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									                                       TOWN OF BANFF
                                      ORDER OF BUSINESS
                              Public Hearing and Regular Council Meeting
                                    Town of Banff Council Chambers
                                 Monday, December 11, 2006 at 2 p.m.

                           PUBLIC HEARING – Business License Bylaw 22-9

1.0    CALL TO ORDER
2.0    OVERVIEW BY ADMINISTRATION
3.0    PUBLIC SUBMISSIONS
4.0    COUNCIL QUESTION PERIOD
5.0    ADJOURNMENT

                                        REGULAR MEETING
1.0    CALL TO ORDER

2.0    APPROVAL OF AGENDA
       2.1  December 11, 2006 Regular Meeting
       2.2  For Information: Long Term Agenda

3.0    DELEGATIONS
       3.1  Earth Tech Canada – 100 Year Recognition
       3.2  Alberta Dairy Council – Milk Container Recycling Program
       3.3  Advertising on Town of Banff Website – Jim Swanson

4.0    ADOPTION OF PREVIOUS COUNCIL MINUTES
       4.1  Minutes of the November 27, 2006 Regular Meeting of Council
       4.2  Minutes of the November 28, 2006 Special Meeting of Council
       4.3  Minutes of the December 4, 2006 Special Meeting of Council

5.0    UNFINISHED BUSINESS

6.0    COMMITTEE REPORTS

7.0    INQUIRIES

8.0    STAFF REPORTS/BYLAWS
       8.1   Request for Decision: 2007 Operating and Capital Budgets
       8.2   Second Reading: Business License Bylaw 22-9
       8.3   First Reading: Land Use Bylaw Amendment Bylaw 259 – Commercial Allotment Annual Submission
             Date
       8.4   Briefing: Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative
       8.5   Briefing: Building Permits November 2006

9.0    CORRESPONDENCE
       9.1  Minutes of the September 28 and October 26 Regular Meetings of Bow Valley Regional Housing

10.0   NEW BUSINESS
       10.1 Councillor Olver Verbal Items:
            10.1.1 Blog
            10.1.2 Communications
            10.1.3 FCM Report to Council

11.0   INQUIRIES

12.0   ADJOURNMENT
                                                                              Agenda prepared by: Cheryl Hyde
REQUEST FOR DECISION
Subject: Business License Bylaw 22-9


Presented to: Council                              Date: December 11, 2006

Submitted by: Tom Maier, Manager of                Agenda #: Public Hearing
             Corporate Services                                 2.0

RECOMMENDATION
That this report be considered in conjunction with the public hearing for Business Licensing Bylaw
22-9.

BACKGROUND
Reason for Report
To update the business licensing bylaw for improved administration, enforcement and to simplify
the fee and discount structure for non-“Schedule B” fees.

Summary of Issue
Through years of administering and enforcing the business licensing bylaw, Town administration has
identified numerous areas in the bylaw that require improvements to reflect changing business
conditions, administration and enforcement procedures. Town administration has untaken a
complete rewrite of the bylaw, which includes the recent changes to “Schedule B” fees approved by
Council in Business License Amending Bylaw 255. A complete listing of the bylaw amendments
would be lengthy, so we have highlighted some of the significant changes to the bylaw below.

“Schedule A” Fees
“Schedule A” fees have been relocated to the main body of the bylaw. A $100 flat rate fee for all
business licences has been added to section 18 of the bylaw. All other “Schedule A” fees have been
moved to the body of the bylaw or have been eliminated.

Definitions
The definition section of the business licensing bylaw has been updated and streamlined with the
removal of definition for business categories and the addition of definition for the five business
sectors referred in “Schedule B” (retail; service; transportation, entertainment and attraction;
lodging; and restaurant/bar). The bylaw definitions have been removed from the main body of the
bylaw and have been relocated to a new “Schedule A”.

Non-Resident Fee
The ‘non-resident fee’ of $200 per business has been reduced to $100. The reduction in the non-
resident fee was made to lessen the barrier for non-resident businesses operating in Banff. With the
booming Alberta economy and the difficulty of attracting contracting firms to work in Banff, the
non-resident fee was viewed as a potential deterrent for many contractors to work in
Banff. With the majority of the non-residents businesses being contractors the license fee in many
cases is passed directly on to Banff businesses and residents. In 2006 there were 282 non-resident
businesses licensed in Banff, which generated revenue of $56,200.
                                                                                                 2 of 3
Local Clientele Discount
Another significant change to the bylaw is the elimination of the ‘local clientele discount’. This
discount was eligible for retail businesses with greater than 80% of sales from the local market. The
reason for the elimination of this discount is that it was only eligible for the retail business sector
and there was no way to confirm whether a business truly qualified for the discount. The discount
entitled the retail business to a 50% discount of their business license fee. There are currently ten
(10) local businesses that meet the discount criteria with total annual discounts amounting to $4,900.
If continued, this amount would increase to approximately $6,000 in 2007 due to the increases in
“Schedule B” fees.

Gross Revenue Discount
The other significant change to the bylaw is to the ‘gross revenue discount’ that is available for
businesses that generate annual gross revenue of less than $12,000 from Banff sales. If a resident
business made less than $12,000 annual gross revenue from Banff sales their total business license
fee would be reduced to $25 and a non-resident business would have their total license fee reduced
to $225 ($25 plus $200 non-resident fee). In 2006, 123 businesses qualified for the gross revenue
discount (half of these being non-residents businesses) for annual discounts totalling $45,000. It is
recommended that the gross revenue discount continue, but the licensing fee for eligible businesses
be reduced to a flat fee of $100. Eligible non-resident businesses would pay a flat fee of $100 plus
the $100 non-resident fee.

In addition, it is recommended that the eligibility threshold be increased from an annual amount
$12,000 to an amount of $30,000. The rational for the increase in the threshold amount is that it is
for the annual gross revenue for the businesses entire sales activity and not just Banff sales. The
$30,000 threshold amount ties in with the GST requirement that all businesses making annual sales
of greater than $30,000 be registered for GST purposes. The increase in the threshold amount
would provide fee savings for small local businesses and makes for easier administration of the
discount as only non-registered GST businesses would be eligible. While the amount of the
threshold will increase it is expected fewer non-resident businesses and some resident businesses will
be eligible for the discount as the eligibility requirement will be based on total company sales.

Due to the significant changes to this discount the financial impact is currently unknown. The new
gross revenue discount will provide for an annual business license fee discount (discount will impact
“Schedule B” fees) for some previously ineligible businesses while other businesses that were
previously eligible will be now be paying their full business licensing fee.

Response Options
   1) To pass Bylaw 22-9 as presented.
   2) To pass an amended Bylaw 22-9.
   3) To not proceed with the passing of Bylaw 22-9.

IMPLICATIONS OF RECOMMENDATION

Financial
The financial impact on the Town will be minor, but there will be some financial impact for some
businesses with the elimination of the local clientele discount and changes to the gross revenue
discount. In 2006, the Town generated business licensing fee revenue of approximately $197,000,
which was used for municipal purposes. This revenue was made up in part from the “Schedule A”
fee of $100, the non-resident fee of $200, and the non-resident “Schedule B” fees, less discounts.

Council: Business License Bylaw 22-9                                      Public Hearing Agenda #2.0
                                                                                                  3 of 3

The bylaw as presented would produce revenue of approximately $106,000 per year for municipal
purposes. While the revenue reduction is $91,000 per year, the Town will save $100,000 in annual
operating expenses due to the reduction of the municipal funding to Banff Special Events
Corporation and Banff Heritage Tourism Corporation. Banff Lake Louise Tourism will be taking
over the annual funding of these organizations starting in 2007. In 2008, the amount of the
operating savings will be $160,000 due to the entire elimination of all funding for these corporations.
This will provide additional funding to be used for other municipal services.

Organizational
A significant number of improvements to the business licencing bylaw will streamline the
administration of the business licensing process. The revenue generated from business licensing will
be used for on-going administration and enforcement of business licensing and for the purpose of
marketing the Town as a tourist destination.

Legislation/Policy
Sections 7 and 8 of the Municipal Government Act of Alberta gives Council the authority to pass a
Business Licensing Bylaw.

Other
An option not yet discussed is the increase to the $100 flat rate business licensing fee. Additional
revenue generated could be used to fund expanded municipal services in the areas of visitor
experience and website. Additional revenues could be raised through business licensing to fund
these emerging municipal service areas, which provide a direct benefit back to our business
community.

Another option for Council would be phasing-in the changes to the gross revenue discount, local
clientele discount. This could be completed over a two-year period to allow the businesses to budget
accordingly.

CONCLUSION
The attached business license bylaw reflects changes to improve the overall administration,
enforcement and quality of the business licensing bylaw. Changes to some business license fees and
discounts will impact some businesses, but the changes will provide a more even fee structure for all
businesses. Administration will complete a review of the new business licensing bylaw at the end of
2007 to determine the effectiveness of the bylaw changes and whether administrative efficiencies
have been achieved.

ATTACHMENTS
  • Bylaw 22-9



Submitted By:
                      Tom Maier, Manager of Corporate Services


Reviewed By:
                              Robert Earl, Town Manager

Council: Business License Bylaw 22-9                                      Public Hearing Agenda #2.0
                                      BYLAW NO. 22-9
                BEING A BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF BANFF, IN THE
              PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, TO PROVIDE FOR LICENSING
            OF BUSINESSES OPERATING WITHIN THE TOWN OF BANFF

WHEREAS the Council of the Town of Banff deems it necessary to provide for the regulation and
Licensing of all Business carried on within the municipality,

AND WHEREAS Banff is, first and foremost, a town within a National Park and World Heritage
Site whose purposes and objectives are set out in the Banff National Park Management Plan and
Banff Incorporation Agreement;

AND WHEREAS the Council of the Town of Banff has dedicated a certain proportion of Business
License fees levied against Businesses resident in the Town for the purpose of marketing the Town
as a tourist destination area;

AND WHEREAS Sections 7 and 8 of the Municipal Government Act, RSA 2000, Chapter M-26
authorizes a council to gives the Council authority to pass such a Bylaw;

NOW THEREFORE, the Council of the Town of Banff, in the Province of Alberta, duly
assembled, enacts as follows:

CITATION
1. This Bylaw may be cited as the “Business License Bylaw.”

DEFINITIONS
2. In this bylaw:
   a) Any reference to a named act is a reference to an Act of the Legislature of Alberta, as
       amended from time to time;

   b) Any reference to a Town of Banff staff position, department or committee, the reference is
      deemed to be to the current name that the staff position, department or committee is known
      by.

   c) The definitions in Schedule “A” will apply to the corresponding words if the first letter of
      that word is capitalized in this bylaw:

LICENCING REQUIREMENTS
3. Except as otherwise provided for in this Bylaw, a License is required to carry on or operate any
   of the following Businesses:
   a) Resident Business
   b) Non-Resident Business

4. The following conditions are sufficient to establish that a Business is being carried on:
   a) Proof of one transaction or offer to transact, or
   b) Any advertising of a Business.

5. Residents and non-residents of the Town shall be entitled to equal rights in all matters relating to
   the issuance of Licenses.
                                                     Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing


6. Separate Licenses are required if two or more owners are operating Businesses from the same
   Business Premises.

7. No License shall be required to carry on or operate any Business that is exempt under the
   provisions of any Statute of Canada or the Province of Alberta. The onus of proving that a
   Business is exempt from requiring a License is on the Business alleging the exemption.

8. No License shall be required by the operator or participants to carry on or operate a craft sale, a
   rummage sale, a flea market or a residential garage sale where the duration of the activity is less
   than seven consecutive days.

9. No Licence shall be required by a Non-Resident Business to deliver goods within the Town
   when those goods are purchased by the recipient from a place or business outside the Town.

10. No License shall be issued to a Business carried on or to be carried on partly in the Town and
    partly elsewhere in Banff National Park unless a License has first been issued by Her Majesty the
    Queen in right of Canada or her designate.

11. No License shall be issued until such time as the Applicant holds current and valid Municipal,
    Provincial or Federal permits, approvals licenses or clearances as required by the relevant
    Municipal, Provincial, or Federal bylaws, statutes or regulations, including a valid Town of Banff
    development permit.

12. No License shall be issued to a Business which, in the opinion of the Licence Inspector, is not
    necessary to meet the purposes and objectives of the Town as are set out in the "Town of Banff
    Incorporation Agreement" made between the Government of Canada and the Government of
    the Province of Alberta as of the 12th day of December, 1989 and further referred to in the
    Town of Banff Land Use Bylaw, the Banff Community Plan, Banff National Park Management
    Plan and Appropriate Use Guidelines.

13. No License shall be issued for Hawkers.

LICENSE APPLICATION AND FEES
14. Every Applicant for a License, for renewal of a License, or for a transfer of License:
    a) must provide the following information, in the form prescribed by the License Inspector:
       i) The civic and legal address for the proposed place of Business;
       ii) The trade name under which the proposed Business will operate;
       iii) Where the Applicant is a sole proprietorship or partnership, the full name, mailing
            address and telephone number of the Applicant or Applicants;
       iv) Where the Applicant is a corporation, the full name and mailing address of the principal
            managing employee or employees and the telephone number of the Business;
       v) Any certificate, authority, License or other document of qualification under this or any
            other Bylaw, or under any Statute of Canada or the Province of Alberta that may be
            required in connection with the carrying on of the Business;
       vi) Such other information as the License Inspector may reasonably require.




                                                                                          Page 2 of 14
                                                       Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
15. An Application for a License or for a renewal of a License shall not be considered by the License
    Inspector until the fees as set out in this bylaw have been received by the Town. Unless
    otherwise indicated in this bylaw, the fee shall be $100 plus the amounts in Schedule “B.”

16. When a License is issued to a Business to carry on operations in two or more Business Sectors
    from the same Business Premises, the License fee shall be calculated as $100 plus the amounts in
    Schedule “B” for each Business Sector Fee in which the Business operates.

17. Temporary Sales located in an established commercial premises will be subject to a daily License
    fee of:
    a) $100/day if already licensed elsewhere in Banff for the same category;
    b) $500/day if not licensed elsewhere in Banff for the same category.

18. The Business Licence Fee, pursuant to Schedule “B”, for each Hotel, Bed and Breakfast Home,
    and Bed and Breakfast Inn with greater than four rooms shall be determined by the Town each
    year in accordance with the following:

   a) Every Hotel, Bed and Breakfast Home and Bed and Breakfast Inn, greater than four rooms,
      shall provide to the Licence Inspector, or to any person authorized by the Licence Inspector,
      on or before November 15, of each year, commencing in 2006 the information specified in
      Section 17(b) of this Bylaw;

   b) For 2007, and each year thereafter, the Business Licence Fee shall be an amount equal to 50
      percent of the Alberta Tourism Levy, as defined in the Tourism Levy Act, RSA 2000, c. T-
      5.5, payable by that Hotel, Bed and Breakfast Home or Bed and Breakfast Inn with greater
      than four rooms, for the prior year, subject to any acceptable adjustments thereto as
      reported in an acceptable form, to the Licence Inspector by such business or their
      authorized agent which shall include any chartered accountant authorized on behalf of such
      businesses to provide this information to the Licence Inspector;

   c) Any amendment to this bylaw provision shall not be operative until the expiry of 12
      consecutive months commencing as of the first day of the January following the year in
      which any such amendment is passed by Council.

19. All Business Licence fees are due and payable:
    a) For all Business except for Hotels, Bed and Breakfast Homes, and Bed and Breakfast Inns
        with greater than four rooms, thirty days after the date invoices are sent to Licensees.

   b) for Hotels, Bed and Breakfast Homes, and Bed and Breakfast Inns with greater than four
      rooms, following issue of an invoice, in accordance with the following:

                    Percentage of Annual Fee        Date Payment is Due
                              20%                         March 31
                              25%                          June 30
                              40%                       September 30
                              15%                       December 31




                                                                                        Page 3 of 14
                                                       Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
20. Notwithstanding the fees set out in this bylaw, if an Applicant for a Business License satisfies
    the License Inspector by way of statutory declaration or otherwise that the gross annual revenue
    of the Business is $30,000.00 or less, the total Business License fee shall be $100, and allocated
    as a Schedule “B” fee.


21. Charitable and Non-Profit Organizations, as defined in this Bylaw, are exempt from all
    requirements of this Bylaw.

22. If a Hotel, Bed and Breakfast Home, or Bed and Breakfast Inn with greater than four rooms
    ceases operations for any reason within a licensing year, the Business Licence fee up to the date
    the Business ceases operations is due and payable.

23. Any Resident or Non-Resident Business which commences Business or operation after January
    1st and has not previously been in operation in that calendar year shall pay prorated amount of
    the appropriate License fees provided for in this bylaw, which amount shall be prorated on a
    quarterly basis.

24. The License Inspector may allow any Business closed for a renovation for which a development
    permit or a building permit has been issued to pay a prorated License Fee, based on the period
    of time the Business is closed due to the renovations.

25. License fees must be paid in full by the due date with cash or cheque. Post-dated cheques must
    be valid the date on which payment is due. A License fee is non-refundable. Unpaid Licence
    fees are a debt owed to the Town.

26. Where a License fee has been paid by an uncertified cheque the License
    a) may be issued subject to the cheque being accepted and cashed by the bank, and
    b) will be automatically revoked if the cheque is not accepted and cashed by the bank on which
       it is issued.

27. The fee to replace a lost license is $25.

28. A Licensee may transfer a License issued to him to another person or to another Business
    Premises, or change the information contained on the License upon approval of the License
    Inspector.

29. All License fees shall be used:
    a) for the administration and enforcement of this Bylaw, for visitor experience project funding,
        and for other municipal services, and

    b) in the case of Schedule “B” for the marketing and promotion of the Town as a tourist
       destination area.

TERM OF LICENSE
30. Every License issued under the provisions of this Bylaw, unless revoked, cancelled or
    surrendered, shall terminate at midnight on the 31st day of December of the year in which said
    License was issued.



