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					The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                Page 1 of 21
Developed February 2004




               The Unusual Suspects Theatre
                                                      Company




                                            STRATEGIC PLAN
                                                      Prepared February 2004

                                          The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company
                                                10536 Culver Blvd. Suite B
                                                    Culver City, CA 90232
                                                     Phone: 310.558.3190
                                                      Fax: 310.558.3191
                                           email : unusualsuspects@sbcglobal.net
                                               www.theunusualsuspects.org
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan   Page 2 of 21
Developed February 2004
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                      Page 3 of 21
Developed February 2004


                                           Prepared February 2004
                                     The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company
                                             STRATEGIC PLAN

Process
This strategic plan was compiled as follows:
    A retreat was held in May 2003 with volunteer artists, which led to a document to be drawn up.

        A new full-time director was hired in January 2004 with 22 years experience in prison and youth
         programs. He reviewed the document and made notes.

        A second planning retreat was held in February 2004 with all artists to revise the initial document. The
         document was refined.

        The refined curriculum was presented to Susan Hill, an outside consultant and Director of Artsreach, the
         organization who invented incarcerated youth programs in California.



Mission Statement

The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization of
professional artists. We exist to bring theatre arts to youth, ages 12-21, from the foster
care and juvenile justice systems. Our programs cultivate pride, racial tolerance and
social consciousness.

Artistic Vision Statement:
                                                We intend to grow by programming in:
                                                   Juvenile Halls and Camps ( County System)
                                                       Youth Authority (State System)
                                                       Probation (County System)
                                                       Parole (State System)
                                                       Foster Care
                                                       Group Homes
                                                       Local gang intervention programs in our site’s
                                                        neighborhood
                                                       Alumni programs in the community
                                                       Hospitals (as part of alumni programs)
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                               Page 4 of 21
Developed February 2004




                                                        Our Team




Our Founder
Laura Leigh Hughes
An Actress for the past 18 years, acting in dozens of television and film
productions, Laura Leigh founded the Unusual Suspects in response to the
1992 civil unrest. She has served as Executive Director for the past 8 years,
before moving to the board to focus on her acting career. She graduated from
UCLA with a BA degree in Sociology.




                                                      Board President:
                                                      Shawn Amos- Board President
                                                      Shawn, a musician and producer, is currently Vice President of Shout!
                                                      Factory. He was formerly Associate Director of Rhino Entertainment.
                                                      He has a long history as a producer and has independently released
                                                      albums including In Between, Harlem, Be Real, and Whitey
                                                      McFearsun. He was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Album
                                                      Notes. Shawn was the past Executive Director of The Quincy Jones
                                                      Listen Up Foundation.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                     Page 5 of 21
Developed February 2004




Other Board Members:
Rona Elliot
Rona managed public relations for the legendary Woodstock Festival. She later created, hosted and produced
network programs including Live From the Hard Rock Café. On NBC’s Today Show, she created the position
of Music Correspondent. As an archivist, she interviewed everyone from the Dalai Lama to Dolly Parton for
foundations including the Shoah Visual History Foundation (interviewing Holocaust Survivors) and currently
for the Grammy Living History Foundation. She also teaches at UCLA in adult education.

David Henry Hwang
David is the Tony award winning playwright of M. Butterfly (Tony Award), Golden Child (Tony nomination,
Obie Award), FOB (Obie Award) among others. The Stanford graduate is also an accomplished screenwriter
(M. Butterfly, Possession) and librettist (The Voyage, 1000 Airplanes on the Roof, Disney's Aida, the revival of
Flower Drum Song). From 1994-2001, he served by appointment of President Clinton on the President's
Committee on the Arts & the Humanities.

Sarah Key
Sarah has her Bachelor’s from Duke University and her Master of Arts degree from the Annenberg School of
Communications. She is the author of six cookbooks. She is a trustee of the W.E.B. Foundation and a USC
Member of the Board of Governors of Newark Academy.

Edward Kummer
Edward is currently the Vice President of Creative Development and Production for Walt Disney Parks and
Resorts. Previously, he ran the Digital Production group of the Walt Disney Company, and oversaw the
computer animation production for such films as The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast, among others. He
was the Vice President of Digital Operations for Digital Domain, where he oversaw all technology and digital
production. During his tenure, Digital Domain won an Academy Award for special effects for the film Titanic.
As the President and CEO of GenSys Software, a web-based medical software company, he developed custom
tools for new drug discovery and blood supply testing.

