transportation—all 400 level or above courses          Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4                      a United States History sequence.
                                                           Finance 301 ............................................................... 3         13
                                                                                                                                                    Marketing Electives—Choose from: Marketing 400,
                                                           Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3                      410, 420, 440, 450, 493; Business Administration
MARKETING                                                  Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3
                                                           12Non-US History ...................................................... 6
                                                                                                                                                 467. In addition, one elective may be selected from
                                                                                                                                                 the Logistics and Transportation courses.
                                                           Marketing 310 ............................................................ 3
Professors:                                                Marketing 320 ............................................................ 3
D.J. Barnaby, Ph.D. Purdue; E.R. Cadotte,
Ph.D. Ohio State; J.T. Mentzer, Ph.D.
                                                           Electives ................................................................... 3
                                                           Senior Year
                                                                                                                                                 PUBLIC
Michigan State; D.W. Schumann, Ph.D.
Missouri (Columbia); R.B. Woodruff, D.B.A.
                                                           13
                                                              Marketing Electives ................................................. 9
                                                           Marketing 430 ............................................................ 3
                                                                                                                                                 ADMINISTRATION
Indiana.                                                   Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3
                                                           Management 401 ....................................................... 3                   Public Administration is a joint program
                                                           Electives ............................................................ 10-12          sponsored by the Department of Economics
Associate Professors:                                      _______________________________________________
                                                                                                                                                 and the Department of Political Science. It is
P.A. Dabholkar, Ph.D. Georgia State; S.F.                                                  Total: 126 hours
                                                           ______________________________________________                                        designed for students interested in public
Gardial, Ph.D. Houston; M.A. Moon, Ph.D.
                                                                                                                                                 sector management, the formation of public
North Carolina (Chapel Hill); R.C. Reizenstein             1
                                                             Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.
                                                                                                                                                 policy, or the interface between the public and
(Chair), Ph.D. Cornell; J.O. Rentz, Ph.D.                  2
                                                             Students who complete English 118, Honors English
                                                           Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their                               private sectors. The program combines gen-
Georgia.
                                                           English Composition requirement by choosing English                                   eral education in business principles with spe-
                                                           102 or a sophomore literature course in the English                                   cific courses in government. Students choose
Assistant Professors:
                                                           Department. If the sophomore literature course                                        electives to focus their interest or expertise.
K.B. Kahn, Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic Institute;           appears on the list for the Humanities Literature                                          Public administration majors find careers in
M.B. Myers, Ph.D. Michigan State; D.J. Flint,              requirement, the course may also be counted toward                                    city management, tax administration, budget
Ph.D. Tennessee.                                           the Humanities requirement.                                                           analysis, and in the functional areas of gov-
                                                           3
                                                             Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are
                                                                                                                                                 ernment such as education, health, and eco-
Instructor:                                                prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during
                                                           the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a                                       nomic development. Opportunities exist at the
M.E. Collins, M.B.A. Middle Tennessee State.
                                                           result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be                                         federal, state, and local levels of government.
                                                           completed by the end of the first semester of the                                     Many public administration majors pursue
     Marketing in an organization has responsi-            Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics                                     graduate-level education and training. Law
bility for identifying who customers are, what             100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses                                     schools and the Masters of Public Administra-
they need and want, and how best to meet                   during their Freshman Year to ensure that                                             tion are two possible options.
those needs/wants by creating and delivering               Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the
96            College of Business Administration

                                                               Hours Credit           8
                                                                                       Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or           manufacturing, transportation, education,
Freshman                                                                              344.                                                       medicine, psychology, agriculture, and com-
1,2
    English 101,102 ...................................................... 6          9
                                                                                       Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,           puter and social sciences.
3
  Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8                    173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,            There are two basic types of statisticians:
4
  Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6                    330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;               applied and theoretical. The focus of the un-
5
  Natural Science ........................................................ 8          Women’s Studies 330.                                       dergraduate program at UT is on applied sta-
6
  Social Science ......................................................... 6          10
                                                                                         Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages             tistics. Applied statisticians help to improve
Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1                   311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative
                                                                                                                                                 processes and solve real-world problems.
Sophomre                                                                              Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,
Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5               232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level
                                                                                                                                                 They may forecast economic or population
Economics 201 .......................................................... 4            Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language            growth, evaluate results of a new marketing
7
  Written Communications ........................................... 3                courses whose content is literature including foreign      program or the effectiveness of a new drug,
8
  Ethics ....................................................................... 3    literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,   identify quality control issues in manufactur-
9
  Arts .......................................................................... 3   262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies           ing, or design experiments to help engineers
Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3         210, 215.                                                  and scientists determine the best design for a
Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4                   11
                                                                                         Oral Communications—One course from: Speech             jet airplane.
10,2
     Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3             210, 240.                                                       Prospective statisticians must have a
11
   Oral Communications .............................................. 3               12
                                                                                         Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:            strong aptitude for mathematics, a solid
Junior                                                                                African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-       computing background, and an earnest curi-
Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4                      102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-             osity to explore the practical application of
Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4                      American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.        statistics. The skills students will learn as a
Finance 301 ............................................................... 3         International students who have not taken U.S.             statistics major at UT will enable them to
Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3                      History in high school may fulfill this requirement with   understand and convey the scope and power
Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3                   a United States History sequence.                          of statistical thinking—resulting in significant
Political Science 340 ................................................. 3             13
                                                                                         Economics or Political Science Elective—Upper
                                                                                                                                                 contributions toward solutions to a variety of
12
   Non-US History ....................................................... 6           division courses in Economics or Political Science.