                                                                                          Page 4 of 14
                                                       Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
31. Notwithstanding Section 30, unless the Town is notified in writing of surrender or cancellation,
    a Business holding a valid License on December 31st is deemed to wish to renew that License for
    a subsequent year, and the Town will issue an invoice to that Business for the fee owing in
    accordance with this bylaw. If the License fee is not received by the Town within the time
    periods provided for in Section 18, the fee will be subject to monthly interest charges, until such
    time that it is paid or is determined by the License Inspector that the license is surrendered or
    cancelled. Where interest is charged, it shall be charged on the outstanding balance each month
    and the monthly rate of interest used to calculate the interest owing shall be one and one half
    percent (1.5%).”

32. Where the Town has approved a quarterly payment structure for Business License fees, the
    License will be considered surrendered if any of the four payments is not received in full by the
    Town within thirty days of the due date provided for in this Bylaw. .

POSTING OR PRODUCTION OF LICENSE
33. A Licensee shall:
    a) post the License in a prominent visible location in the Business Premises; or
    b) if it is not practical to post the License, produce the License forthwith upon demand by a
       License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer.

NATIONAL PARK REGULATIONS
34. The granting of a License pursuant to this Bylaw does not of itself establish that the holder of
    the License is a "Resident" as defined in the National Parks Lease and License of Occupation
    Regulations (Canada) as amended.

CONSULTATIONS
35. The License Inspector may consult, prior to issuing or renewing a License, with the Province of
    Alberta, the RCMP, Parks Canada, Headwaters Regional Health Authority, and any Town
    Department to determine whether they are in possession of information which, in the opinion
    of the License Inspector, renders it inappropriate for an Applicant to be issued a License.

36. The License Inspector may determine that it is inappropriate to issue a License to an Applicant
    where the safety, health or welfare of the public may be at risk due to the issuance of a License.

37. With respect to License renewal, the License Inspector may renew the License without
    consulting the Town Planning and Development department, if the Town Planning and
    Development department has previously confirmed that all necessary approvals required under
    the Town’s Land Use Bylaw have been obtained, and
    a) There has not been a change in the Business ownership since the Town Planning and
        Development department gave approval, and
    b) The Business has been carried on continuously at the same Business Premises and in the
        same manner.

38. Subject to the provisions of this Bylaw, upon receipt of an Application for a License, the License
    Inspector may
    a) grant a License, or
    b) refuse a License, if the Applicant is in breach of this or any other Bylaw of the Town, does
        not have an occupancy permit (if required pursuant to the Town's Building Permit Bylaw),
        has not met the requirements of this Bylaw, or in the License Inspector's opinion, there are
        other just and reasonable grounds for the refusal of the Application.

                                                                                           Page 5 of 14
                                                     Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
INSPECTIONS
39. Where a Business requires a Business Licence or is Licensed, then the Business Premises and
    surrounding lot may be inspected by a License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer, who shall at
    all reasonable times have the right to enter upon any Business Premises required to be Licensed
    under the provisions of this Bylaw for the purpose of inspection or for the purpose of
    ascertaining if the provisions of this or any other Bylaw of the Town are being complied with.

40. A Licence Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer may inspect a Business Premises or site at which
    a contractor is working for the purpose of ascertaining if the provisions of this or any other
    Bylaw of the Town are being complied with

41. A person whom a License Inspector reasonably believes is carrying on a Business requiring a
    Business License, or who is an Applicant, shall,
    a) permit and assist in all inspections requested by a License Inspector or Bylaw Services
       Officer;
    b) furnish to a License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer all identification, information, or
       documentation related to the inspection or Licensing requirement; and
    c) not provide to a License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer false or misleading information
       or information intended to mislead with regard to any matter or thing arising in connection
       with the Licensing of the Business.

42. No person shall attempt to prevent, obstruct or hinder a License Inspector or Bylaw Services
    Officer from making an inspection authorized by this Bylaw.

43. During an inspection authorized under this Bylaw, a License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer
    may examine any Business record or document for the purpose of enforcing this Bylaw, remove
    any relevant record or document from the Business Premises for the purpose of copying it, and
    will provide a receipt for any document or record so removed.

REFUSAL, REVOCATION, SUSPENSION
44. The License Inspector may,
    a) make inquiries and receive information, including information from the Applicant, to
       determine whether there are just and reasonable grounds for the refusal of an Application, a
       revocation, or a suspension of a License; or
    b) suspend a License prior to completing inquiries to determine whether there are just and
       reasonable grounds for the suspension or revocation of a License where, in the sole
       discretion of the License Inspector, the safety, health or welfare of the public may be at risk
       if the License is not suspended immediately. In the case of such suspension, the inquiries by
       the License Inspector must be completed within ten days of the suspension.

45. A License Inspector may refuse an Application if, in the opinion of the License Inspector, the
    Business would not satisfy the Appropriate Use Guidelines as set forth in the Banff National
    Park Management Plan or the Purposes of the Town as set forth in the Town of Banff Land
    Use Bylaw.

46. Where any certificate, authority, License or other document of qualification under this or any
    other Bylaw, or under any statute of Canada or the Province of Alberta is suspended, cancelled,
    terminated or surrendered, the License Inspector shall suspend any License issued under this
    Bylaw based in whole or in part on the certificate, authority, License or other document of
    qualification without convening a hearing.

                                                                                         Page 6 of 14
                                                      Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
47. A suspension of a License may be
    a) for a period of time not exceeding the unexpired term of the License, or
    b) where the suspension is for non-compliance with a Bylaw, until the holder of the suspended
       License complies with that Bylaw.

48. A License may be revoked or suspended for non-compliance with any law or regulation
    notwithstanding that the holder of the License has not been prosecuted for a contravention of
    that law, where the License Inspector has reasonable grounds to believe that the Licensee poses
    a danger to the safety, health or welfare of the public, to the protection of property.

49. Upon an Application for a License or an Application for exemption being refused or a License
    being revoked or suspended, the License Inspector shall notify the Applicant or Licensee, in
    writing, of the refusal, revocation or suspension and the reasons for it:
    a) by delivering a notice to the Applicant or Licensee personally; or
    b) by delivering a notice by registered mail to the Applicant’s or Licensee’s most recent place of
        Business or residence as shown on the License or Application.

50. Subject to Section 36, after the delivery of a notice of the refusal of an Application or an
    Application for exemption or a suspension or revocation of a License,
    a) the License shall be given, upon request, to a License Inspector or returned immediately to
       the License Inspector, and
    b) the Business shall not be carried on until such time as a License is issued or the suspended
       License is reinstated; and
    c) where a License was suspended or revoked under Section 35, furnish the License Inspector
       with satisfactory proof of a renewal or reissue of any certificate, authority, License or other
       document of qualification referred to in Section 35.

APPEALS
51. Where an Application has been refused, a License revoked or suspended or an exemption has
    been refused, the Applicant may appeal the decision to Council. All appeals shall be made in
    writing addressed to the Manager of Corporate Services of the Town, and received by the Town
    within 20 days of the date of issue of the notification of refusal, revocation or suspension.

52. Any Applicant for a License may appeal to Council the License fee imposed or the Business
    Sector of Business applied to the Applicant. All appeals of License fee or Business Sector shall
    be made in writing addressed to the License Inspector of the Town and received by the Town,
    on or before the due date for payment of the License fee.

53. Upon receipt of any appeal of License fee or Business Sector, Council or a Committee appointed
    by Council, shall:
    a) Schedule and hold an appeal hearing not more than fifteen days following the due date for
        payment of the Business Licence fee;

   b) Advertise the date, time and details of the appeal hearing at least once a week for two
      consecutive weeks in at least one newspaper or other publication circulating in the area to
      which the appeal relates;

   c) Allow any third party to make written or oral representation in support of or in opposition
      to the appeal at its first regular meeting following receipt of the recommendation;


                                                                                           Page 7 of 14
                                                    Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
    d) If a committee hears the appeal, make a written recommendation to Council within fifteen
       days of the hearing following which Council shall make a decision upon the appeal;

    e) If Council hears an appeal, make a decision on the appeal.

54. Council may extend the time frames referred to in Section 49 of this Bylaw, but any such
    extension shall not exceed fifteen (15) days in total.

VIOLATIONS
55. Any Person who contravenes a provision of this bylaw or the terms of any permit issued
    pursuant to this bylaw is guilty of an offence and is liable for the penalty set out in Schedule “C”,
    or if no penalty is specified in Schedule “C” for the particular offence, for the penalty in
    accordance with Section 58 of this bylaw.

56. When a corporation commits an offence under this bylaw, every principal, director, manager,
    employer or agent of the corporation who authorized the act or omission that constitutes the
    offence or assented to or acquiesced or participated in the act or omission that constitutes the
    offence is guilty of the offence whether or not the corporation has been prosecuted for the
    offence.

57. If a partnership is guilty of an offence under this bylaw, each partner in that partnership who
    authorized the act or omission that constitutes the offence or assented to or acquiesced or
    participated in the act or omission that constitutes the offence is guilty of the offence.

58. Violation tickets:
    a) Where a License Inspector reasonably believes that a person has contravened any provision
       of this bylaw, the License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer may serve upon the person a
       Violation Ticket, allowing payment of the specified penalty set out in Schedule “C” for the
       offence, and the recording of such payment by the Court shall constitute acceptance of a
       guilty plea and the imposition of a fine in the amount of the specified penalty.

    b) This section shall not prevent any License Inspector or Bylaw Services Officer from issuing
       a ticket requiring a court appearance of the defendant, pursuant to the provisions of the
       Provincial Offences Procedure Act or from laying an information in lieu of issuing a
       Violation Ticket.

59. Except as otherwise provided in this Bylaw, a person who is guilty of an offence under this
    Bylaw for which a penalty is not otherwise provided, is liable to a fine of not less than $200.00
    and not more than $500.00.

60. The imposition of a fine either by issuance of a Violation Ticket or by summary conviction in
    court shall not relieve any person so fined from any debt owing to the Town for an unpaid
    Business Licence.

TRANSITION
61. If any clause in this Bylaw is found to be invalid, it shall be severed from the remainder of the
    Bylaw and shall not invalidate the whole Bylaw.

62. Schedules “A,” “B,” and “C” form part of this Bylaw.

63. Bylaw 22-8 and Bylaw 255 are repealed upon this Bylaw coming into force.
                                                                                            Page 8 of 14
                                                      Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing

64. This Bylaw comes into force on January 1, 2007.

Read a first time this xx day of month, 2006.

   Read a second time this xx day of month, 2006.

   Read a third time this xx day of month, 2006.



Approved on behalf of the Town of Banff:



          John Stutz                                                    Date
            Mayor



         Robert Earl                                                    Date
        Town Manager




                                                                                       Page 9 of 14
                                                     Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
                                                            SCHEDULE “A” - DEFINITIONS

1. Applicant means a person who applies for a License or the renewal of a License required by this
   Bylaw.

2. Application means a written Application for a Business License or renewal thereof required
   under this Bylaw.

3. Business means
   a) a commercial, merchandising or industrial activity or undertaking;
   b) a profession, trade, occupation, calling or employment, or
   c) an activity providing goods or services,

   whether or not for profit and however organized or formed, including a co-operative or
   association of persons.

4. Business License and Licence, Licensed and Licensing means a License issued pursuant to
   this Bylaw.

5. Business Premises includes any store, office, dwelling, warehouse, yard, building, enclosure or
   other place occupied, or capable of being occupied, for the purpose of carrying on a Business
   and in which place the carrying on of a Business is a permitted or discretionary use under the
   Town’s Land Use Bylaw.

6. Business Sector and Business Sectors means any one of the following: lodging,
   restaurants/bars, retail, transportation/attractions/entertainment, or service.

7. Bylaw Services Officer means an employee of the Town who has been appointed to the
   position of Bylaw Enforcement Officer or Bylaw Services Officer pursuant to Bylaw
   Enforcement Officer Bylaw 5-2

8. Carry on, carrying on, carried on and carries on means to conduct, operate, perform, keep,
   hold, occupy, deal in or use, for a fee or exchange of benefits, whether as principal or agent.

9. Charitable Organization means
   a) any incorporated or unincorporated organization that is formed for a charitable purpose,
      including a philanthropic, benevolent, educational, health, humane, religious, cultural, artistic
      or recreational purpose, so long as the purpose is not part of a Business, or
   b) a person who makes solicitations for contributions to be used for a charitable purpose and
      who is not connected to any incorporated or unincorporated organization that is formed for
      the charitable purpose for which the solicitation is made.

10. Development Officer means a person appointed as Development Officer by resolution of
    Council to fulfil the duties specified in the Town of Banff Land Use Bylaw.

11. Hawker means any person who:
    a) goes from house to house selling or offering for sale any merchandise or service, or both, to
       any person, and who is not a wholesale or retail dealer and direct seller in that merchandise
       or service, and not having a permanent place of business in the municipality, or.
    b) sells merchandise or a service, or both, on the streets or roads or elsewhere than at a building
       that is his permanent place of business.
                                                                                          Page 10 of 14
                                                      Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing

12. Licensee means the holder of a valid and subsisting License issued pursuant to the provisions
    of this Bylaw.

13. License Inspector means the Town’s Manager of Corporate Services or any other person as
    may be authorized by Council to enforce the provisions of this Bylaw.

14. Lodging means a person, corporation or organization resident in Banff engaged in the rental of
    accommodation on a short term basis, including hotels, motels, hostels, and bed & breakfasts.

15. Non-Profit Organization means a club, society, or association that's organized and operated
    solely for social welfare, civic improvement, pleasure or recreation, or any other purpose except
    profit.

16. Non-Resident Business means a Business that is carried on, in whole or in part, within the
    Town, but neither maintains a permanent place of Business within the incorporated boundaries
    of the Town nor is listed on any current Town tax assessment roll.

17. Resident Business means any Business that locates or maintains a permanent place of Business
    within the incorporated boundaries of the Town, including commercial operations, licensed
    home occupations and bed and breakfast operations.

18. Restaurant/Bar means a person, corporation or organization resident in Banff engaged in the
    retail sale of food or beverage to the public for consumption within the premises or off the site,
    and, without limiting the foregoing, includes licensed drinking establishments, restaurants, cafes,
    delicatessens, ice cream shops, tea rooms, lunchrooms and take-out restaurants.

19. Retail means the sale or offering for sale of tangible personal property from a premises in the
    Town of Banff to a consumer for purposes of use and not for resale, and without limiting the
    forgoing includes the retail sale of groceries, beverages, baked goods, household goods, clothing,
    jewellery, furniture and appliances, hardware, printed matter, confectionery, gifts and souvenirs,
    tobacco, pharmaceutical and personal care items, automotive parts and accessories, office
    equipment, stationery and similar goods, minor public services, such as postal services and film
    processing depots, and convenience retail stores from within an enclosed building.

20. Service means a person, corporation or organization engaged in the operation of a business in
    Banff which primarily serves residents or businesses defined as Lodging, Restaurants/Bars,
    Retail, Ski area or Transportation/Attraction/Entertainment; and without limiting the forgoing
    includes; agency sales or distributors, automotive, banks, full service banking machines (when no
    local branch), brokerages, business support services, car washes, cleaning services, contractors,
    currency exchanges, educational services, financial institutions, garages, laundry and linen
    supplies, marriage commissioners, newspapers, personal services including massage and spa,
    printing businesses including publishers, designers and websites, property development firms,
    property management companies, repair services, service stations, towing companies, trades,
    travel agencies, and wholesalers.

21. Town means the Corporation of the Town of Banff and, where the context requires, the land
    included within the boundaries of the Town of Banff.



                                                                                         Page 11 of 14
                                                     Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing

22. Transportation/Attraction/Entertainment means a person, corporation or organization
    resident in the Town of Banff engaged in the operation of public transportation, a photography,
    film or video production business, a tour and/or guide business, or in the operation of a
    business which primarily operates as a business encouraging patrons to use its facilities and,
    without limiting the foregoing, includes movie theatres, live theatres, bowling alleys, pool rooms,
    museums, gondola lifts, arcades, rentals, golf courses and tennis courts; or in the business of
    selling, providing or distributing tour packages, tour arrangements and reservation services.

23. Temporary Sales means the selling of goods or services, including food and beverages from a
    temporary location in any place where the public has an expected right of access, but not
    including sales to a wholesale or retail dealer in any such goods.

24. Violation Ticket means any ticket or tag in a form approved by the Town of Banff, authorized
    under the Provincial Offenses Procedures Act, issued for any offence for which a penalty may
    be paid out of court in lieu of appearing to answer a summons.




                                                                                         Page 12 of 14
                                                  Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
                                                                    SCHEDULE “B” – FEES

            Note: A single business may have levies in more than one category.

                 CATEGORY                           Class Sub     Fee      Measure Minimum
                                                                                     Fee
                 Sector I - Lodging
Lodging - Hotels, B&B Inns, and B&B Homes with       100           Fee determined           n/a
greater than four (4) rooms                                          annually in
                                                                  accordance with
                                                                  Section 17 of the
                                                                        Bylaw
Lodging - B&B Homes with four (4) rooms or less      101         $30.94 Per Pillow          n/a
             Sector II - Restaurant/Bar
Restaurant/Bar                                       200         $22.00    Per Seat       $350.00
                 Sector III - Retail
Retail Sales                                         300         $1.18    Per Sq. Ft.     $350.00
    Sector IV -Transportation, Attractions and
                   Entertainment
Amusement/Arcade                                     405          $312     Flat Rate
Attractions/Entertainment                            407          $432     Flat Rate
Bowling Alley                                        411          $312     Flat Rate
Canoe Concession                                     414          $432     Flat Rate
Heli Skiing/Heli Hiking                              424         $2,760    Flat Rate
Horse Livery                                         425         $5,400    Flat Rate
Mini Golf                                            431          $312     Flat Rate
Movie Theatres                                       432          $900    Per Screen        n/a
Motor Vehicle a) Bus Companies                       433    A   $18,120    Flat Rate
Motor Vehicle b) Taxi Companies                      433    B    $1,320    Flat Rate
Motor Vehicle c) Tour Vehicles                       433    C    $1,740    Flat Rate
Motor Vehicle d) Commuter Shuttle Service            433    D    $1,140    Flat Rate
Vehicle Rentals (unless otherwise specified)         433    H    $1,296    Flat Rate
Other Transport & Rentals                            433    I     $432     Flat Rate
(motorcycles/scooters/horse carriages)
Tour Package & Reservation Agency                    445         $618     Flat Rate
                 Sector V - Service
All Other Services and Businesses                    500          $450   Flat Rate
Bank/Financial Institution                           501         $4,200 Per Branch          n/a
Banking Machines (Full Service)                      502         $1,200 Per ATM             n/a
Newspapers                                           503         $2,280 Flat Rate
Travel Agency                                        504         $1,620 Flat Rate
Automotive Equipment Repair                          505          $390   Flat Rate
Agency or Sales Business, Business Support,          506          $510   Flat Rate
Contractor




                                                                                      Page 13 of 14
                                                        Town of Banff Bylaw 22-9 – Business Licensing
                                                      SCHEDULE “C” – SPECIFIED PENALTIES


    Section                          Description                                      Amount

2                Carrying on or operating a Business within or             $500.00 plus $100.00 per day
                 partially within the Town without a valid and             for each day the offence
                 subsisting Business License.                              continues after conviction.