Lisa Lindstrom
Lisa, a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, has her Master of Fine Arts in Directing from Carnegie-Mellon
University. She served as Senior Vice President of Development and Production for the Avnet/Kerner
Company where she was involved in the creation of numerous film and television projects, including Fried
Green Tomatoes, Red Corner starring Richard Gere and Bai Ling, Up Close and Personal starring Robert
Redford and Michelle Pfeiffer, and The War starring Kevin Costner. She produced the CBS mini-series, Mama
Flora's Family, and was instrumental in the creation of the new low-budget arm of the Jon Avnet Company,
which she ran with Jon Avnet and Marsha Oglesby. Her extensive theater background includes work in New
York at the Ensemble Studio Theatre, LaMama, the Circle Repertory Company and New Dramatists. In Los
Angeles, she was active as a director and dramaturg at the Los Angeles Theater Center. She recently relocated
to New York where she is working toward a Master’s degree in Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding at
the School for International Training.

Thomas Reed- Board Treasurer/Organization’s Accountant
Tom received his BFA from San Francisco Art Institute in Film Production and his Master’s degree from Long
Island University in Accounting & Finance. He spent twenty seven years as an accountant and business
manager with a primary concentration in the entertainment industry. Currently he is running his own firm,
Affiliated Financial Service Group, Inc.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                   Page 6 of 21
Developed February 2004




Roderick Spencer
Roderick is a writer/producer of film and television. Current projects include 'Tulia, Texas' for CBS, and the
independent feature 'The Dogwalker' recently released on DVD and video. Ironically, he does not own a dog. He
also wrote and produced the Emmy nominated educational documentary series 'You Got that Right' for
Mississippi Public Television. He is a co-founder and board member of Artists for a New South Africa (ANSA).

Advisory Council
Edward Asner- Actor, Former Union Leader, Activist
Carol Biondi- Youth Advocate and Activist
Leigh Curran- Director of the Virginia Avenue Project Performing Arts & Youth Programs
Dr. Barbara Firestone- Director of the HELP Group
Judge Terry Friedman- Retired Presiding Juvenile Court Justice for Los Angeles County
Paul Michael Glaser- Actor
Robert Greenwald- Producer
Terence Hallinan- Former San Francisco District Attorney
Tom Hayden- Former Senator, Author and Activist
Stacy Keach- Actor
Amanda Massucci- Accountant
Mwitu Ngudu- Former Legislative Aide to Speaker of the Assembly Herb Wesson
Connie Rice- Lawyer and Legal Activist
Luis J. Rodriguez- Author and Gang/Youth Activist
Cheryl Silver- Non-Profit Consultant
Susanna Styron- Screenwriter/Director
Steve Tisch- Film Producer
Julie Tugend- Chief Financial Officer of the California Endowment
Daphna Edwards Ziman- Chair, Children Uniting Nations

Staff
Executive Director
Zoot Velasco
Zoot spent 12 years as a dance/theater artist touring internationally and
teaching in schools, juvenile halls, prisons, malls and hospitals under 16
grants and numerous commissions. He created and produced programs
including the 1992 CAC- LA Riot Recovery Program in Watts with the
California Arts Council (CAC) and the 1994 Los Angeles Earthquake
Recovery Program. He received a CAC Multi-Cultural Community
Leadership Fellows award and a City of Pasadena Fellows award and many
commendations from the City of LA, Ventura and Oxnard for his community
work.

From 1994-2000, he managed a prison arts program. He created the first inmate music CDs produced in prison,
the first youth deterrent program in the form of a play and hand made books in museum collections at the Getty,
Hammer and Library of Congress. In 2000, he managed all cultural programs in the Harbor area and opened
four new art centers for the City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department. In 2002, he left the City to work
as a non-profit arts consultant raising more than a million dollars for a dozen organizations. He joined The
Unusual Suspects in January 2004.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                       Page 7 of 21
Developed February 2004


Sally Fairman
Executive Assistant
Sally has a BA in Psychology and an MA in Applied Linguistics from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
She was an ESL Teacher at Columbia University for ten years before becoming an Outreach Coordinator in
AIDS Policy for the Mayor of New York City. She was the Co-winner of the jury award in the short play
category at the HBO Aspen Comedy Arts Festival in 1997. After moving to Los Angeles she was a proposal
writer and manager. After four years of volunteering as a grant writer and workshop facilitator, Sally became
Program Coordinator for The Unusual Suspects. She has also produced plays independently.

