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October 2009
The Watershed Landscape                                                                WL1: Access




     Theme One: Access to the Landscape

     The Access & Audience Development Plan identified the need for general
     awareness raising about the significance of the moorland landscape for pro-
     viding society’s needs, both now and in the future. The Plan suggested fo-
     cussing on ‘gateways’, making the most of those places that people already
     visit, to connect with the general public. Several of the projects propose to
     provide easy walks as a ‘way in’ to experiencing and enjoying the more re-
     mote and exposed moorlands. These walks can also be made suitable for
     use by those with mobility difficulties, or with pushchairs, buggies or wheel-
     chairs, thus opening up the unique moorland experience to those who have
     often been excluded in the past.

     In many instances the reservoirs form the focus for the popular sites for
     visitors, providing exceptional views and recreational experiences combined
     with facilities like car parks and tracks. The reservoirs not only provide an
     exciting visitor experience, distinctive to the South Pennines, but they are an
     immediate topic of interest that can be developed, through on-site interpreta-
     tion, leaflets or other means of interpretation.

     For these reasons, we have selected several key visitor points where a com-
     bination of works, addressing the visitor experience, habitat enhancement,
     signage and interpretation, can effectively meet identified needs. In addition,
     some of the projects provide new or improved links for more active audi-
     ences, notably horseriding and mountain bike riding.

     Aims:
     • To create level routes with clear signage and information to enable a
        wider range of visitors to enjoy the Watershed Landscape
     • To improve the visitor experience at key visitor points and provide infor-
        mation and facilities to act as a ‘way in’ to accessing the moorlands
     • To improve understanding of the significance of the moorlands, in partic-
        ular for water supply, in the past, present and future, through researching
        and providing interpretation of sites and features
     • To create new facilities and links to enable more active audiences to ac-
        cess and enjoy the moorland landscape

     Objectives:
     These aims will be achieved through:
            working with partners, landowners, tenants and moorland managers
            to agree key paths and bridleway links
            creating selected routes to provide access for all – including push
            chairs and wheelchairs
            carrying out minor works at key visitor points including improving car
            park layouts, tree planting, restoring drystone walls
            installing clear and consistent signage and on-site interpretation
            (where appropriate)
            carrying out works to conserve and interpret features of the water
            supply landscape, especially those farmsteads abandoned when the
The Watershed Landscape                                                              WL1: Access




     reservoirs were built

     Links to other programmes
     Some sites include sites of historical and geological interest, thus linking
     with theme two: the Historic Environment; all sites will have some element
     of interpretation connected with them, and theme five: Interpretation will
     provide the overall steering and co-ordination.

     Training:
     The training proposals in theme six will be delivered through practical work
     on some of these sites, in particular drystone walling, some habitat im-
     provement work, track construction, and interpretation. Opportunities for
     drystone walling will arise under project WL1.1.

     Supporting studies
     Oldham Rights of Way Improvement Plan
     Rochdale Borough Renaissance Masterplan, 2005 – with a key theme
     of ‘Capitalising on our environmental assets’, and Rochdale’s Local Area
     Agreement, with specific targets for improved access
     Upper Colne Valley Integrated Management Plan, 2004
     Kirklees Council Highway Service Disability Liaison Group has consulted
     on and monitored the use of sites eg. Cupwith Reservoir

     Other specialist advice
     Specialist advice has come from relevant staff, in particular the Countryside
     Services, within the local authorities, and from the recreation and catch-
     ment management staff of the water authorities. Detailed project support
     for specific issues has also come from Greater Manchester Archaeological
     Unit, Greater Manchester Ecology Unit, West Yorkshire Biodiversity Officer.

     Outputs and outcomes
     • Approx 12 km of pathway will be created/upgraded
     • Restoration of approx. 2 km. of drystone walling
     • Provision of on-site and other interpretation at 6 sites
     • High quality interpretation provision at two visitor centres
     • Restoration of 1 abandoned farmsteads for interpretation
The Watershed Landscape                                            WL1: Access




                                                           WL1.2 Castleshaw

     Title                 WL1.2 Castleshaw – Improving Access

                           Oldham Council with United Utilities
     Lead organisation     2010-2013
                           Match funding through Oldham Council, United Utili-
                           ties

                           The aim of this project is to:
                           • Increase the number and range of people that visit
     Project description   the Castleshaw Valley,
                           • Make visitors feel safer, and more confident about,
                           visiting and exploring the area,
                           • Generally increase people’s awareness of the area
                           and what it has to offer.

                           This will be done through access improvements on
                           the ground and improving access to information about
                           the area. Specifically:
                           a) Access works will be carried out to tracks around
                           Lower Castleshaw Reservoir, to create a new circular
                           trail that is accessible to a wide range of users, in-
                           cluding less mobile/less confident ‘countryside users’.
                           b) Improvements will be made to the car park, to
                           make it a more attractive and safer place, thus en-
                           hancing the visitor experience.
                           c) On-site information and interpretation material will
                           be produced:
                           d) Creation of a main ‘Welcome to the Castleshaw
                           Valley’ Information point within the main car park,
                           which consists of a fixed map-based interpretation/
                           information panel and an enclosed notice board.
                           e) Production of 1-2 interpretive features located
                           at key viewpoints along the lower reservoir circular
                           route.
                           f) Castleshaw Valley website - Providing a virtual in-
                           troduction to the Castleshaw Valley, using content de-
                           veloped through this and other Castleshaw projects.

                           This project will involve Castleshaw Education Cen-
                           tre, Saddleworth and Lees District Partnership, Sad-
                           dleworth Parish Council and other local community
                           groups.
The Watershed Landscape                                          WL1: Access




                                                          WL1.2 Castleshaw

     Delivered by          United Utilities and Oldham Council
                           Contact: Imogen Fuller
                           imogen.fuller@oldham.gov.uk
                           Tel: 0161 770 4165

                           Castleshaw Centre
     In partnership with   Saddleworth and Lees District Partnership
                           Saddleworth Parish Council
                           Other local community/voluntary groups
The Watershed Landscape                                          WL1: Access




                                                         WL1.2 Castleshaw

     Procurement       All works over £ 10,000 to be tendered competitively
                       [including access works and car park work packages]



                       3km circular, accessible route created around lower
                       reservoir
     Deliverables      260m new path created (zig-zag section up to Dirty
                       Lane)
                       Improvement to car park layout, access and security
                       1-2 interpretation boards designed and installed
                       (circular route)
                       1 information point (introductory display and notice
                       board) installed
                       Castleshaw webpages created
                       1 launch event held
                       1 promotional leaflet designed and produced



     Land ownership    UU with responsibility for Rights of Way network rest-
                       ing with Oldham Council.



     Consents          Match funding secured
                       Planning consent required (for car park element only)
                       Landowner consent - Obtained



     Risk management   Need for Statutory Approvals/ Ownership issues:
                       Detailed negotiations have been undertaken with key
                       stakeholders such as United Utilities.

                       Need for Internal Approvals: The Project has been
                       raised internally within Oldham Council.

                       Community consultation: Consultation is planned at
                       various stages of the project, and has been built into
                       the project timetable to allow sufficient time for this to
                       take place.

                       Cost over-runs: Professional advice has been sought
                       from interpretation consultants, Telltale and from rec-
                       reation staff at United Utilities, regarding the costs of
                       the technical elements of this programme. The project
The Watershed Landscape                                                   WL1: Access




                                                                  WL1.2 Castleshaw

                                  budget will be closely monitored throughout the whole
                                  project to reduce the likelihood of cost over-runs or
                                  underspend. However, If tender costs do become
                                  higher or lower than budget costs, then the project will
                                  be revised (in agreement with Pennine Prospects) so
                                  that the scope of the project will be reduced/expand-
                                  ed as appropriate, without impacting on the quality of


     Enhanced Maintenance        The proposals have been designed to minimise and/
                                 or reduce maintenance obligations. The future main-
                                 tenance obligations for the assets improved under
                                 this project will be met from within the following
                                 budgets:
                                 • Oldham Council, Rights of Way maintenance
                                 budget for access work
                                 • United Utilities asset management budget relating
                                 to car park, interpretation boards
                                 Therefore the improvements made as a result of
                                 this project should be able to be maintained for the
                                 required 10 year period after completion.


     Changes from original bid   Minimal changes (refining costings and addition of
                                 interpretation element for circular route), original bid
                                 value £78,200.
The Watershed Landscape                                   WL1: Access




                                                   WL1.2 Castleshaw

     Timescale       Yr 0 – 2009/10
                     Dec 09        Match funding secured
                                   Works tendered for circular route
                     March ’10     Contract finalised/awarded for circular
                                   route
                                   Project delivery team finalised and
                                   reporting processes agreed

                     Yr 1 – 2010/11
                     Q1     Produce initial draft design for car park (im
                            provements)
                            Path improvements carried out (circular route)
                     Q2     Carry out initial consultation on car park re-
                            design
                            Way marking installed (circular route)
                     Q3     Produce revised design for car park improve
                            ments
                            Locations agreed for interpretation (circular
                            route)
                            Location and specification of structure agreed
                            for main information point
                     Q4     Development of content for interpretation
                            starts (circular route)
                            Framework and design for Castleshaw web
                            site agreed
                            Go out to tender for car park improvements

                     Yr 2 – 2011/12
                     Q1     Begin implementation for car park improve
                            ments
                            Agree content/scope for main information
                            point
                            Web page design and content development
                            starts
                     Q2     Content and design finalised for interpretation
                            (circular route)
                            Development of design and content for main
                            information board starts
                     Q3     Interpretation installed (circular route)
                     Q4     Production of route plan for inclusion on web
                            site/ information board (circular route)
                            Design and content for main information board
                            completed
                            Agreement in place (between UU and Castle
The Watershed Landscape                                    WL1: Access




                                                   WL1.2 Castleshaw

                            shaw Centre) for maintenance of main infor
                            mation point and notice board
                            Completion of works on car park

                     Yr 3 – 2012/13
                     Q1     Information point designed and installed
                            Design and content development for Castle
                            shaw Valley leaflet starts
                     Q2     Web page design and content development
                            completed
                            Castleshaw Valley leaflet completed and sent
                            to print
                     Q3     Launch/celebration event (circular route, inter
                            pretation and car park improvements)
                     Q4     Project financially completed
The Watershed Landscape                                             WL1: Access




                                                                WL1.1 Denshaw
                            WL1.1 Denshaw Moor – Access and Dry Stone
     Title
                            Wall Training

                            Oldham Council with others
     Lead organisation      2010-2013
                            Match funding through Oldham Council


                           The aim of this project is to:
                           • Increase the number and range of people that visit
     Project description   Denshaw Moor
                           • Make people feel more confident about, visiting and
                           exploring the area, using both rights of way and open
                           access land
                           • Raise awareness of the areas heritage, specifically
                           the story of ‘Dowry Castle’
                           • Give local people/land managers the skills and sup-
                           port needed to be involved with the conservation of
                           dry-stone walls within the Watershed Landscape.

                           The project is made up of two elements:
                           • Access – Improving access on the ground, and to
                           information about the area
                           • Dry Stone Wall Training – keeping traditional con-
                           servation skills alive, through practical training and
                           volunteering for local people/land managers

                           Access
                           This element of the project will involve:
                           • Creating a short circular ‘Open Access trail’ between
                           Dowry and Readycon Dean Reservoirs, linking sec-
                           tions of existing rights of way (including the Pennine
                           Bridleway) with routes across the Open Access land.
                           • Improvements to the ‘Rapes Highway’ stretch of
                           the Pennine Bridleway, focused on access controls,
                           signage and path improvements.
                           • Producing information and interpretation material –
                           to raise awareness of open access land (rights and
                           responsibilities etc.), and trails created
                           • Restore and/or carry out physical improvements
                           to, and produce interpretative material for, the ruined
                           Dowry Castle site*. To enable visitors to appreciate
                           the story it tells and its links to the Watershed Land-
                           scape.
The Watershed Landscape                                            WL1: Access




                                                               WL1.1 Denshaw
                           *A stolid, Victorian mansion, built in 1867 by John
                           Gartside founder and head of the Ashton brewing
                           family, later demolished when the reservoirs were
                           constructed.

                           Dry stone wall training
                           This element of the project will involve the devel-
                           opment of a drystone walling training programme,
                           working with local volunteers and landowners/man-
                           agers. The practical training sessions will focus on
                           the restoration of key dry stone walls to the north of
                           Dowry Reservoir, Denshaw (see map).




     To be delivered by    Oldham Council and Lancashire Branch of the Dry
                           Stone Walling Association, with support from United
                           Utilities.

                           Contact: Imogen Fuller
                           imogen.fuller@oldham.gov.uk




     In partnership with   Oldham Rights of Way User group
                           Oldham Countryside Service volunteers
                           Other local community and voluntary groups
The Watershed Landscape                                   WL1: Access




                                                      WL1.1 Denshaw




      Funding




      Procurement   Access works and car park work packages over
                    £10,000 will be tendered for. The drystone walling
                    element will be awarded to the Lancashire Branch of
                    the Drystone Walling Association based on a detailed
                    breakdown and agreed rates.
The Watershed Landscape                                                       WL1: Access




                                                                         WL1.1 Denshaw

     Changes from the original bid    Original bid submission £ 90,000.

                                      Savings of £13,000 have been made on the Access
                                      element of the project (since the original submission).
                                      This is due to the removal of the work to improve
                                      links to the Haigh Gutter car park (on the A640 above
                                      Denshaw Moor), and removal of a capital allocation
                                      for dry stone wall repairs (as the focus has moved to
                                      restoration through the training programme).

                                      Removal of more significant restoration of Dowry
                                      Castle.


     Deliverables                    Access
                                     2.2 km new accessible route improved
                                     4-5 new access controls installed (2-3 on Rapes
                                     Highway and 2 on Open Access Route)
                                     4.7km new Circular Route established across RoW
                                     and Open Access Land.
                                     2-3 promotional leaflets produced (open access
                                     route, rights and responsibilities on open access
                                     land and Dowry Castle) and a promotional event.
                                     2 promotional/launch events held
                                     1-2 interpretation displays - Dowry Castle
                                     Way marking installed on open access route.
                                     1 local heritage structure enhanced for interpretation
                                     purposes (Dowry Castle).

                                     Training
                                     8 training sessions delivered
                                     80 volunteering opportunities created
                                     70 different individuals receiving dry stone wall train-
                                     ing
                                     5% of participant undertake a DSWA exam
                                     9 press releases issued
                                     New web content created on OMBC and DSWA
                                     websites
                                     Project posters/flyers produced and displayed in Job
                                     Centres, Countryside Centres, and Libraries etc.
                                     Local media coverage of project generated
The Watershed Landscape                                               WL1: Access




                                                                  WL1.1 Denshaw

     Land ownership         United Utilities with responsibility for Rights of Way
                            network resting with Oldham Council.




                            Match funding secured           YES
     Consents               Planning consent                Depends on scale of
                                                            works at Dowry Castle
                            Landowner consent               Yes
                            Highway Orders                  Not required
                            Natural England Consent         Not required



     Risk management        Need for Statutory Approvals/ Ownership issues:
                            Detailed negotiations have been undertaken with key
                            stakeholders such as United Utilities.

                            Need for Internal Approvals: The Project has been
                            raised internally within Oldham Council.

                            Community consultation: Consultation is planned at
                            various stages of the project, and has been built into
                            the project timetable to allow sufficient time for this to
                            take place.

                            Cost over-runs: The project budget will be closely
                            monitored throughout the whole project to reduce the
                            likelihood of cost over-runs or underspend. However,
                            If tender costs do become higher or lower than budg-
                            et costs, then the project will be revised (in agree-
                            ment with Pennine Prospects) so that the scope of
                            the project will be reduced/expanded as appropriate,
                            without impacting on the quality of the work delivered.



     Enhanced Maintenance   The proposals have been designed to minimise and/
                            or reduce maintenance obligations. The future main-
                            tenance obligations for the assets improved under
                            this project will be met from within the following budg-
                            ets:
                            • Oldham Council, Rights of Way maintenance
                               budget for access work
The Watershed Landscape                                     WL1: Access



                                                       WL1.1 Denshaw

                     • United Utilities asset management budget relating
                       to car park, interpretation boards

                     Therefore the improvements made as a result of this
                     project should be able to be maintained for the re-
                     quired 10 year period after completion.

                     Yr 0 – 2009/10
     Timescale       Dec 09          Match funding secured
                                     Contract tendered for access improve
                                     ments
                     March ‘10       Project delivery team finalised and
                                     reporting processes agreed
                                     Contract awarded for access improve
                                     ments
                     Yr 1 – 2010/11
                     Q1     Web and promotional material produced (dry
                            stone wall training)
                            Access Improvements started (Circular and
                            Rapes Highway routes)
                            Scope agreed for Dowry Castle works
                     Q2     2 dry stone wall training session held
                            Access Improvements completed (Circular
                            and Rapes Highway routes)
                            Draft trail leaflet produced for Open Access
                            circular route
                            Draft Open Access ‘rights and responsibilities’
                            leaflet produced
                            Brief produced and contract tendered for
                     Dowry           Castle improvements
                     Q3     Way marking installed
                            2 promotional leaflets printed
                            Launch/promotional event for Open Access
                            route
                            Contract awarded for Dowry Castle improve
                            ments
                     Q4

                     Yr 2 – 2011/12
                     Q1     1 dry stone walling session held
                            Physical work starts on site including Dowry
                            Castle
The Watershed Landscape                                    WL1: Access




                                                       WL1.1 Denshaw

                     Q2     2 dry stone walling sessions held
                            Scope and format of Dowry Castle interpreta
                            tion and leaflet agreed
                     Q3     Physical work completed
                            Draft design/content produced for Dowry Castle
                            interpretation and leaflet
                     Q4     Dowry Castle interpretation and leaflet finalised
                            and produced

                     Yr 3 – 2012/13
                     Q1     1 dry stone walling session held
                            Installation of Dowry Castle interpretation
                     Q2     2 dry stone walling sessions held
                            Promotional/launch event (Dowry Castle)
                     Q3
                     Q4     Financial closure
The Watershed Landscape                                             WL1: Access




                                                       WL1.3 Reservoir trails
                            WL1.3 Reservoir Trails
     Title

                            Rochdale Council with others
     Lead organisation      2010-2013
                            Match funding through LEADER, Rochdale Council


                           This project forms a continuous spine through the
                           Watershed Landscape by creating an interpretive
     Project description   trail that runs past several reservoirs – Chelburn,
                           Blackstone Edge, Piethorne, Dowry / Readycon Dean
                           and Castleshaw linking Calderdale in the north with
                           Oldham in the south.

                           Using existing rights of way within the Watershed
                           Landscape primarily the Pennine Way and the Pen-
                           nine Bridleway; the Project will seek to improve the
                           access both along these sites and links/ gateways to
                           the Watershed Landscape. The idea of developing
                           links and gateways is a long term aspiration for this
                           project partnership as outlined in the HEAN (Heritage
                           Education and Access Network) Report.

                           Working with a number of local interest groups which
                           may include for example, Saddleworth Archaeologi-
                           cal Society, Friends of Hollingworth Lake, Saddle-
                           worth Historical Society, Littleborough Historical and
                           Archaeological Society and Gaddings Dam Group.
                           Local stories and information will be researched, and
                           key themes identified for each reservoir which has its
                           own unique story and function. The trail includes both
                           drinking water and canal reservoirs, significant biodi-
                           versity and geological interest, as well as reservoirs
                           with archaeological or historical interest. A range of
                           other community and interest groups will be actively
                           involved and contribute to the project as it develops.

                           Interpretive material will be prepared as appropriate
                           eg. on-site boards, leaflets and downloadable audio
                           / interpretative trails. Other works along the trail will
                           be carried out once the research and consultation has
                           been completed; this may include restoring key drys-
                           tone walls, small scale access improvement works
                           including signage and waymarking.
The Watershed Landscape                                            WL1: Access




                                                      WL1.3 Reservoir trails
     To be delivered by    Rochdale MBC will project manage the project includ-
                           ing co-ordination and claims.

                           Newground CIC/Groundwork will deliver elements of
                           the Project; particularly the delivery of the project’s
                           revenue activities (e.g. events, workshops, research
                           work).
                           This element of work will be steered by a Project
                           Group but charged to the programme of community
                           engagement.

                           The minor capital work where these have been
                           identified (e.g. access improvements, installation of
                           signage etc.) is expected to be undertaken by United
                           Utilities, the two Local Authorities Countryside Serv-
                           ices, Right of Way Improvement team etc. Where
                           these are related to the Pennine Way or Pennine
                           Bridleway, these will be in co-ordination with Natural
                           England.