35 and 36        Refusing a License Inspector the right to enter upon      $500.00
                 the premises licensed for the purpose of inspecting
                 or for the purpose of ascertaining if this or any other
                 Bylaw is being complied with.

52               Failing to post the Business License in a conspicuous $200
                 place on the Business premises of the Licensee.

258024;December 7, 2006




                                                                                            Page 14 of 14
                                                                                 Long Term Council Agenda
                                                                                 Last Updated: December 7, 2006

January 8, 2007 Regular Meeting
1. Essential Services Definition                                          Manager of Planning & Development
2. Bicycle Access to the CS District                                      Manager of Planning & Development
3. First Reading: Community Standards Bylaw                               Bylaw Services
4. Community/Recreation Centre – Site Identification and                  Manager of Community Services
   Community Survey
5. First Reading: Traffic Bylaw 16-6                                      Municipal Clerk

January 22, 2007 Regular Meeting
1. Public Hearing: Land Use Bylaw Amendment Bylaw 259                     Senior Planner
6. Second Reading: Land Use Bylaw Amendment Bylaw 256                     Manager of Planning & Development

The following Council priorities were identified by Council at the October 2006 Strategic Planning Meeting.

             Strategy                   Progress                              Status
                                        Review
Alternate Revenue
• Alternate Revenue Generation
• Resort Municipality Status
• Land Rent
Banff Refreshing

Banff Summit
• Industry Collaboration
• Banff Summit on Workforce
    Resources
Housing
• Housing Supply
• RCMP Housing
• Redefine Affordable Housing
Infrastructure
• Infrastructure
• Funding for Major Capital
    Projects
Pedestrian Bridge

Recreation Centre




                                                                                                         Page 1 of 2
                                                                                  Long Term Council Agenda
                                                                                  Last Updated: December 7, 2006
The following administrative priorities were identified by Council at the October 2006 Strategic Planning Meeting:

             Strategy                                                   Status
Emergency Plan
• Improved Municipal Emergency
   Plan & Training
Environment
• Biosolids
• Environment
• Recycling/Solid Waste
• Community Energy Efficiency
Late Night Noise
• Extended Bylaw Hours
• Late Night Issues
Parking

Transit
• Transit/Transportation
Visitor Experience
• Visitor Experience Plan Execution
• Bus Wrap
Wayfinding
• Wayfinding
• Town Entrances




                                                                                                          Page 2 of 2
     Regular Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                             PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
     November 27, 2006                                                              DATE: December 11, 2006
     Page 117                                                                       AGENDA #4.1

                             MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF COUNCIL
                                 of the Town of Banff in the Province of Alberta
                                          Town Hall Council Chamber
                                     Monday, November 27, 2006 at 2:00 pm


             COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT
             John Stutz      Mayor
             Bob Haney       Councillor
             Chip Olver      Councillor (arrived at 2:04 p.m.)
             Ossi Treutler   Councillor
             Chris MacDonald Councillor
             Justin Burwash  Councillor and Acting Mayor

             COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT
             Karen Sorensen Councillor and Deputy Mayor

             ADMINISTRATION PRESENT
             Robert Earl     Town Manager
             Megan Squires   Planner
             Randall McKay   Manager of Planning & Development
             Tom Maier       Manager of Corporate Services
             Michelle Gurney Manager of Communications
             Cheryl Hyde     Municipal Clerk (Recording Secretary)

     1.0     CALL TO ORDER
             The Mayor called the meeting to order at 2:02 p.m.

     2.0  APPROVAL OF AGENDA
          2.1.   Meeting Agenda
COU06-309 Moved by Councillor MacDonald to approve the agenda of the November 27, 2006 regular meeting of
          Council as presented.
                                                                                                CARRIED
          2.2.   Long-Term Agenda
          Council received the long-term agenda as information.

             Councillor Olver arrived at 2:04 p.m.

     3.0     DELEGATIONS
             3.1.   Banff Heritage Corporation
             Banff Heritage Corporation members Herb MacAulay and Ralphine Locke provided Council with an
             update of 2006 activities.




                                                                  Minutes approved by:
     Regular Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                                 PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
     November 27, 2006                                                                  DATE: December 11, 2006
     Page 118                                                                           AGENDA #4.1

     4.0  ADOPTION OF PREVIOUS COUNCIL MINUTES
          4.1.    Minutes of the November 14, 2006 Regular Meeting of Council
COU06-310 Moved by Councillor Treutler to approve the minutes of the November 14, 2006 regular meeting of
          council as presented.
                                                                                                  CARRIED
          4.2.    Minutes of the November 14, 2006 Special Meeting of Council
COU06-311 Moved by Councillor Haney to approve the minutes of the November 14, 2006 special meeting of
          council as presented.
                                                                                                  CARRIED

          4.3.    Minutes of the November 20, 2006 Special Meeting of Council
COU06-312 Moved by Councillor Burwash to approve the minutes of the November 20, 2006 special meeting of
          council as presented.
                                                                                                 CARRIED

     5.0     UNFINISHED BUSINESS
             No unfinished business was considered.

     6.0     COMMITTEE REPORTS
             6.1.   Minutes of the November 15, 2006 Regular Meeting of the Municipal Planning Commission
             Council accepted the minutes of the November 15, 2006 regular meeting of the Municipal Planning
             Commission as information.

     7.0     STAFF REPORTS/BYLAWS
             7.1.    Policy C104 Management of Construction Sites
             Administration presented a new policy, Policy C104 Management of Construction Sites, for Council’s
             review and approval. This policy was drafted to address management of sites during construction,
             including redevelopment, as well as maintenance of existing lands and infrastructure.

COU06-313 Moved by Councillor Olver to adopt Policy C104 Management of Constructions Sites as presented.

             Discussion
             Council was divided on whether the proposed policy represented a consolidation of existing municipal
             policy and practice that would help developers through the permitting and construction process, or if it
             represented a new layer of regulation and cost that could discourage development.
                                                                                                      DEFEATED
                                                                                   Olver, Stutz and Haney in favour

             7.2.    Business License Bylaw 22-9
             Business License Bylaw 22-9 is an update of Bylaw 22-8, with changes recommended to improve the
             overall administration, enforcement and quality of the business licensing bylaw and also consolidate the
             fee schedule changes made in Business License amending bylaw 255.

             Mayor Stutz declared a conflict of interest as he works as a marriage commissioner and this category has
             been added for the first time to the business licensing bylaw. He passed the gavel to Deputy Mayor
             Burwash and left the meeting at 2:52 p.m.



                                                                      Minutes approved by:
      Regular Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                               PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
      November 27, 2006                                                                DATE: December 11, 2006
      Page 119                                                                         AGENDA #4.1

COU06-314 Moved by Councillor Haney to give first reading to Business Licensing Bylaw 22-9 and schedule a public
          hearing for December 11, 2006.
                                                                                                    CARRIED

              The Mayor returned to the meeting at 2:54 p.m. and resumed the chair.

      8.0     INQUIRIES
              There were no inquiries.

      9.0     CORRESPONDENCE
              No correspondence was considered.

      10.0    NEW BUSINESS
              10.1. Federation of Canadian Municipalities Resolution
              This item was added to the agenda by unanimous consent of council. Council Olver reported on a
              resolution sponsored by the City of Windsor and passed by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to
              support the continuation of the federal GST rebate program for visitors due to its importance to the
              tourism industry.

      11.0    INQUIRIES
              There were no inquiries.

    12.0 ADJOURNMENT
COU06-315 Moved by Councillor Treutler to adjourn at 2:57 p.m.
                                                                                                         CARRIED




              _______________________                      _______________________
              John Stutz                                   Cheryl Hyde
              Mayor                                        Municipal Clerk




                                                                     Minutes approved by:
      Special Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                               PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
      November 28, 2006                                                                DATE: December 11, 2006
      Page 120                                                                         AGENDA #4.2

                               MINUTES OF THE SPECIAL MEETING OF COUNCIL
                                   of the Town of Banff in the Province of Alberta
                                            Town Hall Council Chamber
                                       Tuesday, November 28, 2006 at 1:00 pm


              COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT
              John Stutz      Mayor
              Bob Haney       Councillor
              Chip Olver      Councillor
              Ossi Treutler   Councillor
              Chris MacDonald Councillor
              Karen Sorensen  Councillor and Deputy Mayor
              Justin Burwash  Councillor and Acting Mayor

              COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT

              ADMINISTRATION PRESENT
              Robert Earl     Town Manager
              Tom Maier       Manager of Corporate Services
              Kelly Gibson    Senior Accountant
              Jack MacIntosh  Fire Chief
              Mike Dobbin     Manager of Operations
              Randall McKay   Manager of Planning & Development
              Mary Brewster   Manager of Community Services
              Bruce Bedwell   Manager of Engineering
              Michelle Gurney Manager of Communications
              Cheryl Hyde     Municipal Clerk (Recording Secretary)

      1.0     CALL TO ORDER
              The Mayor called the meeting to order at 1:02 p.m.

      2.0 APPROVAL OF AGENDA
          2.1.   Meeting Agenda
COU06-316 Moved by Councillor MacDonald to approve the agenda of the November 28, 2006 special meeting of
          Council as presented.
                                                                                                         CARRIED
    3.0   DELEGATIONS
          3.1.   Small Business Association of Banff (SBAB)
          Speaking on behalf of the Small Business Association, Rob McIntyre inquired about the philosophy of
          Council with respect to the anticipated reduction in the provincial school requisition and the use of these
          funds for funding the infrastructure deficit. Mr. McIntyre suggested that Council consider refunding any
          decreases in the school requisition directly to the taxpayer. Council provided the following response:
               • It is Council’s understanding that the province is reducing the school requisition specifically to
                 allow municipalities to fund their infrastructure deficits.




                                                                     Minutes approved by:
      Special Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                                 PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
      November 28, 2006                                                                  DATE: December 11, 2006
      Page 121                                                                           AGENDA #4.2

                  •   If the estimate of the reduction varies significantly, the budget would be re-opened and the
                      transfer to capital would likely be reduced.
                  •   Council expects that any savings from the province after the infrastructure is fully funded would
                      be passed on to the taxpayer.

              With respect to the Banff Refreshing project, McIntyre stated that summer construction would not be in
              the best interests of the SBAB members.

              Administration confirmed that cost estimates for various construction schedules are expected in early
              December. Once the figures have been received, administration will schedule a meeting with
              representatives from SBAB. Council can expect debate on this issue at the December 11 meeting, or at
              the next earliest time possible, depending on when the cost estimates are received.

      4.0     2007 CAPITAL BUDGET
              The Senior Accountant presented the first draft of the 2007 capital budget for Council’s consideration.
              A copy of the presentation is attached to these minutes for information.

              Council discussed whether or not to direct administration to prepare a comprehensive site plan for the
              Operations Compound before funds are approved for any new buildings on the site. Debate will
              continue on GG 32-06 Operations Compound Building Replacement, GG new-3 Fleet Shop Expansion
              and GG new-4 Bus Storage Building at the next budget meeting.

COU06-317 Moved by Councillor MacDonald to remove $41,000 from 2007 RC-3c Bow Falls View Point
          Rehabilitation and Upgrades for the design of washroom facilities.
                                                                                           DEFEATED
                                                                                   MacDonald in favour.

COU06-318 Moved by Councillor Burwash to increase GG 23-04 Street Pole Banner and Christmas Pageantry from
          $25,000 to $75,000, reduce the corresponding costs from 2009 and 2010, leaving $25,000 in 2008 for
          costs associated with the 100 and 200 blocks of Banff Avenue, and to direct administration to obtain as
          many partnerships as possible to help offset municipal costs.
                                                                                                       CARRIED
                                                                                MacDonald and Stutz opposed.

      5.0     INQUIRIES
              There were no inquiries.

    6.0   ADJOURNMENT
COU06-319 Moved by Councillor MacDonald to adjourn at 4:16 p.m.
                                                                                                            CARRIED



              _______________________                        _______________________
              John Stutz                                     Cheryl Hyde
              Mayor                                          Municipal Clerk



                                                                       Minutes approved by:
2007-2011 Capital Budget
Capital Budget Process
  Brief presentation
  Individual Councillor’s expectations
  including projects to be brought
  forward, pushed back or eliminated
  Year by year analysis and debate
Cost Drivers
  Labour market– primary cost driver in
  Alberta’s construction market
  Interest rates – anticipated to drop
  between 0.25 and 0.5% in 2007
  Construction volumes – slowing but
  could increase with dropping interest
  rates
  Fuel prices – 25% of the cost of building
  a road
Cost Drivers
  INFTRA forecasted inflation rates
  2006-2007 – 20 to 25%
  2007-2008 – 15%
  2008-2009 – 10 to 15%
  2009-2010 – 7%
  2010-2011 – 7%
Cash Flow
 Short-term debt potential for 2008
 Positive cash flow at end of 2011
 2 projects identified having debt funding
   (2008) Lighting upgrades $1.3M over 10
   years
   (2011) Bow River Watermain Project $1.1M
 Large projects scheduled for 2012-2016
Current Borrowing Rates
ACFA Rates   as of Nov. 27/06
 3 year       4.178%
 10 year      4.265%
 15 year      4.401%
 20 year      4.505%
Borrowing Restrictions
  2005 Audited Debt Limit $27.3M
  2005 Audited Debt Servicing $4.5M
  In 2005 2% of limit was used for both
  debt limit and servicing
  2007 up to $3.5M of debt servicing is
  assigned to BHC
  2007-2009 up to $8.9M of debt limit and
  $895,000 of debt servicing is assigned
  to Rocky Mountain Co-operative Housing
  Association
Long-term Borrowing
 $20M over 20-year

 Annual Debt Servicing of $1.53M
Short-term Borrowing
 $6M over 3-year
 Annual Debt Servicing of $2.15M
 The intent of short-term borrowing
 to fund a project not larger than
 approx. $10M
 Delayed because of cash flow but
 subject to a higher rate of inflation
 than cost of borrowing
2006 Projects Re-Budgeted
  Banff Child Care Centre Flooring
  $60,000
  40 Mile Creek Dam $40,000
  Neighborhood Parks $31,000
  Bow Falls Cliff Top $50,000
  Joint Use School Grounds $30,000
Banff Refreshing
  Project carried form 2006 to 2007
  and 2008
  Anticipated inflation on costs of
  $4M added for cash flow purposes
  Report requesting additional funds
  anticipated January 2007
What’s new in 2007
 Transit
 Fire Services
 Equipment/Vehicle
 Mobile Stage
What’s Missing?
  Recreation Centre
   Community Centre $4.6 million
   removed from 2008 – 2009
   Expected budget amendment from
   report coming Q1 of 2007 on revised
   Multi-Plex Recreation Facility project
  Pedestrian Bridge
   Currently in 2012-2016
Council Deliberations
     Special Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                               PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
     December 4, 2006                                                                 DATE: December 11, 2006
     Page 122                                                                         AGENDA #4.3

                              MINUTES OF THE SPECIAL MEETING OF COUNCIL
                                  of the Town of Banff in the Province of Alberta
                                           Town Hall Council Chamber
                                       Monday, December 4, 2006 at 9:00 am


             COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT
             John Stutz      Mayor
             Bob Haney       Councillor
             Chip Olver      Councillor
             Ossi Treutler   Councillor
             Chris MacDonald Councillor
             Karen Sorensen  Councillor and Deputy Mayor
             Justin Burwash  Councillor and Acting Mayor

             COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT

             ADMINISTRATION PRESENT
             Robert Earl     Town Manager
             Tom Maier       Manager of Corporate Services
             Kelly Gibson    Senior Accountant
             Jack MacIntosh  Fire Chief
             Mike Dobbin     Manager of Operations
             Randall McKay   Manager of Planning & Development
             Mary Brewster   Manager of Community Services
             Bruce Bedwell   Manager of Engineering
             Michelle Gurney Manager of Communications
             Cheryl Hyde     Municipal Clerk (Recording Secretary)

     1.0     CALL TO ORDER
             The Mayor called the meeting to order at 9:04 a.m.

     2.0  APPROVAL OF AGENDA
          2.1.    Meeting Agenda
COU06-320 Moved by Councillor Haney to approve the agenda of the December 4, 2006 special meeting of Council
          as presented.
                                                                                                  CARRIED

     3.0     2007 CAPITAL BUDGET
             Debate continued on the 2007 capital budget.

             Councillor Olver made the following requests:
             • that administration investigate environmentally effective methods of constructing any new buildings
                that may be approved through this budget process.
             • that the Pedestrian Bridge project be moved forward, and that it be constructed to allow vehicles.




                                                                    Minutes approved by:
      Special Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                                  PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
      December 4, 2006                                                                    DATE: December 11, 2006
      Page 123                                                                            AGENDA #4.3

              •   that administration investigate whether or nor power from the local transfer station could be
                  redirected toward the Town of Banff in the event of power failure.
              •   that Communications work with local businesses who have “No Public Washrooms” signs displayed
                  to incorporate directions to public washrooms on their signs.

COU06-321 Moved by Councillor Treutler to postpone GG-1-03 Senior Centre Enhancement until 2009.