Active Volunteers:
The artists are industry professionals- actors, dancers, fight choreographers, directors, writers, producers, set
designers, costume designers and lighting designers. All are prominent in their industry experience and work for
not much more than gas money in order to bring this program to the youth. Artists include the Executive
Producer/Writer of Sex and the City, Cindy Chupack; Actress Roma Maffia (Nip/Tuck, Double Jeopardy,
Profiler); 2001 Oscar nominees Colin Campbell, Director and Gail Lerner, Writer (Short Film/Seraglio; Gail is
also a Will & Grace writer); Producer Lisa Lindstrom (Fried Green Tomatoes, Up Close and Personal); actor
Tony Okungbowa (Ellen DeGeneres Show); and actor John Freeland, Jr. (Actors Studio and 20 years in Arts In
Corrections).

    1. Sarah Amos- Office Assistant. Volunteer since          23. Roma Maffia- Actor. Volunteer since 2000.
        2001.                                                 24. Summer Mahoney- Office Assistant. Volunteer
    2. Oscar Arguello- Bilingual Writer/Actor. Volunteer          since 2001.
        since 2002.                                           25. Eliraz Malka- Set Designer. Volunteer since 2000.
    3. Guillermo Aviles- Bilingual Actor. Volunteer since     26. Garry Margolis- Network/IT. Volunteer since
        2002.                                                     1998.
    4. Russell Bell- Actor/Teacher. Volunteer since 2001.     27. Denise Martinez- Costume Designer. Volunteer
    5. Michael Bortman- Writer. Volunteer since 1993.             since 1994.
    6. Colin Campbell- Director. Volunteer since 1998.        28. Jason Mayland- Writer/Actor. Volunteer since
    7. Sarah Chang- Actor. Volunteer since 2002.                  1998.
    8. Lydia Chung- Graphic Designer. Volunteer since         29. Noel McCarthy- Set Designer. Volunteer since
        2000.                                                     1999.
    9. Cindy Chupack- Writer. Volunteer since 2002.           30. Vivianne Nacif- Bilingual Actor. Volunteer since
    10. Matt Downs- Sound Designer. Volunteer since               2002.
        1999.                                                 31. Tony Okungbowa- Actor. Volunteer since 1999.
    11. Jen Derwingson- Director. Volunteer since 2000.       32. Calvi Pabon- Actor. Volunteer since 2002.
    12. Lisa Ehrenberg- Actor. Volunteer since 1997.          33. Steve Pacini- Writer/Actor/Producer. Volunteer
    13. Marissa Engel- Actor. Volunteer since 2002.               since 2002.
    14. Laura Ford- Actor. Volunteer since 1999.              34. Anna Pheil- Actor/Dancer. Volunteer since 2001.
    15. Bo Foxworth- Fight choreographer/Actor.               35. Sheilagh Polk- Actor. Volunteer since 2001.
        Volunteer since 2001.                                 36. Marc Precilla- Web Designer. Volunteer since
    16. John Freeland, Jr.- Actor/Director. Volunteer since       2001.
        1993.                                                 37. Manuel Ramos- Bilingual Drug & Alcohol
    17. Marc Gomes- Actor. Volunteer since 2000.                  Counselor. Volunteer since 2002.
    18. Rebecca Hoyt- Intern. Volunteer since 2002.           38. Gisele Sanchez-Rochet- Bilingual Producer.
    19. Gail Lerner- Writer. Volunteer since 1998.                Volunteer since 1995.
    20. Marlene Lindner- Actor. Volunteer since 1993.         39. Kaile Shilling- Director. Volunteer since 2001.
    21. Elizabeth Logun- Writer. Volunteer since 2002.        40. Michelle Silver- Actor. Volunteer since 1999.
    22. Ada Luz Pla- Bilingual Actress/Writer. Volunteer      41. Michael Spillers- Actor. Volunteer since 2001.
        since 2002.                                           42. Merrick Velasco- Web Designer. New Volunteer.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                  Page 8 of 21
Developed February 2004


The Unusual Suspects History:
In 1993, Board Member Laura Leigh Hughes, the Founder and former Executive Director of the program, began
The Unusual Suspects in response to the need for community reunification after the civil unrest in Los Angeles.
She set out to empower youth by giving them an effective tool for communication--the theatre. Hoping to break
down barriers between rival gangs, she gathered together a volunteer team of her peers – professional actors,
writers and directors – who worked with groups of at-risk teens, helping them create original plays.


With the help of the Department of Children and Family Services, she launched the program in foster care
placement facilities. After six successful years, she added workshops for 14 to 18-year-old high-risk, male
offenders in Central Juvenile Hall and later for teens involved in gang intervention programs in low-income
communities. Approximately 100 kids go through the Unusual Suspects program each year.