Economics 311 .......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                 important jobs. Well-paying jobs are available
Electives ................................................................... 3                                                                  at the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. levels.
Senior Year                                                                           STATISTICS                                                                                                               Hours Credit
Economics 471 .......................................................... 3
Economics 472 .......................................................... 3                                                                       Freshman
Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3              Professors:                                                1,2
                                                                                                                                                     English 101,102 ...................................................... 6
Political Science 441 ................................................. 3             Robert W. Mee (Head), Ph.D. Iowa State; H.                 3
                                                                                                                                                   Math 123-125 or 141-142 ................................. 6 or 8
Management 401 ....................................................... 3              Bozdogan, Ph.D. Illinois; Frank M. Guess,                  4
                                                                                                                                                   Intermediate Foreign Language ................................ 6
13
   Economics or Political Science Elective ................. 3                        Ph.D. Florida State; Robert A. McLean                      5
                                                                                                                                                   Natural Science ........................................................ 8
Electives ............................................................ 10-12          (Emeritus), Ph.D. Purdue; William C. Parr,
                                                                                                                                                 6
                                                                                                                                                   Social Science ......................................................... 6
_____________________________________________                                                                                                    Business Administration 101 ..................................... 1
                                                                                      Ph.D. Southern Methodist; John W. Philpot
                                Total: 126 hours                                                                                                 Sophomore
______________________________________________                                        (Emeritus), Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic;                    Accounting 201, 202 ................................................. 5
                                                                                      Richard D. Sanders (Emeritus), Ph.D. Texas;                Economics 201 .......................................................... 4
1
  Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.
2
  Students who complete English 118, Honors English                                   David L. Sylwester (Emeritus), Ph.D.                       7
                                                                                                                                                   Written Communications ........................................... 3
Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their                               Stanford; Charles C. Thigpen (Emeritus),                   8Ethics ...................................................................... 3
English Composition requirement by choosing English                                   Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic Institute.                      9Arts .......................................................................... 3
102 or a sophomore literature course in the English                                                                                              Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3
Department. If the sophomore literature course                                        Associate Professors:                                      Business Administration 201 ..................................... 4
appears on the list for the Humanities Literature                                     Mary G. Leitnaker, Ph.D. Kentucky; Ramon V.
                                                                                                                                                 10,2
                                                                                                                                                      Humanities (Literature) .......................................... 3
requirement, the course may also be counted toward
                                                                                                                                                 11
                                                                                                                                                    Oral Communications .............................................. 3
                                                                                      Leon, Ph.D. Florida State; William L. Seaver,              Junior
the Humanities requirement.
                                                                                      Ph.D. Texas A&M; Esteban Walker, Ph.D.                     Business Administration 331-332 .............................. 4
3
  Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are
prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during                               Virginia Polytechnic; Mary Sue Younger, Ph.D.              Business Administration 341-342 .............................. 4
the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a                                       Virginia Polytechnic.                                      Finance 301 ............................................................... 3
result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be                                                                                                    Statistics 365 ............................................................ 3
completed by the end of the first semester of the                                     Assistant Professor:                                       Business Administration 351-352 .............................. 3
Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics                                     Halima Bensmail, Ph.D. Paris VII; Hyunjoong                Business Administration 361 ..................................... 3
100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses                                     Kim, Ph.D. Wisconsin.
                                                                                                                                                 13
                                                                                                                                                    Mathematics Elective ........................................... 3-4
during their Freshman Year to ensure that                                                                                                        Statistics 320 ............................................................ 3
Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the                                                                                               Statistics 330 ............................................................ 3
                                                                                      Instructor:                                                Electives ................................................................... 3
first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who
have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of                                      Charles M. Cwiek, M.S. Tennessee.                          Senior Year
their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in                                                                                               Statistics 471 ............................................................ 3
the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to                                  Lecturer:                                                  12
                                                                                                                                                    Non-US History ....................................................... 6
taking Mathematics 123.                                                               James L. Schmidhammer, Ph.D. Pittsburgh.                   Business Law 301 ..................................................... 3
4
  Foreign Language—Students must complete the                                                                                                    Management 401 ....................................................... 3
intermediate sequence of a foreign language.                                          Adjunct:
                                                                                                                                                 13
                                                                                                                                                    Mathematics Elective ........................................... 3-4
Students may either continue the Foreign Language
                                                                                                                                                 14
                                                                                                                                                    Statistics Electives ................................................. 6
                                                                                      K.O. Bowman, Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic                    Electives ................................................................ 4-6
begun in high school or start a new sequence.