                           Contact:
                           Emily Barker
                           Environmental Planner
                           Strategic Planning
                           Rochdale Council
                           PO Box 32
                           Telegraph House
                           Baillie Street
                           Rochdale
                           OL16 1 JH


                           Groundwork
     In partnership with   United Utilities
                           Oldham Metropolitan Borough Council
                           Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council
                           Greater Manchester Archaeological Unit
                           Manchester University
                           Natural England National Trails Team
The Watershed Landscape            WL1: Access




                          WL1.3 Reservoir trails
The Watershed Landscape                                                 WL1: Access




                                                            WL1.3 Reservoir trails




     Funding




     Changes/ progress from the   Original HLF bid £76,500 . The original programme
     original bid                 was designed as an access and interpretation project,
                                  but has now been refocused onto both an interpreta-
                                  tion and community engagement, with access im-
                                  provements forming a small and subsidiary element
                                  of the project. However linked to other work in the
                                  Project ie Pennine Way works on Heptonstall Moor.
                                  Costings have been refined according cost estimates
                                  within the Interpretation Plan produced by TellTale
                                  Associates.

                                  In year one – the Programme will focus on the com-
                                  munity engagement elements of the Programme and
                                  investigation and research.

                                  In year two it is intended that the Programme will
                                  develop these trails on the ground using multi-media
                                  resources.
The Watershed Landscape                                                  WL1: Access




                                                           WL1.3 Reservoir trails


                                During year one, physical works will be negotiated,
                                defined and tendered for delivery in years two to three.

                                Since the original project outline was conceived:
                                • Match funding of £30,000 has been secured from
                                Rochdale MDC.
                                • A project team has been in place and met regularly to
                                discuss Reservoir Trails.
                                • There has been detailed consultation with Natural
                                England and United Utilities.
                                • Project members have visited the interpretation facili-
                                ties and resources provided through HLF funding at
                                the Edale Centre as a fact finding tour.



     Other sources of funding   Rochdale Council has secured £30,000 towards the
                                Reservoir Trails project, which can be used to fund
                                both the creation of the downloadable interpretation
                                trails and physical improvements. In addition Ro-
                                chdale will undertake the monitoring and claims for
                                these projects as an in kind contribution to the project.

                                United Utilities have committed to replace Interpreta-
                                tion Boards at Piethorne reservoir, match funding of
                                approximately £4,000


     Procurement                All works over £10,000 to be tendered competitively
                                [ ie AV and interpretation packages]



     Deliverables               Participants – 300 community members directly
                                involved and participating the development and re-
                                search for the Reservoir Trails.
                                Press releases = 12
                                Events – minimum of 10 on site over the project life-
                                time
                                Minimum of 20 outreach activities over the project
                                lifetime
                                Reservoir trail guide produced
                                Co-ordinated signage and bespoke waymarking
                                package
                                Conservation and access enhancements at specific
The Watershed Landscape                                          WL1: Access



                                                   WL1.3 Reservoir trails

                       identified sections of the trail route – extent and loca-
                       tion to be confirmed.
                       Interpretation features installed – minimum of 6

     Land ownership    Various – including United Utilities who are aware and
                       support proposals.


     Consents          Routes will be existing Public Rights of Way where
                       the authority has existing powers.
                       Any works to the Pennine Way or Pennine Bridleway
                       will be co-ordinated with the National Trails Team at
                       Natural England.
                       It is not anticipated that any of the works to be under-
                       taken will require planning permission.


     Risk management   The Project Team has been meeting for 12 months to
                       look at these issues. Detailed negotiations have been
                       undertaken with key stakeholders such as United
                       Utilities and Natural England.

                       Need for Internal Approvals: The project has been
                       through the internal approvals process within Ro-
                       chdale MBC and has the necessary approvals from
                       Rochdale as project lead. The project similarly has
                       approvals from its partners.

                       Negotiations have started but are not completed with
                       the Whitehouse Public House to enhance its role as
                       a gateway to the South Pennines. This will be ongo-
                       ing during 2009/10 to agree their role in the project
                       and the wider Watershed Landscape.

                       Community consultation: The appointment of Ground-
                       work with local experience of working with communi-
                       ties has helped to refine this Project. Through the
                       Development Stage important links have been made
                       with community organisations through the Rochdale
                       Canal Festival.

                       Cost over-runs: Professional advice has been sought
                       from interpretation consultants, Telltale, regarding the
                       costs of the technical elements of this programme.
The Watershed Landscape                                             WL1: Access



                                                       WL1.3 Reservoir trails
                            Capacity: the appointment of Groundwork will ensure
                            that there is sufficient capacity to carry out this Pro-
                            gramme.

                            All the partners in this project have considerable ex-
                            perience of project management within a grant funded
                            environment where they are required to ensure that
                            project run on time and to budget.



                             The proposals have been designed to minimise
     Enhanced Maintenance    maintenance obligations, where there are enhanced
                             maintenance obligations there is a budget of approxi-
                             mately £30 000 available for maintaining footpaths
                             through the Borough. The Pennine Way and Pennine
                             Bridleway are both maintained to a high standard by
                             funding provided through Natural England. This is
                             additional funding to the Rights of Way budgets within
                             the relevant local authorities.


                             Match funding secured for LEADER and RMBC Done
     Timetable               Tendering of works Done
                             Community engagement brief agreed.
                             Award of contracts/ agreement of final brief APRIL 10
                             Initial consultation and awareness raising Spring 2010
                             Ongoing research and development of the reservoir
                             story Summer 2010
                             Liaison with GMAU Summer 2010
                             Awareness raising community engagement events at
                             Rochdale Canal Festival JULY 10
                             [Through community engagement].
Reservoir Trails Project Brief for Groundwork.

Introduction

This project links Rochdale and Oldham by creating an interpretive trail that runs past several
reservoirs – Chelburn, Blackstone Edge, Piethorne, Dowry / Readycon Dean and Castleshaw link-
ing eventually with Calderdale.

Using the Pennine Bridleway with links from and to the Pennine Way, the project will provide in-
terpretive resources in the form of leaflets, information boards or audio-visual materials to raise
awareness and understanding of the history, functions and cultural links. The idea of developing
links and gateways is a long term aspiration for this project partnership as outlined in the HEAN
(Heritage Education and Access Network) Report.

Working with a number of local interest groups which may include for example, Saddleworth
Archaeological Society, Friends of Hollingworth Lake, Saddleworth Historical Society, Littlebor-
ough Historical and Archaeological Society and Gaddings Dam Group local stories and informa-
tion will be researched, and key themes identified for each reservoir which has its own unique
story and function.

The trail includes both drinking water and canal reservoirs, significant biodiversity and geologi-
cal interest, as well as reservoirs with archaeological or historical interest. A range of other com-
munity and interest groups will be actively involved and contribute to the project as it develops.

The Reservoir Trails project will deliver will have a number of elements:
1. a long distance trails linking the reservoirs in the project. This will extend from Castleshaw,
Oldham in the South to Gadding Dam Reservoir, Calderdale in the North. This route will primarily
use the Pennine Bridleway, and also sections of the Pennine Way with connecting routes
2. A series of circular reservoir routes around either individual reservoirs or a series of reservoirs.
These will be fully interpreted with leaflets and AV information
3. AV guides providing information on each of the reservoirs
4. On site interpretation boards
5. Electronic interpretative materials for countryside visitor centres in Oldham and Rochdale

Other works along the trail will be carried out once the research and consultation has been com-
pleted; this may include restoring key dry stone walls, small scale access improvement works
including signage and way marking.

The Brief

Groundwork Oldham and Rochdale will be responsible for the following elements of the project:

1. Raising awareness of the Reservoir Trails to the general public, through the production of a
web content, trail leaflets and delivery of a reservoir trail events programme

2. Promoting the project to local community groups to secure their engagement in the detailed
development of the project. A minimum of 15 community groups will be involved in the project,
with identification and targeting undertaken in partnership with Oldham and Rochdale Councils.

3 Working directly with selected community groups, to identify how they want to get involved
with the project , and agreeing a clear programme of activity with each group, which includes,
some or all of the following:

a. Finding out what existing knowledge and historical research there is for the selected reser-
voirs
b. Identifying gaps in the existing information, and agreeing which ones will be tackled by the
group and how
c. Selecting the themes and content to be covered by the interpretation material (for the se-
lected reservoirs) and webpages
d. Production of interpretation material / webpages content

4. Liaison with Greater Manchester Archaeological Unit to ensure accuracy and quality of his-
torical information.

5. To provide technological input for the project and procure as appropriate technological ex-
pertise for the production of AV materials and provide training and support for community
groups and Countryside Services staff as appropriate.

6. Production of text and images for the Reservoir Trails leaflets:
a. General leaflet (promoting the whole reservoir trail route)
b. 3 x circular trails leaflet (one each focus around a reservoir in Oldham, Calderdale and Roch-
dale)

7. Production of text, audio and/or images for 8 audio/visual trail guides for the agreed named
reservoirs

8. Production of the text and images for the Reservoir Trails webpages within the Watershed
Landscapes website.

9. Attending the bi-monthly steering group for the Reservoir Trails project.

10. Providing claims and progress reports to Rochdale Council to agreed deadlines.

Steering group
The project steering group will be made up of representatives from Oldham and Rochdale
Councils, United Utilities and Groundwork. The group will be responsible for:
a. delivering the project on time and to budget
b. leading on project development and agreeing interpretation styles
c. final “sign off” of all materials produced both electronic and print
d. providing advice, support and guidance where necessary
e. agreeing any changes or variations to the project, timescales etc prior to submission to Water-
shed Landscapes programme officer

Lead authority
Rochdale Council will act as the lead authority and “accountable “ body for the Reservoir Trails
project, and will be responsible for:
a. quarterly claims to Pennine Prospects for the project and payments to the porject partners
NB: Groundwork Oldham and Rochdale will be responsible for claiming for their time through
Groundwork Pennine Lancashire
b. organising the bi-monthly steering group meetings and their administration
c. ensuring that the project remains on time and to budget and leading liaison with the Water-
shed Landscapes Project Officer

Timescales

Year 1
1. Consultation and awareness raising with sessions with 10 groups to include site visits, walking
events etc as required to complete 4 AV guides.
2. Initial consultation session with GMAU to identify existing relevant materials
3. Ongoing liaison with groups to confirm interest and agree areas of involvement, research and
next steps
4. Feasibility session to determine the most suitable interpretation option for each site (e.g. on-
site feature, and/or AV downloads), and the preferred approach (e.g. lectern or upright panels,
oral history or character story audio downloads etc.) for each site.
5. Agree events with partners for year 2; focused on raising awareness of the overall Reservoir
Trail concept
6. Start developing image / logo for download markers
7. Admin / claims and monitoring
8. 3 events for the South Pennines walk and ride festival linked to Reservoir Trails

Year 2
1. Identify topics and sites for the remaining 5 groups and under-lying additional research
2. Identify and select 5 additional community groups and promote project to them
3. Ongoing liaison with GMGU
4. Agree scope for the 3 static boards
5. Agree scope, style, and soft/hardware requirements for AV downloads
6. Commence work on webspace
7. Edit content for AV download and website
8. Production and testing of 4 AV downloads
9. Complete 4 AV downloads
10. 3 training days on creating the AV downloads delivered
11. Continue to raise awareness of the Reservoir Trail route and concept ( through walks and
talks)
12. Agree 3 circular trails routes and collect any additional information required
13. Admin, claims and monitoring

Year 3
1. Identify on site download points (for markers)
2. Design , agree and edit content for static boards
3. Agree static board locations
4. Install static boards
5. 6 training days on AV downloads delivered
6. Design , agree and edit content for leaflets
7. Produce 3 trail leaflets and 1 general leaflet
8. Install download markers
9. Finalise webspace
10. Continue to raise awareness of the Reservoir Trail route and concept ( through walks and
talks)
11. Launch event March 2013
12. Admin, claims and monitoring
13. Evaluation
The Watershed Landscape                                              WL1: Access




                                                          WL1.4 Scammonden
                            WL1.4 Scammonden Access
     Title

                            Yorkshire Water with Kirklees
     Lead organisation      2010-2013
                            Match funding through Upper Colne Valley Area
                            Committee and Yorkshire Water [ unconfirmed]

                           Yorkshire Water and Kirklees Council share the vision
                           of Scammonden as a gateway site to the Watershed
     Project description   Landscape.

                           Yorkshire Water will use HLF funding to support of
                           their proposal for improving and developing access
                           and recreation to, and around, Scammonden Res-
                           ervoir for all users. This supports Kirklees vision to
                           improve access for less able walkers, equestrian us-
                           ers and cyclists.

                           The proposals for access will be combined with habi-
                           tat improvements for both landscape and biodiversity
                           benefits. Key habitats have been identified and man-
                           agement proposals developed which will include tree
                           planting, woodland management, riparian zone and
                           wetland enhancement, Appropriate on-site interpreta-
                           tion will also be provided.

                           Kirklees intend to work with Yorkshire Water on an
                           agreed management plan for the area. This plan will
                           identify initial priorities for the area to implement work
                           on the ground. Such priorities are likely to include
                           footpath work, fencing of some habitats and restruc-
                           turing of woodlands.
The Watershed Landscape                                                       WL1: Access




                                                                   WL1.4 Scammonden
     To be delivered by               Yorkshire Water as lead partner will be supported by
                                      Kirklees Council when undertaking community con-
                                      sultation, land management, access improvements
                                      and interpretation.


     In partnership with             Yorkshire Water
                                     Kirklees Council
                                     Yorkshire Water tenants (agricultural and water
                                     sports)
                                     Huddersfield Birdwatchers
                                     Halifax Birdwatchers
                                     Local residents
                                     West Yorkshire Police
                                     Other relevant bodies as identified




     Funding




     Changes from the original bid   The Programme is shown as approx £ 20,000 smaller
                                     than the original bid of £ 98,100 in part this recognis-
                                     es less need for in-kind time and in part , uncertainty
                                     regarding the scale of the OFWAT approval.
The Watershed Landscape                                                WL1: Access




                                                             WL1.4 Scammonden
                                Match funding:
     Other sources of funding   Up to £ 30,000 from Kirklees
                                Pending OFWAT AMP submission up to £50,000 from
                                Yorkshire Water
                                Kirklees Council and stakeholder time “in kind” as
                                match
                                Volunteer input from: Colne Valley Tree Society 3 activ-
                                ity days / year
                                Volunteer input from: bird clubs 3 survey days / year


     Procurement                All works over £10,000 to be tendered competitively
                                [ ie main access works at Scammonden]


     Deliverables               Production of baseline surveys.
                                804 m of DDA path
                                15 ha of land managed for biodiversity benefit
                                5 ha of new woodlands enhanced for landscape ben-
                                efit
                                5 Interpretative facilities
                                3 awareness raising and consultation events
                                20 people involved in the project
                                10 volunteer workdays




     Land ownership             Yorkshire Water


     Consents                   YWS match funding secured subject to OFWAT ap-
                                proval
                                Planning consent may be required subject to plan
                                Landowner consent subject to internal consultations
                                based on plan.
                                Tenants (agricultural and water sports).
                                Highway Orders based on plan.
                                Forestry Commission (felling licence) based on plan.
The Watershed Landscape                                            WL1: Access



                                                        WL1.4 Scammonden

                            OFWAT approval will be known in December 2009.
     Risk management        Risks of not receiving approval low, plan will adapt to
                            meet approval requirements.

                            Cost over-runs: Will be managed by YWS and
                            Kirklees.




                            The proposals will be designed to minimise mainte-
     Enhanced Maintenance   nance obligations , where there are enhanced main-
                            tenance obligations there is a general budget within
                            YWS for recreational maintenance on this site.




     Timetable              2008
                            • Site identified as a gateway site to meet YWS’ super
                            site strategy.
                            • Broad costs developed based on standard costs to
                            achieve gateway.
                            • Proposal included in AMP 5 Draft Business Plan.
                            • Opportunities discussed further with Pennine Pros-
                            pects to include in HLF bid.

                            2009
                            • Proposal in AMP 5 Draft Business Plan accepted by
                            auditors.

                            • Joint working proposal developed and explored with
                            Kirklees and Pennine Prospects
                            • YWS commissioned an access consultant to de-
                            velop proposals with costs.
                            • July – Draft Determination received from OfWAT
                            with regards to the YWS Business Plan for AMP 5.
                            OfWAT comment ‘bills to fall by 2%’. Could impact on
                            Environment & Catchment Business Plan, await YWS
                            business decision.
                            • Informally discussed broad proposals with YWS ten-
                            ant (agricultural).
                            • Ongoing maintenance on site.
                            • Forestry report produced detailing woodland condi-
The Watershed Landscape                                   WL1: Access




                                                WL1.4 Scammonden

                     tion and management proposals.
                     • Proposals discussed with YWS Media Team and
                     future strategy discussed with regards to media stories
                     to change the public’s ‘perception’ of the site.

                     Next Steps
                     End of August Access consultant proposal return.

                     September     Continue discussions with Kirklees
                                   Council on partnership.

                     December      Await Final Determination of Business
                                   Plan (AMP 5).

                     December 2009       Match funding secured.
                     Q1 – 3   2010       Finalise plan and communicate
                                         with stakeholders.
                     Q1          2011    Awarding of contract
                     Q2 – 4      2011    Contract period
Report on Scammonden Water
        and Environs
               August 2009
             John T. Gleadow
    Kirklees Countryside Access Officer
Introduction

Scammonden Reservoir is one of Yorkshire Water’s most visible sites, sitting adjacent to the M62.
Opened in 1971 by the Queen, this reservoir measures 0.9 miles in length and took three years to
build. The M62 utilises the top of the dam for about 0.4 miles and at its maximum, the roadway is
242ft above the natural valley floor. The surface area of the reservoir is 42 hectares, with a water
capacity of 1730 million gallons. At its deepest it is 170 feet deep.

The White Rose Forest strategy supports the work of Yorkshire Water and Pennine Prospects in
leading the revival of the South Pennines area. This strategy by seeking to improve the upland water
catchment at Scammonden will provide an outsanding opportunity for leisure visitors using the site.

Facilities on site include car parks and picnic area.
Map of the Scammonden area showing rights of way and promoted routes
1. Access Survey
Following on from a site visit on 26th June 2009 by Andy Gardener, Rights of Way Officer, Kirklees
Public Rights of Way Unit and John Gleadow, Countryside Access Officer, Culture and Leisure
Services the following works have been identified and costed.
2. Recreational activities within the site and opportunities for Introducing other activities

As a contribution to the West Yorkshire wide White Rose Forest, Kirklees Council along
with other partner organizations, such as The Highways Agency, Forestry commission,
Yorkshire water, Yorkshire Forward and the Colne Valley Tree Society have been
improving the landscape and biodivisty of the site in recent years by establishing new
woodland areas on the Scammonden site. The White Rose Forest website will actively
promote the Scammonden site along with others in the Leeds City Region area. This
website can be accessed at http://www.whiteroseforest.org.uk .
The White Rose Forest, along with Kirklees Council, has produced a guide leaflet
entitled Explore the wildlands of Scammonden Water intended to awaken an interest
in this attractive valley and to help visitors discover its value as a visitor destination.
An electronic version of this leaflet can be accessed at http://www.kirklees.gov.uk/
visitorportal/whattodo/routedetails.asp?rId=63 .
Scammonden Water and its environs is heavily utilized for recreational activities by local and
regional visitors. Some such activities are promoted on the Yorkshire Water website
http://www.yorkshirewater.com/leisure-time/land-and-recreation.aspx .

Walking
Yorkshire Water’s website offers a 4.1 mile walk off the A640 road; however at
Scammonden there is no easy access route for wheelchair and pushchair users or
other demanding easier walking. This route is available to download at http://recreation.
yorkshirewater.com/?PT=Y&OBH=3750&ID=336

The Kirklees Way, a 72 mile walking route following the boundary of Kirklees boundary
and promoted by Kirklees Countryside Unit, passes through the site between Deanhead
Reservoir and Scammonden Water. This route is supported by a full colour 82 page
book produced by Kirklees Council.

Picnic Site
There is a picnic site to the west of the reservoir that is very popular in summer months
with adjacent car parking area.

Orienteering
The East Pennine Orienteering Club uses the site for there orienteering competitive
events.

Horseriding
Yorkshire Water offer horseriding opportunities on bridleways at some of their sites in
Yorkshire, but none is offered at Scammonden.

Cycling
Yorkshire Water has developed cycling routes at some sites such as Langsett and
Haworth & Denholme but not at Scammonden. However the Huddersfield & District
CTC [Cycle Touring Club] uses the banking on the north side of the site to avoid major
roads on some of the evening rides. Other cyclists informally use this useful link or the
one to the north side of the M62.