With the hire of a full-time Executive Director in 2004, we will expand to new programs throughout the foster
care and juvenile justice systems.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                      Page 9 of 21
Developed February 2004


Our Programs:
Our core program is a 12-week intensive workshop meeting twice each week for 2-3 hours each session. We
have 10 volunteers for each program who work with the participants. We try to have a ratio of one volunteer for
2-3 participants. The volunteers are industry professionals- actors, dancers, fight choreographers, directors,
writers, producers, set designers, costumer designers and lighting designers. There is a program coordinator, a
director, a workshop leader and “participant liaisons” whose job it is to be especially attuned to the participants
who have trouble focusing, are not participating, or are disruptive. (We make sure to give individual attention
to each participant which helps pull all of them into the process.) In the course of the program, the youth learn
theatre and writing techniques; then they write, produce and perform a play of their own work for parents,
friends, peers, staff and USTC supporters.

In addition to nurturing their communication skills and creativity, the program builds individual self-respect. For
some, this confidence motivates them to overcome difficult, and even tragic backgrounds and set previously
unimaginable goals, such as going to college. For others this confidence may give them something to sustain
their spirit when facing a life in prison. The kids that come through The Unusual Suspects program experience
the success of creating a thing to call their own. This program offers these kids that experience as a step toward
creating a positive future for themselves. The process provides them an opportunity to work with peers of
different races and gang affiliations bridging their differences. The product raises social consciousness,
teaching them they are woven in a social fabric and each one is part of a larger whole.

US Advisory Council member Edward Asner commented in a recent article published in the Daily News,
"These kids develop hilarious, stirring, heartbreaking plays about growing up in the ghetto, the tug-of-war
between good and evil, the pain of poverty and the alluring glitter of the street economy. As adversaries work
together toward a common goal, animosity dissolves into trust, collaboration and lasting friendship.”

Why? (The Need)
In addition to nurturing their communication skills and creativity, the program builds individual self-respect. For
some, this confidence motivates them to overcome difficult backgrounds and set previously unimaginable goals,
such as going to college. For others this confidence may give them something to sustain their spirit when facing
a life in prison. The kids that come through The Unusual Suspects program experience the success of creating a
thing to call their own. This program offers these kids that experience as a step toward creating a positive future
for themselves. The process provides them an opportunity to work with peers of different races and gang
affiliations bridging their differences. The product raises social consciousness, teaching them they are woven in
a social fabric and each one is part of a larger whole.

Currently there is no other program of this kind working in juvenile corrections, either on the County level or
State level. The only regular sanctioned program to provide arts to incarcerated youth was an intermittent
statewide program that closed down several years ago. Our programs are designed to fill the need in providing a
quality theatre program to institutionalized youth.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                  Page 10 of 21
Developed February 2004


Targeted Conditions:
Our client base is made up of youth with the following risk factors (Negative influences on youth that cause
them to be at risk of dangerous or destructive behaviors):
    A destructive or non-existent home life.
    Past victims of abuse.
    Poverty.
    Gang affiliation.
    Drug abuse.
    Underperforming schools or school drop outs.
    Racial/territorial tensions from the environment.
    Peer pressure and family pressures to participate in illegal or irresponsible activities.
    Low self esteem and no positive identity.
    No sense of belonging outside of negative groups such as gangs.
    No sense of achievement in positive areas.

The following are the conditions our program is designed to address. These are the protective factors
(Conditions that buffer youth from exposure to risk factors by reducing the risk or changing the way youth
respond to it.)
     A sense of belonging to a positive group made up of youth and adults of other races and backgrounds.
       This replaces a need for a gang and eases racial conflicts.
     A place where that experience can carry on into the community after the youth leave the juvenile
       institutions. This helps replace a non-existent home life or the temptation to return to gang life.
     A positive experience on stage that provides a “natural high.”
     A program that addresses the state standards for performing arts and can help them with attaining their
       GED and going on to college in the arts.
     An environment that teaches cultural awareness and opens participant’s perspectives on race and gangs.
     Positive peer pressure to participate in responsible and rewarding activities that provide a future and
       drive to succeed in participants.
     New self-esteem and positive identity as an artist and creative individual and member of an ensemble
       cast.
     A sense of achievement in positive areas of a participant’s life.

Outcomes (Intermediate Effects on The Participants):
   Reduced levels of violence while incarcerated thereby making incarceration easier for both staff and
     wards.
   Changes in participants attitudes towards peers of other races and gang affiliations.
   Changes in attitude towards staff and authority figures.
   Sense of pride and self-esteem as creative individuals.
   Social Consciousness- understanding through ensemble theatre that each of us is part of a larger whole.
   Empowerment and goal setting.