                                                                                      Institute; Edward L. Frome, Ph.D. Emory;                   _____________________________________________
Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are
treated as non-business electives. Students whose                                     Stephen A. McGuire, Ph.D. Kansas State.                                                    Total: 126 hours
                                                                                                                                                 ______________________________________________
native language is not English may meet this
requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by                                         The general perception of “statisticians” is           1
                                                                                                                                                   Must be completed by the end of the Freshman Year.
passing two English language literature courses                                       most often associated with sporting events.                2
                                                                                                                                                   Students who complete English 118, Honors English
taught by the English Department at the 200-level.                                    The life a professional statistician, however, is          Composition, with a grade of A or B will complete their
5
  Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from                                        much more varied and interesting than com-                 English Composition requirement by choosing English
those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may                                                                                               102 or a sophomore literature course in the English
                                                                                      puting the average rushing yards per play.                 Department. If the sophomore literature course
apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See
                                                                                      Actually, statistics is the science of learning            appears on the list for the Humanities Literature
individual course descriptions or advisor for details.
Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;                                       from data, and all processes generate data.                requirement, the course may also be counted toward
Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;                                        Statisticians determine how to collect and                 the Humanities requirement.
Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or                                    manage this necessary information; they in-                3
                                                                                                                                                   Mathematics—Mathematics 125 or 141 are
107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.                                     terrogate the data and present the results in a            prerequisites for Statistics 201, which is taken during
6
  Social Science—Political Science 101 or 107 and one                                 clear fashion so that wise decisions can be                the second semester of the Sophomore Year. As a
course from: Anthropology 110,120, 130, 320;                                          made.                                                      result, either Mathematics 125 or 141 must be
Geography 101, 102, 320, 323; Political Science 102;                                                                                             completed by the end of the first semester of the
                                                                                          Statistics is used in various areas of busi-
Psychology 110, 117, 220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology                                                                                               Sophomore Year. Students testing into Mathematics
                                                                                      ness, industry, science, and government. The               100, 110, 115, or 119 must complete these courses
110, 117, 120, 127, 310, 370, 415, 459.                                               fields of opportunity for statisticians are nu-
7
  Written Communications—One course from: English                                                                                                during their Freshman Year to ensure that
                                                                                      merous—e.g, economics, finance, market re-                 Mathematics 125 or 141 can be completed during the
263, 295, 355, 360.
                                                                                      search, e-commerce, engineering,                           first semester of the Sophomore Year. Students who
                                                                                                                      College of Business Administration   97

have not completed Mathematics 125 by the end of           12
                                                              Non-US History—Any two-course sequence from:
their Freshman Year should take Mathematics 125 in         African-American Studies 235-236; Asian Studies 101-
the first semester of their Sophomore Year, prior to       102; History 241-242, 247-248, 261-262; Latin-
taking Mathematics 123.                                    American Studies 251-252; Medieval Studies 201-202.
4
  Foreign Language—Students must complete the              International students who have not taken U.S.
intermediate sequence of a foreign language.               History in high school may fulfill this requirement with
Students may either continue the Foreign Language          a United States History sequence.
begun in high school or start a new sequence.              13
                                                              Math Elective—To attain at least 126 hours,
Courses taken at other than the intermediate level are     students who took the six credits of Math 123-125
treated as non-business electives. Students whose          should take Math 141-142; for others the
native language is not English may meet this               recommended courses are Math 241 and 251.
requirement by passing English 131 and 132 and by          14
                                                              Statistics Electives—Choose any two courses from
passing two English language literature courses            Statistics 472, 473, 475; Mathematics 423, 424, 425.
taught by the English Department at the 200-level.
5
  Natural Science—Any two-course sequence from
those listed below: NOTE: Certain restrictions may         CENTER FOR BUSINESS
apply to receiving credit in some of these areas. See
individual course descriptions or advisor for details.
                                                           AND ECONOMIC
Astronomy 161-162, or 217-218; Biology 101-102;            RESEARCH
Botany 110-120; Chemistry 120-130, or 128-138;
Geography 131-132; Geology 101-102, or 101-103, or
107-108; Physics 135-136, or 137-138, or 221-222.          W.F. Fox (Director), Research Professor,
6
  Social Science—Two courses from: Anthropology               Ph.D. Ohio State
110,120, 130, 320; Geography 101, 102, 320, 323;           M.N. Murray (Associate Director), Research
Political Science 101, 102, 107; Psychology 110, 117,         Professor, Ph.D. Syracuse
220, 310, 320, 360; Sociology 110, 117, 120, 127,          D. Bruce, Research Assistant Professor,
310, 370, 415, 459.                                           Ph.D. Syracuse
7
  Written Communications—One course from: English          M.J. Cornelius, Research Associate, M.S.
263, 295, 355, 360.
                                                              Tennessee
8
  Ethics—One course from: Philosophy 242, 342, or
344.                                                       V.C. Cunningham, Research Associate, B.A.
9
  Arts—One course from: Art 191; Art History 172,             Tennessee
173, 183; Classics 232, 233; Music History 110, 120,       P. Dowell, Research Associate, Ph.D.
330; Speech 280, Theatre 100, 220, 221, 260;                  Tennessee
Women’s Studies 330.                                       P.A. Price, Research Associate, B.S.