Pennine Cycle Way
The Pennine Cycle Way runs from Derby in the Midlands to Berwick-on-Tweed, being
355 miles long.
At Scammonden Water there is a narrow rocky path traversing the dam on the ‘water’ side
of the motorway and then after going under the M62 the path leads to a locked gate where
you have to lift your bike over a stile - this is as part of Yorkshire Water’s conditions to
permit cyclists to use the path (but not motorised vehicles) and is part of the correct route.
The route is supported by a route guide published by Sustrans.

West Yorkshire Cycle Route
The West Yorkshire Cycle Route, promoted by the five local authorities in West Yorkshire
passes with a full colour map goes around the west side of Scammonden Water on quite
country lanes and is popular with touring cycles who spend between two and four days to
complete the full route.

26-mile Overgate Hospice Mountain Bike Challenge
Scammonden is on the route of the annual Overgate Hospice Mountain Bike Challenge
charity event. This usually brings in about £2,000 for a local hospice.

Scammonden Water Sailing Club
Scammonden Water Sailing Club, based on the site, organised both competitive races and
sailing events on Scammonden Water.

Fishing
Fishing permits/tickets can be purchased to fish at two other sites owned by Yorkshire
Water in Yorkshire, but these are not available at Scammonden.

Birds and other wildlife
Scammonden is often used by bird watchers. Bird spotted include twite, whinchat,
grasshopper warbler, reedbunting, mallard, canada goose, curlew, tawny owl.

Remains of 14th Century Settlement
On the north side of the shore is the remains of a 14th century settlement, however nothing
can be seen on the site at ground level. However, the site is visible from the air. All there is
on the site is a information panel informing of the existence of the site.

Podcasts
To enrich visitor experiences Yorkshire Water have developed a collection of unique
podcast guides for some walks. To date none are offered for Scammonden.

Geocaching
Since April 2002 Scammonden Water has been used for geocaching. The cache is about
five minutes walk from the top car park towards the reservoir. The series is entitled the
Harry Potter Series.

Scammonden Dam Hill Climb Course
To the north of Scammonden Water is a short motor vehicle race hill climb course. This
climb has been used for over 40 years. This short, but tricky hill has long been regarded by
competitors as a significant challenge where a good time depends on achieving the perfect
balance of car control to maximise the use of its available power. Indeed, until the early
80’s, the hill was regarded as sufficiently difficult to be included in one of the National Hill
Climb Championships and was regularly visited by the top British hill climbers. Now, run by
Mid Cheshire Motor racing Club, it is mainly used for club level events, many of which are
rounds in a number of northern regional championships for the club competitor.
Activities for children
The Yorkshire Water website provides downloadable resources for children to enhance there
experience of some sites as pdf’s. No specific pack is available for Scammonden but some
are generic enough to us on the site and it would not be a large task to develop some specific
to Scammonden ie quiz, identify birds/mammals/plants, colouring sheets.

Scammonden Activity Centre
The buildings now in use as Scammonden Activity Centre were originally a 17th century listed
farmhouse (New Hey) and barn, both of which were derelict for many years. The Centre is
now a residential centre situated on the edge of the Pennine moors about six miles west of
Huddersfield. Scouts, Guides, youth groups, school parties and other organisations use it
as a base for a wide range of outdoor sports and activities. These include sailing, canoeing,
orienteering, rock climbing and hill walking.

The Centre is let exclusively to groups, organisations and occasionally families seeking a
venue for a residential gathering or simply a day visit, and will accommodate up to 42 people.
It is used throughout the year, with an estimated total of over 2,500 people staying at the
Centre per year.

Huddersfield South West District Scout Council manages the centre, and holds a long lease
on it. All of the work at the centre is carried out by hard working volunteers and any operating
profits are reserved to pay for continuing repairs, renewals and improvements to the Centre.

New Hey was a derelict farmhouse and barn situated on the side of Scammonden reservoir. It
is a building of great character and dates from at least 1693.

The Holdsworth family farmed the surrounding land for many years before it was taken over
by the Water Authority during the construction of Scammonden Dam in the 1960’s.

Since the building of the M62 Motorway and Scammonden Dam in the 1960’s it had been
disused, and was formerly included in the lease of Scammonden Water Sailing Club from its
owners the Yorkshire Water Authority.

Scammonden Water Sailing Club surrendered New Hey from its lease, and a lease of New
Hey was taken by Huddersfield South West District Scout Council.

The property was successfully converted into a unique centre to accommodate 42 people.
The range of activities available in the area is unlimited; walks on the Pennine moor land,
down into the pleasant Deanhead Valley or further a-field. The new Kirklees Way passes the
building and the Pennine Way is only a short distance away. There are many suitable local
venues for rock-climbing, including Pule Hill at Marsden. It is ideally situated for water based
activities - Huddersfield Scouts already sail and row on the reservoir.

The centre is also well placed as a study centre for map study, industrial and social
archaeology, country care, local history, canal study, plus an endless list of other subjects.

The centre helps to introduce young people to a whole new range of activities and benefits not
just scouting but the whole community.
Mysterious Scammonden

For years the area of Scammonden and the dam has been a hot bed of paranormal and ufo
activity, from witchcraft, sightings of a phantom Roman legion seen walking across the moors
on what once the old Roman road. To UFO sightings from as early as the 1930, to rumours of
an underground base which locals have been talking about since the 1930. Skywatch events
have been organised at Scammonden.

Anti-social Behaviour on the Site

In recent years the site has become dogged with people using it for anti-social behaviour that
had been profiled in the local media. Yorkshire Water has responded by closing at least one of
the smaller carparks and police patrol the site. The problem is compounded by Scammonden
featuring on “cruising”, “dogging” and other sex websites.

Improvements to the site

In recent years the site has been improved by a tree planting scheme carried out on the north
site of the site by the White Rose Forest in partnership with Kirklees Countryside Unit.
The Watershed Landscape                                              WL1: Access




                                                                 WL1.5 Cupwith

     Title                 WL1.5 Upper Colne Valley : Cupwith
                           Kirklees Way

                           Kirklees Council
     Lead organisation     2010-2012
                           Match funding through Upper Colne Valley Area
                           Committee
                           This project is the creation of a 700m path around
                           the reservoir suitable for use by those with mobility
     Project description   difficulties or with pushchairs, buggies or wheelchairs.
                           Local people, including the Kirklees Highways Disabil-
                           ity Liaison Group, have identified this as an excellent
                           opportunity as it will give access to all the moorland
                           experiences, the views and sounds and habitats. The
                           reservoir was originally built to supply the textile mills,
                           so there is scope for interpretation of its history. A
                           small parking area will be provided, and the route is
                           adjacent to a bus route, making it available to all.

                           This route was identified as an excellent opportunity
                           to provide access to moorland because it is one of a
                           very few in the area leading onto moorland which has
                           minor gradients and the necessary width (for mobility
                           scooters, for example).

                           The works to Cupwith also include improvements to
                           Huck Hill Lane. This is an old lane and a major route
                           for walkers which carries the Colne Valley Circular
                           and the Kirklees Way. It links Marsden with the moors
                           and allows a connection on definitive rights of ways
                           and across access land to the Scammonden access
                           project. The project supports the Marsden ‘Walkers
                           Welcome’ initiative.

     Delivered by          Kirklees Council Highway Service (PROW)
                           andy.gardner@kirklees.gov.uk




                           Dartmouth Estates and tenants, Kirklees Council
     In partnership with   Countryside Unit, Kirklees Highways Disability Liai-
                           son Group
The Watershed Landscape                                                          WL1: Access




                                                                              WL1.5 Cupwith




     Funding




     Other sources of funding        There has been an investment in the project of
                                     £31,500 funded by the Upper Colne Valley Area Com-
                                     mittee through Kirklees Council Highways Service
                                     (Public Rights of Way). Further contributions in officer
                                     time will be made by Kirklees Public Rights of Way
                                     Unit.




     Changes from the original bid   Changes through Stage 1:Original HLF budget
                                     £18,000 The project has increased by £45,000 to
                                     place 200m of flags and 220 m of drainage on Huck
                                     Hill Lane which will require helicopter lift, as detailed
                                     above. This is a high cost item but will make the wider
                                     links to the Upper Colne Valley and Marsden.


     Procurement                     Standard works will go through Highways term con-
                                     tractor [ Streetcare Kirklees] where works will be com-
                                     petitively tendered. The client, Andy Gardner, Rights
                                     of Way Officer will produce a value for money report
                                     [based on similar rates for similar works].

                                     Specialist works will be separately tendered [ ie heli-
                                     copter lift] ; possibly linking up with the helicopter lift
                                     required on the Marsden Moor Estate.
The Watershed Landscape                                              WL1: Access




                                                                  WL1.5 Cupwith
     Deliverables            •   A 700 metre access path to moorland views,
                                 sounds, flora and fauna previously unreachable
                                 by many people, especially those with disabilities
                             •   Access for all to Cupwith Reservoir along its dam
                                 Interpretation panel highlighting physical features,
                                 the moorland environment and the history and
                                 current use of the reservoir
                             •   A route promoted as fully accessible to group and
                                 individual visitors
                             •   Monitoring of use by people with disabilities in
                                 partnership with the Disability Liaison Group.
                             •   All users are encouraged to use the path pro-
                                 vided, thereby reducing damage to and aiding
                                 conservation of the surrounding moorland
                             •   Connection to the public transport network via the
                                 adjacent bus route
                             •   Vehicle parking at the beginning of the route
                             •   Improvements to Huck Hill Lane. This is an old
                                 lane and a major route for walkers which carries
                                 the Colne Valley Circular and the Kirklees Way. It
                                 links Marsden with the moors and allows a con-
                                 nection on definitive rights of way and across ac-
                                 cess land to the Scammonden access project.




     Land ownership          Public Right of Way over private land [ Dartmouth
                             Estates]



     Consents                Match funding secured [ £ 31,500]    YES
                             Planning consent required            NO
                             Landowner consent                    YES
                             Highway Orders                       YES


     Enhanced maintenance   The proposals have been designed to minimise
                            maintenance obligations [ ie Causey paving], where
                            there are enhanced maintenance obligations there is
                            a budget available for maintaining footpaths.
The Watershed Landscape                                  WL1: Access




                                                      WL1.5 Cupwith


     Timescale       Aug 09          Match funding secured
                     April 10        Tendering of contracts
                     Q2 2010/11      Award of contract
                     Q3 2010/11      Pre-works
                     Q3/Q4 2010/11   Contract period
The Watershed Landscape                                             WL1: Access




                                                                 WL1.6 Marsden

     Title                  WL1.6 Upper Colne Valley: Marsden Moor Estate

                            National Trust
     Lead organisation      2010-2012
                            Match funding through agri-environment funding


                           Access improvements to the Standedge Trail.
                           This project is to improve access for walkers along
     Project description   the Standedge Trail on National Trust land at
                           Marsden. There are several sections of the trail where
                           the path has become waterlogged and badly eroded,
                           exposing the peat and making it difficult for people to
                           find a passable way through, consequently widening
                           the path and creating further erosion. Marsden Moor
                           Estate is a designated SSSI, SAC and SPA due to the
                           important habitat and wildlife that it supports. Preserv-
                           ing the peat and preventing erosion are key aims of
                           the Trust’s management work. Access works will be in
                           parallel with habitat restoration/management works to
                           revert from Molinia grass monoculture to heather and
                           cotton grass habitats.

                           Improvements to Buckstones Car Park.
                           The second part of this project aims to improve the
                           busy main car park at Buckstones Edge which is
                           frequently subject to abuse and needs some mainte-
                           nance work to help guide people to the footpaths that
                           lead from the car park and help preserve the other
                           areas around it. We propose to replace remnants of
                           an old barrier and place a low rail around the edge of
                           the car park. This links to the management plan being
                           produced by the west Yorkshire Geology Trust relat-
                           ing to the Buckstones Local Geology Sites.

     Delivered by          The National Trust, Marsden Moor Estate

                           Contact: Gemma Wren 01484 847016
                           gemma.wren@nationaltrust.org.uk



     In partnership with   Natural England, commoners, Kirklees Council
The Watershed Landscape                                               WL1: Access




                                                                   WL1.6 Marsden




     Funding




     Other sources of funding




     Procurement                All works over £10,000 to be tendered competitively
                                [ ie supply of flagstones; helicopter lift].
The Watershed Landscape                                              WL1: Access




                                                                 WL1.6 Marsden
     Deliverables           A 300m section of the Standedge Trail will be sur-
                            faced using old millstone flags. The flags will be flown
                            out to site by helicopter and laid by skilled volunteers
                            and staff of the National Trust.

                            All users are encouraged to use the path provided,
                            thereby reducing damage to and aiding conservation
                            of the surrounding moorland.

                            200m around the limits of the car park at Buckstones
                            will be fenced with a low rail to help encourage park-
                            ing within the designated area. This will have man-
                            aged gaps to lead people onto footpaths and away
                            from the open area surrounding the car park, helping
                            to prevent damage to the moorland and manage ac-
                            cess better. Fencing will be erected using volunteers
                            and staff of the National Trust.


     Land ownership         Public Right of Way over National Trust land (also
                            common land)
                            Car park owned by National Trust


     Consents               Match funding secured [staff and volunteer time
                            £13,200, ESA] YES
                            Planning consent required           NO
                            Landowner consent                  YES
                            Natural England Consent necessary YES

                            The risk is in using ESA as matched funding that the
     Risk management        National Trust will not carry out obligations. The ESA
                            on this land runs until 2013, at which point we plan
                            to go into HLS scheme. National Trust have been in
                            ESA for over 10 years and as part of this are obliged
                            to carry out certain management works which are
                            approved by Natural England. It is highly unlikely that
                            they would negate our duties to the ESA agreements
                            as we would face fines or be required to return money
                            to Natural England.
     Enhanced maintenance   Using volunteers for labour is how the National Trust
                            do the majority of their management work and they
                            are skilled and willing to undertake the job. If for some
                            reason they couldn’t do the work we would find con-
                            tractors to complete it.




                                                                                        2
The Watershed Landscape                                              WL1: Access




                                                                 WL1.6 Marsden

     Enhanced maintenance   Once the work on the path is done there should be
                            minimal to nil maintenance required due to the nature
                            of the paving. Maintenance to the fencing on the car
                            park will be undertaken by the National Trust as and
                            when needed.




     Timescale              April 10       Tendering of contract for flags and
                            delivery

                            June 10       Award of contract

                            April – July 10 Fencing

                            Sept 10       Delivery of half of flags onto site

                            Oct 10 – Mar 11 Laying of flags

                            Sept 11       Delivery of half of flags onto site

                            Oct 11 – Mar 12 Laying of flags
The Watershed Landscape                                               WL2: Historic environment




    Theme Two : The Historic Environment

    The Heritage Strategy revealed clearly the wealth of historic features within
    the South Pennines, with time depth from the hill tops down to the valleys.
    Most of the historic interest of the moorlands of the Watershed Landscape
    is from earlier periods, for instance with lines of boundary stones delineat-
    ing the rights of townships to exploit the resources of peat and stone, and
    old tracks that were the route of early traders across the watershed.

    Rombalds Moor is of international significance for the many cup and ring
    stones there. It also has many mediaeval boundary stones, and then the
    19th. century network of small reservoirs, channels and drains that were
    installed to manage the water supply and drainage.

    But it is of course the underlying geology that has led to the creation of the
    unique landscape and its history, and this is revealed at a number of old
    quarry sites. Improving understanding of the historic development of the
    current landscape is key to the whole Watershed Landscape Project.

    Aims:
    • To expand the understanding of the history and geology of the moor-
       lands amongst the wider public
    • To bring together local interest groups to share knowledge and informa-
       tion, and engage them in undertaking further research and survey work
       on priority sites
    • To improve intellectual access to the historic environment

    Objectives:
    • Restore and protect archaeological features within the landscape, as at
       Rombalds Moor
    • Improve condition, protect and improve access and interpretation at
       selected sites of geological interest
    • Involve groups in locating, identifying and mapping archaeological
       ground features, notably boundary stones
    • Involve local groups in carrying out research into the history of extrac-
       tion, including oral histories of mining, in particular at Baildon Moor
       (Northern Mine Research Society) and Todmorden Moor (Todmorden
       Moor Restoration Trust)
    • Establish joint working between the many local history societies and
       organisations to share data, collate and record in compatible ways
    • Set up a website to make a wide range of existing and new data avail-
       able for wider use

    Links to other themes
    This links with theme five, in that the findings of the work of the local groups
    will feed in to a wider interpretation package; for instance, from the work
    undertaken in these projects, a series of leaflets on the specific geological
    and historic features will be produced.
The Watershed Landscape                                             WL2: Historic environment




    It also links with theme six, in that many training opportunities will arise
    in survey and recording techniques, historic research techniques, use of
    software to manage data, use of GPS, and conservation of archaeological
    features. Moreover, the groups involved may well benefit from wider skills
    training eg. in project management for example. West Yorkshire Geology
    Trust are able to provide training in geology.

    Supporting studies
    Todmorden Moor Restoration Trust: Flower Scar Project Moorland Assess-
    ment, by Penny Anderson Associates 2007
    Previous studies of Castleshaw Roman Fort by Greater Manchester Ar-
    chaeological Unit
    Oldham Borough Rights of Way Improvement Plan
    The Upper Colne Valley Integrated Management Plan

    Other specialist advice
    Advice on these projects has been received from:
    Gavin Edwards, Museums Officer, Archaeology, Bradford MDC
    Norman Redhead, County Archaeologist at Greater Manchester Archaeol-
    ogy Unit
    Alison Tymon at West Yorkshire Geological Trust
    Oldham’s Countryside Service
    Andrea Burgess and others at West Yorkshire Archaeological Service
    Mike Gill, Northern Mine Research Society
    Imogen Fuller, Principal Regeneration Officer, Oldham Metropolitan Bor-
    ough Council
    Ruth Welch, Nell Bank Outdoor Activities Centre
    Yvonne Luke, English Heritage
    Kev Cale, Community Archaeology Limited

    Outputs and outcomes
    • Management plans produced for 6 Local Geology Sites with proposals
       for improvements and interpretive material prepared for each
    • Evidence of mining history at 2 sites: Todmorden and Baildon Moors,
       protected and interpreted
    • Archaeological features on Rombalds Moor identified, conserved and
       interpreted
    • Local groups working together and using a shared data management
       system, sharing information across the hills
    • Local interest groups gain experience in achieving site improvements
       and preparing interpretive material
    • 5 archaeology trails with appropriate interpretive material installed (Tod-
       morden, Baildon, around Castleshaw, linking Castleshaw and Denshaw,
       and Upper Colne valley)
    • Information from all projects made widely available through appropriate
       interpretation (through theme five) so that more people understand and
       appreciate the history of the uplands
The Watershed Landscape                        WL2: Historic environment




                                                               WL2.1 Geology

     Title                 WL2.1 Delving: Local Geological Sites


     Lead organisation     West Yorkshire Geology Trust / Pennine Prospect and
                           others 2010-2013
                           Match funding secured from LEADER


                           The West Yorkshire Geology Trust (WYGT) will draw
     Project description
                           up management plans for 6 Local Geological Sites
                           (LGS) within the Watershed Landscape with the
                           agreement of the landowners (local authorities, Na-
                           tional Trust and Yorkshire Water). WYGT will provide
                           information for the preparation of leaflets and on-site
                           interpretation, where appropriate. WYGT will liaise
                           with landowners so that they can carry out simple
                           works on site to make the geological features more
                           accessible. WYGT will run 5 training seminars to
                           provide training on Pennine geology for local authority
                           staff, those involved in tourist information and volun-
                           teers.

     Delivered by          West Yorkshire Geology Trust (WYGT)



     In partnership with   Landowners – National Trust, Yorkshire Water, Brad-
                           ford, Calderdale and Kirklees Councils
The Watershed Landscape                    WL2: Historic environment



                                                         WL2.1 Geology

     Value for money   Management plans and daily rates based on Natural
                       England agreed rates



     Funding




                       Site management surveys completed for 6 LGS sites,
     Deliverables      with geological interpretation information provided for
                       each.