              Discussion
              It is Councillor Treutler’s intent to move $500,000 of capital project funding to future budgets so that
              this amount could be allocated in 2007 toward funding the design and building of parking facilities.

              The vote followed on the motion.
                                                                                                         DEFEATED
                                                                                                     Treutler in favour.

COU06-322 Moved by Councillor Treutler to postpone GG-24-04 Banff Child Care Centre until 2009.
                                                                                                         DEFEATED
                                                                                                     Treutler in favour.

COU06-323 Moved by Councillor Burwash to move T1-00 Parking Structures from 2008 and 2009, at total of
          $555,000, to 2007 so that the planning phase for parking structures can occur in 2007 and construction
          can then begin accordingly.

              Discussion
              • Administration confirmed that, if all capital projects go ahead in 2007, it would be necessary to
                 obtain a short-term loan of $125,000 to cover the addition of the $555,000 proposed in the motion.
                 A short-term loan is fundamentally different from a long-term loan and is generally used to manage
                 cash flow during a budget year.
              • The planning phase is meant to examine the feasibility of both intercept parking and the construction
                 of a downtown parkade.

              The vote followed on the motion.
                                                                                                             CARRIED

COU06-324 Moved by Councillor Burwash move RC-3-B Pedestrian Bridge, at a total of $1,100,000 from future
          initiatives to 2007.

              Discussion
              • Councillor Treutler encouraged administration to approach ID#9 regarding a partnership for funding
                 construction of a pedestrian bridge.
              • Administration advised that $110,000 of funding in 2007 would be sufficient to prepare initial
                 assessments for the pedestrian bridge.




                                                                        Minutes approved by:
     Special Town of Banff Council Meeting – Unapproved                                PRESENTED TO COUNCIL
     December 4, 2006                                                                  DATE: December 11, 2006
     Page 124                                                                          AGENDA #4.3

COU06-325 Moved by Olver to amend motion COU06-324 by changing the proposed 2007 funding allocation from
          $1,100,000 to $110,000, with the remaining amount budgeted in RC-3-B moved to 2008.
                                                                                              DEFEATED
                                                                                Olver and Treutler in favour.

             The vote followed on motion COU06-324.
                                                                                                         CARRIED
                                                                                Olver, Stutz, and Treutler opposed.

             Councillor Burwash recommended that administration investigate the possibility of establishing a
             recreational reserve fund.

     4.0     INQUIRIES
             There were no inquiries.

     5.0     ADJOURNMENT
             Council unanimously agreed to cancel the special meeting scheduled for December 12, 2006. The
             operating and capital budgets, as amended, will be presented for Council approval at the regular meeting
             scheduled for December 11, 2006.

COU06-326 Moved by Councillor Treutler to adjourn at 11:17 a.m.
                                                                                                          CARRIED



             _______________________                       _______________________
             John Stutz                                    Cheryl Hyde
             Mayor                                         Municipal Clerk




                                                                     Minutes approved by:
                         2007-2009 Operating Budget Changes
                                                             2007        2008       2009
Beginning Surplus                                          $ (68,200) $ (172,100) $ (28,300)
   Council Modifications
Banff Summit Phase II                                      $    10,000      $   10,000     $   10,000
Succession Planning                                        $    25,000
Four Fire Dept Members (Net)                               $    14,200      $   14,200 $       14,200
Solid Waste/Recycling Labourer                             $    40,000      $   40,000 $       40,000
Planning Adjustment                                                         $   (5,000)
Website Enhancements                                       $        7,500
Capital budget operational impacts
  Recycling Program - Tfr to Local Agencies                                                $ 40,000
  Off-Leash Dog Walk Area - Salaries                                                       $ 14,000
  Street Pole Banner and Pageantry-Equip.                               $        5,000     $   5,000
  banff.ca Complaint Tracking-Maint.                       $     2,500 $         2,500     $   2,500
  banff.ca Online Payments-Maint./User Fee                              $       (7,500)    $ (7,500)
  Speed Radar Display Trailer-Rental Rev.                  $    (1,000) $       (1,000)    $ (1,000)
  Pager Replacement-Contracted Serv/Op. Res                $    (2,000) $       (2,000)    $ (2,000)
  Machinery/Equipment New-Rental Rev.                      $      (500) $         (500)    $    (500)
  Industrial Lot Improvements-Contracted Services                                          $   3,000
  Loop Trail - Contracted Service                          $         $  5,000
                                                                    5,000                  $   5,000
  Bow Falls Viewpoint-Salaries/Supplies                              $ 10,000              $ 20,000
  Pedestrian Bridge-Contracted Services                              $ 10,000              $ 10,000
Total Council Modifications                                $ 100,700 $ 80,700              $ 152,700
Tax Revenue Adjustment                                     $ 32,500 $ (91,400)             $ 124,400
Overall Tax Bill Increase                                      2.44%    2.53%                  4.26%
Municipal Tax Increase w/out Growth                           13.90%    9.05%                 10.44%

                           2007-2011 Capital Budget Changes

Street Pole Banner and Holiday Pagentry Program - $50,000 moved from 2009/10 to 2007

Transit Buses - $137,908 in additional NDCC grant funds confirmed

Parking Structures - $555,000 moved from 2008/09 to 2007

Pedestrian Bridge - $1,100,000 moved from 2012-2016 to 2007. $500,000 of this funding is
identified as partner funded
                                   Town of Banff
                                Summary of All Units
                             2007-2009 Operating Budget



                                    Budget            Budget             Budget
         Description                 2007              2008               2009

REVENUES
Municipal Tax Revenue            $10,767,500.00    $11,824,800.00     $13,283,900.00
Sale of Goods & Services             408,300.00        459,300.00         459,400.00
Donations/Gifts                        6,000.00          6,000.00           6,000.00
Rental                               316,600.00        323,800.00         331,100.00
Interest                             100,000.00        100,000.00         100,000.00
Penalties & Costs                     90,500.00         90,500.00          95,500.00
Business Licenses                  2,108,000.00      2,409,000.00       2,710,000.00
Tax Certificates                       9,000.00          9,000.00           9,000.00
Animal Licenses                       20,000.00         20,000.00          20,000.00
Parking/Traffic Fines                305,000.00        305,000.00         305,000.00
Animal Control Fines                   2,500.00          2,500.00           2,500.00
Consumption Charges                3,465,000.00      3,895,700.00       4,491,600.00
Recycling Revenue                     80,000.00         80,000.00          80,000.00
Garbage Collection Fees               87,400.00         90,900.00          94,500.00
Subdivision Processing Fees            3,000.00          5,000.00           5,000.00
Building Permits                     100,000.00        100,000.00          75,000.00
Development Permits                   45,000.00         45,000.00          40,000.00
Rezoning Processing Fees               5,000.00          5,000.00           5,000.00
Compliance Certificates                4,000.00          4,000.00           4,000.00
Ice Rentals                          277,100.00        290,800.00         305,200.00
Program Fees                          73,000.00         75,000.00          77,000.00
Membership Fees                        8,500.00          8,700.00           8,800.00
Advertising Revenue                   62,100.00         72,100.00          72,100.00
Curling Ice Rentals                   25,000.00         24,200.00          27,600.00
Room Rentals                           8,900.00          8,600.00           8,800.00
Site Use Fees                          8,900.00          9,000.00           9,200.00
Ball Diamond Rentals                  11,000.00         12,100.00          12,700.00
Summer Fun Registrations              63,000.00         66,000.00          69,000.00
Kids Kampus Fees                      36,700.00         37,600.00          38,200.00
Drop-in Fees                           5,700.00          5,800.00           6,300.00
Other Permit Revenue                  51,000.00         91,000.00          91,000.00
Other Sales and Revenue              254,500.00        267,500.00         267,500.00
Franchise Revenue - ATCO Gas         400,000.00        400,000.00         400,000.00
Franchise Rev -Misc.                   2,000.00          2,000.00           2,000.00
Sales - Federal Government            60,000.00         60,000.00          60,000.00
Sales - Provincial Government        696,400.00        716,700.00         736,200.00
Sales - Local Government             502,400.00        504,700.00         508,000.00
Provincial Unconditional Grant        24,300.00         24,300.00          24,300.00
Local Govt Unconditional Grant         3,000.00          3,000.00           3,000.00
Federal Conditional Grants             2,200.00          2,200.00           2,200.00
Provincial Conditional Grants        654,600.00        659,400.00         664,200.00
Local Govt Conditional Grants         11,000.00         11,000.00          11,000.00
Transfer from Operating Reserv       320,000.00        340,000.00         310,000.00
Transfer from Capital Reserves        35,000.00        160,000.00         160,000.00
TOTAL REVENUES                    21,519,100.00     23,627,200.00     25,991,800.00




                                              December 11, 2006 Draft #2 for Approval
                                       Town of Banff
                                    Summary of All Units
                                 2007-2009 Operating Budget



                                        Budget            Budget             Budget
          Description                    2007              2008               2009

EXPENDITURES
Wages and Benefits                    $7,063,300.00     $8,104,000.00      $8,447,500.00
Recruitment Costs                          9,600.00         12,100.00          12,200.00
Training/Conference & Travel             209,500.00        193,400.00         195,700.00
Memberships                               19,100.00         19,200.00          19,200.00
Postage/Freight                           26,400.00         26,500.00          25,600.00
Telephone                                 83,800.00         83,800.00          83,800.00
Advertising & Promotion                   79,700.00         79,600.00          79,700.00
Printing & Binding                        62,400.00         62,100.00          55,700.00
Subscriptions                              7,000.00          7,700.00           7,800.00
Licenses & Permits                         3,200.00          3,200.00           3,200.00
Rental Fees                              653,900.00        675,900.00         684,500.00
Insurance Premiums/Claims                158,000.00        160,700.00         160,700.00
Bad Debt Expenses                          1,000.00          1,000.00           1,000.00
Short Term Interest Charges                7,500.00          7,500.00           7,500.00
Other Initiatives                         28,000.00         19,000.00          19,000.00
Misc. Expense                              2,900.00          2,900.00           2,900.00
Legal Fees                                50,000.00         50,000.00          50,000.00
Professional Fees                        158,700.00        149,700.00         151,200.00
Contracted Services                    5,148,200.00      4,782,000.00       5,104,100.00
General Goods and Supplies             1,051,800.00      1,070,800.00       1,047,800.00
Utilities                                753,500.00        753,500.00         866,300.00
Repair & Maint. - Buildings               11,000.00         11,000.00          11,000.00
Repair & Maint. - Equipment               18,700.00         18,700.00          18,700.00
Repair & Maint. - Vehicles                52,000.00         60,000.00          63,000.00
Federal Purchases                      1,650,000.00      1,700,000.00       1,750,000.00
Grants                                   638,300.00        538,300.00         538,300.00
Debenture Principal                       14,000.00         15,100.00          16,200.00
Debenture Interest                        21,900.00         20,800.00          19,700.00
Transfer to Local Agencies               117,900.00         57,900.00          97,900.00
Transfer to Operating Reserves           142,300.00        133,800.00         133,800.00
Transfer to Capital Reserves           3,275,500.00      4,807,000.00       6,317,800.00
TOTAL EXPENDITURES                    21,519,100.00     23,627,200.00     25,991,800.00
Internal Chargeback Revenue            2,811,600.00      2,811,600.00       2,811,600.00
Internal Chargeback Expenditur         2,811,600.00      2,811,600.00       2,811,600.00




                                                  December 11, 2006 Draft #2 for Approval
                                                                                                                                                           Draft #2 For Council Approval




                                                                         Capital Projects by Section
                                                                                    2007
                                                                                                                             Cost to Capital
PROJECT                                          DESCRIPTION                                     Total Cost Other Funding      Reserve          Funding Reserve
GG-1-03      Senior Centre Enhancement                                                                85,700                           85,700   General Reserve
GG-23-04     Street Pole Banner and Holiday Pagentry                                                  75,000                           75,000   General Reserve
GG-24-04     Banff Child Care Centre                                                                 100,000                          100,000   General Reserve
GG-31-06     Maintenance Repairs to Fire Hall                                                         15,000                           15,000   General Reserve
GG-32-06     Operations Compound - Building Replacement                                              540,000                          540,000   General Reserve
GG-36-06     Urban Forest Management Plan                                                             45,000                           45,000   General Reserve
GG-new-1     Banff.ca Complaint Tracking                                                              15,000                           15,000   General Reserve
GG-new-3     Fleet Shop Expansion                                                                    497,000       200,000            297,000   NDCC/Reserve
GG-new-4     Bus Storage Building                                                                    678,000                          678,000   General Reserve
GG-new-5     Fire Hall - Staff Accomodations Upgrades                                                 15,000                           15,000   General Reserve
GG-new-6     Speed Radar Display Trailer                                                              13,000                           13,000   General Reserve
                                                                                                   2,078,700       200,000          1,878,700
PS-13-04     FireSmart Program                                                                       175,000                          175,000   General Reserve
PS - new-1   Thermal Imaging Camera                                                                   13,000                           13,000   Fire Reserve
PS - new-2   Fire Command Vehicle Replacement                                                         55,000                           55,000   Fire Reserve
PS - new-3   Fire Department Hose Replacement                                                         25,000                           25,000   Fire Reserve
PS-new-4     Municipal Emergency Plan & EOC Equipment                                                 25,000                           25,000   General Reserve
PS - new-5   Fire Department Pager Replacement                                                        21,000                           21,000   Fire Reserve
PS - new-6   Vehicle Exhaust Collection System                                                        50,000                           50,000   Fire Reserve
                                                                                                     364,000                          364,000
PW-11-06     Fleet Management-Vehicle Replacement                                                    399,000                          399,000   Fleet Reserve
PW - 6-93    GIS - Digital Data Acquisition & Survey Control Monuments                                30,000                           30,000   General Reserve
PW-35-94     Bridge Maintenance                                                                       37,000                           37,000   General Reserve
PW-49-97     Cemetary Upgrades                                                                        26,500                           26,500   General Reserve
PW-53-01     Bear Street Parkade - Captial Improvements                                              195,000                          195,000   General Reserve
PW-56-02     Machinery and Equipment - New                                                            50,000                           50,000   General Reserve
PW -75-06    Forty Mile Creek Dam                                                                     40,000                           40,000   General/Water
                                                                                                     777,500                          777,500
RC-3a        Loop Trail                                                                              180,000                          180,000   General Reserve
RC-3b        Pedestrian Bridge                                                                     1,100,000       500,000            600,000   General Reserve
RC-3c        Bow Falls View Point - Rehabilitation & Upgrades                                        111,000                          111,000   General Reserve
RC-3d        Bow Falls Cliff Top Staircse & Trail Upgrade                                            160,000                          160,000   General Reserve
RC-4         Neighbourhood Parks                                                                      81,000                           81,000   General Reserve
RC5-99       Recreation Centre - Major Upgrade                                                       280,000                          280,000   General Reserve
RC-new-1     Mobile Stage                                                                            130,000        65,000             65,000   Reserve/Donations
RC-new-3     Recreation Grounds - Outfield Fencing                                                    15,000                           15,000   General Reserve
RC-new-4     Joint Use School Grounds Updating`                                                       30,000        15,000             15,000   Reserve/Grant
                                                                                                   2,087,000       580,000          1,507,000
S-33-02      WWTP-Outflow Replacement                                                                370,000       100,000            270,000   Sewer Reserve
                                                                                                     370,000       100,000            270,000
T1-00        Parking Structures                                                                      555,000                          555,000   General Reserve
T-new-1      Experiential Transportation                                                              45,000        45,000                      Partner Funding
T-new-2      Signage & Wayfinding                                                                    149,000       149,000                      MSG Grant
T-new-3      Transit Fare Boxes                                                                       80,000                           80,000   General Reserve
T-new-4      Transit Buses                                                                         1,660,000     1,237,908            422,092   General Reserve
                                                                                                   2,489,000     1,431,908          1,057,092
W-11-95      Well Systems Upgrades                                                                    57,000                           57,000   Water Reserve
W-21-04      Water Master Plan                                                                        26,000                           26,000   Water Reserve
W-29-06      Hidden Ridge Watermain Upgrade                                                          500,000       250,000            250,000   Reserve/Developer
                                                                                                     583,000       250,000            333,000
                                                                                                   8,749,200     2,561,908          6,187,292




                                                                                                                                                                      Revised 12/7/2006
                                                                                                                              Draft #2 For Council Approval