10
   Humanities—One course from: Asian Languages                Tennessee
311, 312, 313, 314; Classics 253; Comparative              J.M. Snoderly, Research Associate, B.A.
Literature 202, 203; English 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,
                                                              Tennessee
232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 333, or 200-level
Honors Literature Courses; Any foreign language            A.R. Thacker, Research Associate, B.S.
courses whose content is literature including foreign         Tennessee
literature in English translation; Medieval Studies 261,   B.B. Vickers, Research Associate, B.A. Mary
262; Religious Studies 312, 313; Women’s Studies              Washington
210, 215.
11
   Oral Communications—One course from: Speech
210, 240.
98      College of Communications




College of Communications
Dwight L. Teeter, Jr., Dean                         COURSE LOAD                                        hours as follows: Communications 100,
Kelly Leiter, Dean Emeritus                             The maximum number of hours an under-          Broadcasting 275, Broadcasting 310 or 320,
Edward Caudill, Associate Dean for Graduate         graduate may take without special permission       and Broadcasting electives (any three
    Studies and Research                            is 19 hours. Permission to take more hours         courses in the department).
Eric Haley, Associate Dean for Undergraduate        must be obtained from the dean or the associ-          A minor in Journalism or Public Relations
    Studies                                         ate dean for undergraduate studies with the        consists of 18 hours from the following: Jour-
Betty Bradley, Director of Advising                 recommendation of the student’s advisor and        nalism 200, Communications 400, plus 12
                                                    department head or school director.                hours in journalism or public relations approved
    Communications is a vital force in today’s                                                         by the School of Journalism minor advisor.
complex society. As a result, programs in the                                                              A minor in Speech Communication consists
College of Communications acquaint students         REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL                               of Speech Communication 100 plus 18 addi-
with the communications process and prepare                                                            tional hours of Speech Communication
them for professional work in many fields.
                                                    CURRICULA                                          courses, at least 12 of which must be at the
    The College includes the School of Journal-                                                        300 level and above. Speech Communication
ism and Public Relations and the Departments        CORE AREAS                                         445, 491, 492, 493 may not be included toward
of Advertising, Broadcasting and Speech Com-            All students in the College take the           requirements for the minor.
munication. Five concentrations are offered:        following core areas:                                  An 18 hour interdisciplinary minor in Com-
advertising, broadcasting, journalism, public           Overview/Survey                                munications for non-majors is available that
relations and speech communication. The five            Writing                                        consists of either Communications 100 or
academic sequences have a core curriculum.              Theory and Research                            Speech Communication 100; two 200-level
This permits specialization at the junior and           Free Speech, Law and Ethics                    sequence introduction courses (Advertising
senior level.                                           Each department designates a course            250, Broadcasting 275, Journalism 200, Public
    Programs for which accrediting is available     (or courses) to fulfill each of the five majors.   Relations 270, Speech Communication 260);
are fully accredited. The advertising, broadcast-                                                      and three upper division courses across two
ing, journalism, public relations, and graduate     SATISFACTORY/NO CREDIT                             sequences in which the 200-level introductory
programs are accredited by the Accrediting                                                             courses have been taken. Students seeking
Council on Education in Journalism and Mass         OPTION                                             an interdisciplinary minor should see the
Communications.                                         This option applies only to general elective   College of Communications undergraduate
    Exchange programs with the Dutch School         courses with the exception of field experience     associate dean.
of Journalism and Communication, Utrecht,           courses. No course that is part of the specific
and the Danish School of Journalism, Arhus,         requirements of the College of Communica-
offer students an opportunity for a European        tions or a student’s major department can be       HONORS PROGRAM IN
Semester. Tennessee students study Euro-            taken under this option. For example, social       SPEECH COMMUNICATION
pean journalism and communication in the            science and humanities electives required by           The Speech Communication Department
Netherlands or Denmark, but maintain their          the various departments cannot be taken S/NC.      offers an honors program that provides an
enrollment at UT and pay only room, board,              Courses evaluated as “satisfactory” will       intense educational experience designed to
and transportation costs. A similar exchange        count as hours toward graduation but not for       assure the participating student a superior and
program with Escuela de Comunicacion                calculating the grade point average. A student     challenging undergraduate education. Speech
Monica Herrera in Ecuador also exists.              who wishes to take a S/NC course must indi-        Communication 107, the Honors version of
    The College, or one of its departments, is a    cate this at the time of registration. Under no    Introduction to Speech Communication, is
member of the Association of Schools of Jour-       circumstances may a student change from            open to students with a 3.0 or higher cumula-
nalism and Mass Communication; Association          S/NC to regular credit or from regular credit to   tive GPA and to entering freshmen with a 3.5
for Education in Journalism and Mass Commu-         S/NC after the deadline for adding courses.        or higher cumulative high school GPA and/or
nication; American Advertising Federation;                                                             ACT composite score of 27 or better. Majors
Advertising Research Foundation; American
Academy of Advertising; Broadcast Education
                                                    MINORS                                             who are prospective juniors and who have a
                                                                                                       3.0 or higher cumulative GPA and a 3.25 or
Association; Tennessee Press Association;               Minors are offered in Broadcasting, Jour-
                                                                                                       higher cumulative GPA in the major are eligible
Society of Professional Journalists; Public         nalism/Public Relations, and Speech Commu-
                                                                                                       to apply for admission to the Speech Commu-
Relations Society of America; National Com-         nication. An interdisciplinary Communications
                                                                                                       nication Honors Program. Application forms
munication Association; Southern States             minor is also available.