                       Priority sites:
                       Baildon Moor LGS
                       Cludders Rocks, Widdop LGS
                       Dimples Quarry, Haworth LGS
                       Gorpley Clough, Todmorden LGS
                       March Haigh and Buckstones LGS
                       Ogden Clough, Ogden Water LGS,

                       5 training seminars over 3 years, to be held in
                       Kirklees, Calderdale and Bradford areas

     Land ownership    Baildon Moor LGS – Bradford Council
                       Cludders Rocks, Widdop LGS – Yorkshire Water
                       Dimples Quarry, Haworth LGS – Bradford Council
                       Gorpley Clough, Todmorden LGS – Yorkshire Water
                       and Calderdale Council
                       March Haigh and Buckstones LGS – National Trust
                       Ogden Clough, Ogden Water LGS – Yorkshire Water

     Consents          Match funding secured YES LEADER
                       Planning consent required Not known
                       Landowner consent needed     Yes
The Watershed Landscape                    WL2: Historic environment




                                                            WL2.1 Geology

     Risk management   Landowner consent may not be secured – alternative
                       LGS identified for survey and interpretation
                       Acceptance of site management plans by others may
                       not be forthcoming – full negotiations with LGS own-
                       ers and managers will be essential
                       Insufficient funding for leaflets, interpretation boards
                       and ground works – project manager to ensure suf-
                       ficient funding built in to the project




     Timescale         Aug 09      Match funding secured
                       Q1          Commission of WYGT
                       Q2-4        Five training days
                       Q2-4        Production of management plans
Brief for West Yorkshire Geology Trust for Watersheds Project

Site Management Plans
Site Management Plans will be provided for 6 Local Geological Sites within the
Watersheds area. They will include a brief geological account to explain the
significance of the site, with maps and plans of the area. Landowners and managers will
be consulted at an early stage. Each plan will include proposals for appropriate
geological interpretation methods, considering the likely users of each site and the need
to maintain its geological value. Secondary factors, such as safety of the site and access
to the site, will also be considered and proposals made.

Geological interpretation
Geological interpretation information, which is appropriate for the interpretation methods
suggested in the Site Management Plan for each site, will be provided. It is likely that the
methods of geological interpretation will include leaflets, if there is an appropriate outlet
for distribution, such as a local Tourist Information Office or Countryside Centre.
Interpretation boards are useful if a suitable location can be found close to the LGS.
Several LGS are covered by websites which serve the local area and geological
information could be included, with the co-operation of the website organisers.

Geodiversity training seminars
Training seminars will be provided at locations within the Watersheds area close to a
LGS site. They will be aimed at volunteers and paid staff working in local authority
Countryside Services departments and any others interested in promoting geodiversity in
the Watersheds area. Each seminar will cover topics such as Pennine geology,
identification of rocks, fossils and minerals, how Pennine landscapes relate to geology
and the economic use of local sandstones, clays and coal seams. The day will include a
visit to a local LGS to see how geodiversity can be included in landscape interpretation
for the general public.
Possible locations for training seminars:
Dimples Quarry, Haworth LGS – use Old School Room, Haworth
Ogden Clough, Ogden Water LGS – use Ogden Water Countryside Centre
Gorpley Clough, Todmorden LGS – use Birchencliffe Centre, Hebden Bridge
2 other venues will be required, one in Kirklees and one in Bradford
Schedule of work for each year

Year 1 April 2010 – March 2011
Site Management Plans:
March Haigh and Buckstones LGS – consult with National Trust, Marsden office.
Dimples Quarry, Haworth LGS – consult with Bradford Council Rights of Way
department
Gorpley Clough, Todmorden LGS – consult with Calderdale Countryside Services and
Yorkshire Water
Interpretation
Begin to develop geological information for the preparation of interpretation materials for
each site surveyed in Year 1.
Training seminars
One training seminar will be held.

Year 2 April 2011 – March 2012
Site Management Plans:
Ogden Clough, Ogden Water LGS – consult with Yorkshire Water (owners) and
Calderdale Countryside Services (managers)
Cludders Rocks, Widdop LGS – consult with Yorkshire Water
Baildon Moor LGS – consult with Bradford Council Archaeology Department and
Northern Mines Society
Interpretation
Develop geological information for the preparation of interpretation materials for each
site for which management plans have been drawn up.
Training seminars
Two training seminars will be held.

Year 3 April 2012 – March 2013
Interpretation
WYGT will complete the provision of interpretation information for the all the sites
surveyed.
Training seminars
Two training seminars will be held.
The Watershed Landscape                                        Proformas
                                               WL2: Historic environment




                                                  Community Archaeology

     Title                 WL2.2;2.3;2.6;2.7 Community Archaeology


                           Bradford Metropolitan District Council/ Pennine Pros-
     Lead organisation
                           pect and others
                           2010-2013
                           Match funding secured from LEADER

                           WL2.7 Community archaeologist
     Project description   A dedicated Community Archaeologist for the South
                           Pennines will be employed with the necessary ar-
                           chaeological skills and expertise, to steer the ar-
                           chaeology projects, provide advice and co-ordinate
                           activities across the Watershed Landscape. The
                           proposal includes establishing a fully integrated data
                           management system that is compatible with national
                           and regional databases.

                           This post will need to establish the shared data man-
                           agement system, as well as providing and co-ordinat-
                           ing advice on suitable projects, and ensuring that all
                           have the skills needed to carry them out successfully.
                           There is also a role in assisting with the organisation
                           of related events and activities.

                           •   provide a comprehensive overview of the historic
                               environment of upland zone landscapes.
                           •   generate an integrated and coherent database
                               of historic environment records relating to upland
                               zone landscapes.
                           •   promote greater public and community engage-
                               ment with upland zone landscapes.
                           •   establish a sustainable community based commit-
                               ment and skills capability for the long term welfare
                               and appreciation of upland zone landscapes
                           •   support Partner projects in the Upper Colne Valley
                               and surveys of mining heritage at Baildon and
                               Todmorden.

                           WL2.3 Cup & ring marked stones
                           Cup and ring stones exist across the South Pennines
                           but notably on Rombalds Moor. The Programme will
                           consider the whole project area but focus on Rom-
                           balds Moor. Rombalds Moor contains 132 Scheduled
                           Ancient Monuments), from cup and ring stones,




                                                                                      2
The Watershed Landscape                  WL2: Historic environment



                                            Community Archaeology

                     to boundary stones and old tracks. In addition to
                     protecting these known features, there is a need to
                     understand their wider landscape context.

                     Priority will be given to identifying those rocks most
                     at risk, the location of tracks and boundary stones,
                     and the network of 19th. century water management
                     schemes. Working with the many enthusiastic lo-
                     cal historical societies and individuals, field survey
                     work will be carried out, requiring the acquisition of
                     some field survey equipment, cameras and software.
                     Once the information is brought together, there will be
                     consultation to draw up a management plan, before
                     embarking upon agreed site based works, and pre-
                     paring interpretive material.

                     The process of consultation will be through the re-
                     cently formed Rombalds Moor Forum, which brings
                     together landowners, tenants, shooting interests,
                     local residents, birdwatchers, horseriders, cyclists,
                     archaeologists, historians and the many others with
                     an interest in the moors.

                     The work on Rombalds Moor will form a pilot study to
                     survey cup and ring marked stones, previously unre-
                     corded in the South Pennine uplands working through
                     the newly formed South Pennines Archaeology
                     Group. Training will be provided for volunteers from
                     local groups to learn photogrammetry techniques for
                     recording rock art. This will require the purchase of
                     hardware and software for volunteer use [ held by
                     BMDC/ PP on behalf of the project]. Production of
                     report, CD of data and upload to Pennine Prospects
                     website.

                     WL2.2 Mining
                     Pennine Prospects and the Northern Mine Research
                     Society have identified Todmorden Moor to the west
                     and Baildon Moor to the east respectively as contain-
                     ing significant evidence of small scale coal mining. At
                     both sites, survey work needs to be done to identify
                     key features.

                     A consultant [ to be appointed] will carry out research
The Watershed Landscape                   WL2: Historic environment




                                             Community Archaeology

                     – site survey, map evidence, literature search – and
                     compile information; capture oral histories from those
                     with direct experience of mining in the two areas;
                     draw up informed management proposals for the pro-
                     tection and interpretation of the remaining evidence of
                     mining on Todmorden and Baildon Moors. All this will
                     then be used to prepare interpretive material for a trail
                     through the area (leaflets, boards, MP3 downloads or
                     other). The consultant will work with Todmorden Moor
                     Trust and Rombalds Moor Forum.

                     WL2.6 Upper Colne Valley
                     An audit of existing information on archaeological
                     features in the Upper Colne valley will be carried out,
                     working with Huddersfield and District Archaeology
                     Group and other interested individuals in the local
                     community. From this assessment, sites that need
                     restoration and sites that are most appropriate for
                     interpretation, will be identified, and a trail set up. Ap-
                     propriate restoration works on site will be carried out,
                     including restoring key drystone walls; this work will
                     be supported by the preparation of interpretive mate-
                     rial in a form suitable for the intended audiences (eg.
                     on-site boards, leaflets, MP3 downloads, webpages),
                     and by holding related events and activities.

                     Community training and education
                     Discussions have taken place regarding rolling out a
                     series of archaeology workshops at focal points within
                     the Watershed Landscape [ ie Castleshaw, Ilkley
                     Moor [see below], Heptonstall Moor, Upper Colne
                     Valley recruiting residents through local parish coun-
                     cils]. Discussions have taken place with Community
                     Archaeology Limited who already carry out similar
                     work through Harrogate Museums Service and Forest
                     of Bowland.

                     For example, Nell Bank is an independent Outdoor
                     Activities Centre based in Bradford. The intention is
                     to appoint a consultant archaeologist to both work
                     individually with groups, the Community Archaeologist
                     and Manor House Museum. Through this work it is in-
                     tended to develop resources that could be used both
                     through Nell Bank and Manor House Museum as well
The Watershed Landscape                  WL2: Historic environment




                                            Community Archaeology

                     as the wider areas with specific activities and informa-
                     tion re. the archaeology of Rombalds Moor.
The Watershed Landscape                        WL2: Historic environment




                                                 Community Archaeology

     Delivered by          Gavin Edwards
                           Curator
                           Bradford Metropolitan District Council
                           Manor House Museum
                           Ilkley
                           gavin.edwards@bradford.gov.uk
                           01943 600066


     In partnership with   BMDC [employment of Community Archaeologist for
                           the Watershed Landscape owner of Ilkley Moor, dis-
                           semination through Manor House Museum, interpre-
                           tation work]
                           English Heritage [consents for work ]
                           Bradford University/ Community Archaeology [train-
                           ing providers]
                           West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service [Histor-
                           ic Environment Records, advice and general promo-
                           tion].
                           Todmorden Moor Restoration Trust and Northern
                           Mining Research Society [voluntary groups relating to
                           mining history]
                           Kirklees Council [‘client’ for archaeological study of
                           the Upper Colne Valley]
                           Volunteer archaeology groups
                           Nell Bank Outdoor Activities Centre [educational ac-
                           tivities relating to Ilkley Moor]
                           Communuity Archaeology Limited
The Watershed Landscape                                   WL2: Historic environment




                                                             Community Archaeology

     Changes from the original bid   Mining – this is a smaller programme due to the un-
                                     certainty over landownership on the Todmorden site.

                                     Upper Colne Valley – reduced in scope due to uncer-
                                     tainty in match funding physical works in years two
                                     and three.

                                     New projects: increased scope of works to include the
                                     whole of the Watershed Landscape in relation to cup
                                     and ring stones.

                                     Included new proposal for education work with Nell
                                     Bank and archaeology training across the Watershed
                                     Landscape.

     Other sources of funding        LEADER funding secured for £68,047
                                     £5,000 to be sought from third parties in relation to
                                     Upper Colne Valley archaeological Study in years 2 &
                                     3.

     Deliverables                    •   To establish in liaison with English Heritage, Lo-
                                         cal Authority Departments and other professional
                                         bodies an agreed standard and approach of
                                         recording.
                                     •   To develop a fully integrated data management
                                         system that ensures the transfer of compatible
                                         information to other national, regional and local
                                         databases.
                                     •   To establish a baseline database of all known
                                         archaeological / historical sites including digital
                                         photography, survey, sketch drawings, condition
                                         survey and GPS survey.
                                     •   To identify and develop links with all local histori-
                                         cal societies and historians who hold information
                                         relevant to the objectives of the post.
                                     •   To seek out and encourage local groups / individ-
                                         uals to become involved in achieving the objec-
                                         tives of the project.
                                     •   Developing and training of volunteers / histori-
                                         cal societies for active involvement in recording
                                         historic environment.
The Watershed Landscape                   WL2: Historic environment




                                            Community Archaeology

                      Outputs
                      • Three interpretation boards on Ilkley Moor
                      • 15 days with local schools on Ilkley Moor
                      • 1 education pack provided
                      • 6 community archaeology workshops
                      • Training for 12 vols in photogrammetry techniques
                      • Survey of cup-marked rocks across moorland in
                         the Watershed Landscape
                      • Production of CD, published report
                      • Database available on South Pennines Rock Art
                         website and to WYAS.

                      Mining
                      • Two key moorland sites managed to ensure
                         protection of mining evidence and improve visitor
                         experience.
                      • Understanding of significance of past mining in-
                         dustry increased amongst audiences.
                      • Research findings to be made available to others
                         in the area via website.
                      • Training opportunities created through theme six
                         will enhance the skills of those involved in survey
                         work, research techniques, use of GPS, record-
                         ing data, and project management. [ 6 training
                         events]
                      • Skills of volunteers enhanced through number of
                         training days undertaken.
                      • Interpretive material produced for identified audi-
                         ences.

                      Upper Colne Valley
                      • Production of survey
                      • Identification of new sites
                      • Three interpretation boards/ trail
                      • 100 metres of drystone wall




     Land ownership   Bradford Metropolitan Council, private landowners.
                      BMDC confirmed; elsewhere subject to engagement
                      of consultants and exact needs for access, conserva-
                      tion designed and approved by English Heritage.
The Watershed Landscape                         WL2: Historic environment




                                                   Community Archaeology

     Consents               Match funding secured YES
                            English Heritage consent – in progress awaiting exact
                            specifications.

     Risk management        Appointment of staff : possible substitution with con-
                            sultants of which a number have been approached
                            in the lifetime of this project. This is unlikely as a
                            number of suitable candidates are expected.


                            Formal appointment of Community Archaeologist
     Procurement            tender of consultancy work for Upper Colne Valley,
                            Mining Heritage, Rombalds Moor


     Enhanced maintenance   n/a



     Timescale              Aug 09                 Match funding secured from
                                                   LEADER
                            Q4 2010/11             Advertisement/appointment of
                                                   staff
                            Q1 2011/12             Appointment re: training
                            Q1 2011/12             Tendering of Upper Colne Valley
                                                   Study and Baildon Moor
                            Q1 2011/12             Award of contracts
                            Q2 2011/12             Studies
Programme 2: the historic environment

Project WL2.1 Delving
Some expert input will be needed to draw up simple management plans for the 6 Regionally Important
Geological Sites identified.

The consultant will be required to:
Visit each of the 6 RIGs and carry out a site survey, assessing their geological interest, and the
potential for improving access and educational use. A short report is to be prepared for each site,
describing the site and setting out its scientific importance, any historical associations, educational
value, access and safety issues, potential for interpretation, and any management issues. The report
will also bring together all known literature, research and survey references.

The consultant will then liaise with landowners, tenants, other rights holders and the West Yorkshire
Geological Trust, to prepare a management plan and agree priorities for action.

Project WL2.2 Mining – east and west
Some further survey, planning and advisory work will be required before work on either of the two
mining sites – Baildon Moor and Todmorden Moor – can be carried out.

The consultant will be required to:
Visit both sites and, with the assistance of volunteers, carry out site survey work to ascertain the extent
of remaining evidence
Assess any visitor management issues, such as damage being caused by motorcyclists, horseriders or
others, and propose solutions to guide such uses away from vulnerable areas
In conjunction with volunteers, collate all existing information and bring together all known literature,
research and surveys relating to the sites
Identify key gaps in information and put forward proposals for work required to fill them
Agree priorities for research with volunteers, and draw up work programme
Liaise with landowners, tenants, volunteers and other interested parties to draw up an agreed
management plan for both sites

Project WL2.4 Castleshaw

Consultants Brief

Background
Within the Watershed Landscape programme a series of interventions, covering access, natural
environment, literary connections and the historical environment, are planned for the Castleshaw
Valley. The aim of the Historic Environment work is to protect and raise awareness of Castleshaw’s
unique historical and cultural associations, providing a better quality user experience that attracts a
wider range of users.

As the Roman Fort at Castleshaw is reasonably well known and well documented, the focus of
the Historic Environment project is Castleshaw’s medieval archaeology. As there are a number of
significant archaeological sites within the valley that are less well known/understood but are worthy of
further study and presentation, such as medieval bloomeries, and a medieval road.

The project consists of two elements:
   a) Discovering Castleshaw’s Past - research into Castleshaw’s mediaeval sites
   b) Exploring Castleshaw’s past - the creation of a trail that connects these archaeological sites to
       the main visitor car park.
This brief is concerned with the first element of the project, namely the initial research and site survey
work, where professional archaeological input is required.

The Brief
The selected consultants are required to:

1. Conduct research and site survey work in order to clarify the scope of the project and determine
   the most relevant areas of focus for the other elements of the project. This will include:
       a. Analysis of existing research material held by GMAU and other local archives
       b. Site visits/surveys

2. Produce a research report based on these initial findings which sets out:
      a. A summary of all the identified medieval archaeological sites known to exist within the
         project area, with an indication of the archaeological importance of each site
      b. A proposal for which of these sites should be incorporated in the archaeological trail (based
         on importance, accessibility, and contribution to the overall ‘historic story’)
      c. Identification, within the list of sites for inclusion in the trail, of those sites that:
               i. Should be subject to small-scale improvements to their setting (to improve
                  visibility, aid protection/management etc). Indicating the type and estimated cost of
                  the work proposed.
              ii. Are most appropriate as subjects for the ongoing community research work.
             iii. Will require further professional research to be undertaken.


Project WL2.6 The Upper Colne Valley

WEST YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGY ADVISORY SERVICE:
SPECIFICATION FOR AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE UPPER COLNE VALLEY

This specification has been prepared for the Kirklees Countryside Unit

   1. Summary

   1.1 The Upper Colne Valley Integrated Management Plan was produced by a partnership of Kirklees
       Metropolitan Council, The National Trust, The Peak District National Park Authority, The
       Pennine Rural Development Programme, English Nature, The Environment Agency, DEFRA,
       Yorkshire Water and the University of Huddersfield, with grant aid from Yorkshire Forward.

   1.2 The management plan defined six aspects of the countryside and economy of the area which
       could be developed and enhanced in order to secure a sustainable future for the Upper Colne
       Valley. Landscape and Heritage is one of these aspects and the specific objectives are to:

   •	 value the archaeology and the cultural heritage of the area in the way that it is managed
   •	 maintain evidence of the traditional walled enclosure system.

1.3 An archaeological desk-based assessment is required in order to identify the cultural heritage resource
of the Upper Colne Valley. The results will determine whether further archaeological work is required
and inform the development of appropriate strategies for i) managing the landscape and heritage of the
area and, ii) providing opportunities for community involvement and educational/interpretive resources.

1.4 Community involvement is an important element of the Upper Colne Valley Project. The
communication and presentation of the results of the desk-based assessment to a diverse audience is an
integral element of this part of the project.

1.5 This specification details the requirements for a desk-based assessment and has been prepared by
the curatorial branch of the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service, the holders of the West
Yorkshire Sites and Monuments Record.

NOTE: The requirements detailed in paragraphs 4.2, 4.3, 4.4 are to be carried out by the archaeological
contractor prior to the commencement of research and fieldwork.

2. Site Location

2.1 The Upper Colne Valley lies in the western part of the administrative district of Kirklees. It is set
at the junction between the South Pennines and the Dark Peak, around the town of Marsden which is
south-west of Huddersfield.

2.2 The area of the Management Plan (and this study) stretches from Scammonden in the north to
Wessenden in the south and March Haigh in the west to Meltham in the east. It covers an area of
approximately 50km2, of which around half lies within the Peak District National Park. Details of the
area are to be supplied by Kirklees Countryside Unit.

3. Aim of the Assessment

3.1. Management and conservation of the Upper Colne Valley is necessary for a long-term and sustainable
future. This assessment will inform the development of appropriate strategies for managing the historic
environment and providing opportunities for community involvement and educational/interpretive
resources.