Impacts (Long Term Effects The Program Is Designed to Achieve)
    Participants renounce violence as a way of life.
    Participants remain open to new ideas, learning and people of different races and backgrounds.
    Maturity in response to authority, rules and the law.
    Growing confidence in one’s own abilities.
    Growing social consciousness with a need to give back to the community.
    Achievement of personal goals such as attaining a GED, college, a trade, continuing in the arts, etc.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                   Page 11 of 21
Developed February 2004




Theory of Change
Through The Unusual Suspects (TUS) theatre program of 12 weeks,
youth spend time in an ensemble cast working on a production with
peers of different races and gang affiliations, and with adults in a
supportive role. Through this experience a world is opened to them
of creativity; new thoughts about adults and their peers; and pride of
accomplishment. Through remaining involved outside of the
institution while on probation or parole, participants can reconnect
with the program and continue a journey of transformation into
artists, thinkers, and instruments of change. They can then set
goals, achieve them and become mentors for the next generation.




The Arts In Corrections Model: A Case For Arts Programming Behind Bars
Arts In Corrections started as a pilot program at California State Prisons in 1980. In
1983, a cost/benefit analysis was done by Dr. Lawrence Brewster, Sociology Professor
at California State University at San Jose. He found that the prison arts program
reduced incidents of violence within the prison by 75-81% and saved close to double
the cost of the program in measurable benefits such as security and medical costs. By
1987, it was proven that the program lowered recidivism rates by 51% at a cost of
$19/per class hour for each student1. There is now an Arts In Corrections program in
every prison in the state funded by legislative line item in the California Department of
Corrections Budget. (No such program exists in youth corrections.)
                   -Research documented in the book “Arts In Other Spaces” by William Cleveland (1992)




1
  Our cost in 2004 is approximately $17/per class hour for each student given that a program for 20 students
with 24 3-hour sessions is $24,000. With 5% annual inflation, the Arts In Corrections program listed above
from 1987 would cost more than $40/per hour for each student today.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                               Page 12 of 21
Developed February 2004


What we have:
     An 11-year track record of programming.
     Brand recognition of "Unusual Suspects" and a great reputation.
     A solid, prestigious and enthusiastic board and advisory board.
     Solid record of grant and foundation development for an organization of our size.
     Office space and a community base in Culver City from which to work.
     Committed volunteers who drive our programming.
     A devoted and growing audience for our programs.

What we need:
     To grow our budget to a point where we can pay key staff and grow our programs.
     Better marketing of our programs to audience, donors and partners.
     More partnerships to expand our programs and funding base.
     To attract attention from more foundation funders.
     A board with greater access, experience, and special services such as law and printing.
     A permanent venue for our community programs to cement us as a permanent fixture in Los Angeles'
      cultural landscape and give donors and audience a focal point to view our work.
     Full-time administrative staff to produce our programs and events with consistency and thoroughness.
     Payment and training for artists who work in our programs.
     A standardized curriculum and independent scholarly study of our curriculum.



Business Concept
What makes us unique?
We are the only group that is operating youth-driven original theatre programs in the juvenile
justice systems and in foster care in the state of California.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                  Page 13 of 21
Developed February 2004


Current Organization:
        Last Program Year (FY 2002-03)- 2 Programs operating at one time with two 12-week sessions in
         each (juvenile hall and gang intervention/Artshare/Probation)

        100 clients served annually

        A $150,000 budget

        Staff- Executive Director, Administrator, several volunteer consultants, and 20-30 artist
         volunteers

Timeline: Goals & Objectives
Goal:
  1. To take the steps to expand to a viable mid-sized organization with a growing slate of programs
      serving Los Angeles County’s juvenile justice and foster care populations.
  2. Developing a national model.

We will do this through the following objectives:

One Year Objectives (by June 2005):
        Program- 3 Programs operating at one time:
             Camp Gonzalez/ Juvenile Hall with six 6-week sessions (120 youth served)

              Gang Intervention in the Community with Culver City Schools with two 12-week sessions
               (60 youth served)

              Fostercare Program with two 12-week sessions (60 youth served)

        240 clients served annually

        A $200,000- $250,000 budget

        Staff-
                 Executive Director
                 Executive Assistant
                 3 Part-time Program Coordinators
                 3 Lead Artists
                 Several volunteer consultants
                 40 artist volunteers

        Commission a three-year study on the program and formalizing of the curriculum by a research
         social scientist, professor, or PhD Candidate.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                          Page 14 of 21
Developed February 2004


Two-Year Objectives
        Program- 4 Programs operating at one time:
             Camp Gonzalez/ Juvenile Hall with six 6-week sessions (120 youth served)

              Fostercare Program with two 12-week sessions (60 youth served)