                                                                                                       are available in the department office. To
Communication Association.                              A minor in Broadcasting consists of 18
                                                                                                       graduate with Honors, students must meet all

                                                                           98
                                                                                                                                                     College of Communications                             99


requirements for the Speech Communication
major and must complete 397 (Honors Semi-
                                                    ADVERTISING                                                                     Instructor:
                                                                                                                                    Bob Legg, M.S. Colorado.
nar) during the junior year and 497-498 (Se-
nior Honors Thesis) during the senior year.         Professors:                                                                                                                             Hours Credit
The GPA requirement for admission to the            Roxanne Hovland, Ph.D. Illinois; Mariea G.                                      Freshman
program must be maintained, and the grade in        Hoy, Ph.D. Oklahoma State; Ronald E. Taylor                                     English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
498 must be B or higher.                            (Head), Ph.D. Illinois.                                                         1
                                                                                                                                      Foreign Language ..................................................... 6
                                                                                                                                    Communications 100 or Speech 100 ......................... 3
                                                    Associate Professor:                                                            Psychology 110 ......................................................... 3
REQUIREMENTS FOR                                    Eric Haley, Ph.D. Georgia.
                                                                                                                                    2
                                                                                                                                    3
                                                                                                                                      Natural Science ........................................................ 8
                                                                                                                                      Mathematics Electives ............................................. 6
GRADUATION                                          Assistant Professors:
                                                                                                                                    Sophomore
    The Bachelor of Science degree in Commu-                                                                                        Political Science 101 ................................................. 3
                                                    Michael Hoefges, Ph.D. Florida; Margaret                                        Broadcasting 275 ...................................................... 3
nications is awarded to majors who complete a       Morrison, Ph.D. Georgia; Sally McMillan,                                        Broadcasting 310 or 320 ........................................... 3
program of 124 hours prescribed under the           Ph.D. Oregon.                                                                   History 241, 242 ........................................................ 6
Advertising, Broadcasting and Journalism                                                                                            Economics 201 .......................................................... 4
departmental requirements listed below. At          Emeritus Professor:
                                                                                                                                    4
                                                                                                                                      English Literature ..................................................... 6
least 90 of those hours must be taken in            Richard Joel, M.A. Wisconsin.                                                   Speech 210 or 240 .................................................... 3
courses other than the major or related com-                                                                                        Computer Science 100 .............................................. 3
munications fields. At least 18 of the hours in                                                                                     Junior
                                                                                                             Hours Credit           Communications 300 or Broadcasting 450 ............... 3
the major must be taken at the University of        Freshman                                                                        Broadcasting Electives .............................................. 6
Tennessee.                                          English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6      5
                                                                                                                                      Professional Electives .............................................. 9
    The Bachelor of Arts in Communications          Communications 100 ................................................ 3           General Electives .................................................... 12
degree is awarded to Speech Communication           1
                                                      Foreign Language .................................................... 6       Senior
majors who successfully complete the pre-           Anthropology 130 ...................................................... 3       Communications 400 ................................................ 3
scribed 124 hours of courses listed below.
                                                    2
                                                      Natural Science ....................................................... 8     Broadcasting 490 ...................................................... 3
                                                    Mathematics 119 or 123, 125 ................................... 6
    Students must achieve a cumulative grade                                                                                        Broadcasting 492 ...................................................... 1
                                                    Sophomore                                                                       Broadcasting Electives .............................................. 6
point average of at least 2.0 in all College        Advertising 250 ......................................................... 3
of Communications courses used to fulfill
                                                                                                                                    5
                                                                                                                                      Professional Electives .............................................. 9
                                                    History 241, 242 ........................................................ 6     Communications Elective .......................................... 3
graduation requirements.                            3
                                                      English Literature ..................................................... 6    General Electives ...................................................... 6
                                                    Economics 201 ......................................................... 4       _____________________________________________
                                                    Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3
PROGRESSION                                         Political Science 101 or 102 ..................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                    Total: 124 hours
                                                                                                                                    ______________________________________________
REQUIREMENTS                                        Accounting 201 ......................................................... 3
                                                    Journalism 280 .......................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                    1
                                                                                                                                      Six hours of intermediate foreign language is
     Entering freshmen and transfer students                                                                                        required.
                                                    Junior                                                                          2
                                                                                                                                      Natural Science Electives are any two courses from:
are first associated with the College as pre-       Psychology 110 ......................................................... 3      Astronomy 161, 162; Biology 101, 102; Botany 110,
majors. They may progress to a major in the         Advertising 340, 350 ................................................. 6        120; Chemistry 100, 110 or 120, 130; Geography
School of Journalism and Public Relations or        Advertising 360 ......................................................... 3     131, 132; Geology 101,102, or 103.
the Departments of Broadcasting or Speech           Speech 240 ............................................................... 3    3
                                                                                                                                      Mathematics Electives: 110, 115, 119, 123, 125.