3.2 Specifically the assessment will (for the defined area):

   i)      Summarise and characterise the historic environment for the defined area, period by period,
           in an academic and accessible way;
   ii)     Identify, in general terms, the nature of threats to the historic environment;
   iii)    Identify archaeological/historic sites that are amenable to education and interpretation;
   iv)     Assess the condition of the sites identified in iii)
   v)      Consider potential routes for archaeological trails (including self-guided trails) and suitable
           positions for information/interpretation boards

3.3 In addition, the results of the assessment will be presented to a range of local audiences.

4. General Instructions

4.1 Health and Safety
4.1.1 The archaeologist on site will naturally operate with due regard for Health and Safety regulations.
This work may require the preparation of a Risk Assessment of the site, in accordance with the Health
and Safety at Work Regulations. The West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service and its officers
cannot be held responsible for any accidents that may occur to outside contractors while attempting to
conform to this specification.

4.2 Confirmation of Adherence to Specification
4.2.1 Prior to the commencement of any work, the archaeological contractor must confirm adherence
to this specification in writing to the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service, or state (with
reasons) any proposals to vary the specification. Should the contractor wish to vary the specification,
then written confirmation of the agreement of the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service to
any variations is required prior to work commencing. Unauthorised variations are made at the sole risk
of the contractor. Modifications presented in the form of a re-written specification/project design
will not be considered by the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service. Any technical queries
arising from the specification detailed below should be addressed to the West Yorkshire Archaeology
Advisory Service without delay.
4.3 Confirmation of Timetable and Contractors’ Qualifications
4.3.1 Prior to the commencement of any work, the archaeological contractor must provide WYAAS in
writing with:
    •	 a projected timetable for the site work;
    •	 details of the staff structure and numbers;
    •	 names and CVs of key project members.

4.3.2 All project staff provided by the archaeological contractor must be suitably qualified and
experienced for their roles. The timetable should be adequate to allow the work to be undertaken to the
appropriate professional standard, subject to the ultimate judgement of WYAAS.

4.4 Notification
4.4.1 WYAAS should be provided with as much notice as possible in writing (and certainly not less
than one week) of the intention to start work. A copy of the archaeological contractor’s risk assessment
for the walkover survey should accompany the notification.

5. Method

5.1 Research
5.1.1 A desk-based assessment is to be undertaken of the area marked on the attached map. The work
is to involve the collation of SMR data and other secondary sources, including relevant written, drawn,
cartographic and photographic information. The research will be limited to the following sources:

   •	 The West Yorkshire Sites and Monuments Record. (Newstead Road, Wakefield; tel. 01924
      306797) Details on known archaeological sites and findspots, the First Edition 6”: 1 mile O.S.
      maps, selected field names from Tithe Award and some estate maps, some oblique aerial
      photographs, some Listed Building records, some secondary information from selected sources.
      Please note that the County SMR makes a charge for consultations of a commercial nature
   •	 The National Monuments Record Centre (Great Western Village, Kemble Drive, Swindon SN2
      3GZ; tel. 01793 414600). Aerial photographs and details on archaeological sites and finds.
   •	 The Yorkshire Archaeological Society (‘Claremont’, 23 Clarendon Road, Leeds; tel: 0113 245
      6362) for secondary sources, maps and aerial photographs.
   •	 Huddersfield Local Studies Library (Princess Alexandra Walk, Huddersfield)
   •	 The West Yorkshire Dry Stone Walling Association. Results from Upper Colne Valley Project
      surveys and proposals for trails, interpretation boards and events. (contact details to be obtained
      from the Kirklees Countryside Unit.

5.1.2 It is anticipated that the archaeological contractor will access any relevant, readily available
primary source material. However, judgement should be exercised in this regard. The contractor should
examine this material in detail only where it is anticipated that the time spent extracting information will
be worthwhile in terms of supplying detail directly relevant to this project.


5.2. Education, Interpretation and Community Involvement
5.2.1 The information accrued from an examination of the above sources should be used to identify
areas/sites that are likely to be suitable for providing education and interpretation resources. Particular
attention should be paid to the following:

   •	   Scheduled Monuments and visible upstanding remains
   •	   Access (able-bodied and disabled)
   •	   Rights of way
   •	   Viewpoints
   •	   Location of existing car parks
5.3 Field Appraisal
5.3.1 Each site of educational/interpretative potential should then be the subject of a systematic field
appraisal. The intention is to assess and record the visibility and condition of the sites and any threats to
the sites.

5.3.2 Concise but detailed field observations should be made, illustrated in each case by photographs
(digital formats are acceptable as long as the illustrations in the report are clear and at an appropriate
resolution). The location and direction of each photograph shall be shown on a map at an appropriate
scale. It should be made clear in the report if specific sites/areas were not accessible to be walked over,
and if they were viewed from neighbouring footpaths and roads.

5.3.3 For each site of educational/interpretative potential the contractor will assess possible routes for
archaeological trails and suitable positions for information/interpretation boards. These may relate to
specific sites or to broader landscapes.

5.3.4 Management issues will be considered for each site of educational/interpretive potential. For
example, sites/areas where additional archaeological survey is required, where management is required
to reduce a threat or to enhance its visibility and education/interpretation value.

6. Reporting

6.1 A fully illustrated report is to be produced. It is not envisaged that the report will be published but it
should be produced with sufficient care and attention to detail to be of academic use to future researchers.

6.2 Details of the style and format of the report are to be determined by the archaeological contractor, but
it should include a catalogue of all identified archaeological sites, each individually numbered, and located
with as accurate a grid reference as possible (and appropriate). Each site should have a sufficiently full
description/interpretation to fulfil the aims of this project. Each site should be fully referenced, including
the existing PRN (if already identified within the SMR). The approximate extent and morphology of a site
(where appropriate) should be represented on a large-scale (at least 1:2500) O.S. map base and related
to fixed structures or roads. The geology, soils and current land-use should be discussed in the text of
the report. Historic mapping will be reproduced in the report where relevant and available.
6.3 Each site of potential educational/interpretative value should be described in detail and illustrated
photographically. Possible routes for archaeological trails and suitable positions for information/
interpretation boards will be described and shown on a plan. The report will also provide management
recommendations based on the condition information and threat identifications made during the field
appraisal.

6.4 The report should also possess a fully referenced bibliography of all sources consulted and a copy
of this specification.

6.5 The attached summary sheet should be completed and submitted to the West Yorkshire Archaeology
Advisory Service for inclusion in the summary of archaeological work in West Yorkshire published on
the WYAAS website.

7. Report Submission and Deposition with the SMR

7.1 A copy of the report is to be supplied directly to the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service
within a period of two months following completion of research and fieldwork.

7.2 The archaeological contractor should make provision for a meeting with WYAAS after supplying
a copy of the report, to discuss the results and to aid WYAAS in formulating appropriate further
recommendations. The meeting may take the form of a telephone discussion at the discretion of WYAAS.

7.3 Completion of this project is dependant upon receipt by WYAAS of a satisfactory report which has
been prepared in accordance with this specification. Any comments made by WYAAS in response to the
submission of an unsatisfactory report will be taken account of in finalising the report, within a timescale
which has been agreed with WYAAS.

7.4 The report will be supplied on the understanding that it will be added to the County Sites and
Monuments Record and will become a public document after an appropriate period of time (generally
not exceeding six months).

8. Presentation of the Results of the Assessment

8.1 Community involvement is an important element of the Upper Colne Valley Project. The
communication and presentation of the results of the desk-based assessment to a diverse audience is
an integral element of this part of the project. It is expected that the archaeological contractor will
(in association with Kirklees MC) give presentations and hold discussions about archaeology and the
results of the study to local school, youth and community groups.

8.2 A proposal, for appropriate and engaging events, should be prepared by potential contractors and
submitted to the client and WYAAS for approval. The proposal should include a summary of previous
experience of similar events and the CV of a nominated education officer.


9. General Considerations

9.1 Unauthorised Alterations to Specification by Contractor
9.1.1 It is the archaeological contractor’s responsibility to ensure that they have obtained the West
Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service’s consent in writing to any variation of the specification prior
to the commencement of work or (where applicable) prior to the finalisation of the tender. Unauthorised
variations are made solely at the risk of the contractor.

9.2 Technical Queries
9.2.1 Similarly, any technical queries arising from the specification detailed above, should be addressed
to the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service without delay.

9.3 Valid Period of specification
9.3.1 This specification is valid for a period of one year from date of issue. After that time it may need
to be revised to take into account new discoveries, changes in policy or the introduction of new working
practices or techniques.


Andrea Burgess
West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service

County Sites and Monuments Record
West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service
Registry of Deeds
Newstead Road
Wakefield
WF1 2DE

Telephone: (01924) 305178
Fax: (01924) 306810
E-mail: aburgess@wyjs.org.uk
WATERSHED LANDSCAPES PROJECT : Rombalds Moor


INTRODUCTION

       Ever since the retreat of the last Ice Age the Upland Zone has been subjected to continuous
       human evaluation and exploitation. The interaction of human ambition and the natural
       resources of the landscape have not only influenced past human activity, but through it, the
       very appearance of all that we see around us. It is also a dynamic relationship that cannot be
       separated and which will continue to shape the appearance of the Uplands.

       As for any continuous process of change, it is the manner in which the present interacts with
       the past that shapes the future. Managing such change in order to produce a balanced and
       sustainable future needs to be informed by a greater understanding of what has gone before.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL BACKGROUND

       As a well defined area of upland, Rombalds Moor has long been recognised as an area of
       significant archaeological interest. For more than 100 years a wide range of archaeological field
       monuments have been recognised and recorded, and large quantities of flint artefacts have
       been recovered, both attesting to the existence of past human activity. However during that
       time the changing standards of recording and classification have introduced inconsistencies
       and high levels of incompatibility within the current historic environment database.

Carved Rocks

       Rombalds Moor is also internationally known for the large number of prehistoric ‘carved rocks’
       that lie embedded in the landscape itself. Many have been known since the mid nineteenth
       century but in recent years a number of new ones have been found to show that yet more have
       still to be recorded across the whole of the South Pennines area. Most of those to be found on
       Rombalds Moor have been included as Scheduled Ancient Monuments, which provides them
       with legal protection, but there are concerns about their lack of protection from weathering.
       Anecdotal evidence suggests that many are suffering as a result of atmospheric pollution but in
       the absence of any objective ‘baseline’ records this cannot be verified.

PRINCIPAL OBJECTIVES

   1. To update archaeological records to the same professional standard by undertaking a
      comprehensive re-evaluation of all existing sites and artefactual evidence.
   2. To record all known carved rocks using photogrammetry to establish an objective photographic
      database by which their condition can be monitored into the future.
   3. To use the outcomes of the project to inform and guide future management strategies, and
      develop greater public understanding of, and engagement with, the wider objectives of the
      Watershed Landscape Project.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECORDS

Much of the effort to combine and upgrade the historic environment records will be carried out under
the auspices of the Community Archaeologist, in consultation with English Heritage and holders of
relevant Historic Environment Records. Wherever possible this will be carried out with the involvement
and help of volunteers, however it will have to be augmented with additional work to be carried out by
qualified archaeological contractors / consultants.

While offering good training opportunities for volunteers there are a number of sites that will require an
established level of expertise in order to achieve the required level of recording. It is probable that as
the project progresses other sites and areas will require similar treatment but at this stage they are as
follows;
Archaeological Level II survey work

Recording all visible archaeological features and finds to the standards of an English Heritage Level
II survey as defined in Understanding the Archaeology of Landscapes (Ainsworth et al. 2007).

Areas

Lanshaw Delves and surrounding area extent 40 Ha
Area surrounding the Twelve Apostles Stone Circle extent 30 Ha

Archaeological Level III survey work

Detailed recording of specific monuments to the standards of an English Heritage Level III survey as
defined in Understanding the Archaeology of Landscapes (Ainsworth et al. 2007).

Sites

SM 25285       Ring Cairn ESE of the Great Skirtful of Stones
SM 25286       Cairn known as the Great Skirtful of Stones
SM 25291       Grubstones Stone Circle
SM 25293       Cairn at Rombalds Moor triangulation pillar
SM 25312       Cairn known as the Little Skirtful of Stones
SM 25313       Twelve Apostles Stone Circle

A detailed specification of works will be issued and tenders invited.


PHOTOGRAMMETRY

As part of its commitment to the Watershed Landscapes Project, the City of Bradford Metropolitan
District Council has already acquired appropriate computer hardware, software and cameras to carry
out a photogrammetry survey of all known carved rocks of Romblads Moor. Additional field survey
equipment will also be acquired to assist in this process and record other field monuments. Both
the equipment and the experience gained in dealing with the known sites of Rombalds Moor will be
utilised to cover the whole of the area encompassed by Watershed Landscape Project.
Project WL2.6 The Upper Colne Valley

WEST YORKSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGY ADVISORY SERVICE:
SPECIFICATION FOR AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE UPPER COLNE VALLEY

This specification has been prepared for the Kirklees Countryside Unit

   1. Summary

   1.1 The Upper Colne Valley Integrated Management Plan was produced by a partnership of Kirklees
       Metropolitan Council, The National Trust, The Peak District National Park Authority, The
       Pennine Rural Development Programme, English Nature, The Environment Agency, DEFRA,
       Yorkshire Water and the University of Huddersfield, with grant aid from Yorkshire Forward.

   1.2 The management plan defined six aspects of the countryside and economy of the area which
       could be developed and enhanced in order to secure a sustainable future for the Upper Colne
       Valley. Landscape and Heritage is one of these aspects and the specific objectives are to:

   •	 value the archaeology and the cultural heritage of the area in the way that it is managed
   •	 maintain evidence of the traditional walled enclosure system.

1.3 An archaeological desk-based assessment is required in order to identify the cultural heritage resource
of the Upper Colne Valley. The results will determine whether further archaeological work is required
and inform the development of appropriate strategies for i) managing the landscape and heritage of the
area and, ii) providing opportunities for community involvement and educational/interpretive resources.

1.4 Community involvement is an important element of the Upper Colne Valley Project. The
communication and presentation of the results of the desk-based assessment to a diverse audience is an
integral element of this part of the project.

1.5 This specification details the requirements for a desk-based assessment and has been prepared by
the curatorial branch of the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service, the holders of the West
Yorkshire Sites and Monuments Record.

NOTE: The requirements detailed in paragraphs 4.2, 4.3, 4.4 are to be carried out by the archaeological
contractor prior to the commencement of research and fieldwork.

2. Site Location

2.1 The Upper Colne Valley lies in the western part of the administrative district of Kirklees. It is set
at the junction between the South Pennines and the Dark Peak, around the town of Marsden which is
south-west of Huddersfield.

2.2 The area of the Management Plan (and this study) stretches from Scammonden in the north to
Wessenden in the south and March Haigh in the west to Meltham in the east. It covers an area of
approximately 50km2, of which around half lies within the Peak District National Park. Details of the
area are to be supplied by Kirklees Countryside Unit.

3. Aim of the Assessment

3.1. Management and conservation of the Upper Colne Valley is necessary for a long-term and sustainable
future. This assessment will inform the development of appropriate strategies for managing the historic
environment and providing opportunities for community involvement and educational/interpretive
resources.

3.2 Specifically the assessment will (for the defined area):

   i)      Summarise and characterise the historic environment for the defined area, period by period,
           in an academic and accessible way;
   ii)     Identify, in general terms, the nature of threats to the historic environment;
   iii)     Identify archaeological/historic sites that are amenable to education and interpretation;
   iv)      Assess the condition of the sites identified in iii)
   v)       Consider potential routes for archaeological trails (including self-guided trails) and suitable
            positions for information/interpretation boards

3.3 In addition, the results of the assessment will be presented to a range of local audiences.

4. General Instructions

4.1 Health and Safety
4.1.1 The archaeologist on site will naturally operate with due regard for Health and Safety regulations.
This work may require the preparation of a Risk Assessment of the site, in accordance with the Health
and Safety at Work Regulations. The West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service and its officers
cannot be held responsible for any accidents that may occur to outside contractors while attempting to
conform to this specification.

4.2 Confirmation of Adherence to Specification
4.2.1 Prior to the commencement of any work, the archaeological contractor must confirm adherence
to this specification in writing to the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service, or state (with
reasons) any proposals to vary the specification. Should the contractor wish to vary the specification,
then written confirmation of the agreement of the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service to
any variations is required prior to work commencing. Unauthorised variations are made at the sole risk
of the contractor. Modifications presented in the form of a re-written specification/project design
will not be considered by the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service. Any technical queries
arising from the specification detailed below should be addressed to the West Yorkshire Archaeology
Advisory Service without delay.

4.3 Confirmation of Timetable and Contractors’ Qualifications
4.3.1 Prior to the commencement of any work, the archaeological contractor must provide WYAAS in
writing with:
    •	 a projected timetable for the site work;
    •	 details of the staff structure and numbers;
    •	 names and CVs of key project members.

4.3.2 All project staff provided by the archaeological contractor must be suitably qualified and
experienced for their roles. The timetable should be adequate to allow the work to be undertaken to the
appropriate professional standard, subject to the ultimate judgement of WYAAS.

4.4 Notification
4.4.1 WYAAS should be provided with as much notice as possible in writing (and certainly not less
than one week) of the intention to start work. A copy of the archaeological contractor’s risk assessment
for the walkover survey should accompany the notification.

5. Method

5.1 Research
5.1.1 A desk-based assessment is to be undertaken of the area marked on the attached map. The work
is to involve the collation of SMR data and other secondary sources, including relevant written, drawn,
cartographic and photographic information. The research will be limited to the following sources:

   •	 The West Yorkshire Sites and Monuments Record. (Newstead Road, Wakefield; tel. 01924
      306797) Details on known archaeological sites and findspots, the First Edition 6”: 1 mile O.S.
      maps, selected field names from Tithe Award and some estate maps, some oblique aerial
        photographs, some Listed Building records, some secondary information from selected sources.
        Please note that the County SMR makes a charge for consultations of a commercial nature
   •	   The National Monuments Record Centre (Great Western Village, Kemble Drive, Swindon SN2
        3GZ; tel. 01793 414600). Aerial photographs and details on archaeological sites and finds.
   •	   The Yorkshire Archaeological Society (‘Claremont’, 23 Clarendon Road, Leeds; tel: 0113 245
        6362) for secondary sources, maps and aerial photographs.
   •	   Huddersfield Local Studies Library (Princess Alexandra Walk, Huddersfield)
   •	   The West Yorkshire Dry Stone Walling Association. Results from Upper Colne Valley Project
        surveys and proposals for trails, interpretation boards and events. (contact details to be obtained
        from the Kirklees Countryside Unit.

5.1.2 It is anticipated that the archaeological contractor will access any relevant, readily available
primary source material. However, judgement should be exercised in this regard. The contractor should
examine this material in detail only where it is anticipated that the time spent extracting information will
be worthwhile in terms of supplying detail directly relevant to this project.


5.2. Education, Interpretation and Community Involvement
5.2.1 The information accrued from an examination of the above sources should be used to identify
areas/sites that are likely to be suitable for providing education and interpretation resources. Particular
attention should be paid to the following:

   •	   Scheduled Monuments and visible upstanding remains
   •	   Access (able-bodied and disabled)
   •	   Rights of way
   •	   Viewpoints
   •	   Location of existing car parks

5.3 Field Appraisal
5.3.1 Each site of educational/interpretative potential should then be the subject of a systematic field
appraisal. The intention is to assess and record the visibility and condition of the sites and any threats
to the sites.

5.3.2 Concise but detailed field observations should be made, illustrated in each case by photographs
(digital formats are acceptable as long as the illustrations in the report are clear and at an appropriate
resolution). The location and direction of each photograph shall be shown on a map at an appropriate
scale. It should be made clear in the report if specific sites/areas were not accessible to be walked over,
and if they were viewed from neighbouring footpaths and roads.

5.3.3 For each site of educational/interpretative potential the contractor will assess possible routes for
archaeological trails and suitable positions for information/interpretation boards. These may relate to
specific sites or to broader landscapes.

5.3.4 Management issues will be considered for each site of educational/interpretive potential. For
example, sites/areas where additional archaeological survey is required, where management is required
to reduce a threat or to enhance its visibility and education/interpretation value.

6. Reporting

6.1 A fully illustrated report is to be produced. It is not envisaged that the report will be published
but it should be produced with sufficient care and attention to detail to be of academic use to future
researchers.

6.2 Details of the style and format of the report are to be determined by the archaeological contractor,
but it should include a catalogue of all identified archaeological sites, each individually numbered,
and located with as accurate a grid reference as possible (and appropriate). Each site should have
a sufficiently full description/interpretation to fulfil the aims of this project. Each site should be fully
referenced, including the existing PRN (if already identified within the SMR). The approximate extent
and morphology of a site (where appropriate) should be represented on a large-scale (at least 1:2500)
O.S. map base and related to fixed structures or roads. The geology, soils and current land-use should
be discussed in the text of the report. Historic mapping will be reproduced in the report where relevant
and available.
6.3 Each site of potential educational/interpretative value should be described in detail and illustrated
photographically. Possible routes for archaeological trails and suitable positions for information/
interpretation boards will be described and shown on a plan. The report will also provide management
recommendations based on the condition information and threat identifications made during the field
appraisal.