                                                               Capital Projects by Section
                                                                          2008
                                                                                                                 Cost to Capital
PROJECT                                       DESCRIPTION                            Total Cost Other Funding      Reserve            Funding Reserve
EH-4-92     Recycling Program                                                            235,000       176,250              58,750    BVWMC/General
                                                                                         235,000       176,250              58,750
GG-1-03     Senior Centre Enhancement                                                     40,000                            40,000    General Reserve
GG-7-03     552 Banff Avenue                                                              15,000                            15,000    General Reserve
GG19-03     Town Hall Maintanence/Improvements                                            35,000                            35,000    General Reserve
GG-22-04    Off-Leash Dog Walk Area                                                       20,000                            20,000    General Reserve
GG-23-04    Street Pole Banner & Christmas Pagentry                                       25,000                            25,000    General Reserve
GG-24-04    Banff Child Care Centre                                                       15,000                            15,000    General Reserve
GG-31-06    Maintenance Repairs to Fire Hall                                               8,000                             8,000    General Reserve
GG-new-1    Banff.ca Online Payments                                                      50,000                            50,000    General Reserve
GG-new-2    FireHall Staff Accomodation Upgrades                                          45,000                            45,000    General Reserve
                                                                                         253,000                           253,000
PS-11-04    Rescue Tools                                                                  40,000                            40,000    General Reserve
                                                                                          40,000                            40,000
PW-11-00    Fleet Managemnt/Replacement                                                  344,000                           344,000    Fleet Reserve
PW-28-06    Wolf/Lynx Intersection                                                       700,000       525,000             175,000    General/SIP
PW- 47-99   Street Lighting Upgrades                                                   1,300,000     1,300,000                   -    Debt Funding
PW-35-94    Bridge Maintanence                                                           164,000                           164,000    General Reserve
PW-49-97    Cemetery Upgrades                                                              5,000                             5,000    General Reserve
PW-53-01    Bear Street Parkade Capital Improvements                                      80,000                            80,000    General Reserve
PW-56-02    Machinery and Equipment - New                                                 20,000                            20,000    General Reserve
PW69-04     Industrial Compound Lot Improvements                                          15,000                            15,000    General Reserve
PW-new-1    Bear & Lynx Crosswalk Re-alignment                                            44,000                            44,000
                                                                                       2,672,000     1,825,000             847,000
RC-3a       Loop Trail                                                                    75,000                            75,000    General Reserve
RC-3c       Bow Falls View Point - Rehabilitation & Upgrades                             250,000                           250,000    General Reserve
RC-3e       Enhanced Connections & High- Use Public Spaces                               100,000                           100,000    General Reserve
RC-4        Neighbourhood Parks                                                           25,000                            25,000    General Reserve
RC-5-99     Recreation Centre-Major Upgrade                                              225,000                           225,000    General Reserve
RC-23-02    Skateboard Park                                                               80,000                            80,000    General Reserve
RC-new      Parks and Recreational Areas Signs                                            30,000                            30,000    General Reserve
                                                                                         785,000                           785,000
T-1-00      Parking Structures                                                                                                        General Reserve
T-new-1     Experiential Transportation                                                   25,000                             25,000   General Reserve
T-new-2     Signage & Wayfinding                                                         428,000                            428,000   General Reserve
T-new-3     Transit Mechanical Tools                                                      50,000                             50,000   General Reserve
                                                                                         503,000                            503,000
W-11-95     Well Systems Upgrades                                                        934,500                            934,500   Water Reserve
W-26-06     Wolf/Lynx Watermain Replacement                                              172,000       129,000               43,000   Water Reserve/SIP
W-30-07     Water Meter Calibration                                                       20,000                             20,000   Water Reserve
                                                                                       1,126,500       129,000              997,500
                                                                                       5,614,500     2,130,250            3,484,250




                                                                                                                                            Revised 12/7/2006
                                                                                                                                        Draft #2 For Council Approval




                                                             Capital Projects by Section
                                                                        2009
                                                                                                                      Cost to Capital
PROJECT                                       DESCRIPTION                         Total Cost         Other Funding      Reserve             Funding Reserve
GG-19-03   Town Hall Maintenance/Improvements                                                4,000                                4,000    General Reserve
GG-23-04   Street Pole Banner and Holiday Pagentry Program                                                                                 General Reserve
GG-24-04   Banff Child Care Centre                                                          20,000                               20,000    General Reserve
GG-new-1   Fire Hall Staff Accomodation Upgrades                                            10,000                               10,000    Staff Housing Reserve
                                                                                            34,000                               34,000
PW-5-96    Spray Ave Reconstruction                                                        247,575          185,681              61,894    SIP/Reserve
PW-11-00   Fleet Management - Vehicle Replacement                                          220,000                              220,000    Fleet Reserve
PW-19-93   Parking Lot Improvements                                                         52,000                               52,000    General Reserve
PW-25-01   Rabbit Street Reconstruction                                                     60,000                               60,000    General Reserve
PW-35-94   Bridge Maintenance                                                               37,500                               37,500    General Reserve
PW-49-97   Cemetary Upgrades                                                                20,000                               20,000    General Reserve
PW-53-01   Bear Street Parkade Capital Improvements                                         80,000                               80,000    General Reserve
PW-56-02   Machinery & Equipment -New                                                       20,000                               20,000    General Reserve
                                                                                           737,075          185,681             551,394
RC-1       Recreation Grounds Upgrade                                                      368,000                              368,000    General Reserve
RC-3e      Enhanced Connections and High Use Public Spaces                                 100,000                              100,000    General Reserve
RC-5-99    Recreation Centre - Major Upgrade                                               396,300                              396,300    General Reserve
                                                                                           864,300                              864,300
S-5-94     Bow River Sewer Syphon                                                          154,000                              154,000    Sewer Reserve
S-28-00    Spray Avenue Sanitary Sewer Replacement                                          30,000                               30,000    Sewer Reserve
                                                                                           184,000                              184,000
T1-00      Parking Structures
T-10-06    Traffic Control Devices                                                       225,000                                 225,000   General Reserve
                                                                                         225,000                                 225,000
W-2-93      Bow River Crossing                                                           150,000                                 150,000   Water Reserve
W13-02     Spray Aveneu Water Main Upgrades                                               20,000                                  20,000   Water Reserve
                                                                                         170,000                                 170,000
                                                                                       2,214,375            185,681            2,028,694




                                                                                                                                                   Revised 12/7/2006
                                                                                                               Draft #2 For Council Approval



                                                           Capital Projects By Section
                                                                      2010
                                                                                             Cost to Capital
PROJECT                         DESCRIPTION                    Total Cost Other Funding        Reserve            Funding Reserve
GG-23-04   Street Pole Banner & Holiday Pagentry Program
GG24-04    Banff Child Care Centre                                   15,000                            15,000 General Reserve
                                                                     15,000                            15,000
PW-5-96    Spray Avenue Reconstruction                            2,326,825      1,745,119            581,706 General/SIP
PW-11-06   Fleet Management                                         220,000                           220,000 Fleet Reserve
PW-25-01   Rabit Street Reconstruction                              600,000                           600,000 General Reserve
PW-35-94   Bridge Maintenance                                        32,500                            32,500
PW-36-94   Deer Street Reconstruction                                50,000                            50,000 General Reserve
PW-56-02   Machinery and Equipment - New                             20,000                            20,000 General Reserve
                                                                  3,249,325      1,745,119          1,504,206
S-5-94     Bow River Sewer Syphon                                   250,000                           250,000 General/Sewer Reserve
S-12-95    River Avenue Sanitary Sewer Replacement                  100,000                           100,000 Sewer Reserve
S-28-00    Spray Avenue Sanitary Sewer Replacement                  500,000                           500,000 Sewer Reserve
                                                                    850,000                           850,000
W-2-93     Bow River Watermain Crossing                             150,000                           150,000 Water Reserve
W-13-02    Spray Avenue Watermain Upgrades                          630,000                           630,000 Water Reserve
                                                                    780,000                           780,000
                                                                  4,894,325      1,745,119          3,149,206




                                                                                                                          Revised 12/7/2006
                                                                                                                     Draft #2 For Council Approval



                                                      Capital Projects By Section
                                                                 2011
                                                                                     Other       Cost to Capital
 PROJECT                             DESCRIPTION                     Total Cost     Funding        Reserve              Funding Reserve
GG-7-03    552 Banff Avenue                                                25,000                           25,000   Staff Accomodation Reserve
                                                                           25,000                           25,000
PW-11-06   Fleet Management                                               423,140                          423,140   Fleet Reserve
PW-20-94   St Julien Reconstruction                                       436,230     334,230              102,000   General Reserve/SIP
PW-36-94   Deer Street Reconstruction                                     650,000     165,770              484,230   General Reserve/SIP
PW-56-02   Machinery and Equipment - New                                   20,000                           20,000   General Reserve
                                                                        1,529,370     500,000            1,029,370

S-12-95    River Avenue Sanitary Sewer Replacement                        900,000                          900,000 Sewer Reserve
S-36-06    St Julien Road Sanitary Sewer Replacment                        48,500                           48,500 Sewer Reserve
                                                                          948,500                          948,500
T-1-00     Parking Structures                                           5,500,000                        5,500,000 General Reserve
                                                                        5,500,000                        5,500,000
W-2-93      Bow River Watermain Crossing                                3,600,000    1,100,000           2,500,000 Debt Funding/Water
W-20-96    Tunnel Mountain Upgrades                                        20,000                           20,000 Water Reserve
                                                                        3,620,000    1,100,000           2,520,000
                                                                       11,622,870    1,600,000          10,022,870




                                                                                                                                 Revised 12/7/2006
                                                                                                                                                            Draft #2 For Council Approval


                                                                                YEAR 2007 CAPITAL RESERVES


                      GENERAL       OFF SITE    FLEET       FIRE EQUIP     GARBAGE     PARKING     WATER       SEWER          ART       COMPUTER      REVOLVING      STAFF     HERITAGE      SPRAY/CAVE       TOTAL
                                                                                                                                                                    HOUSING                 KOOTENAY ARP


BALANCE                7,302,532      689,260    373,596        364,171       33,000   (244,592)   (705,281)   (1,301,779)    41,694        66,812       188,711       (512)     179,952                -     6,987,564
OPERATING TRANSFERS    1,816,908                 225,000         70,000                             657,500       605,600     10,000                                  33,400     (35,000)                     3,383,408
GOVERNMENT GRANTS      5,207,000                                                                                 100,000                                                                                      5,307,000
DEVELOPMENT LEVIES                    50,000                                 10,000      25,000                                                                                                    10,000          95,000
INTEREST                                                                                                                                                                                                                -
DEBT PAYMENT                                                                                                                                                                                                            -
SALE PROCEEDS                                     33,000                                                                                                                                                           33,000
OTHER
  *Fund Transfer                                                                                                                                                                                                       -
  *Borrowing                                                                                                                                                                                                           -
  *Cost Shared           515,000                                                                     250,000                                                                                                     765,000
CARRY-OVERS           (8,157,109)                                                                  (137,000)     (94,492)    (45,000)      (30,439)      (33,712)                                 (10,000)   (8,507,751)
PROJECTS              (7,233,200)               (399,000)      (164,000)                      -    (583,000)    (370,000)                                                                                    (8,749,200)
BALANCE                 (548,869)     739,260    232,596        270,171       43,000   (219,592)   (517,781)   (1,060,671)     6,694        36,373       155,000      32,888     144,952                -        (685,980)




                                                                                                                                                                                                     12/7/2006
                                                                                                                                                         Draft #2 For Council Approval


                                                                              YEAR 2008 CAPITAL RESERVES


                      GENERAL       OFF SITE    FLEET       FIRE EQUIP   GARBAGE     PARKING     WATER         SEWER         ART      COMPUTER     REVOLVING     STAFF     HERITAGE      SPRAY/CAVE     TOTAL
                                                                                                                                                                HOUSING                 KOOTENAY ARP


BALANCE                 (548,869)     739,260    232,596       270,171      43,000   (219,592)    (517,781)    (1,060,671)    6,694       36,373      155,000     32,888     144,952               -        (685,980)
OPERATING TRANSFERS    2,090,400                 225,000        75,000                             844,300        881,000    10,000                               38,400     (35,000)                       4,129,100
GOVERNMENT GRANTS      4,156,250                                                                    129,000                                                                                                 4,285,250
DEVELOPMENT LEVIES                    50,000                               10,000      25,000                                                                                                 10,000          95,000
INTEREST                                                                                                                                                                                                           -
DEBT PAYMENT                                                                                                                                                                                                       -
SALE PROCEEDS                                     27,000                                                                                                                                                      27,000
OTHER
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 -
  *Borrowing           1,300,000                                                                                                                                                                         1,300,000
  *Cost Shared                                                                                                                                                                                                   -
CARRY-OVERS           (7,245,140)                                                                                                                                                                      (7,245,140)
PROJECTS              (4,089,000)               (344,000)                             (55,000)   (1,126,500)                                                                                           (5,614,500)
BALANCE               (4,336,359)     789,260    140,596       345,171      53,000   (249,592)    (670,981)     (179,671)    16,694       36,373      155,000     71,288     109,952          10,000   (3,709,270)




                                                                                                                                                                                                12/7/2006
                                                                                                                                                                    Draft #2 For Council Approval


                                                                                      YEAR 2009 CAPITAL RESERVES


                             GENERAL       OFF SITE    FLEET       FIRE EQUIP   GARBAGE     PARKING     WATER       SEWER        ART      COMPUTER     REVOLVING      STAFF      HERITAGE      SPRAY/CAVE     TOTAL
                                                                                                                                                                     HOUSING                  KOOTENAY ARP


BALANCE                      (4,336,359)     789,260    140,596       345,171      53,000   (249,592)   (670,981)    (179,671)   16,694       36,373      155,000      71,288      109,952          10,000   (3,709,270)
OPERATING TRANSFERS           3,413,600                 250,000        80,000                           1,100,000    1,154,700   10,000                                43,400      (35,000)                   6,016,700
GOVERNMENT GRANTS             2,749,680                                                                                                                                                                        2,749,680
DEVELOPMENT LEVIES                           50,000                               10,000      25,000                                                                                                10,000           95,000
INTEREST                                                                                                                                                                                                                 -
DEBT PAYMENT                  (161,000)                                                                                                                                                                        (161,000)
SALE PROCEEDS                                            34,000                                                                                                                                                      34,000
OTHER
  *Fund Transfer-Franchise     161,000                                                                                                                                                                          161,000
   *Borrowing                                                                                                   -                                                                                                     -
   *Cost Shared                                                                                                                                                                                                       -
PROJECTS                     (1,630,375)               (220,000)                                        (170,000)    (184,000)                                        (10,000)                               (2,214,375)
BALANCE                        196,546       839,260    204,596       425,171      63,000   (224,592)    259,019      791,029    26,694       36,373      155,000     104,688       74,952          20,000     2,971,735




                                                                                                                                                                                                         12/7/2006
                                                                                                                                                              Draft #2 For Council Approval


                                                                                       YEAR 2010 CAPITAL RESERVES


                             GENERAL       OFF SITE    FLEET       FIRE EQUIP   GARBAGE     PARKING     WATER       SEWER        ART      COMPUTER     REVOLVING     STAFF     HERITAGE      SPRAY/CAVE      TOTAL
                                                                                                                                                                    HOUSING                 KOOTENAY ARP


BALANCE                         196,546      839,260    204,596       425,171      63,000   (224,592)     259,019      791,029   26,694       36,373      155,000    104,688      74,952          20,000     2,971,735
OPERATING TRANSFERS           3,538,600                 250,000        80,000                           1,375,000    1,574,000   10,000                               43,400     (35,000)                    6,836,000
GOVERNMENT GRANTS             1,745,119                                                                                                                                                                      1,745,119
DEVELOPMENT LEVIES                           50,000                               10,000      25,000                                                                                              10,000           95,000
INTEREST                                                                                                                                                                                                                -
DEBT PAYMENT                  (161,000)                                                                                                                                                                          (161,000)
SALE PROCEEDS                                            25,000                                                                                                                                                    25,000
OTHER
  *Fund Transfer-Franchise      161,000                                                                                                                                                                        161,000
   *Borrowing                                                                                                                                                                                                        -
   *Cost Shared                                                                                                                                                                                                      -
PROJECTS                     (3,044,325)               (220,000)                                        (780,000)    (850,000)                                                                              (4,894,325)
BALANCE                       2,435,940      889,260    259,596       505,171      73,000   (199,592)    854,019     1,515,029   36,694       36,373      155,000    148,088      39,952          30,000     6,778,529




                                                                                                                                                                                                     12/7/2006
                                                                                                                                                                Draft #2 For Council Approval


                                                                                       YEAR 2011 CAPITAL RESERVES


                             GENERAL       OFF SITE    FLEET       FIRE EQUIP   GARBAGE     PARKING     WATER         SEWER        ART      COMPUTER     REVOLVING     STAFF      HERITAGE      SPRAY/CAVE      TOTAL
                                                                                                                                                                      HOUSING                  KOOTENAY ARP


BALANCE                       2,435,940      889,260    259,596       505,171      73,000   (199,592)      854,019     1,515,029   36,694       36,373      155,000    148,088       39,952          30,000         6,778,529
OPERATING TRANSFERS           3,538,600                 350,000        80,000                            1,700,000     1,900,000   10,000                               43,400      (35,000)                        7,587,000
GOVERNMENT GRANTS               500,000                                                                                                                                                                              500,000
DEVELOPMENT LEVIES                           50,000                               10,000      25,000                                                                                                 10,000           95,000
INTEREST                                                                                                                                                                                                                   -
DEBT PAYMENT                  (161,000)                                                                                                                                                                             (161,000)
SALE PROCEEDS                                            64,000                                                                                                                                                       64,000
OTHER
  *Fund Transfer-Franchise      161,000                                                                                                                                                                           161,000
   *Borrowing                                                                                            1,100,000                                                                                              1,100,000
   *Cost Shared                                                                                                                                                                                                         -
PROJECTS                     (6,606,230)               (423,140)                                        (3,620,000)    (948,500)                                       (25,000)                               (11,622,870)
BALANCE                       (131,690)      939,260    250,456       585,171      83,000   (174,592)       34,019     2,466,529   46,694       36,373      155,000    191,488        4,952          40,000         4,501,659




                                                                                                                                                                                                        12/7/2006
REQUEST FOR DECISION
Subject: Bylaw No. 259
Amendment to Commercial Allotment Annual Submission Date

Presented to: Council                                 Date: December 11, 2006
                                                      Agenda #: 8.3
Submitted by: Troy Pollock, Senior Planner            File: 06RZ05

RECOMMENDATION
It is recommended that Council give first reading to Bylaw 259 and schedule a Public Hearing for
January 22, 2007.

BACKGROUND
Reason for Report
A total of 961.4m2 (10,348 sq.ft.) of previously allocated commercial use development allotments (CDA)
have expired in the past year and is now eligible for reallocation. The proposed bylaw will amend the
existing annual submission date to facilitate the allocation of the expired allotments as early as
possible (i.e. Spring 2007 rather than Fall 2007). A copy of Bylaw 259 is attached as Appendix ‘A’.

Summary of Issue
All 32,515 m2 (350,000 sq.ft.) of commercial use development allotments have been allocated as of the last
random selection the Fall draw in 2005. 17,063 m2, (or 52 % of the total allocated gross floor area)
has been physically developed or constructed to date leaving 15,542m2 (or 48% of the total gross
floor area) undeveloped.

Undeveloped projects that received a full allotment will expire if a development permit application is
not submitted within five years from the date the full allotment was received. Undeveloped projects
that received only a partial allotment will expire on November 15, 2009 unless the full allotment is
received before that date. If a partial application receives a full allotment prior to that date the
applicant will then have five years to apply for a development permit. The proposed bylaw will help
ensure some projects obtain their full allotments as early as possible.