Communication after the completion of at least      Marketing 300 ............................................................ 3    4
                                                                                                                                      English Literature Electives: 201, 202, 221, 222, 231,
                                                    Marketing 310 ............................................................ 3
30 hours of prescribed coursework with a 2.5                                                                                        232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281.
                                                    Management 300 ....................................................... 3        5
                                                                                                                                      Professional Electives are: a minor in Cinema
cumulative GPA. Students who have com-              Arts and Sciences Electives ..................................... 6
pleted the course requirements for the fresh-                                                                                       Studies, Political Science, Geography, Psychology,
                                                    Senior                                                                          History, Theatre, African and African-American
man year with a minimum 2.75 cumulative             Psychology 360 ......................................................... 3      Studies, Asian Studies, Latin American Studies,
average in those courses will be considered         Advertising 380, 450 ................................................. 4        Urban Studies, Women’s Studies, Economics,
for progression into the Department of Adver-       Advertising 470, 480 ................................................. 6        Sociology, German, Russian, French, Italian,
tising. Applicants must submit a completed de-      Communications Electives ........................................ 6             Spanish, Speech*, Business Administration*, or
partment application, a statement of career         Arts and Sciences Elective ....................................... 3            English.
                                                    Electives outside College of Communications ........... 9
goals, and an academic history.                     _____________________________________________                                       *NOTE: If courses in these areas are
     Until they progress to a major, students may                                  Total: 124 hours                                 taken, at least some general elective hours
not enroll in courses in the College numbered       _____________________________________________                                   must be used for courses given in the College
300 or above without approval.                      1
                                                      Six hours of intermediate foreign language is                                 of Arts and Sciences. Between general elec-
     Students who do not progress to a major by     required.                                                                       tives and professional electives, at least 14
the time they have accumulated 80 credit hours      2
                                                      Natural Science Electives are any two courses from:                           hours must be taken from the College of Arts
will be dismissed from the College.                 Astronomy 161, 162; Biology 101, 102; Botany 110,                               and Sciences.
     During their last 32 hours prior to gradua-    120; Chemistry 100, 110, or 120, 130; Geography
                                                    131, 132; Geology 101,102, or 103.
tion, all students must have been accepted as
majors in the College.
                                                    3
                                                      English Literature Electives: English 201, 202, 221,
                                                    222, 231, 232, 233, 251, 252, 253.
                                                                                                                                    JOURNALISM
                                                                                                                                    Professors:
TRANSFER STUDENTS                                   BROADCASTING                                                                    Paul G. Ashdown, Ph.D. Bowling Green;
    Students from other colleges within the                                                                                         Dorothy A. Bowles, Ph.D. Wisconsin
University are eligible to progress to a major                                                                                      (Madison); Edward Caudill, Ph.D. North
                                                    Professors:
in the College of Communications, with the                                                                                          Carolina; Mark Littmann (Chair of Excellence),
                                                    Barbara A. Moore (Head), Ph.D. Ohio;
exception of the advertising major, as soon as                                                                                      Ph.D. Northwestern; Mark Miller, Ph.D.
                                                    Norman R. Swan, Jr., Ph.D. Missouri.
they complete at least 30 hours of prescribed                                                                                       Michigan State; Michael W. Singletary, Ph.D.
coursework with a 2.5 cumulative GPA,                                                                                               Southern Illinois; Dwight L. Teeter, Jr., Ph.D.
                                                    Associate Professor:
complete Communications or Speech Com-                                                                                              Wisconsin (Madison).
                                                    Benjamin J. Bates, Ph.D. Michigan.
munication 100, and make application to the
appropriate Department or School. Students                                                                                          Associate Professors:
                                                    Assistant Professors:
pursuing a major in advertising must complete                                                                                       Daniel Foley, M.S.J. Northwestern; Robert B.
                                                    Barbara K. Kaye, Ph.D. Florida State;
the freshman year course requirements with                                                                                          Heller, M.S. Syracuse; Jerry L. Morrow, Ph.D.
                                                    Catherine A. Luther, Ph.D. Minnesota; Mark
a 2.75 cumulative GPA to be considered for                                                                                          Toledo; Candace L. White, Ph.D. Georgia.
                                                    D. Harmon, Ph.D. Ohio.
admission.
                                                    Emeritus Professors:                                                            Assistant Professors:
GRADUATE                                            Darrel W. Holt, Ph.D. Northwestern; Herbert                                     Lisa T. Fall, Ph.D. Michigan State; Bonnie P.
                                                    H. Howard, Ph.D. Ohio.                                                          Riechert, Ph.D. Tennessee; Candace L.
   Consult the Graduate Catalog for listing of                                                                                      White, Ph.D. Georgia.
graduate level courses.
100          College of Communications


Instructor:
Bonnie L. Hufford, M.Ed. Bowling Green.