6.4 The report should also possess a fully referenced bibliography of all sources consulted and a copy
of this specification.

6.5 The attached summary sheet should be completed and submitted to the West Yorkshire Archaeology
Advisory Service for inclusion in the summary of archaeological work in West Yorkshire published on
the WYAAS website.

7. Report Submission and Deposition with the SMR

7.1 A copy of the report is to be supplied directly to the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service
within a period of two months following completion of research and fieldwork.

7.2 The archaeological contractor should make provision for a meeting with WYAAS after supplying
a copy of the report, to discuss the results and to aid WYAAS in formulating appropriate further
recommendations. The meeting may take the form of a telephone discussion at the discretion of
WYAAS.

7.3 Completion of this project is dependant upon receipt by WYAAS of a satisfactory report which has
been prepared in accordance with this specification. Any comments made by WYAAS in response
to the submission of an unsatisfactory report will be taken account of in finalising the report, within a
timescale which has been agreed with WYAAS.

7.4 The report will be supplied on the understanding that it will be added to the County Sites and
Monuments Record and will become a public document after an appropriate period of time (generally
not exceeding six months).

8. Presentation of the Results of the Assessment

8.1 Community involvement is an important element of the Upper Colne Valley Project. The
communication and presentation of the results of the desk-based assessment to a diverse audience is
an integral element of this part of the project. It is expected that the archaeological contractor will
(in association with Kirklees MC) give presentations and hold discussions about archaeology and the
results of the study to local school, youth and community groups.

8.2 A proposal, for appropriate and engaging events, should be prepared by potential contractors and
submitted to the client and WYAAS for approval. The proposal should include a summary of previous
experience of similar events and the CV of a nominated education officer.


9. General Considerations

9.1 Unauthorised Alterations to Specification by Contractor
9.1.1 It is the archaeological contractor’s responsibility to ensure that they have obtained the West
Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service’s consent in writing to any variation of the specification prior
to the commencement of work or (where applicable) prior to the finalisation of the tender. Unauthorised
variations are made solely at the risk of the contractor.

9.2 Technical Queries
9.2.1 Similarly, any technical queries arising from the specification detailed above, should be addressed
to the West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service without delay.

9.3 Valid Period of specification
9.3.1 This specification is valid for a period of one year from date of issue. After that time it may need
to be revised to take into account new discoveries, changes in policy or the introduction of new working
practices or techniques.


Andrea Burgess
West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service

County Sites and Monuments Record
West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service
Registry of Deeds
Newstead Road
Wakefield
WF1 2DE

Telephone: (01924) 305178
Fax: (01924) 306810
E-mail: aburgess@wyjs.org.uk
The Watershed Landscape                        WL2: Historic environment




                                                            WL2.4 Castleshaw

     Title                 WL2.4 Castleshaw Heritage


     Lead organisation     Oldham
                           2010-2013
                           Match funding secured from Oldham, United Utilities
                           and LEADER

     Project description   The aim of this project is to:
                           • Research and protecting significant archaeologi-
                              cal/historic sites within the Castleshaw valley, and
                           • Raise awareness and understanding of the area’s
                              important heritage amongst local residents, visi-
                              tors and other interested parties
                           • Encourage people to visit and explore the wider
                              area (beyond the reservoirs and Roman fort)

                           The project consists of two elements:
                           • Discovering Castleshaw’s past - research into the
                              historical and archaeological interest.
                           • Exploring Castleshaw’s past - the creation of trails
                              that connect these archaeological sites alongside
                              improvements to the settings/visibility of key fea-
                              tures and production of interpretation material.

                           Professional research and site survey work carried
                           out at the start of year 1, will lead on to involving lo-
                           cal people in further detailed research linked to the
                           preparation of interpretive material. The Saddleworth
                           Archaeological Trust, Saddleworth Historical Society,
                           Saddleworth Museum and Castleshaw Education
                           Centre will be involved in the project, in particular the
                           development of interpretation material and creation of
                           the heritage trail.

                           The new interpretive material will be created to ac-
                           company a heritage trail set out along existing rights
                           of way within the area. The trail will link key historic/
                           archaeological sites, and include both on-site displays
                           and a downloadable trail guide, to help bring the his-
                           tory of the area to the attention of a wider audience.

                           The heritage trail will introduce users to the various
                           key ‘historical stories’ within the Castleshaw Valley.
The Watershed Landscape                        WL2: Historic environment




                                                            WL2.4 Castleshaw

                           As the Roman history is well known and documented,
                           the initial survey will seek to identify the other key
                           stories (such as turnpike roads, Standedge tunnel,
                           power supply for the industrial revolution, Iron Age
                           and medieval Castleshaw etc.). The final route of the
                           trail will be chosen to enable users to get to (or near
                           to) those sites/features that can best illustrate the
                           selected ‘valley stories’.

                           A number of interpretive boards/features and minor
                           improvements will be made to the setting/landscaping
                           of selected sites at key points along the heritage trail.
                           The need to replace and update the existing boards
                           at the Roman fort site has already identified, so it
                           is planned that 2 new interpretation boards will be
                           produced for this location. The location and purpose
                           of the other interpretive features will depend on the
                           recommendations from the initial research and sur-
                           vey, and input from local groups.

     Delivered by          Oldham Council (project management, managing
                           claims and delivery on site), with the support of
                           United Utilities (land owner consent and improve-
                           ments to interpretation for Castleshaw Roman Fort).

                           Contact: Imogen Fuller
                           imogen.fuller@oldham.gov.uk
                           Tel: 0161 770 4165

     In partnership with   Greater Manchester Archaeological Unit
                           Saddleworth Archaeological Trust
                           Saddleworth Historical Society
                           Saddleworth Museum
                           Other local community/voluntary groups
The Watershed Landscape                                  WL2: Historic environment


                                                                    WL2.4 Castleshaw




     Changes from the original bid   The objectives of the project have remained the
                                     same, but the costs have reduced by £14,000 since
                                     the original bid.



      Delivered by




      In partnership with
The Watershed Landscape                                             Proformas
                                                    WL2: Historic environment




                                                                WL2.4 Castleshaw

     Other sources of funding   HLF contribution £22,750 [66%]


                                * Approval is currently being sought for allocation of
                                funds identified within the 2009-2012 Capital pro-
                                gramme.

                                + Grants will be sought from a number of other fund-
                                ing sources such as Veolia Environment Trust grant,
                                Saddleworth Parish Council, Saddleworth and Lees
                                District Partnership)




     Deliverables               1 archaeological survey report produced
                                2-3 community groups engaged
                                4 -5 display boards designed and installed.
                                1 leaflet/downloadable trail guide produced
                                1-2 Archaeological trails established.
                                1 launch event held


     Land ownership             United Utilities, Oldham Council and potentially other
                                private landowners (depending on final route of herit-
                                age trail and location of selected features)

                                However, the responsibility for Rights of Way network
                                along which the trail will take place, sits with Oldham
                                Council.




                                                                                          2
The Watershed Landscape                     WL2: Historic environment




                                                         WL2.4 Castleshaw

     Consents          Match funding secured           Partially (LEADER bid
                       pending)
                       Planning consent required       Not required
                       Landowner consent               YES
                       Highway Orders                  Not required
                       Natural England Consent         Not required
                       necessary

     Procurement       All works over £10,000 to be tendered
                       [ Most work elements are small].
                       Brief for consultant has already been tendered.



     Risk management   Need for Statutory Approvals/ Ownership issues: The
                       Project Team has been meeting for 12 months to
                       look at these issues. Detailed negotiations have been
                       undertaken with key stakeholders such as United
                       Utilities and Natural England.

                       Need for Internal Approvals: The Project has been
                       raised internally within Oldham Council

                       Community consultation: Consultation on the project
                       outline and the brief for the initial research and sur-
                       vey work has already been undertaken with local
                       interest groups. Further consultation is planned at
                       various stages of the project, and has been built into
                       the project timetable to allow sufficient time for this to
                       take place.

                       Cost over-runs: Professional advice has been sought
                       from interpretation consultants, Telltale, regarding the
                       costs of the technical elements of this programme.
                       The project budget will be closely monitored through-
                       out the whole project to reduce the likelihood of cost
                       over-runs or underspend. However, If tender costs
                       do become higher or lower than budget costs, then
                       the project will be revised (in agreement with Pennine
                       Prospects) so that the scope of the project will be
                       reduced/expanded as appropriate, without impacting
                       on the quality of the work delivered.
The Watershed Landscape                         WL2: Historic environment




                                                            WL2.4 Castleshaw

     Enhanced maintenance   The proposals have been designed to minimise and/
                            or reduce maintenance obligations. The future main-
                            tenance obligations for the assets improved under
                            this project will be met from within the following budg-
                            ets:
                            • Oldham Council, Rights of Way maintenance budget
                            for access work and interpretation boards
                            • United Utilities asset management budget relating to
                            Castleshaw Roman Fort
                            Therefore the improvements made as a result of this
                            project should be able to be maintained for the re-
                            quired 10 year period after completion.

     Timescale              Yr 0 – 2009/10
                            Aug ’09       LEADER funding secured
                                          Tendering of initial survey and re
                                          search brief
                            Oct ’09       Initial survey and research contract
                                          awarded (subject to funding)
                            Dec ’09       Other match funding secured
                            March ’10     Project delivery team finalised and
                                          reporting processes agreed

                            Yr 1 – 2010/11
                            Q1     Initial survey and research brief com
                                   pleted
                                   Partners consulted on survey recom
                                   mendations
                            Q2     Heritage Trail route(s) and key fea
                                   tures agreed
                            Q3     Community research for trail guide and
                                   interpretation content starts
                                   Schemes drawn up and agreed for site
                                   improvements (to improve setting of
                                   selected heritage features)
                            Q4     Community research completed

                            Yr 2 – 2011/12
                            Q1     Outline content (key stories) and format (leaf
                                   let/audio download etc.) agreed for heritage
                                   trail guide, and contract tendered
                                   Specification and outline content agreed for
                                   Roman Fort interpretation boards
                                   Site improvement works (to improve setting of
                                   selected heritage features) starts
The Watershed Landscape                 WL2: Historic environment




                                                    WL2.4 Castleshaw

                     Q2     Draft design produced and consulted on for Ro
                            man Fort boards
                            Format and location agreed for non-fort interpre
                            tation features
                            Contract awarded for production of trail guide
                     Q3     Roman fort boards produced and installed
                            Draft content/design of non-fort interpretation
                            features produced and consulted on
                            Draft script/audio/text and images produced for
                            trail guide
                     Q4     Content/design of non-fort interpretation features
                            agreed
                            Format/design of trail waymarkers agreed
                            Draft trail guide consulted on and revised

                     Yr 3 – 2012/13
                     Q1     Non-fort interpretation features produced and
                            installed
                            Trail way markers produced
                            Trail guide tested and finalised
                            Site improvement works (to improve setting of
                            selected heritage features) completed
                     Q2     Trail waymarkers installed
                            Trail guide completed
                     Q3     Heritage Trail launch event
                     Q4     Financial completion
WL 2.4 BRIEF FOR ARCHAEOLOGICAL DESK BASED ASSESSMENT FOR THE
CASTLESHAW HERITAGE TRAIL, NEAR DELPH, SADDLEWORTH, OLDHAM

Background

Within the Watershed Landscape HLF programme a series of interventions, covering access, natural
environment, literary connections and the historical environment, are planned for the Castleshaw
Valley. The aim of the Historic Environment project is to protect and raise awareness of Castleshaw’s
unique historical and cultural associations, providing a better quality user experience that attracts a
wider range of users.

As the Roman Fort at Castleshaw is reasonably well known and documented, the focus of the Historic
Environment project is Castleshaw’s watershed landscape archaeology in an area that has received
very little study previously. The area of interest, or study area, is centred on SE009099 and lies on the
eastern flank of the head of the valley. It has as its boundary the line of the Roman road on its north
side running from the fort up towards Millstone Edge, the Pennine Way on the east side (on top of
Standedge), Huddersfield Road (A62) and Dean Lane to the south, and the western boundary being
formed by Cote Lane and Waters Lane (see attached plan).

This area has several strong historical themes based around changing land use and the development of
communities. These include: transport across the narrowest point of the Pennines (Roman, medieval,
and a series of turnpike roads), early farming, field systems, enclosure of the moorland edge,
industrialisation and development of industrial communities.

The project consists of two elements:

   a) Discovering Castleshaw’s Past - research into the historical and archaeological interest;
   b) Exploring Castleshaw’s past - the creation of trails that connect these archaeological sites to
      main visitor car parks in the area.

This brief is concerned with the first element of the project, namely the initial research and site survey
work, where professional archaeological input is required.

This brief is for an archaeological assessment of the area (highlighted above and in the plan) to inform
engagement with local communities and develop heritage trails and information points. The trail will
take as its focal point the changing landscape including the development of the local road system,
standing buildings and other structures, earthworks and local finds. Five provisional trail routes have
already been identified but these need checking and will be subject to a consultation exercise with the
local community and interested stakeholders. The archaeological study may identify other potential
routes.

Aim

The aim of the assessment will be:

1) To identify and assess the nature of the archaeological and heritage resource within and around the
area of the proposed Heritage Trail.

2) To gather historical information on the development of this area and individual sites within it to
inform the Heritage Trail and other potential interpretation.
3) To recommend the potential course of the Heritage Trail.

4) To recommend key sites and features to be described by the Heritage Trail.

Brief

The survey will take the following form:

   i)        Undertake a historic map regression exercise to produce scaled-up maps showing the area’s
             evolution and identifying the location of any former buildings and buried features, as well
             as extant buildings.

   ii)       Analysis of readily accessible historical documentation will be undertaken to inform
             interpretation and our understanding of the origin and function of former buildings across
             the sites. It will be important to describe the historical context of the study areas, proving
             an understanding of the way the surrounding landscape and settlement patterns changed
             through time. Sources of information to be examined include: Oldham Local Studies Library,
             Saddleworth Museum Archives, and the Greater Manchester Historic Environment Record
             (HER). Oblique and vertical aerial photographs will also be analysed.

   iii)      There should be a gazetteer linked to a plan listing all sites and features of archaeological
             interest within the proposal boundaries. The study will include a 100m wide buffer zone
             (which will include the Roman Fort site to ensure appropriate overlap).

   iv)       There will be a walk over of the whole study area to relate research findings to the existing
             landscape.

   v)        There will be a discussion section examining the relative significance of identified sites
             and presenting a selection of key sites worthy of mention in relation to proposed heritage
             trails. The criteria for scheduling monuments, which are set out in Annex 4 of the Planning
             Policy Guidance No. 16 – Archaeology and Planning (1990) provide the best methodology
             for assessing the relative significance of all archaeological sites, and should be used in this
             context.

   vi)       An understanding of the potential for educational/community involvement or further
             professional input will be provided. Two days will be included to do workshops with local
             groups to get feedback, such as on the best trail options, and to give a presentation.

   vii)      For the whole survey a report should be produced to an agreed timetable. It will include:

          a) A summary statement of the survey’s findings.

          b) The background to the survey including location details.

          c) An outline of the methodology of the survey.

          d) The setting such as topography and geology.

          e) A section charting the historic development of the study area and surrounding landscapes,
          supported by detailed scaled up historic map evidence and old photographs (if available).

          f) A gazetteer showing all sites of archaeological interest, linked to a location plan.
       g) A section providing options for heritage trails as a basis for discussion, including a list of sites
       of interest based on importance, accessibility and contribution to the overall historical story. This
       will include suggestions for sites where ongoing community research work will be appropriate
       or further professional research work.

       k) A copy of the brief.

ix) A digital copy of the report including illustrations and photographs (PDF Format) should be submitted
to GMAU on CD (with the project title, date and author noted on the CD) for inclusion in the HER.

x) The Greater Manchester Historic Environment Record supports the Online Access to Index of
Archaeological Investigations (OASIS) project. The overall aim of the OASIS project is to provide
an online index to the mass of archaeological grey literature that has been produced as a result of
the advent of large-scale developer funded fieldwork. The archaeological contractor must therefore
complete the online OASIS form at http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/project/oasis/ .

Contractors are advised to contact the Greater Manchester Historic Environment Record prior to
completing the form. Once a report has become a public document by submission to or incorporation
into the HER, the Greater Manchester Historic Environment Record may place the information on
a web-site. Please ensure that you and your client agree to this procedure in writing as part of the
process of submitting the report to the case officer at Greater Manchester Historic Environment
Record.


Other Considerations

1) The County Archaeologist and Cllr Mike Buckley, will be consulted on a draft report as he has
specialist research knowledge and interest on landscape enclosure and field systems.

2) The archaeological contractor will abide by the Institute of Field Archaeologists Bye-Laws of
Approved Practice.

3) Contractors shall comply with the requirements of all relevant Health & Safety legislation and adopt
procedures according to guidance set out in the Health & Safety Manual of the Standing Conference of
Archaeological Unit Managers.

4) Copies of the survey report will be sent to:

The County Archaeologist (GMAU), Cllr Mike Buckley (Saddleworth Historical Society, Ken Booth
(Saddleworth Archaeological Trust), Imogen Fuller (Principal Regeneration Officer Oldham Council),
Dave Faulconbridge (Castleshaw Outdoor Education Service), Doug Murray (Oldham Countryside
Service), Peter Fox (Saddleworth Museum), Robin Gray (Project Co-ordinator, Pennine Prospects),
Saddleworth Civic Trust and British Waterways.


Norman Redhead
County Archaeologist
GMAU
7th July 2009
The Watershed Landscape                                                      WL3: Natural heritage




    Theme Three: Natural heritage: the enhancement of landscapes

    This programme focuses on measures to enhance the physical landscapes
    and habitats characteristic of the Watershed Landscape, in particular blanket
    bog, heathland, grasslands and woodland. These habitats have been identi-
    fied as priorities through the work done to prepare the Integrated Management
    Strategy and Conservation Action Plan, and confirmed through subsequent
    consultations and discussions with partners, interest groups and landown-
    ers. They support the PSA target to reduce the number of SSSIs in unfavour-
    able condition. The UK Biodiversity Action Plan identifies all these habitats
    as being of international importance requiring protection and enhancement,
    while the twite is a Red Listed Species of Conservation Concern. Funding for
    much of this work is through the agri-environment funding. Measures, mostly
    funded by HLF, include reducing visitor impact to Ilkley Moor and the Pennine
    Way by installing ‘causey’ paving; repairing drystone walling at Worsthorne;
    re-instating haymeadow on in-bye land across the Watershed Landscape
    and managing upland tarns on Ilkley Moor. Proposals have been designed
    to take account of Defra guidelines regarding dual funding and stewardship.


    Aims:
    • To ensure the retention and enhancement of the international status
       and wildlife value of key South Pennine habitats, notably blanket bog
       and upland heathland
    • To protect and restore the vulnerable populations of twite, the Pennine
       Finch
    • To enhance and conserve landscape and historic features for the im-
       provement of the visitor experience.

    Objectives:
    These aims will be achieved through:
    • Supporting peat restoration and moorland improvement work [with fund-
       ing through Stewardship and MoorLife WL3.2; WL3.3]
    • Carrying out landscape improvements aimed at enhancing the habitats
       for twite
    • Creating suitably surfaced routes to protect vulnerable habitats and
       eliminate erosion [Rombalds WL3.4]
    • Setting up seed banks to provide suitable seed for future habitat en-
       hancement [Twite WL3.1]
    • Restoring historic structures within the Watershed Landscape

    Links to other themes
    There will be training opportunities (theme six) in practical conservation
    work to achieve the delivery of these projects, in particular in relation to the
    work on improving habitats for twite. Volunteers will be able to gain skills in
    ecological survey and monitoring techniques, while volunteers, landowners
    and local contractors will be able to gain skills in habitat management and
    the creation and management of seed banks.
The Watershed Landscape                                                      WL3: Natural heritage




    Drystone walling features in WL3.2, WL3.3 and WL3.4, much to be car-
    ried out by trainees [through the Acorn Centre]. The theme will also create
    opportunities for interpretation [specifically relating to eco-system services]
    and this will be co-ordinated and steered under theme five: Interpretation
    and Engagement.

    Pennine Prospects will also be working with partners to protect the re-
    source through servicing the Fire Operations Group and the MoorWatch
    website [funded by Natural England].