When any amount of previously allocated CDA has expired, the expired allotment must be
reallocated in accordance with the procedures set out in section 9.8.0 of the Land Use Bylaw.
However, prior to any expired allotments being reallocated, the recent transferability amendment
mandates that those applicants that received a partial allocation have an opportunity to transfer an
allotment to another partial applicant or an unsuccessful applicant.

At least 120 days prior to the allocation date, the Development Officer is required to send
notification to those partial and unsuccessful applicants informing them of the deadline to submit an
application for transfer. The deadline for submission of an application to transfer is 60 days prior to
the allocation date.

The annual submission date is presently set at October 15th of each calendar year (sec. 9.6.1) and
allocation must occur within 60 days of the annual submission date (sec. 9.8.9). The time frame to
meet the transferability notification requirements (i.e. minimum 120 days notice prior to allocation
date and minimum 60 days prior to submission date) has passed for this year so without the
proposed bylaw amendment the next allocation date cannot occur until after October 15th, 2007.
                                                                                            2 of 4


Response Options
   1. Give first reading to Bylaw 259 and schedule a Public Hearing for January 22, 2007 or an
      alternative date acceptable to Council (recommended option).
   2. Request additional information before taking further action.

IMPLICATIONS OF RECOMMENDATION
Legislation
In accordance with the Municipal Government Act, a public hearing is required to be held prior to
second reading of an amendment to the Land Use Bylaw. Pursuant to the Incorporation
Agreement, the Minister of Environment must give final approval to an amending bylaw prior to its
taking effect.

Commercial Growth Management
There is potential for additional allotments to expire in November of 2007 through to 2009. The
proposed bylaw amendment will facilitate the reallocation of any future expired allotments much
earlier than the existing regulation.

CONCLUSION
The proposed bylaw amendment will advance the timetable for reallocation of expired commercial
use development allotments. The intent of the amendment is to make sure that any expired
allotments can be reallocated in an appropriate timeframe. The bylaw amendment should enhance
clarity and certainty for commercial reinvestment and ensure that all of the CDA allotments can be
eventually developed into functioning commercial space.

ATTACHMENTS
Appendix ‘A’ – Amending Bylaw No. 259


Authored By:

                     Troy Pollock, Senior Planner
Submitted By:

                     Randall Mckay, Manager of Planning &
                     Development

Reviewed By:
                     Bruce Bedwell, Acting Town Manager




Council: Bylaw 259                                                                   Agenda #8.3
                                                                                         Appendix ‘A’

                                           BYLAW 259
 BEING A BYLAW OF THE TOWN OF BANFF, IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA,
  TO AMEND LAND USE BYLAW 31-3 WITH RESPECT TO COMMERCIAL USE
        DEVELOPMENT ALLOTMENT ANNUAL SUBMISSION DATE

WHEREAS Council may, in a Land Use Bylaw pursuant to the Municipal Government Act, RSA
2000, Chapter M-26 (the “Act”) and the Town of Banff Federal Provincial Incorporation
Agreement, divide all or part of the area of the Town into land use districts, define each district,
regulate the land, buildings and structures within each district, and the uses of land, buildings, and
structures within each district;

AND WHEREAS it is in the interest of the Town of Banff to amend Land Use Bylaw 31-3 to
revise the annual submission date in Section 9.6.1 of the Bylaw affecting the commercial use
development allocation procedure.

NOW THEREFORE the Council of the Town of Banff, in the Province of Alberta, duly
assembled, enacts as follows:

CITATION
1. This bylaw may be cited as the “Commercial Allotment Submission Date Amendment Bylaw.”

PROVISIONS
2. Section 9.6.1 of Land Use Bylaw 31-3, regarding the annual submission date for
   applications for a commercial use development allotment, is amended by deleting
   “October 15th” and replacing it with “February 15th.”

ENACTMENT
3. This bylaw comes into force after the date of final passing, upon approval and execution by the
   Superintendent, Banff National Park, for the Minister of the Environment.



    Read a first time this xx day of month, 2006.

    Pursuant to the Municipal Government Act (Alberta), a Public Hearing was held this xx day of
    month, 2007.

    Read a second time this xx day of month, 2007.

    Read a third time this xx day of month, 2007.
                 Town of Banff Bylaw 259 – Commercial Allotment Submission Date Amendment

Approved on behalf of the Town of Banff this ______ day of ___________, 2007.



              John Stutz
                Mayor



             Robert Earl
            Town Manager


Approved by the Minister of the Environment, by his delegate, this ______ day of ___________,
2007.



 Minister of the Environment/Delegate
BRIEFING
Subject: Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative


Presented to: Council/Committee                      Date: December 11, 2006

Submitted by: Alison Ortwein, FCSS Supervisor        Agenda #: 8.4


RECOMMENDATION
It is recommended that Council receive this report as information.

BACKGROUND

Reason for Report

Lack of sufficient childcare spaces in our community prompted Banff FCSS to work in partnership
with Canmore & Cochrane FCSS to acquire funds from Region 3 Child & Family Services Authority
to conduct a childcare study in the communities West of Calgary. The study had 3 purposes:

        1. To provide an accurate description of the current child care operations.
        2. To identify demand for quality community childcare.
        3. To recommend a strategic plan for quality childcare capacity building for the areas of
           Cochrane, M.D. of Bighorn, Canmore, Banff & Lake Louise.

The study, conducted by Dr. Malcolm Read, PhD, has tabled several recommendations and
strategies for ways to address the childcare situation currently being faced in each of the 3 partnering
communities that are participating in this initiative.

Summary of Issue

The demand for quality community childcare in Banff far outweighs the current provision. This
issue was listed as one of the significant concerns of parents with young children in the 2006 Banff
FCSS Community Social Assessment. As such, Banff FCSS, in collaboration with the neighbouring
municipalities of Canmore & Cochrane, partnered to acquire funds to conduct this childcare study.

Some highlights from the study that pertain specifically to Banff include:

•   There are currently 80 government regulated childcare spaces in Banff, and there are twice as
    many people on the wait list as there are spaces in the program. The most acute demand is for
    infant and toddler care spaces.
•   Most children are cared for by unregulated caregivers, in the caregivers home and while some
    abide by the Provincial requirements (i.e. # of children allowed), many do not.
•   Affordability is an issue for many families. Government subsidy is only available if the child
    attends a government regulated program.
•   Fees for unregulated childcare range from $30/day to more than $50/day. The average is
    $40/day.
•   Unregulated childcare is not monitored for quality.
•   Currently, the Banff Childcare Facility meets basic licensing standards, but has not yet met
    Provincial standards for accreditation
•   The Banff Childcare Centre has historically had difficulties attracting and retaining staff
                                                                                                   2 of 3

The specific recommendations tabled in this report are based on the premise that the purpose is to
develop a comprehensive and high quality system of childcare supports for families in the Calgary
West Rural Region. Where possible, and when appropriate, Banff will work in partnership with
neighbouring municipalities to achieve the recommendations tabled. The three goals &
corresponding recommendations for our region include:

Goal #1: Increase the availability of high quality, Government regulated childcare
• Establish a Family Day Home Agency
• Propose to the Provincial Government that new program types may be regulated (i.e. shared
   day nanny programs)
• Assist parents in setting up parent cooperatives

Goal #2: Ensure that existing and new childcare programs in the region operate efficiently,
and provide services to families that are affordable.
 • Incorporate a new HUB agency in Canmore, Banff, Lake Louise and the MD of Bighorn to
    replace the current two daycare societies in Canmore & Banff and to realize several
    administrative efficiencies.
 • Engage all sectors of the community developing and maintaining childcare services
 • Work with all levels of Government – Municipal, Federal and Provincial to ensure adequate
    funding for services

Goal #3: Provide community supports to assist services in providing high quality childcare
programs for families
 • Encourage new and existing services to apply for Accreditation status
 • Provide training opportunities for both regulated and unregulated sectors
 • Engage the community in working with childcare services
 • Promote memberships in professional associations
 • Connect childcare centres with regional College Early Childhood Education programs

Response Options

A detailed 22 page work plan matrix has been created by the consultant, which accompanied the
primary report. In it, specific action items are listed to address the above-mentioned
recommendations. Banff FCSS, in partnership with the Banff Childcare Centre and our other
municipal partners will work collaboratively on many of the recommendations. It is encouraging to
note that since our sharing of the recommendation pertaining to the application of Accreditation
with the Banff Childcare Centre, they have since applied for it, with a goal to have accreditation
status by early 2007.

Some of the recommendations have implications that are Bow Valley wide. There is interest on the
part of both the Banff & Canmore Board Chairs, and Executive Directors to discuss options for the
possible creation of one society that would oversee both sites. At this stage, it is too early to tell if
this recommendation could be fully realized, but there is definitely an interest to work together in
addressing childcare issues that affect both communities.




Council: Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative                                           Agenda #8.4
                                                                                                   3 of 3
IMPLICATIONS OF RECOMMENDATION

Financial
There are no specific financial implications to the Town of Banff as a result of this report. The
findings of this report do however, solidify the importance of the Town’s ongoing support of the
Banff Childcare Centre in the form of the operation & maintenance of the current childcare facility.

Organizational
There are possible organizational implications for the Banff Childcare Society and the Canmore
Daycare, should all of the recommendations in this report be realized in full. It would of course be
up to their respective boards, should they wish to amalgamate to achieve administrative efficiencies.

 Banff Community Plan/Banff Community Indicators/Council Strategic Plan (etc.)
Banff FCSS has participated in this particular initiative in specific response to Recommendation #21
from the 2006 Banff FCSS Community Social Assessment: “To identify solutions that will address
childcare issues in Banff”.

Other
Banff FCSS will dedicate staff time to assist in exploring the various recommendations that have
been tabled in this report. Currently, the FCSS Supervisor is the liaison for this particular project.

CONCLUSION
Lack of quality childcare is a significant concern for young families in our community, and is
something we need to address creatively. Many of the recommendations tabled in the Calgary West
Rural Child Care Initiative report could go a long way in addressing the lack of childcare currently
available. It is essential for Banff FCSS to keep abreast of this issue, and to work, wherever possible
to encourage, support and facilitate the creation of additional quality childcare spaces in Banff.

ATTACHMENTS

Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative – Final Report


Submitted By:
                            Alison Ortwein, FCSS Supervisor

Reviewed By:
                         Bruce Bedwell, Acting Town Manager




Council: Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative                                          Agenda #8.4
                Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative



                                     REPORT




Prepared by:    Malcolm Read Ph.D.
                Pathways: Services for Children & Families


Prepared for:    Brenda Caston, Manager FCSS, Canmore.

                Susan Flowers, Manager, FCSS, Cochrane

                Alison Ortwein, Supervisor, FCSS, Banff


Submitted on: October 15, 2006.
.
       Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative

                              Final Report

                      Executive Summary

                              October 2006


This study was conducted between July 01 and September 31st. 2006.

The purpose was to describe the current child care services in the region and to
recommend ideas for a strategic plan that would improve these services.

The following gives a brief summary of major findings and recommendations from
the study.

Findings:
   1.     There are 144 Government regulated childcare spaces in the region, and
          approximately 2500 children under age. six.- Canmore has spaces for 58
          children, Banff for 80 children and Cochrane for 6 children. There are no
          Government regulated childcare spaces in Lake Louise or the MD of Bighorn.
   2.     Most children are cared for by unregulated caregivers, in the caregivers home.
   3.     Affordability is an issue for many families, Government subsidy is available
          only if the child attends a regulated program.
   4.     Fees for regulated childcare appear to be lower than fees in other parts of the
          Province.
   5.     Fees for unregulated childcare range from $30.00 per day to more than $50.00
          per day, with an average of approximately $40.00 per day.
   6.     Unregulated childcare is not monitored for quality.
   7.     Regulated childcare meets basic licensing standards but, with the exception of
          the approved family day home in Cochrane, has not met Provincial standards
          for Accreditation
   8.     Two daycare centres in the region (Banff and Canmore) have difficulty
          attracting and retaining qualified staff.




                                            2
Recommendations:
1.   Increase the availability of Government regulated childcare in the region by:
            a.     Establishing Family Day Home Agencies (in both Cochrane and
                   Canmore).
            b.     Establishing a Day Care Centre in Cochrane
            c.     Expanding the license capacity of the daycare centre in Canmore
            c.     Proposing to the Provincial Government that new program types
                   maybe regulated.
            d.     Assisting parents in setting up parent cooperatives

2.     Increase the efficiency / affordability of childcare in the region by:
              a.     Incorporating a new HUB Agency in Canmore, Banff, Lake Louise
                     and the MD of Bighorn, to replace the current two day care
                     societies, and realize several administrative efficiencies.
              b.     Proposing to the Boys & Girls Club in Cochrane that it become the
                     HUB Agency for Cochrane and western MD of RockyView.
              c.     Engaging all sectors of the community developing and maintaining
                     childcare services
              d.     Working with all levels of Government – Municipal, Federal and
                     Provincial – to ensure adequate funding for services

3.     Support childcare services in their efforts to maintain high quality childcare:

              a.     Encouraging new and existing services to apply for Accreditation
                     status
              b.     Provide training opportunities for both regulated and unregulated
                     sectors
              c.     Engage the community in working with childcare services
              d.     Promote memberships in professional associations
              e.     Connect the child care communities with local College ECCE
                     programs.




                                           3
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                           `
Contents
Introduction                                    Page 5

Study Purposes                                  Page 5

Data collection                                 Page 5

Research Results                                Page 6

Current Child Care Operations                   Page 6

Availability                                    Page 9

Affordability                                   Page 12

Quality                                         Page 13

In conclusion                                   Page 16

Recommendations: Introduction                   Page 16

Recommendation 1: Goals                         Page 17

Recommendation 2: Multi-Sectoral Agencies       Page 18

Recommendation 3: Availability                  Page 19

Recommendation 4: Increase Efficiencies         Page 20

Recommendation 5: Support Quality               Page 21

Participant List                                Appendix A

Reading List                                    Appendix B

Letter re. Federal Government Child Care Plan   Appendix C

Workplan Matrix                                 Appendix D




                                          4
Introduction.
This report is prepared by Dr. Malcolm Read to provide a final copy of the findings and
recommendations that result from the study Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative,
(July 01 – September 30, 2006).


The study, commissioned by Family and Community Support Services in Banff,
Canmore and Cochrane, had three primary purposes:


1.     to provide an accurate description of current child care operations

2.     to identify demand for quality community child care, and

3.     to recommend a strategic plan for quality child care capacity building for the
       areas of Cochrane, M.D. of Bighorn, Canmore, Banff and Lake Louise.


Data Collection.

The study was completed over approximately twelve weeks, from early July until the end
of September 2006. Data were gathered in a variety of ways.


A.     A majority of opinions and perspectives were gathered through informal
conversational interviews with individuals and groups from across the region. While the
majority of these interviews took place in-person, a smaller number (approximately 10%)
were conducted by telephone, and a smaller number again (approximately 5%) were
completed by email


A total of 96 individuals participated (see Appendix B) in the data gathering as described
in (A) above. Participant groups may be described as follows:


      i.     Key informants in the field of child care, living in the Calgary West Rural
             region. Starting with FCSS Directors and staff, participants were identified
             by these offices as members of the communities whose personal and
             professional interests and positions identified them as both knowledgeable
             and interested. This group included those directly involved in providing
             government regulated childcare services and professional personnel who
             worked with families who used regulated child care services. Individual

                                           5
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                           `
             participants in this group included personnel representing Day Care
             Centres, Day Care Boards, Parent Link Centres, Community Health,
             Rehabilitation Services, Mental Health workers, Boys & Girls Club,
             YMCA, School District personnel.
      ii.    Those with direct involvement in the child care field both as parents and as
             caregivers working in the non-regulated sector.


      iii.   Community members with a potential interest in child care as it relates to
             other activities. This included Chambers of Commerce, representatives of
             businesses and municipal recreation departments.


B. Factual data regarding populations, numbers of children in the region, and
   comparisons with other municipalities and regions were gathered from documentary
   sources, including the Cochrane Community Survey (2005), the 2005 Banff
   Municipal Census, the 2005 Canmore Census, and the Canadian Early Learning &
   Child Care Report (2006).

C. Other information, regarding indices of quality care, standards of care, and childcare
   alternatives was gathered from current published research and opinion articles (See
   Bibliography).


Research Results.

Current Child Care Operations
The study looked at childcare operations throughout the rural region west of the city of
Calgary. This region included the municipalities of Cochrane, Canmore, Banff and Lake
Louise, and the Municipal District of Bighorn, including Exshaw, Harvie Heights, and
Lac des Arcs.


       Government Regulated Childcare
       Throughout the region Government Approved/ Licensed Child Care operations
       are limited to three programs:


   1. In Banff, the Banff Child Care Centre is licensed to provide care for up to 80
      children between the ages one-month and 83 months. Three spaces are for
      children up to 12 months, a further 4 spaces for children 13 – 18 months, and the
      remaining 73 spaces are for children between the ages 19 and 83 months. At
      present, however, the Centre uses only 62 of these spaces – six spaces for children
      up to 19 months, 12 spaces for children 19 – 30 months, 12 spaces for children 31



                                            6
       months to 42 months, 16 spaces for children from 42 months to 54 months, and
       16 spaces for children between 55 months and six years. The Centre is exploring
       the possibility of expanding its intake to accommodate 80 spaces.


   2. In Canmore, the Canmore Community Child Care Centre is licensed to provide
      care for up to 58 children between ages one month and 83 months. Four spaces
      are for children up to 12 months, 4 spaces for children 13 – 18 months, and the
      remaining 50 spaces are for children between 19 and 83 months.


   3. In Cochrane, there are two approved Family Day Homes. One operates under
      contract to the Calgary Family Day Home Agency. The other operates under
      contract to the Bowness-Montgomery Child Care Association The maximum
      number of children that can be accommodated in each home is six children under
      six years of age at any one time, including the providers own children – not more
      than 2 children under 2 years of age, and not more than 3 children under 3 years
      of age.


These 132 (150) childcare spaces are the only Government approved/ licensed and
regulated childcare spaces in the Calgary West region. (There will be 150 Government
approved / licensed spaces in the region if the Banff Day Care expands to accommodate
80 spaces).