                                                                                PUBLIC RELATIONS                                                                SPEECH
                                                                                CONCENTRATION                                                                   COMMUNICATION
Emeritus Professors:                                                                                                                     Hours Credit
June N. Adamson, M.S. Tennessee; Dozier                                         Freshman
                                                                                English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6      Professor:
C. Cade, Ph.D. Iowa; James L. Crook, Ph.D.                                                                                                                      Faye D. Julian, Ph.D. Tennessee.
                                                                                Communications 100 ................................................. 3
Iowa State; George A. Everett, Ph.D. Iowa;                                      1
                                                                                  Foreign Language ..................................................... 6
Jack B. Haskins, Ph.D. Minnesota; B. Kelly                                      2
                                                                                  Natural Science Electives ........................................ 8          Associate Professors:
Leiter, Ph.D. Southern Illinois; Frank B.                                       3
                                                                                  Humanities Elective .................................................. 3      John W. Haas (Head), Ph.D. Kentucky; Marcus
Thornburg, M.S. Florida.                                                        Math 119 or 123 ........................................................ 3      L. Ambrester, Ph.D. Ohio; Robert W. Glenn,
                                                                                Math 125 or 141 ........................................................ 3
                                                                                                                                                                Ph.D. Northwestern.
                                                                                Sophomore
JOURNALISM                                                                      Public Relations 270 .................................................. 3
                                                                                                                                                                Assistant Professors:
CONCENTRATION                                                                   Journalism 200 .......................................................... 3
                                                                                Journalism 203 .......................................................... 3     Robert S. Ambler, Ph.D. Ohio State; Kelby K.
                                                        Hours Credit            Journalism 280 .......................................................... 3     Halone, Ph.D. Oklahoma; Michelle T. Violanti,
Freshman                                                                        History 241, 242 ........................................................ 6     Ph.D. Kansas.
English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6      Economics 201 .......................................................... 4
Communications 100 ................................................ 3           Statistics 201 ............................................................ 3
1
  Foreign Language .................................................... 6                                                                                       Emeritus Professor:
                                                                                1
                                                                                  Foreign Language or General Electives ................... 6
2
  Natural Science Electives ........................................ 8                                                                                          G.A. Yeomans, Ph.D. Louisiana State.
                                                                                Junior
Psychology 110 ......................................................... 3      Communications 300 ................................................ 3
3
  Math Elective ........................................................... 3   Public Relations 320 ................................................. 3                                                               Hours Credit
Math 115 or Statistics 201 ........................................ 3           Public Relations 370 ................................................. 3        Freshman
Sophomore                                                                       Speech 240 ............................................................... 3    Speech 100 ............................................................... 3
Journalism 200 .......................................................... 3     Accounting 201 ......................................................... 3      English 101, 102 ....................................................... 6
Journalism 203 .......................................................... 3     4
                                                                                  Literature Electives .................................................. 6
                                                                                                                                                                1
                                                                                                                                                                  Mathematics Elective ............................................... 3
History 241, 242 ........................................................ 6     Political Science Elective .......................................... 3         Psychology 110 ......................................................... 3
1
  Foreign Language or General Electives .................. 6                    5
                                                                                  Social Science Elective ............................................ 3
                                                                                                                                                                2
                                                                                                                                                                  Natural Science ....................................................... 8
4
  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3       Marketing 300 ............................................................ 3
                                                                                                                                                                3
                                                                                                                                                                  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3
Economics 201 ......................................................... 4       Senior
                                                                                                                                                                4
                                                                                                                                                                  Computer Science 100 or 102 ............................. 3-4
Journalism 280 or 290 .............................................. 3          Public Relations 470 ................................................. 3        Sophomore
Speech 210 ............................................................... 3    Communications 400 ................................................ 3           Speech 210 or 240 ................................................... 3
Junior                                                                          Speech Communication 440 ..................................... 3                Speech 250 or 270 ................................................... 3
Communications 300 ................................................ 3           Public Relations 492 ................................................. 1        History 241, 242 ........................................................ 6
Journalism 360 .......................................................... 3     Communications Elective .......................................... 3            Math 115 or Statistics 201 ........................................ 3
5
  Political Science Electives ....................................... 6         Business Elective ...................................................... 3
                                                                                                                                                                5
                                                                                                                                                                  Foreign Language .................................................... 6
6
  Social Science Elective ............................................ 3        5
                                                                                  Social Science Electives .......................................... 6
                                                                                                                                                                3
                                                                                                                                                                  Humanities Elective ................................................. 6
Accounting 201 ......................................................... 3      3
                                                                                  Humanities Electives ............................................... 6        General Electives ...................................................... 6
4
  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3       General Elective ........................................................ 3     Junior
7
  Literature Electives .................................................. 6     _____________________________________________                                   Speech 300, 310, 320 or 330 ................................... 3
General Elective ........................................................ 3                                    Total: 124 hours                                 Speech 340 ............................................................... 3
Senior                                                                          _____________________________________________                                   Speech 350 ............................................................... 3
Communications 400 ................................................ 3           1
                                                                                  Six hours of intermediate foreign language is                                 Speech 390 ............................................................... 3
Journalism 420 .......................................................... 3     required.