              CYA Intensive Workshops with four 6-class sessions over a weekend (80 youth served)

              Community Gang Intervention program with three 12-week after-school sessions and
               productions (100 youth served)

        360 clients served annually

        A $450,000- $500,000 budget

        Staff-
                 Executive Director
                 Executive Assistant
                  New Hire Development & Marketing Director
                 3 Part-time Program Coordinators
                 3 Lead Artists
                 Several volunteer consultants (Web, Network, IT, etc.)
                 60 artist volunteers

        Curriculum is finalized. First year study results are in.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                 Page 15 of 21
Developed February 2004


                                                      Three-Year Objectives

        Program- 4 Programs operating at one time:
             Camp Gonzalez/ Juvenile Hall with six 6-week sessions (120 youth served)

              Foster care Program with two 12-week sessions (60 youth served)

              CYA Intensive Workshops with four 6-class sessions over a weekend (80 youth served)

              On-site Gang Intervention program with continuous after-school sessions and productions
               - 36 weeks each year with special productions at LA Area hospitals, hospice care and
               fostercare facilities (400 youth served)

        640 clients served annually

        A $800,000 budget\

        Staff-
                 Executive Director
                 Executive Assistant
                 Development & Marketing Director
                 New Hire Stage Manager/Facility Director for theatre
                  New Hire Part-time Program Manager for the on-site program
                 3 Part time Program Coordinators
                 4 Lead Artists
                 Several consultants (Web, Network, IT, etc.)
                 100 artist volunteers

        Use Curriculum and research study to set up plans for new city site of programs in 2007.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                           Page 16 of 21
Developed February 2004


Financial Plan
 INCOME                                                Year 2003    Year 2004    Year 2005       Year 2006
 Contributed:        Carryover                           $11,600      $25,100      $70,400          $3,100
                     Grants                               $8,000      $10,000      $30,000        $100,000
                     Individual Contributions            $11,500     $100,000      $52,600         $60,000
                     Corporate Contributions             $18,300      $24,000      $30,000         $60,000
                     Foundations                         $40,000      $20,000      $60,000         $80,000
                     Memberships                              $0           $0       $5,000         $12,000
                     Program ads                              $0           $0       $5,000         $35,000
                     Fall fundraiser                          $0      $20,000      $40,000         $60,000
                     Spring Fundraiser                        $0           $0      $15,000         $25,000
                     Other fundraisers                    $5,000       $5,000      $30,000         $30,000
                     In kind Donations                                 $5,000      $20,000         $20,000
                     Subtotal                             $94,400    $209,100     $358,000        $485,100

 Earned              Ticket sales                              $0           $0           $0         $30,000
                     Concessions                               $0           $0           $0          $5,000
                     Contracts                            $49,000      $36,000     $100,000        $150,000
                     Tuition/workshops                         $0           $0      $25,000         $40,000
                     Product sales                             $0           $0       $5,000          $5,000
                     Investment income                         $0           $0       $5,000          $8,000
                     Subtotal                             $49,000      $36,000     $135,000        $238,000
 TOTAL                                                   $143,400     $245,100     $493,000        $723,100
 INCOME

 EXPENSES                                             Year 2003     Year 2004    Year 2005    Year 2006
 Personnel           Director                             $51,000      $55,000      $65,000         $85,000
                     Assistant                            $23,900      $30,000      $40,000         $45,000
                     Dev & Mrktng Dir                                       $0      $50,000         $60,000
                     Program Coordinator                   $2,400           $0      $38,300         $38,300
                     Program Director                                       $0           $0         $36,000
                     Facility Manager                                       $0           $0         $36,000
                     Lead Artists                                      $12,000      $36,000         $48,000
                     Artists                               $4,200       $7,200     $129,600        $100,000
                     Administrative                       $12,300      $24,000      $30,000         $50,000
                     Benefits                              $1,500       $6,000      $12,000         $12,000
                     Technical                              $500            $0      $20,000         $20,000
                     Subtotal                             $95,800     $134,200     $420,900        $530,300

 Operating           Facility Rental                       $3,700       $4,200       $5,000         $15,000
                     Utilities/Phone                       $5,300       $6,000       $8,000         $10,000
                     Supplies/Materials                     $100        $2,800       $5,000         $10,000
                     Marketing                                 $0      $10,000      $20,000         $50,000
                     Production                           $13,300       $2,000       $2,000         $30,000
                     Travel                                 $100        $1,500       $2,000          $5,000
                     Fundraising                                       $10,000      $20,000         $50,000
                     Insurance                                          $2,500       $5,000         $10,000
                     Misc Fees                                          $1,500       $2,000          $5,000
                     Subtotal                             $22,500      $40,500      $69,000        $185,000
 TOTAL                                                   $118,300     $174,700     $489,900        $715,300
 EXPENSES
 SURPLUS/ DEFICIT                                         $25,100      $70,400       $3,100          $7,900
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                   Page 17 of 21
Developed February 2004


Financial Plan- Description Detail
INCOME
Carryover- Surplus or Deficit carried over to the next year’s budget.