       Government Licensed Out-Of-School-Care
       In addition each of the above communities has a program that provides Out-Of-
       School-Care (OSC) – that is, care for school-age children before school, at lunch-
       time, after school, and on days when school is not open - for children from ages
       six to thirteen years.
       In Cochrane, the Cochrane Before & After School Care program is operated by
       the Boys and Girls Club.
       In Banff the Town of Banff Community Services Department operates the Kids
       Kampus After School Club.
       In Canmore, the Bow Valley Before & After School Care is licensed by the
       Province to provide OSC, and is operated by the Canmore Day Care Society.


       Unregulated childcare in the region.


       A majority of childcare occurs on an informal and unregulated basis – with
       parents leaving their children with an unregulated (that is, not licensed, approved
                                           7
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                           `
or regulated by the Province) provider in the provider’s home. There is no
organized system of this care. Parents discover who may be willing to care for
their child through advertisements in local newspapers, community bulletin
boards and by word-of mouth. Provincial regulation restricts the number of
children that may be cared-for in a provider’s home (regulated and unregulated)to
not more than six children under 11 years of age at any one time (including the
provider’s own children) with no more than two children under 2 years of age and
no more than three children under 3 years of age. Several verbal reports from
professional personnel, parents and providers indicate that there are instances in
which this Provincial standard is not adhered to.


Comprehensive registries of these providers are not maintained in the region and
there is no central referral point to which parents may go to look for childcare.
The YWCA in Banff does maintain a list of providers, as does the Resource
Centre in Cochrane. However, these are not always updated or maintained and
are not well advertised to parents.
It is difficult to estimate the number of unregulated family day home providers.
Home-based businesses in each of the municipalities are expected to register with
the town, meet certain by-law requirements and pay an annual fee. It appears that
only a small fraction of child care providers obtain the necessary home-based
business license. Fewer than 20 such licenses had been issued across the region at
the time of this study. Informal estimates of the number of home-based child care
businesses range from 50 – 70 homes.
Francophone Society
In Canmore the Francophone Society has organized to operate a licensed Nursery
School program, and offers a French-only family day home program – which is
unregulated - and is planning (hoping) to gain support to operate a Francophone
Day care program.
Nanny Services
Some families use nanny services. Live-in nannies, often performing duties that
include housework and cooking as well as childcare, are used in some families.
Estimates at costs range from $1300.00 - $3000.00 per month, excluding costs of
living and rent. Day-nannies – in which the nanny comes into the home for 8 -9
hours daily but sleeps / lives elsewhere are also used by some families. Several
examples were provided of situations in which families “shared” a day-nanny.
Typically this involved parents transporting their children to the home of another
family and the nanny caring for all of the children in that home.
Kin Care
There were a few instances of family members caring for children. This took two
forms. The most common was that children were taken to the home of a relative
(usually grandparent) and were cared for in that home. Sometimes parents
provided care by working shift work – for instance, mom would care for the
children during the day – and dad during the night.


                                     8
       Drop-in Care
       In Cochrane a part-time, drop-in care facility (Christopher Robin) provides
       childcare. This is not a government licensed or approved program. It operates
       out of a recreation facility and provides care for children while their parents are
       on site in the facility. It also provides intermittent, short-term and part-time care
       for children whose parents are not on site. A similar unregulated drop-in program
       operates in the recreation centre in Canmore.


Availability, Affordability and Quality
In completing this study, the three strands that were investigated were those of
availability, affordability and quality of childcare services in the region.


Availability
There is an obvious deficit in the availability of Government regulated/ approved or
licensed childcare in the region. National Census data, (2001) shows that approximately
2500 pre-school-aged children (0 – 5 years) live in the region. National and provincial
research data suggests that at least 50.0% of children in this age range require some (part-
time or full-time) non-parent child care each week – that is approximately 1250 children
need child care in the region. The 132 Government regulated spaces represent
approximately one space for every 9 children who require childcare. Current economic
pressures would indicate that few families in this region are able to live on one income
(in a two-parent family) or to live on social assistance (in a one-parent family). The
estimate of 50.0% of children in the region needing childcare appears to be a
conservative estimate. A recent report from Statistics Canada (Luffman, 2006) shows
that 68.0% of mothers with children under six years of age are currently in the workforce
in Alberta.
This lack of available Government regulated childcare has several consequences.


              1.       Parents are missing an opportunity to receive a Provincial
                       Government Subsidy for childcare.
              Parents who may be eligible for a Provincial Government subsidy to enable
              them to afford child care can only collect this assistance if the child is
              attending a Government regulated child care program (approved family day
              home or licensed day care centre).
              Eligibility for subsidy includes two parent families with two children with
              an annual net income of up to $70,000, and for single parent families with
              one child with an annual net income of up to $52,000.00. It is difficult to
              present a precise number of families in the region that would qualify for
              financial assistance in the form of a childcare subsidy. However, census
                                           9
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                           `
figures from 2001 suggest that median annual incomes for people over 15
years of age in the region were approximately $24,000.00 in the year 2000.


2.      Lack of Government regulated childcare services has resulted
        in an ad-hoc patchwork of programs that are not organized,
        advertised or cohesive.
For families with young children moving into the region, and for families
living in the area and needing childcare, the search for childcare is
bewildering and stressful. Every family interviewed talked of the initial
worries and negative experiences as they began their search. These
included:
                (a).    Families may wait several months for an opening
                        in one of the two day care centres
                        Families living in Banff and Canmore and who
                        registered their child into a licensed daycare centre,
                        often found themselves facing a wait of several
                        months before the child could be accepted. Several
                        families and a Day Care Director indicated that
                        families often register their child several months
                        before he/she is born!
                (b)     The demand for child care in the region is so
                        great that most unregulated providers do not
                        advertise their services – even so, they report
                        receiving between one and five phone calls every
                        week from parents looking for care.
                        For families living in Cochrane and a majority of
                        families living in Canmore, Banff, Lake Louise and
                        the MD of Bighorn, the search was restricted to
                        trying to locate an unregulated family day home
                        provider who had space for their child. Parents
                        related stories of their desperation in simply trying
                        to find the name and phone number of a local
                        provider. Providers also told of telephone messages
                        from parents, begging them to take “just one more
                        child” and sometimes offering to pay more than the
                        provider’s regular fee.
3.      This patchwork of unregulated care that is so much in demand
        leaves parents feeling vulnerable.
Even those parents who expressed satisfaction with the care their child
received in an unregulated home, continue to worry about what they would
do if the current service fails. Several parents stated that they simply would
not know what to do if the provider told them that she could no longer care
for their child. When asked that question, several parents made statements


                              10
             that echoed one mother who said, “I try not to think about that. I hope it
             never happens”.
             4.       Many of the unregulated day home providers (more than 50%)
                      stated a preference to be part of an organized and Government
                      regulated service.
             Providers spoke of the stress and difficulty in telling parents that they were
             unable to help them in their search for childcare. Many felt that this would
             be reduced if services were well organized and advertised and they could
             refer parents to other programs or individuals. Some providers also spoke
             of preferring to work as part of a network system, in which they could have
             more opportunity to share ideas, get information, and gain support.
             5.       Lack of available child care affects employment
             While discussions with the business sector – Chambers of Commerce and
             individual business owners and managers – indicated that most were
             unaware of childcare issues and their possible impact on employment, a few
             examples of the direct negative impact were provided. For instance, a
             community health nurse was unable to accept a position in Cochrane
             because there was no childcare available in the community
             6.       Absence of Government regulated spaces adversely affects
                      some populations and programs
              Health Care professional personnel in all three communities spoke of how
             the absence of regulated childcare services adversely affected their
             opportunity to assist families in need of temporary respite care. Respite
             care is provided in many Albertan and Canadian communities by reserving
             spaces in child care programs that may be used (on a referral basis) by
             families with particular needs. This may apply to families experiencing a
             particular crisis – such as a mother suffering from post-partum depression,
             or a parent having an accident, or a mother leaving a domestic abuse
             situation. This service is unavailable in the West Calgary region.
              Health Care professional personnel across the region, also expressed
             concerns about the well-being of young children with special needs in the
             region. The absence of regulated childcare reduces the options for parents
             in their search for care for their children which is supportive, and may
             require additional expertise and/ or additional personnel to ensure that the
             child’s needs are met. Estimates of the number of young children in the
             population who may be described as having special needs vary from 2% to
             8%. (between 50 and 200 children in the region).


             7.       Transportation may hinder access.
             In all three communities parents spoke of difficulties involved in
             transportation. This was most acute in instances where children were
                                           11
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
             eligible to attend a Kindergarten program, and were also in the care of an
             unregulated provider. Since the Provider typically had several other
             children in her care, transporting the five-year-old child to Kindergarten
             and then picking her up three hours later was impossible. Some parents did
             arrange for taxis to pick up and drop off their children. However, other
             parents were unable to enroll their children in Kindergarten.


             8.       Informal, temporary childcare systems needed.
             Parents in two communities (Cochrane and Canmore) spoke of he need for
             informal, temporary and part-time care. For instance, while attending
             medical appointments, shopping etc. Given that a characteristic of the
             region is the steady influx of people from other parts of Canada and from
             outside Canada – all without extended family or friends in the area – this
             appears to be a gap in childcare support services to families.


              9.      Parents drive to other communities to find regulated care for
                      their children.
              Parents in several communities – both rural and urban – reported that they
              drove to other communities to find Government regulated (licensed or
              approved) childcare. Parents living and working in Canmore may drive
              back and forth to Banff for childcare because the daycare in Canmore has
              no openings. Similarly, parents in Cochrane, spoke of using childcare
              services in Calgary.


              10.     Licensed Childcare operates with extensive wait-lists.
              Both licensed day care centres (Banff and Canmore) report
              that they typically operate with extensive wait-lists. While wait-lists vary
              from one year to the next, both centres report that they may have twice as
              many people on the wait list as there are spaces in the program. The
              most acute demand is for infant and toddler care spaces.


Affordability
The lack of available childcare services also impacts on affordability. The supply and
demand situation in Cochrane, Canmore and Banff has resulted in increased costs for
parents, especially in the unregulated sector.


       Regulated Childcare fees.
       Regulated day care programs in Canmore and Banff struggle economically to
       maintain their services even though they both receive municipal support in the
       form of reduced rent and utilities. Both programs are involved in fund-raising,


                                           12
       often needing to use the proceeds for operational costs. At present fees in both
       programs are at about $600.00 per child per month and are under review at this
       time.
       Comparisons with the unregulated sector (see below) and with fee schedules in
       licensed daycare centres in other communities would suggest that the fees at both
       Banff and Canmore are lower than average. By comparison, the YMCA in Ft.
       McMurray recently increased it’s fees to approximately $1000.00 per month and
       fees in the community-based childcare centres in Calgary average between
       $750.00 - $850.00 per child per month.


       Unregulated childcare fees
       Fees for children to attend unregulated day homes vary from lows of $30.00 per
       day per child ($660.00 per month) to highs of $50.00 + per day per child
       ($1200.00 or more per month), with some parents reporting that they had been
       asked to pay more than $100.00 per day per child. The average fees are between
       $35.00 and $45.00 per day per child (approximately $800.00 per month). For
       some families these fees are affordable and not an issue. However, for families
       on lower incomes these prices are often beyond their means and they are forced to
       make difficult decisions.


       The cost of nanny services varies and seems to fall into the range from $1300 -
       $3000.00 per month.


       One of the most significant effects of the affordability issue is that of parent
       access to a Provincial government subsidy. ( See Availability #1 above).


Quality
Both availability and affordability affect the quality of services being provided.
The maintenance of high quality childcare in the regulated sector has been challenged by
several factors:


       Basic License standards.
       Government regulated/ licensed/approved spaces are monitored by the Provincial
       Government and are expected to meet minimum standards of care. Even then, it
       is difficult to maintain standards within the current funding systems. For instance,
       in both Canmore and Banff, the day care centers work hard to maintain quality
       standards. While both Centres satisfactorily meet Provincial licensing standards,

                                           13
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
difficulties in attracting and retaining qualified and experienced staff make
maintaining these standards difficult.


Quality care and the daycare building in Canmore
In Canmore, a part of the problem is focused on the condition of the physical
building. The day care operates out of a renovated barn, and has been doing so
for more than 30 years. The estimated costs of major renovation or rebuilding
over the past few years have prevented any substantive changes. The building,
though adequate in size, has difficulties with noise control ( not having complete
walls in some areas), and is unable to provide food as a part of the program – in
part because of difficulties in attracting a cook and in part because the kitchen
area is inadequate. The centre also struggles to hire and retain qualified staff.


Although not universal, there is a perception in the community that the daycare
centre in Canmore is in need of change and improvement in the quality of its
services for children and families. Community members expressed concern about
the condition of the building and were mostly unfamiliar with the programs it
offered. While it has retained some staff for several years, replacing staff that
leave is always a challenge.


Difficulties in attracting and retaining staff.
In Banff, the day care has struggled to maintain a full complement of staff and
high turnover has made maintaining quality standards difficult. It is particularly
difficult to hire and retain staff that is qualified to work in daycare centres (See
also, the attached, “What We Heard”). Although the Day Care Centre building is
much newer than that in Canmore and was purpose-built as a Day Care Centre, it
is in need of renovations to maximize use of the space, to improve the safety and
health of children and staff, and to improve the aesthetic qualities of the space.


Accreditation as a measure of high quality.
Over the past two years the Provincial Government has sponsored a childcare
accreditation system. More than 150 programs have completed the requirements
for this standard, which has led to increased salaries and professional
development support for staff, as well as increased materials and support for the
program. Neither of the two day care centres in the region (Banff and Canmore)
has completed this process.


In Cochrane one approved family day home is contracted to the Calgary Family
Day Home Agency, and the other approved family day home contracts with the
Bowness Montgomery Day Care Society – both of these agencies have been
accredited.


                                     14
       While quality of care is not an issue with these homes, they both deal with
       stresses of an over-demand for service and difficulties of dealing with local by-
       law restrictions.


       Quality in unregulated childcare
       Unregulated family day homes are expected to meet the Provincial requirement
       that no more than six children may be cared for at any one time – including the
       providers own children, with no more than two children under two years of age
       and no more than three children under three years of age. While some providers
       adhere to this requirement, there are many reports of providers exceeding this
       number.


       There are no other external quality controls. It is a “buyer beware” market.
       While a majority of parents expressed satisfaction with the care their children
       received, many acknowledged that they spent little / no time in the provider’s
       home and made only brief contact at the beginning or end of each day. When
       asked basic questions of quality – such as,” what arrangements do you have if the
       provider becomes ill during the day?” most parents admit they have no
       arrangements and simply hope that does not occur.


       Conversations and visits with childcare providers from the unregulated sector
       pointed to the fact that most took the job very seriously, genuinely enjoyed
       working with other people’s children, and believed they were providing a
       worthwhile service. In one instance (in Canmore), providers had taken the
       initiative to begin to work together – to exchange ideas, offer back-up support for
       each other (in the event that one became ill, for instance), and to meet together in
       local parks.


       Aproximately 50% of the providers spoke favourably about the possibility of
       becoming part of an agency that would provide supports for them and would help
       them to be more effective in their childcare practices.


       While this study did not undertake an assessment of quality standards in the
       various programs in the region, from conversations with professional personnel in
       the communities, and with parents and childcare providers, the only conclusion
       that can be made about the quality of child care in the region is that it does not
       appear to be exemplary. Regulated programs face many issues, most involving
       finances and qualified personnel. The quality of care provided in the unregulated
       sector is unknown. Assessments of quality are left to parents, who are often not


                                           15
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
       in a position to spend the time assessing the quality of their child’s care, and who
       have little / no alternatives to choose even if they are concerned or dissatisfied.


In conclusion.

The demand for quality community childcare far outstrips the current provision.
Government regulated child care exists only in two of the three large communities (Banff
and Canmore). The single approved family day home in Cochrane does not make a
significant impact on the availability of childcare in that community. Rural regions –
Lake Louise, the MD of Bighorn and most areas of the western MD of RockyView –
have no access to Government regulated childcare services.
Unregulated family day homes are the most common form of childcare in the region, and
it is difficult to obtain a total picture of these programs. They operate as individual
businesses, some having met local by-law and business license requirements and abiding
by Provincial Government requirements. However, there are many homes that operate
outside of these requirements.
Low income families in the region, in particular, feel the consequences of supply and
demand pressures and the resulting increases in childcare fees. For most families they
are unable to access Government subsidies.


Issues of quality are something of an enigma. The licensed programs meet licensing
standards – which are the basic government requirements to operate, but neither has yet
met the accreditation standards. It is likely that many unregulated providers offer good
quality care to children. However, it is impossible to determine how good the quality is.




Recommendations.
The following describes recommendations that may be useful in the region for improving
the availability, affordability and quality of childcare services for families. A more
detailed workplan is detailed in Appendix A.


First, the municipalities of Banff, Canmore, Cochrane, the MD of Bighorn and the
western MD of RockyView are to be commended for initiating a study at a local level to
study issues in childcare and it appears they may be able to assist their communities in
making improvements in the childcare support services for children and families.


However, to implement a comprehensive system of childcare supports will require the
assistance of other levels of government. (See the attached Provincial Government
Report, “What We Heard”, September 2006). For instance, the regulation of childcare is


                                            16
under the control of the Provincial Government. As a result, any changes or initiatives
made at the local level will require the support and recognition of the Provincial
government. Also the federal government has suggested financial assistance for creating
new child care spaces. The status of this initiative is unknown (See Appendix D). The
sustainability of high quality childcare services requires well-trained and well-paid
childcare providers. Recognition of this and assistance in rectifying the current situation
will need Provincial Government initiatives and financial support.


The support of the Provincial and Federal Governments is particularly important in two
areas:
(a), the Provincial Government would need to approve any new child care initiatives
proposed by the local communities
(b), all / any new programs, including day care centre and family day home agency
programs, will require financial support both for initiation of the program and for
sustainability over time. While communities may pursue a number of options to assist
with the financing necessary for new services, Provincial and Federal support is the only
way to ensure the success of implementing and sustaining these family support services.