    Supporting studies
    IMASCAP – Integrated Management Strategy and Conservation Action
    Plan for the South Pennine Moors, 1998

    Assessment of SSSIs in unfavourable condition: Vol 4 South Pennines
    SSSI, United Utilities / Penny Anderson Associates, 2003

    Other specialist advice
    The twite recovery project will be receiving support and steering from spe-
    cialist staff within both Natural England and RSPB.

    Natural England will play a leading role in advising on the moorland restora-
    tion work, as well as the technical and countryside staff from the two water
    authorities. Advice will also be sought from the Environment Agency on
    issues around drainage and grip blocking.

    Outputs and outcomes
    • Improve the quality and range of heathland habitats in the peat moor-
       land by bringing over 200 ha. of moorland back into favourable condi-
       tion
    • Control bracken over 16 ha. of moorland
    • Restore and enhance 500 ha. of grasslands (hay meadows, pastures,
       verges)
    • Restore and enhance 500 ha. tall dwarf shrub and other tall vegetation
       for twite nesting habitat
    • Secure 20 agri-environment / management agreements to restore twite
       breeding and feeding habitats
    • Establish six seedbanks for the long term provision of local provenance
       seed and seeding vegetation for future habitat enhancement
    • Create 10 ha. of upland ash / oak woodland at Scammonden
    • Put in place 1.5km. of stone flagged path over vulnerable stretches of
       Rombalds Moor
    • Restore 1km of Pennine Way, 2km of drystone wall
    • Restore 4 historic structures on moorland
The Watershed Landscape                                WL3: Natural heritage




                                                                     WL3.1 Twite

     Title                 WL3.1 Twite Recovery Programme


                           RSPB [with funding from Natural England]
     Lead organisation     2010-2013


     Project description   The Twite Recovery Programme will address the
                           decline of the twite, a Red Listed Species of Con-
                           servation Concern and a UK Biodiversity Action Plan
                           Priority Species. As a breeding bird it is confined to
                           the South Pennines, with just 19 colonies remaining
                           (almost exclusively within the Watershed Landscape).
                           RSPB will work with landowners, local community and
                           interest groups, including the South Pennines Twite
                           Study Group, to restore and re-create new feeding
                           and nesting habitats for twite. This will involve restor-
                           ing tall dwarf shrub communities along the edges of
                           the moorlands, and re-creating flower rich hay mead-
                           ows and pastures along the moorland fringes.

                           Six priority areas within the Watershed Landscape
                           have been identified where management agreements
                           will be secured with local landowners to achieve long
                           term habitat changes – Worsthorne Moor, Turley
                           Holes, Rishworth Common, Denshaw and Scam-
                           monden Water. Suitable sites for seed banks will be
                           established, and local landowners / contractors will
                           be equipped to carry out seed collection and grass-
                           land management.. In addition, wherever possible,
                           sites will be brought into Higher Level Stewardship
                           Schemes. Both these measures will ensure that
                           the benefits of the initiative will last well beyond the
                           project period.

                           The Twite Recovery Programme will work with com-
                           munity groups and local Authorities to restore and
                           recreate new feeding and nesting habitat for twite.
                           This will involve restoring tall, dwarf shrub communi-
                           ties (i.e. heather, bilberry ) along the moorland edge
                           and within cloughs and re-creating flower rich hay
                           meadows adjacent to the moors where twite can for-
                           age. As such the project shares common objectives
                           with a number of other proposed projects within the
                           Watershed Landscape HLF bid and will be delivered
The Watershed Landscape                               WL3: Natural heritage




                                                                    WL3.1 Twite

                           in partnership with a range of other organisations.

                           Working under the programme, the HLF funded post
                           of Hay Meadow Restoration Officer will locate donor
                           hay meadow sites; recruit, train and manage groups
                           of volunteers who will collect seeds from donors and
                           transfer and reintroduce them to restoration sites,
                           facilitated by the Twite Programme Officer. The Hay
                           Meadow Restoration Officer will oversee the on-going
                           restoration works at the recipient sites.


     Delivered by          The Programme will be delivered on the ground by
                           the Natural England/RSPB Twite Programme Manag-
                           er and HLF-funded Hay Meadow Restoration Officer
                           as part of the Twite Species Recovery Project. Project
                           management will be provided by the RSPB’s Conser-
                           vation Programmes Manager.

                           A Recovery Project Steering Group will provide
                           strategic direction and support to the project. The
                           Steering group will comprise of representatives from
                           NE, RSPB, South Pennines Twite Study Group, West
                           Yorkshire Biodiversity Project officer and Watershed
                           Landscape HLF.

                           Contacts:
                           RSPB
                           Westleigh Mews
                           Wakefield Road
                           Denby Dale
                           West Yorkshire
                           HD8 8QD
                           Roy Taylor Conservation Programmes Manager
                           roy.taylor@rspb.org.uk
                           Kerry Gowthorpe (Twite Project Officer)
                           kerry.gowthorpe@rspb.org.uk

     In partnership with   The project will work with Natural England staff
                           throughout, ensuring consent and support for all
                           agri-environment scheme applications. In addition,
                           key partnerships have been identified for the 6 target
                           areas;
                           Worsthorne Moor – United Utilities, Yorkshire Water,
                           tenant farmers
The Watershed Landscape                                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                                                             WL3.1 Twite

                                     Turley Holes – Calderdale Council, Calderdale Seed
                                     Project, Yorkshire Water, tenant farmers
                                     Rishworth Common – Yorkshire Water, National Trust,
                                     tenant farmers
                                     Todmorden Moor – Calderdale Council, Todmorden
                                     Moor Restoration Trust, Calderdale Seed Project, ten-
                                     ant farmers
                                     Denshaw – Yorkshire Water, Calderdale Seed Project,
                                     Bradford Ornithological Group, tenant farmers
                                     Scammonden – Yorkshire Water, Kirklees Council,
                                     Huddersfield Birdwatching Club, tenant farmers




                                     RSPB have seconded a Project Officer during the
     Changes from the original bid   development/feasibility of the Programme [ 2010/11].
                                     HLF funding will allow the Project to move into a
                                     delivery stage with an enhanced habitat intervention
                                     fund available for physical works [ seed collection,
                                     propagation and planting] and the creation of the new
                                     seasonal post of Habitat Intervention Officer (hay
                                     meadow restoration).

                                     The post will be appointed for a twenty week period
                                     per year to coincide with seed harvesting.

                                     This proposal has increased in size from the original
                                     project proforma; ie, from a £150,000 to a £255,000
                                     project.Through the development phase of the Project
                                     it has been recognised that there would not be the
                                     resources to deliver the Project across the full extent
                                     of the project area. HLF funding is now sought to fund
                                     the delivery stage of the Project with an increase in
                                     resources for the Habitat Intervention Fund and the
                                     new staff role.
The Watershed Landscape                                    WL3: Natural heritage




                                                                         WL3.1 Twite

                                Additional HLF funding will enable the RSPB to de-
                                liver more habitat enhancement through funding with
                                the Project Officer to deal solely with increasing the
                                number of agreements with landowners and manage-
                                ment of other staff. The Habitat Intervention Officer
                                will oversee and deliver the direct, on-site habitat
                                works.


     Other sources of funding   In 2010/2011 the Twite Species Recovery Project has
                                secured
                                • £35,000 Natural England funding [Countdown
                                    2010]

                                The funding shortfall of £118,848 will be made up
                                from HLF funding over the three years [£35,000 in
                                2010/11].




     Deliverables               The project objectives are outlined below. The fig-
                                ures presented are the sum output when work in all 6
                                target areas is combined.

                                •   Restore and enhance 500 ha of flower rich habi-
                                    tats (hay meadows, species rich pasture, roadside
                                    verges etc), which are protected in the long term
                                    through agri-environment scheme or management
                                    agreements (20 recipient sites per annum)
                                •   Restore and enhance 500 ha of tall dwarf shrub,
                                    or other tall vegetation, suitable as twite nesting
                                    habitat, around the moorland edge and which are
                                    protected in the long term through agr-environ-
                                    ment scheme or management agreements.
                                •   Establish a seed bank (donor farm secured
                                    through HLS agreement) in each of the 6 target
                                    areas
                                •   Secure 20 agri-environment and/or management
                                    agreements between 2008 – 2011 which restore
                                    twite breeding and feeding habtiat and the man-
                                    agement of which is funded beyond the life of the
                                    HLF programme.



                                                                                          P
The Watershed Landscape                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                                              WL3.1 Twite

                    •   Establish informal contracts with 2 – 3 local
                        contractors to deliver habitat enhancement works
                        ie seed collection, hay cutting, across the 6 target
                        areas
                    •   Deliver a programme of 12 talks and presenta-
                        tions to local groups, farmer clubs etc over the 6
                        target areas.
                    •   Deliver a programme of 9 guided walks for local
                        communities during the 3 year HLF programme,
                        aimed at increasing knowledge and support for
                        twite conservation
                    •   Recruit and train 30 volunteers in survey and
                        monitoring of Twite breeding numbers and habi-
                        tat utilisation in order to inform the management
                        practices implemented by the Recovery Project.
The Watershed Landscape                                WL3: Natural heritage




                                                                     WL3.1 Twite

     Land ownership         Yorkshire Water, United Utilities, private landowners.


                            Match funding secured already from Natural England
     Consents               Landowner consents would be part of agri-environ-
                            ment programmes


    Risk management         Need for Statutory Approvals/ Ownership issues:
                            Addressed through the negotiation of Environmental
                            Stewardship Schemes.

                            Need for Internal Approvals: Agreement of RSPB on
                            establishment of the post

                            Community consultation: The Twite Recovery Project
                            Officer has already had several meetings and already
                            recruited volunteers.

                            Cost over-runs: These will be managed internally by
                            RSPB.

                            Capacity:


                            Addressed through Environmental Stewardship
     Enhanced maintenance
                            schemes administered by Natural England.


                            Match funding secured for year one YES
     Timescale
                            Establishment of post Q1 2010/11
                            Advertising post / recruitment Q3/Q4 2009/10
                            Negotiations with landowners
The Watershed Landscape                                WL3: Natural heritage




                                                   WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

     Title                  WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor: From Town to Top


                            Lancashire County Council co-ordination and man-
     Lead organisation      agement [United Utilities and Lancashire County
                            Council delivery]
                            2010-2013
                            Match funding to be secured by Lancashire County
                            Council [£35,000], United Utilities [£35,000], United
                            Utilities SCAMP 2 [£117,775]


     Project description   Project Aim
                           The Worsthorne Moor Project will seek to effect signif-
                           icant landscape change across moorland fringe and
                           moorland habitats, whilst helping to raise awareness
                           and promote community involvement in the sustain-
                           able management of the natural and cultural heritage
                           of the South Pennines Watershed Landscape.

                           Project objectives are to:
                           1. Restore moorland habitats of blanket bog, wet
                           heath and dry heath.
                           2. Restore landscape heritage features, such as dry
                           stone walls and boundary stones.
                           3. Reduction in peat erosion and carbon loss.
                           4. Promote carbon sequestration, helping to combat
                           climate change.
                           5. Contribute to improved water quality (particularly
                           reduction in colour).
                           6. To provide environmental education opportunities
                           for schools to learn about the environment, conserva-
                           tion and other land-based topics.
                           7. Improve access and interpretation of the landscape
                           to give an enhanced visitor experience and to appeal
                           to a wider diversity of the population.
                           8. Involve local communities in sustainable upland
                           management.
                           9. Raise awareness and promote the conservation of
                           habitats for South Pennine birds with local communi-
                           ties, farmers and landowners.
                           10. Contribute towards the efforts to increase breed-
                           ing upland bird populations (including the red-listed
                           twite).
The Watershed Landscape                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                            WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

                     Location
                     The Worsthorne Estate covers 1307ha. owned by
                     United Utilities, of which 85% is tenanted to one farm
                     business. It is situated to the east of Burnley, beyond
                     the villages of Worsthorne and Hurstwood. Principal
                     site access from the road is from the car park on the
                     minor road at Long Causeway, off the A646 between
                     Burnley and Todmorden. In addition, the project will
                     seek to work in partnership other local landowners
                     (including Yorkshire Water) adjacent to this large
                     water-gathering site in proposed project activi-
                     ties, thereby maximising the envisioned landscape
                     change.

                     Project Management
                     The project will be co-ordinated and managed by
                     Lancashire County Council and will be guided by a
                     management group with representatives from:
                     • United Utilities Central Catchment team and
                        SCAMP II project.
                     • Lancashire County Council
                     • Burnley Borough Council
                     • Groundwork Pennine Lancashire (Community
                        Engagement Lead for Programme)
                     • RSPB
                     • Natural England

                     Themes
                     The project activities can be grouped into five key
                     themes:

                     Moorland Restoration (Delivery partners - UU)
                     This moorland restoration work will focus primarily on
                     testing recently established peat stabilisation and re-
                     vegetation techniques to regenerate important moor-
                     land habitats in the South Pennines. This work would
                     seek to add value to the land management prescrip-
                     tions already under way as part of the current Stew-
                     ardship Scheme agreements for Worsthorne Estate.
                     United Utilities will manage the delivery of this theme
                     using contractors, liaising with tenants and other
                     project partners, particularly where this work builds
                     on the agreements and/or complements the Natural
                     England/RSPB Twite Species Recovery Project.
                     The restoration programme would include:
The Watershed Landscape                          WL3: Natural heritage




                                             WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

                     • Targeted bare peat stabilisation & re-vegetation
                     • Limited moorland grip-blocking
                     • Molinia reversion to heather moorland
                     In addition, the proposed restoration of key drystone
                     walls will help to establish optimal stock grazing levels
                     to maintain the restored moorland habitats.

                     Environmental Education (Delivery partners – UU/
                     LCC)
                     An environmental education specialist will be con-
                     tracted to work alongside United Utilities to develop
                     educational opportunities and resources for second-
                     ary school pupils to learn about sustainable upland
                     management at Worsthorne. The specialist will work
                     with a local secondary school which delivers the
                     Diploma in Environmental and Land-based Studies.
                     A local school has already worked with United Utilities
                     Central Catchment Environment and Communities
                     team making some initial field visits, with a view to de-
                     livering aspects of the Diploma using the Worsthorne
                     project site.

                     It is envisaged that this work will culminate in the
                     development of education packs for schools/teachers
                     to use to develop similar courses/field visits in other
                     areas of the project areas.

                     Access for All (Delivery Partners – LCC/UU)
                     This theme will focus on improving access to the site
                     making it more accessible for previously excluded
                     groups, particularly people with mobility difficulties.
                     The site is currently well served by footpaths and the
                     Mary Towneley Loop Pennine Bridleway. However,
                     access for the footpaths and bridleway could be im-
                     proved for people with mobility difficulties (e.g. gates
                     allowing access by off-road mobility scooters).
                     In addition, a woodland site (Hurstwood Wood) within
                     Worsthorne Estate lends itself to providing short
                     mountain bike trails targeted at a growing number of
                     off road cyclists seeking more technical and challeng-
                     ing routes. United Utilities would manage the delivery
                     of this theme, in close liaison with Lancashire County
                     Council Countryside Service.

                     Community Engagement (Delivery Partners –
The Watershed Landscape                                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                                            WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

                                     LCC/RSPB/Groundwork PL)
                                     The principal project delivery agents will work closely
                                     with the programme’s community engagement con-
                                     sultants and RSPB to deliver a programme of com-
                                     munity events and workshops throughout the project
                                     life. Workshops/events will include:
                                     • Habitat management for upland birds workshops
                                          aimed at land managers
                                     • Moorland restoration techniques workshop for
                                          landowners, tenants, land managers, contractors
                                          etc.
                                     • Drystone walling activities
                                     • School field survey visits
                                     • Cottongrass planting events

                                     Interpretation (Delivery Partners – Programme
                                     Staff/LCC/UU/RSPB)
                                     The principal project delivery agents will work closely
                                     with programme staff to develop interpretation on
                                     a variety of locally relevant themes (e.g. reservoir
                                     history, the 16th century limestone hushings and the
                                     importance of sustainable moorland management).
                                     The project will seek to use the latest media technolo-
                                     gies (e.g. MP3 trail downloads) to complement more
                                     traditional interpretation (e.g. boards and leaflets).



     Changes from the original bid   The most significant change to the project (affecting
                                     costs) is additional moorland restoration works identi-
                                     fied during the planning process for United Utilities
                                     Sustainable Catchment Management Programme
                                     2. RSPB were contracted to develop a farm environ-
                                     mental plan for the Worsthorne Estate, which identi-
                                     fied more areas of moorland requiring suitable bare
                                     peat restoration, grip blocking and gully re-profiling
                                     – this work increased the projects costs by approxi-
                                     mately £140,000. However, this expenditure will be
                                     funded by SCAMP2, if approved.
The Watershed Landscape                                   Proformas
                                                WL3: Natural heritage




                                            WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

     Deliverables    Project outputs include:
                     • 29ha. of restored moorland
                     • 1.48ha. of bare peat stabilised
                     • 3019m of gully re-profiling
                     • 810m of grip blocking
                     • 1000m of restored dry stone wall
                     • 10 training events/workshops held
                     • 10 voluntary/community groups involved
                     • 1 school working with project to deliver Diploma in
                        Environmental and Land-based Studies
                     Physical restoration can be measured and docu-
                     mented through relevant survey work. All delivery
                     agents will be required to monitor numbers of groups,
                     schools involved etc. United Utilities will monitor
                     numbers of visitors using counters at appropriate visi-
                     tor facilities e.g. car parks, footpaths, mountain bike
                     trails.




                                                                               2
The Watershed Landscape                                     WL3: Natural heritage




                                                        WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

     Other sources of funding




     Delivered by               Principal delivery agents:
                                Lancashire County Council - overall project man-
                                agement and administration of claims, in addition to
                                delivery of access works.
                                United Utilities - contract management of physical
                                works.

                                Other joint delivery agents have been identified in the
                                project outline.

                                Project Contact:

                                Elliott Lorimer
                                Lancashire County Council
                                01772 533979
                                elliott.lorimer@lancashire.gov.uk


     In partnership with        Watershed Landscape Programme Staff
                                Natural England
                                RSPB
                                Groundwork Pennine Lancashire
                                Burnley Borough Council
The Watershed Landscape                                 WL3: Natural heritage




                                                    WL3.2 Worsthorne Moor

     Land ownership         The Worsthorne Estate covers 1307ha. owned by
                            United Utilities, of which 85% is tenanted to one farm
                            business.

     Consents               Several of the proposals are subject to negotiating a
                            Environmental Stewardship Agreement between the
                            existing tenant, Natural England and United Utili-
                            ties. Operations will have to be consented by Natural
                            England. To reduce risk; most spend has been pro-
                            grammed for year two and year three. Even without a
                            new agreement, access, interpretation and education
                            work can be implemented.

                            •   Consents and programming [above].
     Risk management
                            •   AMP5 funding; If United Utilities were not to get
                                the full extent of funding then the works would still
                                proceed but probably over a longer time span and
                                probably not to the full extent of funding. If this is
                                the case, then there would be a need to re-assign
                                funding in years two and three.
                            •   Lack of community interest and involvement in
                                developing and holding community events. [See
                                appointment of Newground CIC/Groundwork
                                and cotton grass propagation will engage local
                                schools]
                            •   Lack of interest from adjacent landowners/local
                                community to work with the project on improving
                                land management practices for moorland birds
                                e.g. training workshops.

     Enhanced maintenance   The proposals have been designed to minimise
                            maintenance obligations where there are enhanced
                            maintenance obligations these appear within United
                            Utilities existing asset management plan with an
                            annual budget for maintenance on the Worsthorne
                            Estate. Stewardship funding will ensure the mainte-
                            nance of capital investment on natural environment/
                            peat restoration proposals.