                                                                                                                                                                6
                                                                                                                                                                  Upper-level General Education Elective .................. 3
Journalism 430 .......................................................... 3     2
                                                                                  Natural Science Electives are any two courses from:
                                                                                                                                                                7
                                                                                                                                                                  Advanced Composition Elective .............................. 3
Journalism 460 .......................................................... 3     Astronomy 161, 162; Biology 101, 102; Botany 110,
                                                                                                                                                                8
                                                                                                                                                                  Communications Elective ........................................ 3
Journalism 492 .......................................................... 1     120; Chemistry 100, 110 or 120, 130; Geography                                  General Electives ...................................................... 3
8
  Journalism Elective .................................................. 3      131, 132; Geology 101, 102, or 103.
                                                                                                                                                                9
                                                                                                                                                                  Social Science Electives .......................................... 6
Communications Elective .......................................... 3            3
                                                                                  Humanities Electives: Art; Classics; English; Foreign                         Senior
6
  Social Science Electives .......................................... 6         Language; Journalism 444, 456; Music; Theatre;                                  Speech 469, or Communications 400 ....................... 3
4
  Humanities Elective ................................................. 3       Philosophy; Religious Studies.                                                  Speech 499 ............................................................... 1
General Elective ........................................................ 3     4
                                                                                  Literature Electives: English 201, 202, 221, 222,
                                                                                                                                                                10
                                                                                                                                                                   Speech Electives .................................................... 9
_____________________________________________                                                                                                                   6
                                                                                                                                                                  Upper-level General Education Elective .................. 3
                                                                                231, 232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 334, 489;
                                Total: 124 hours                                Journalism 444, 456.
                                                                                                                                                                8
                                                                                                                                                                  Communications Electives ....................................... 6
______________________________________________                                                                                                                  9
                                                                                                                                                                  Social Science Elective ............................................ 3
                                                                                5
                                                                                  Social Science Eectives: Anthropology; Geography;
1
  Six hours of intermediate foreign language is                                 Economics; History; Political Science; Psychology;                              General Electives .................................................. 6-7
                                                                                                                                                                _____________________________________________
required.                                                                       Sociology; Child and Family Studies; African and
2
  Natural Science Electives are any two courses from:                           African-American Studies; Women’s Studies; Speech                                                              Total: 124 hours
                                                                                                                                                                _____________________________________________
Astronomy 161, 162; Biology 101, 102; Botany 110,                               Communication; Information Sciences; Journalism
120; Chemistry 100, 110 or 120, 130; Geography                                  460.
                                                                                                                                                                1
                                                                                                                                                                  Mathematics Electives: Mathematics 110, 119, 123,
131, 132, Geology 101, 102, or 103.                                                                                                                             125, 130, 141, 142, 151, or 152.
3
  Mathematics Electives: Math 110, 119, or 125
                                                                                                                                                                2
                                                                                                                                                                  Natural Science Electives are any two courses to be
4
  Humanities Electives: Art; Classics; English; Foreign                                                                                                         chosen from a list of approved courses available from
Language; Journalism 444, 456; Music; Theatre;                                                                                                                  the Department office, 293 Communications Building.
Philosophy; Religious Studies.
                                                                                                                                                                3
                                                                                                                                                                  Humanities Electives: to be chosen from a list of
5
  Political Science Electives: 315, 320, 321.                                                                                                                   approved courses available from the Department
6
  Social Science Electives: Anthropology; Geography;                                                                                                            office, 293 Communications Building.
Economics; History; Political Science; Psychology;
                                                                                                                                                                4
                                                                                                                                                                  CS 102 and CS 100 are 4 and 3 hour classes
Sociology; Child and Family Studies; African and                                                                                                                respectively. If CS 100 is taken, an additional hour of
African-American Studies; Women’s Studies; Speech                                                                                                               general electives must be taken.
Communication; Information Sciences.
                                                                                                                                                                5
                                                                                                                                                                  Six hours of intermediate foreign language is
7
  Literature Electives: English 201, 202, 221, 222,                                                                                                             required.
                                                                                                                                                                6
                                                                                                                                                                  Upper-level general education electives to be chosen
231, 232, 233, 251, 252, 253, 281, 334, 489;
                                                                                                                                                                from a list of approved courses available from the
Journalism 444, 456.
                                                                                                                                                                Department office, 293 Communications Building.
8
  Journalism Elective: 310, 412, 414, 433, 450, 451,                                                                                                            7
                                                                                                                                                                  Advanced composition course: English 295, 355,
490.                                                                                                                                                            360, 455; Journalism 200, 444 or 456.
                                                                                                                                                                8
                                                                                                                                                                  Communications Electives: courses from Advertising,
                                                                                                                                                                Broadcasting, Journalism, or Public Relations.
                                                                                                                                                                9
                                                                                                                                                                  Social Science Electives to be chosen from a list of
                                                                                                                                                                approved courses available from the Department
                                                                                                                                                                office, 293 Communications Building.
                                                                                                                                                                10
                                                                                                                                                                   Speech Electives: six hours must be in 400-level
                                                                                                                                                                courses. No more than three hours in 200-level
                                                                                                                                                                courses may be counted toward the major. The
                                                                                                                                                                following do not count toward the major: 445, 491,
                                                                                                                                                                492, 493.

								
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