Recommendation #1: Adopt the following goals
The specific recommendations that follow and that are detailed as a possible work-plan in
Appendix A are based on the premise that the purpose is to develop a comprehensive and
high quality system of child care supports for families in the Calgary West Rural region.

Three goals are recommended for the region:

1.     Increase the availability of high quality, Government regulated childcare
       throughout the region

2.      Ensure that existing and new childcare programs in the region operate efficiently,
       and provide services to families that are affordable.

3.     Provide community supports to assist services in providing high quality childcare
       programs for families.

Elements of Available, High Quality, and Affordable Childcare

A high quality, efficient and comprehensive system of childcare in the region will consist
of several programs and services that will be developed over time. These services and
programs should include:



                                           17
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
1. Provincially licensed and accredited child care/ development centres providing care
   for children from infants to age six– both part-time and full-time care.

2. Provincially approved, regulated and accredited family day home agencies, providing
   care for children from infants to age six – both part-time and full-time care.

3. Provincially licensed nursery schools and pre-school programs.

4. Opportunities for children to receive care in their own homes.

5. Educational and/or recreational childcare programs for kindergarten and school aged
   children (Out of School Care)

6. Parenting support resources and programs.

7. Organized support/ education for private/ non-regulated family day home providers.

8. Support and facilitation of parent cooperatives or similar informal organizations for
   part-time and temporary child care.

Several of these services are already in place and operate well within each community.
These services are not addressed here. For example, the new Parent Link Centres are
providing opportunities for parent education and resources as well as support for non-
parent caregivers, and each community has a number of licensed nursery schools.


Recommendation #2: Establish two Multi-Sectoral Agencies.

To plan and implement these services a central agency or “Hub” needs to be identified.
Typically, this Hub model would be an agency that operated a child development centre
as its primary focus, and would then operate family day homes, out-of school care
services etc. as additional parts of the comprehensive system.
Incorporation as a Society would allow this HUB Agency to oversee and coordinate
existing and future childcare programs. This Agency would need to include
representatives from all sectors of the community – including Health, Education, Social
Services, Municipal Government, Childcare Programs, Parents, and Business. It would
also need to include representatives from various areas and communities across the
region.
In the Calgary West region it is recommended that two HUB Agencies are created.
             i.   Located in Cochrane and including the Western MD of RockyView.
                  Cochrane is experiencing unprecedented growth and demands for
                  childcare services will only increase. In addition, it has closer
                  geographic and business ties to Calgary and the MD of RockyView
                  than to Canmore and Banff.


                                            18
               ii. Located in Canmore or Banff and including Banff, Canmore, Lake
                   Louise and the MD of Bighorn.
               In addition to geographic proximity, these communities share many
               business and human services and residents travel back and forth for work
               and recreation.


Recommendation #3: Increase Availability of Government regulated
                   Childcare spaces.



       i.       Form family day home programs, (one in Cochrane & Western MD of
                RockyView) and another in Canmore, Banff & MD Bighorn) that will
                provide opportunities for approved family day homes to operate in all of
                the communities (implementation, 2007)

       ii.      continue planning process for the establishment of a child development /
                day care centre in Cochrane (implementation, 2010)

       iii.     reactivate the planning process for renovations to the existing day care
                building in Canmore or for replacement of the current building
                (implementation, 2010)

       iv.      combine the operation of the day care centres in Banff and Canmore
                under one administration. (implementation, 2007)

       v.       develop alternative forms of childcare and to propose these to the local
                CFSA and Children’s Ministry, for recognition and regulation – these
                alternative forms of child care to include group family childcare homes
                and shared day nanny programs. (implementation, 2007)

       vi.      work collaboratively with health services, mental health services and
                social services to ensure that respite care spaces are available for families
                in need (implementation, 2007)

       vii.     To work collaboratively with health and education services to ensure that
                children with developmental delays are appropriately included and
                supported in all child care programs (implementation, 2007)

       viii.    To work collaboratively with local school districts and others to resolve
                issues of transportation of children to and from kindergarten programs and
                child care programs (implementation, 2007).

                                           19
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
     ix.        Work in collaboration with Resource Centres and / or Parent Link
                Centres to provide support to providers who provide unregulated care in
                their own homes (implementation 2007)

      x.        Work in collaboration with Parent Link Centres / Resource Centres to
                provide parents with information that will help them select and monitor
                the child care option they select for their child. This may include
                establishing a referral system for parents. (implementation, 2007).

          xi     Work with Parent Link Centres / Resource Centres to build
                 parent/community capacity for parents to organize their own informal,
                 temporary and part-time care arrangements – parent cooperatives
                 (implementation, 2007)

            xii. Ensure that municipal by-laws, land-use by-laws, zoning, licensing
                 requirements and business fees support the creation of childcare services
                 (implementation, 2007)

     xiii.      Work with the local Francophone society, as it continues to develop
                childcare services in French. - Also with other minority language and
                culture groups in the region (implementation, 2007)


Recommendation #4: Increase Efficiency & Affordability
                   Childcare services



     i.         Combine the Banff Day Care Society and the Canmore Community Day
                Care Society into one Agency and operate the two programs under one
                administration. This Agency would be the HUB Agency for Canmore,
                Banff, Lake Louise & the MD of Bighorn.

     ii.         Approach the Boys & Girls Club in Cochrane with a request that they
                 become they incorporate Childcare into their organization. The Boys &
                 Girls Club would be the HUB Agency for Cochrane & Western MD of
                 RockyView.

     iii.        Ensure that fee schedules in the region reflect the costs of providing and
                 maintaining child care programs and are in-line with other programs in
                 the Province.

     iv.        Raise community awareness of and access to Provincial Government
                childcare subsidy programs




                                             20
             v.    Create ways of sustaining the operations of childcare services in the
                   region.


Recommendation #5: Provide Community Support to ensure quality
                   of Childcare services in the region.

        i.         Connect with local College / University programs to assist with planning,
                   staffing and program plans. Recent research on quality of care points to
                   significantly higher standards of care in programs associated with
                   Colleges or Universities.
        ii.        Work with private business to look for ongoing contributions (some
                   businesses may be willing to purchase spaces in an ongoing manner)

        iii.       Approach the provincial and federal governments for financial
                   support.

        iv.        Municipalities to advocate/ lobby the Provincial Government through all
                   possible channels (including the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association
                   (AUMA) and FCSS) for increased regulatory and financial support in
                   providing child care services that are available, affordable and of high
                   quality.

        v.         Connect new and existing programs with professional organizations that
                   will provide support, education and resources.
   .
        vi.        Involve other community groups – organizations and individuals – in the
                   operations of the childcare programs

        vii.       Encourage and support current and all new Government regulated
                   childcare services to complete the Provincial accreditation process.


Next Step.

The following two actions are recommended as ways of ensuring that actions are taken to
improve childcare services in the region:

        i.         Communities are engaged in discussing the findings and recommendations
                   of this report.

       ii.        Implementation of recommendations contained in this report, or some
                  version of them following community discussion, begin immediately.

                                           21
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
iii.   Approach Provincial Ministry of Children’s Services to request both
       financial and regulatory support for initiatives.




                                   22
                        Appendix A




                      Participant List




                                           23
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
PARTICIPANT LIST.

The following is a list of participants in the research study.

A majority of the people named on this list were interviewed by the researcher in an
informal conversational interview that asked for their views on:

   i.      the current state of childcare in the region or particular community
   ii.     their contact / relationship with local child care services
   iii.    ideas, thoughts and suggestions they had for improving the present system.

Themes that emerged from these conversations are reported in the body of the report,
including suggestions for changes that may improve the current situation.

Some of the participants listed provided information via email and/ or telephone
conversations.
(Not all participants are listed, in some instances because they requested to speak
anonymously and in other cases because permission to use names was not obtained).

Barb Shellian                          Shannon Bradley             Janis Tarchuk
Carol Duncan                           Judy Churchill              Brian Page
Robin Sargent                          Brenda O’Brien              Kim Fiala
Kim Bater                              Brenda Caston               Agnes Dallison
Shelley Gregorash                      Alison Ortwein              Jo Ann Gainor
Shelly Hill                            Linda Schofield             Shannon Luyendyk
Susan Flowers                          Leslie Reid                 Louise Dunham
Brenda Sine                            Tracey Nault                Kelly Finell
Nycole Sanborn                         Sandy Wong                  Janice Orsthoorn
Sandra McDonald- Mullison              Jennifer Turlock            Lois Mccullough
Brenda Birch                           Dawn Martin                 Tara Langlois
Kevin Driver                           Lori Kovacs                 Kathy Harmon
John Avery                             Debbie Mains                Roxanne Hume
Monique DesRosier                      Pat McMillan                Jen Staudinger
Peggy Keeling                          Nicky Brink                 Nikki Stadnyk
Emily Smith                            Ella Schatsman              Carol Marks
Kathryn Hamilton                       Rebecca Withers             Tim Smyth
Kerry Lee Sheltice                     Dawn                        Anya Dodd
Teresa Mullen                          Joanne Wyckham              Margaret Loewen
Susanne Dupuis                         Leslie Baldwin              Greta Corell
Karen McDiarmid                        Genevieve Poulin            Vera Blower
Pat Brooks                             Terry Card                  Danielle Matineau
Gary LaMontagne                        Kate Thompson
Elizabeth Jones                        Janis Brabon


                                              24
                                Appendix B




                               Reading List




                                           25
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
Reading List:

Belfield, C. (Jan 2006). Does it pay to invest in preschool for all? National
        Institute for Early Education Research.

Berlinski, S., Galiani, S., & Manacorda, M. (2006). Giving children a better start:
       Preschool attendance and school age profiles. Institute for Fiscal Studies,
       WP06/18.

Chang, F., Early, D., & Winter, P. (Aug. 2006). Early childhood teachers often ill-
prepared to care for children with disabilities. Journal. Of Early Intervention:
       University of N. Carolina @ Chapel Hill.

Doherty, G., Forer, B., Lero, D., Goelman, H., & LaGrange, A. (Sept. 2006). Predictors
of quality in family child care. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 21(3) 296- 312.

Doherty, G. et al. ( 2002). You bet I care. University of Guelph.

Ferrarri, J. (Sept. 2006). Quality childcare luck of the draw. The Australian.

Goelman, H., Forer, B., Kershaw, P., Doherty, G., Lero, D., & LaGrange, A. (Sept. 2006)
      Toward a predictive model of quality in Canadian child care centres. Early
      Childhood Research Quarterly 21(3) 280 – 295.

Govn. Of Alberta. (2006). What we heard.

Luffman, J. (Sept. 2006). The core-age labour force. Perspective: Statistics Canada Cat.
      # 75-001-X1E.

OECD (Sept. 2006). Starting Strong: Early Childhood Care and Education. OECD
     Bookshop (www.oecdbookshop.org)

Statistics Canada (2001): Community Profiles – Canmore

Statistics Canada (2001): Community Profiles – Banff

Statistics Canada (2001): Community Profiles – Cochrane




                                            26
                            Appendix C




      Letter re. Federal Government Childcare
                   Program




                                           27
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
                                                           Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A9
                                                           8 August 2006




Mr. Myron Thompson, M.P.
Room 601
Justice Building
House of Commons
Ottawa



Dear Mr. Thompson:

               The following information is in response to your request of 2 August 2006
regarding the federal government’s child care initiative.

               The May 2006 federal budget proposed the creation of a Universal Child
Care Benefit (UCCB) to provide parents with $100 per month per child under six years of
age, effective 1 July 2006. Bill C-13, An Act to implement certain provisions of the
budget tabled in Parliament on May 2, 2006, Part 6 of which proposed to enact the
Universal Child Care Benefit Act, received Royal Assent on 22 June 2006.

               The 2006 federal budget estimated the cost of the proposed UCCB to be
$3.695 billion over the next two fiscal years ($1.610 billion in 2006-2007 and $2.085
billion in 2007-2008). New cost estimates will be available in fall 2006 when the federal
government releases its supplementary estimates.

              The UCCB is taxable in the hands of the lower-income spouse or
common-law partner but is not considered to be income for the purposes of federal
income-tested programs such as the Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Canada
Education Savings Grant, the Canada Learning Bond and Employment Insurance.
Moreover, the UCCB reduces neither the amount that can be claimed under the child care


                                           28
expense deduction nor the benefits paid under the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and
the Goods and Services Tax credit. Benefits paid under the existing CCTB under-seven
supplement, however, have been phased out as of 30 June 2006 for children under six
years of age and will be phased out by 30 June 2007 for children who turn six before that
date.

               I am enclosing an information sheet that provides responses to frequently
asked questions regarding the UCCB, including how to apply for the benefit, as well as a
news release from 20 July 2006 announcing the inaugural UCCB payments.

                With respect to the creation of child care spaces, the federal government
indicated its intention to phase out the Early Learning and Child Care agreements with
provinces by 31 March 2006, in the meantime honouring the $650 million commitment
under the agreements in 2006-2007. The May 2006 federal budget committed $250
million per year, beginning in 2007-2008, to support the creation of an estimated 25,000
additional child care spaces each year. At that time, the federal government indicated its
intention to consult on key issues related to the creation of child care spaces, including:
•   delivery approaches (e.g., grants versus tax credits);
•   the unique needs of specific groups (e.g., small and large businesses, rural and urban
    communities); and
•   the types of start-up and equipment costs that should be eligible for assistance.

I was unable to locate any information regarding the status of this consultation.

                Should you require further information on this or any other subject, please
do not hesitate to contact the Parliamentary Information and Research Service.

                                                              Yours sincerely,




                                                              Sheena Starky
                                                              Economics Division
                                                              Parliamentary Information
                                                               and Research Service


SS/ml

Encl.


                                           29
Calgary West Rural Child Care Initiative: Final Report
Prepared by: Pathways: Services for Children & Families
October 15, 2006                            `
 APPENDIX D




Workplan Matrix




        30
BRIEFING
Subject: Building Permits November 2006

Presented to: Council                                    Date: December 11, 2006

Submitted by: Randall McKay, Manager of                  Agenda #:
              Planning and Development

                                                                                                 FILE: 7803
RECOMMENDATION
It is recommended that this report be received as information

BACKGROUND
Reason for Report
To update Council on the number and type of Building Permits issued each month within the Town of Banff.

Summary of Issue
Three (3) Building Permits was issued in November 2006 with a minimum construction value of $175,700.
Fifty-five (55) Building Permits have been issued for construction for the year to date, with a total minimum
estimated construction value of $27,723,376.

Building Permit activity for the first eleven months of 2006 (to the end of November) compares to the
previous years as follows:

                Year                        # of Permits                    Estimated Value

                2006                               55                           $27,723,376.00
                2005                               52                            $9,249,300.00
                2004                               49                            $5,882,688.00
                2003                               61                           $19,837,350.00
                2002                               64                           $13,198,970.00
                2001                               59                           $18,932,300.00
                2000                               45                            $9,614,500.00

No dwelling units were issued a Building Permit during the month of November. The processing time
averaged eleven days.

The Town of Banff collected $1300.00 in fees for Building Permits issued in November 2006 and
$187,109.93 for the year to date.

ATTACHMENTS
Monthly Building Statistics

Submitted By:

                                        Randall McKay,
                                Manger Planning and Development
Authored By:

                              Tracy Robinson, Administrative Assistant

Reviewed By:
                                    Robert Earl, Town Manager
                                                TOWN OF BANFF
                                          BUILDING PERMIT REPORT
                                          MONTH OF NOVEMBER 2006

Applicant              Use                Civic Address         Processing Time            Value             Fee      Permit

Helly Hanson      Int Reno                11, 201 Banff Ave     Oct 13/Nov 7  $150,000.00 $1,050.00                  06BP54
Markus Wespi      Add'n Reno              10 Fairholme Pl       Nov 15/Nov 21    $700.00     $75.00                  06BP55
Banff Sweet Shoppe Int Reno               12, 201 Banff Ave     Nov 20/Nov 21 $25,000.00    $175.00                  06BP56



TOTALS                                                                             $175,700.00       $1300.00          3


For the Month of November, 2006
Value of Construction = $175,700.00                       Building Permit Fees (November ’06) = $1300.00
Value of Construction (’06 Year to date) = $27,723,376.00 Building Permit Fees (’06 Year to date) = $187,109.93
Building Permits Issued = 3 (’06 Year to date =55 )
Additional Dwelling Units = 0
Average Permit Processing Time = 11 Days

For the Month of November, 2005
Value of Construction = $ 642,000                            Building Permit Fees (November ’05) = $1329.21
Value of Construction (’05 Year to date) = $ 9,999,300       Building Permit Fees (’05 Year to date) = $50,349.95
Building Permits Issued = 5 (’05 Year to date = 53 )
Additional Dwelling Units = 0
Average Permit Processing Time = 2.4 Days

                             Year to Date Building Permit Statistics – November 2006
                                       2005                                                    2006
              # Building      YTD       Construction      YTD Total        #        YTD        Construction        YTD Total
               Permits        Total        Value                        Building    Totals        Value
                                                                        Permits
  January          3            3         $243,500         $243,500        2           2           $570,000         $570,000
 February          1            4         $50,000          $293,500         8         10       $13,542,200         $14,112,200
  March            6           10         $243,000         $536,500         5         15           $220,200        $14,332,400
   April           4           14        $ 776,000        $1,312,500        3         18             $9000         $14,341,400
   May             7           21         $694,000        $2,006,500       11         29           $2,312,000      $16,653,400
   June           10           31        $1,422,000       $ 3,428,500       7         37           $8,711,000      $25,364,400
   July            5           36         $519,600        $ 3,948,100       2         39           $801,500        $26,165,900
  August           3           39       $ 1,623,000       $5,571,100        7         46           $791,276        $26,957,176
September          9           48        $3,274,200       $8,845,300        5         51           $586,500        $27,543,676
 October           4           52         $404,000        $ 9,249,300       1         52             $6000         $27,549,676
November           6           58         $647,500        $ 9,896,800       3         55           $173,700        $27,723,376
December           2           60        $ 246,320       $10,143,120
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1
Agenda # 9.1

								
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