Grants- Money given by government and foundation programs specifically for projects. Down in 2004
due to budget cuts; rise in 2005-06 due to restoration of programs and new grants from arts fees, 1%
money and Prop 49 funds. Also grants written in 2004 will not be funded until 2005.

Individual Contributions- Up in 2004 due to venture capital plea in planning process. Return to more
normal levels in 2005-06 given history plus new fundraising efforts and marketing.

Corporate Contributions- Rise steadily with community partnerships, partner programs such as with
SONY in Culver City, a full-time development director and Chamber of Commerce networking.

Foundations- Money given for operating expenses (not project grants). Lower in 2004 because
foundation requests from 2004 will not be received until 2005. Then a large increase is anticipated with a
full-time development director on staff.

Memberships- Auxiliary membership program for newsletter, event info and invites to functions for
$50/year.

Program ads- New program ads sold for performance programs/newsletters. Will increase dramatically
with development and marketing position.

Fall fundraiser- Board generated fundraiser will grow as the board learns what works best. Could be
even larger with celebrity auction items, etc.

Spring Fundraiser- After the board has mastered the fall fundraiser, a spring fundraiser will be added in
2005 for a smaller scale event.

Other fundraisers- Staff generated fundraisers grow with strategic partnerships in the community.

In-kind donations- Grow with networking and community partnerships. It could be a much larger part of
our budget, but we didn’t want to count on a larger share.

Ticket sales- With the acquisition of a new site for programs in the community, we will be able to host
regular events for ticket income and concessions.

Concessions- See above.

Contracts- Our 2003 contract was with ArtShare, who is no longer our partner. We have a promise
(depending on County budget) of $36,000 for our Camp program in 2004. As we expand to Fostercare
and community programs we will receive other money by contract which we can then match to grant
money.

Tuition/workshops- Corporations and individuals will sponsor a youth’s “tuition” for our program. This
will not be coming from the youth. It will be a way to market and develop our community program.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                    Page 18 of 21
Developed February 2004


Financial Plan- Description Detail (continued)
Product sales- We will sell hats, t-shirts, etc. out of our community programs space after shows.

Investment income- The money carried over from the previous year will be drawing interest until it’s
used. That interest is income.

EXPENSES
Director- Director’s salary raises incrementally adjusted for inflation and based on overall budget.

Executive Assistant- Raises incrementally to the standard for that position in 2006.

Development & Marketing Dir- New position in 2005 based on average salary.

Program Coordinator- Based on $25/hr x 170 hrs (each session) x 3 sessions x 3 staff (for 3 programs)

Program Director- New position in 2006 with a new site based on $25/hr x 30 hr/wk x 48 wks. (A ¾
time position.

Facility Manager- New position in 2006 with a new site based on $25/hr x 30 hr/wk x 48 wks. (A ¾ time
position.

Lead Artists- Based on $25/hr x 120 hrs x 4 staff for one program in 2004. 12 staff for 3 programs will
be hired in 2005. 16 staff for 4 programs will work in 2006.

Artists- $10/hour for 120 hours by 6 artists (plus 4 lead artists makes 10 total artists) for the Camp
Gonzalez program in 2004. $15/hr x 120 hrs x 3 programs x 24 staff in 2005. The same figures apply in
2006 but with 4 programs.

Administrative- Office supplies and other administrative expenses will rise as our workload increases.

Benefits- Based on $250/month per full-time employee increased to $300/month by 2006 for the rising
cost of health care and adjusted for the number of employees.

Technical- We will buy no new computer equipment this year (some are being donated to us) and our IT
needs are being met through volunteers. As our programs increase we will need to update software and
hardware and start paying for some IT services.

Facility Rental- Our current office rent will increase as we start renting community space or take
possession of our own site. Although I hope to get a site through a community partnership we will still
incur some expense.

Utilities/Phone- Slight increase as our workload increases.

Supplies/Materials- Will increase with programs and workload.

Marketing- A key element of growth. You get what you pay for. “It takes money to make money.”
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                      Page 19 of 21
Developed February 2004




Financial Plan- Description Detail (continued)
Production- Large in 2003 because of a transportation cost for the Artshare program we will not incur
again. The costs of materials are small until 2006 when we hwve our own theatre space.

Travel- Costs increase as we set up plans for new sites in other cities and as we increase fundraising
efforts.

Fundraising- See Marketing above

Insurance- Increases due to amount of programs, space, inflation, etc.

Misc. Fees- A catch-all for miscellaneous items which rises as the workload rises.

Budget Summary
There is no ability to fundraise or program before July 2004 when the fiscal year ends because most partners and
donors have already planned their year through July and committed to programs and funds. Therefore, we need
an infusion of money into the organization by board, friends, and known donors to act as venture capital to
carry out this plan. We have 4 months worth of working capital and can not expect to see money until January-
June, 2005 (12-18 months), when grants and donor support from next fiscal year’s projects come in, usually at
the end of the project. A month’s expenses (with no programs running) costs about $10,000 and a month with
programs costs about $15,000. Therefore we need to raise $120,000-$250,000 to act as venture capital until the
end of next fiscal year when our programs and fundraising will start to pay dividends.

Documentation & Evaluation
        This plan will be evaluated and updated annually.
        A report with regular budget updates will be added quarterly. An archive of group activities in print,
         video, photo, digital media and press clippings will be kept by the executive assistant and added to the
         reports by the Board President or Director.
        A one-day retreat will be held sometime between December 2004 and February 2005 to reevaluate the
         plan by a group consisting of board members, members, volunteers, artists, staff, parents, alumni and
         financial contributors. Detailed changes will be made at that time and approved at the following meeting
         of the Board of Directors.
        An annual report will be presented to the membership in March of each year starting in 2005 made up of
         information from the quarterly reports and updated strategic planning.

The First Step
Community Partnership and Development by developing ties with local government deputies, foundations, non-
profit/corporate/government partners, Chambers of Commerce, and service clubs such as Rotary, Lions, Etc:
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan                                                      Page 20 of 21
Developed February 2004


Reach Funding Formulas:
20%- 30%        Earned income- Contracts, ticket sales, etc.

20%- 40%        Grants- With a track record, government and foundation grants are built upon board development
                and relationship-building with elected officials and corporate managers from local business.

20%- 40%        Corporate, individual and local government donations- This is the best way to develop funds
                       beyond grants but depends on local relationship building.
20%- 30%        Fundraisers- These are a great way to raise funds but only work with a group planning and
                execution with block sales and community marketing.

10%- 20%        In-kind Services- Volunteers, goods and services are often not recorded in non-profits but can
                sometimes account for large portions of income which will help an organization move to a higher
                level of attention and grant eligibility. In-kind is also developed through community partnerships

Funding Tips:
Local community partnerships are crucial to all these areas for raising funds. If our partnering is good, we may
find that these categories all run together. (i.e.- We may have a corporate giant in our neighborhood who sits on
our board, gets us a big grant, buys tickets to our productions/fundraisers, and donates money on the side.)

WORK WITHIN OUR BASE AND MOVE OUT. DON’T TRY TO INVENT A BASE WE DON’T
HAVE.

Who cares about us most? That is our base. We must continue to mobilize them into volunteering, board
development, grants, in-kind services, fundraisers, corporate donors and marketing ticket sales.

If we have 50 people who care about us and we can mobilize half, 25 people can each reach 3 people for one of
these areas, and we can get 75 new partners as donors, patrons and volunteers. A long term concerted effort can
grow that by double each year.

Also if someone in our group is employed by one of these groups they may be able to help secure more funding
through their job:
EMPLOYEES OF:                           11. Disney                            21. SBC Foundation
    1. All Unions                       12. FedEx                             22. Target Corporation
    2. Altria (Phillip Morris)          13. Forest Lawn                       23. Times Mirror
    3. American Express                 14. GE Fund                           24. Toyota
    4. AT&T Foundation                  15. Honda of America                  25. US Bancorp
    5. Avon                             16. IBM Corporation                   26. Verizon Foundation
    6. Bank of America                  17. JC Penney                         27. Viacom
    7. Bank of the West                 18. MetLife Foundation                28. Warner Brothers
    8. Boeing Employees                 19. Nissan                            29. Washington Mutual
    9. China Shipping                   20. Office Depot                      30. Wells Fargo
    10. Coca-Cola
All these groups (and more including most major incorporations) have community giving programs requiring
employee recommendations. Or you may check with your employer about community giving programs.

Someone in the organization besides the director must be entrepreneurial about seeking out and creating these
community ties.
The Unusual Suspects Theatre Company Strategic Plan   Page 21 of 21
Developed February 2004

				
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