     Procurement            All contract work above £ 10,000 will be competi-
                            tively tendered.
                            [ major work packages: fencing contracts, grip
                            blocking, access work, drystone walling, mountain
                            bike trails].
                            Drystone walling will be delivered as a training
                            scheme [Acorn Centre, Todmorden]
                          WL 3.2 WORSTHORNE MOOR : From Town to Top
Timetable /   2010/11                     2011/12                       2012/13
milestones
              Stock fencing restoration   Gully re-profiling and        Bare peat areas of
              activities                  grip-blocking restoration     moorland stabilised/re-
                                          activities                    vegetated and suitable
              4 tramper accessible                                      areas re-wetted
              gates installed


              400m of dry stone wall                                    300m of dry stone wall
              restored                    300m of dry stone wall        restored
                                          restored
              Mountain bike trails
              designs completed           Mountain bike trails
                                          completed
              2 community events/                                       4 community events/
              training workshops held     4 community events/training   training workshops held
                                          workshops held
              Schools education pack                                    Schools education pack
              developed                                                 distributed to relevant
                                          Schools education pack        South Pennine schools,
                                          distributed to relevant       with training for teachers.
                                          South Pennine schools, with
                                          training for teachers.
The Watershed Landscape                               WL3: Natural heritage




                                           WL3.3 Yorkshire Water Estate

     Title                 WL3.3: Yorkshire Water Estate: Landscape Restora-
                           tion

                           Yorkshire Water 2010-2013
     Lead organisation
                           Match funding to be secured through HLS agree-
                           ments [capital works]
                           Delivery by Yorkshire Water [Listed structures, ac-
                           cess, interpretation]
                           Pennine Prospects [volunteers and interpretation ]
                           Natural England with Calderdale Metropolitan Bor-
                           ough Council [consents & implementation of works to
                           Pennine Way]
                           Moors for the Future [Peatland restoration, contract
                           management]


    Project description   Peatland restoration [ funded through HLS/LIFE fund-
                          ing] :
                          Several moorland areas have been identified as in
                          need of restoration works following current best prac-
                          tice, or other measures to achieve appropriate man-
                          agement that will improve the quality of the mosaic of
                          moorland habitats. In places bare peat needs to be
                          stabilised, in some instances by establishing a quick
                          growing sward, and re-wetted, through grip block-
                          ing. Further work is then carried out to improve the
                          species composition of the swards, to prevent further
                          erosion and improve the quality of the habitats.

                          On moors which are dominated by Molinia, work is
                          needed to scarify the surface and introduce a wider
                          range of appropriate species, for example through the
                          laying of heather brash. Other works include control
                          of bracken, grip blocking, and fencing to control stock.
                          These works are usually funded through agri-environ-
                          ment schemes administered by Natural England.

                          Ongoing mapping/survey work being undertaken
                          by Moors for the Future, Yorkshire Peat Project and
                          others in identifying priority sites across the South
                          Pennines. Yorkshire Water is the major landowner in
                          the area.

                          The priority areas for restoration owned by Yorkshire
The Watershed Landscape                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                     WL3.3 Yorkshire Water Estate
                     Water include Rishworth Moor, Heptonstall Moor,
                     Turley Holes/Higher House/Soyland Moors. Yorkshire
                     Water also owns a portfolio of other sites including
                     Ovenden, Keighley and Oakworth Moor

                     Proposals for sites follow guidance available from
                     DEFRA; namely HLF funding will be used for dis-
                     crete proposals relating to access, recreation, histori-
                     cal assets and community engagement rather than
                     funding those elements that will be supported through
                     agri-environment funding administered by Natural
                     England.

                     Historical, recreational and landscape assets
                     [funded through HLF funding and through third par-
                     ties including Yorkshire Water]
                     As well as the natural, biodiversity and geomorpho-
                     logical assets of the Uplands there are a number of
                     historic remains, listed structures and scheduled an-
                     cient monuments within these estates. These include

                     •   Archaeological remains including cup and ring
                         stones.
                     •   Evidence of quarrying [ Ovenden Moor]
                     •   Packhorse trails [ Oxygrains, Rishworth Moor,
                         Blackstone Edge].
                     •   Ruined farmhouses [including Top Withins on
                         Haworth Moor, Raistrick Greave].
                     •   Features related to the management of the moor [
                         sheepfolds, shooting lodges on Turley Holes].

                     The Partners wish to use HLF funding to restore tradi-
                     tional built features in the landscape, improve access
                     and interpretation and look at alternative traditional
                     means of removing invasive species such as bracken,
                     molinia and rhododendron using horses and volun-
                     teers. These works will be largely funded by HLF [up
                     to 85%] but in parallel with the peat restoration works
                     carried out by Moors for the Future.

                     The Pennine Way: Heptonstall Moor [subject to
                     HLS agreement funded 85% by HLF and 15% by
                     Natural England; managed by Calderdale MDC]
                     Heptonstall Moor is a priority for restoration where
                     habitat restoration works will be funded through HLS
The Watershed Landscape                                WL3: Natural heritage




                                           WL3.3 Yorkshire Water Estate
                           countryside stewardship and Yorkshire Water funding.

                           It is anticipated that HLF funding is used to improve
                           access through paving the Pennine Way across the
                           moor. Using stone flags to ensure that people keep
                           off the vegetation is the most suitable technique, as
                           it uses an attractive, traditional and local material. It
                           has also been found to be an effective, non-intrusive
                           way of protecting vegetation and allowing it to restore.

                           Any works would have to be subject to a success-
                           ful outcome to the negotiation of a HLS agreement
                           on Heptonstall Moor [consequently, this has been
                           phased to a year two or three project].

                           Priorities in year one include restoration work on
                           Rishworth Moor, Turley Holes and Higher House
                           Moor funded through EU Moor LIFE and delivered
                           by Moors for the Future. Stewardship agreement has
                           been secured and the funding is in place. A Steward-
                           ship agreement is currently being negotiated for Hep-
                           tonstall Moor, when this is in place, over 25 hectares
                           of moorland restoration will be carried out [funded
                           through Higher Level Stewardship]. These works are
                           programmed for year two [to avoid the risk of not se-
                           curing Stewardship agreement in advance].




                           Yorkshire Water [landowner, funder, interpretation,
                           work to structures]
                           Pennine Prospects [community engagement, volun-
     Delivered by          teers, interpretation advice].
                           Moors for the Future [contract administration on be-
                           half of YW; project managing MOORLIFE+].
                           Natural England [Calderdale Council] Pennine Way


     In partnership with   Natural England [ consents and administration of agri-
                           environment schemes]
                           RSPB [ production of farm management plans]
The Watershed Landscape                                        WL3: Natural heritage




                                                    WL3.3 Yorkshire Water Estate




     Changes from the original bid   Recent guidance available from DEFRA has pro-
                                     duced advice of how best to support landscape
                                     change on Yorkshire Water sites without ‘dual funding’
                                     the same activity. The [above] proposals represent
                                     discrete proposals that will be [substantially] funded
                                     through HLF funding whilst linked thematically to the
                                     wider and larger programmes of peatland restoration.
                                     Taking Yorkshire Water proposals together, Turley
                                     Holes, Heptonstall Moor and Rishworth Moor; ex-
                                     penditure of £334,000 was expected at stage one.
                                     In discussions with the HLF Project Monitor, it was
                                     agreed to group these sites together as a portfolio
                                     project with a budget of £256,000.

                                     Match through Natural England’s Higher Level Stew-
     Other sources of funding
                                     ardship Scheme [£50,000]
                                     Match through Yorkshire Water £3,000 in 2010 and
                                     £12,075 [in total]
                                     Match through EU MoorLIFE Programme [£60,000]

     Deliverables                    10 ha Area of molinia grass cutting/ bracken on Soy-
                                     land Moor
                                     2 structures restored [ including sheepfold, shooting
                                     lodge]
                                     2 further structures surveyed with a view to restora-
                                     tion
                                     3 interpretation boards
The Watershed Landscape                          WL3: Natural heritage




                                      WL3.3 Yorkshire Water Estate
                       1 community project

                       Future years
                       35 ha of scrub removed by volunteers on Heptonstall
                       Moor]
                       3 structures restored
                       1,000m Length of the Pennine Way restored by pav-
                       ing
                       2,000m Length of path restored
                       200 metres of path restored
                       4 interpretation boards
                       up to 125 ha area of erosion re-instated [funded
     Land ownership    Yorkshire Water [ the landowner] will be carrying out
                       works to their property.
                       Tenants – works will need to be included within HLS
                       agreements [ agreed with the tenants and freeholder ]
                       and negotiated by Natural England.

     Consents          Routes will be existing Public Rights of Way where
                       Natural England/Calderdale MBC has existing pow-
                       ers.
                       The work on Rishworth, Higher House and Turley
                       Moors are subject to existing stewardship agree-
                       ments.
                       Consent from Natural England is in progress on Hep-
                       tonstall, Widdop and Gorple Moors

     Risk management   • Need for Statutory Approvals/ Ownership issues:
                       Detailed negotiations have been undertaken with key
                       stakeholders Natural England, tenants and Yorkshire
                       Water.
                       • Match funding through Moors for the Future is
                       secure on Rishworth Moor, Higher House Moor and
                       Turley Holes.
                       • The work on Heptonstall Moor is pending a new
                       HLS agreement ; consequently this has been identi-
                       fied as a potential year two project.
                       • All other works form part of existing HLS agree-
                       ments with Natural England
                       • Need for funding approvals: Yorkshire Water – sub-
                       ject to AMP 5 [ this has been mitigated by reducing
                       any financial commitments of Yorkshire Water in year
                       one].
                       • Cost over-runs: Costings have been supplied based
                       on tendered rates based on previous sites. Some
The Watershed Landscape                                WL3: Natural heritage




                                            WL3.3 Yorkshire Water Estate
                            of the structural work already have structural survey
                            reports.
                            • Capacity: Contracts will be managed by organisa-
                            tions best placed to carry out the work ie Moors for
                            the Future relating to peatland restoration, Yorkshire
                            Water surveyors relating to structures.



     Enhanced maintenance   The proposals have been designed to minimise
                            maintenance obligations, where there are enhanced
                            maintenance obligations there is a budget available
                            for maintaining structures or sites on Rishworth Moor,
                            Heptonstall Moor

                            The Pennine Way is subject to a budget and Service
                            Level Agreements with the local authorities.


     Procurement            Pennine Way works will be managed and tendered by
                            Calderdale Council Rights of Way Team.
                            Structural works will be procured by Yorkshire Water.


                             Year one project 2010/ 11:
     Timescale
                             2009/10        Survey & tendering work of structures
                             2010 Q3/4      Approval of AMP 5 / MoorLIFE
                             2010/11 Q2/3 Structural work on sheepfold and
                                            shooting lodge
                             2010/11        Survey work of bracken/molinia
                                            grass cutting
                             2010/11        Interpretation boards research
                             2010/11 Q2/3    Bracken cutting / molinia grass
                                             reversion
                             2010/11         Small scale propagation of cotton
                                             grass

                             Year two projects
                             2010/11 Subject to negotiation of HLS agreements on
                             Heptonstall/ Widdop/Gorple
 Preliminary project brief for a survey of Scheduled Monument GM5 / W32 Blackstone Edge
                                         Roman Road

Site description
The scheduled monument GM5 / W32 Blackstone Edge Roman Road is a famous and dramatic paved
road which crosses the Pennine watershed between Rochdale and Calderdale, Greater Manchester
(formerly Lancashire) and Yorkshire. Its exact origins and development are still not clear, although it
is generally now thought to be unlikely to be Roman in origin, whatever the earlier academic opinion
of Roman specialists and local folklore.

The scheduled site is 3.2km (approximately 2 miles) in length. It runs, west to east, from beneath
Blackstone Edge on a bend of the Halifax Road near Blackstone Edge Pasture (SD96311682) to New
Gate End where it rejoins the modern Rochdale Road from Ripponden and Halifax (SD98941844).
The old Lancashire side of the county boundary contains the most visible sections of flagged highway,
about 4-5m wide with its distinctive and unusual grooved central stones and kerbs along both
edges. However, the paved section runs within a much broader holloway, which supports a different
vegetation to the peat hags on either side and presumably marks the path of the unpaved route prior to
the construction of the later paved road. Over the upper summit some of the paved section is lost under
vegetation and/or runs on bare rock. On the Yorkshire side most of the road is a wide holloway covered
in coarse grasses, bents and sedges. Due to the near comprehensive cover of vegetation it is not known
how much of the route is of stone construction on this side, though at least two sections (including the
part known as Dhoul’s Pavement between Slate Pit Hill and Fairy Hill SD9868918199) appear to run
over the natural rock of flat bedded sandstone.

Management issues
According to the English Heritage Monuments at Risk survey the site is at High Risk and is continuing
to decline. While much of the site is in good condition, sections of it suffer from a number of problems
including natural erosion, vandalism, vehicle erosion, and visitor erosion.

A public footpath runs along its entire length. The public footpath is in good condition between the far
eastern end of the scheduled site to where it meets the Rishworth Drain. However, from the Rishworth
Drain westwards to the Aiggin Stone there is considerable erosion along the course of the public
footpath, largely caused by unauthorised vehicles such as motorbikes which unofficially access the
path from the Rishworth Drain service track. Over the summit there are several places of erosion,
though here the paved surface does not seem to be continuous, use again being made occasionally
of the natural bedrock. Erosion and vandalism are a major problem where Broad Head Drain (SD
9694616995) cuts through the trackway, natural erosion on the upslope side being exacerbated by the
disturbance and removal of pieces of paving. In the past the water authority who own the drain have
had to remove dumped material, including moved paving slabs, from the drain at this point. Previous
repairs have taken place here, but have failed to hold and this remains the most vulnerable section of
road. Downslope from there to the far western end the paved section is nearly continuously visible,
with occasional areas of decay.

In addition to the footpath, a major public bridleway, the Pennine Way crosses the path of the road by
the Aiggin Stone at SD9733017063. This has caused considerable localised erosion across the site of
the monument, which is largely down to bedrock at this point.

Recommended survey
Whatever its age, as part of a major historic communication route across the Pennines, Blackstone
Edge Roman Road is an important piece of the region’s historic fabric. A survey is recommended in
order to
   •	 better understand the history and development of the site
   •	 identify the parts of the site which are deteriorating and why
   •	 suggest management solutions to the problems

Because much of the roadway, particularly on the Yorkshire side, is invisible beneath turf one of the
major unresolved questions is how much of the road runs on exposed bedrock, how much is paved and,
where paved, the exact nature and style of paving used. With the reduction of grazing animals on the
moor through stewardship schemes, the few sections visible on the Yorkshire side are fast disappearing
from view and these questions may be even more difficult to resolve in the future.

The survey will include
    •	 Review of previous research, documentary information e.g. historic maps, previous excavations
       and works
    •	 Measured survey of the entire length at an appropriate scale, with provision for selected areas
       to be recorded at an enhanced level e.g.
    •	 Incorporation within the measured survey of the current line of the public footpath and
       bridleways, where they run within or close to the scheduled area, and their associated erosion
       patches
    •	 Photographic survey
    •	 Provision for probing, or temporary turf removal in order to clarify the position and nature of
       the road (where this is unclear); this may be enhanced where necessary with geophysics
    •	 Management recommendations based on knowledge and understanding of its history, the nature
       of its construction and the type of problems different parts of it are facing.

It is recommended that an itemised tender for the different parts of the survey and report be made.
Scheduled Monument Consent will be required for some elements of this survey.
The Watershed Landscape                               WL3: Natural heritage




                                         WL3.4 Rombalds & Ilkley Moor

     Title                 WL3.4 Rombalds & Ilkley Moor


                           Bradford Metropolitan District Council
     Lead organisation     2010-2013
                           Match funding secured through Higher Level Stew-
                           ardship and Capital Grants


     Project description   There are a number of locations on Rombalds Moor
                           where demand for access in general, and specifically
                           to archaeological sites or viewpoints, is causing dam-
                           age to the vegetation, especially across fragile wet-
                           lands and wet bogs. Using stone flags to ensure that
                           people keep off the vegetation is the most suitable
                           technique, as it uses an attractive, traditional and lo-
                           cal material, although it is not cheap. It has also been
                           found to be an effective, non-intrusive way of protect-
                           ing vegetation and allowing it to restore.

                           To undertake on-site access improvement works
                           using stone flags in order to reduce erosion of sensi-
                           tive wetland areas on Rombalds Moor. There are
                           a number of locations where demand for access in
                           general and specifically to archaeological sites, view-
                           points etc. has caused damage to the surface vegeta-
                           tion and widening of routes. Small scale experiments
                           using stone flags has shown that this is an effective
                           and acceptable [in conservation terms] method of
                           quickly restoring path-side vegetation and removing
                           unsightly areas of erosion.

                           The Project will also work with the Friends of Ilkley
                           Moor on access and restoration of the tarns which is
                           a unique and rare upland habitat [this would be year
                           two or three].

                           1) The upper tarn is an important cultural, historical
                           and ecological feature of the moorland landscape.
                           Open water habitats are rare on the moor and in eco-
                           logical terms provide an essential open water feeding
                           and watering habitat for a large range of bird, mam-
                           mal, invertebrate and amphibian species. Including
                           species of conservation concern under the UK
The Watershed Landscape                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                   WL3.4 Rombalds & Ilkley Moor
                     BAP. The tarn has educational and visitor potential
                     to attract people and school groups to the moor and
                     as a first stop to providing access to the wider South
                     Pennines Moor.The tarn needs restoring and en-
                     hancing a) to retain the open water ecological interest
                     of the water body: the tarn is becoming silted up and
                     too densely vegetated. If left the water body would
                     eventually turn to marsh and then dry habitat. To
                     inform this restoration both hydrological and ecologi-
                     cal surveys need to be carried out to ensure that the
                     restoration works do not impact negatively on any
                     species and to identify the hydrological functioning of
                     the water body b) to increase its educational potential:
                     New access around and leading up to the tarn will be
                     created to provide a well defined access route and a
                     dipping platform and benches will be installed.
                     2) The recreational pool is a heritage feature on the
                     moor that requires restoring for the use by families
                     and visitors for boating and paddling. Formerly the
                     pool had all the water from a stream going through it.
                     Some years ago the flow was altered so that only a
                     proportion of the water goes through. This has af-
                     fected the hydrological functioning of the pool and
                     there is now also a growth of algae that makes the
                     pool very slippery and dangerous for its use as a
                     recreational water body. Restoration works would re-
                     align the flow of water, address the problem of algae
                     growth and restore the surround of the pool.
                     3) The lower tarn is also an important heritage feature
                     of the moor which as both ecological and significant
                     recreational interest. Restoration works would include
                     vegetation clearance and access restoration.


     Delivered by    Danny Jackson
                     Countryside Manager
                     Bradford Metropolitan District Council
                     Countryside and Rights of Way Service, Bradford
                     Metropolitan Council
                     Danny.jackson@bradford.gov.uk
                     01274 432666

                     Tracy Gray
                     Project Officer: Friends of Ilkley Moor
                     tracy@ilkleymoor.org
The Watershed Landscape                                         WL3: Natural heritage




                                                   WL3.4 Rombalds & Ilkley Moor

     In partnership with             Natural England [consents and administration of agri-
                                     environment schemes];
                                     landowners (Bingley Moor Estate, BMDC)




     Changes from the original bid   Original HLF bid £97,625 .
                                     Revised total value is £248,600

                                     The significance of Ilkley Moor amongst the partners
                                     has grown in part with the recognition (to facilitate a
                                     significant change in the degradation of the Moor)
                                     that more had to be done to mitigate the pressures
                                     brought about by visitor numbers to the moor. This
                                     has necessitated a greater network of paved paths;
                                     [1.3 kms] as well as habitat improvements to the tarns
                                     and moorland restoration to take account of burn
                                     damage in 2006 [funded entirely by agri-environment
                                     funding].
The Watershed Landscape                                   WL3: Natural heritage




                                              WL3.4 Rombalds & Ilkley Moor

     Other sources of funding   Match through Natural England’s Higher Level Stew-
                                ardship Scheme for separate and discrete items.
                                BMDC match funding up to £ 60,000
                                Volunteer time [Friends of Ilkley Moor] counted sepa-
                                rately

     Deliverables               1,300 metres Length of path restored
                                875 metres of drystone wall
                                8 ha of erosion re-instated – photographic survey
                                20 No volunteers engaged

     Land ownership             Bradford Metropolitan Council
                                Trustees of Bingley Moor Estate whose land agent
                                has given consent to the works.


     Consents                   The Proposals form part of the the Ilkley Moor Man-
                                agement Plan [ 2003 -2012]
                                Routes will be existing Public Rights of Way where
                                the authority has existing powers.



     Risk management            Community consultation: Proposals were presented
                                at the Rombalds Conference 25th April 2009 [25 re-
                                sponses on favour of proposals].

                                Cost over-runs: The extent of flagged paving and use
                                of the Armed Services might reduce costs consider-
                                ably.

                                Capacity/ value for money : the contract will be man-
                                aged by BMDC Landscape Architects who have
                                considerable experience of managing similar con-
                                tracts. Major elements of work [over £10,000] will be
                                tendered.

                                The works form part of existing HLS agreements with
                                Natural England.

                                Match funding: HLS funded costs could be as much
                                as £ 150,000 over the three years
The Watershed Landscape                               WL3: Natural heritage




                                           WL3.4 Rombalds & Ilkley Moor

     Enhanced maintenance   The proposals have been designed to minimise
                            maintenance obligations, where there are enhanced
                            maintenance obligations there is a budget available
                            for maintaining footpaths on Ilkley Moor. In addition
                            Stewardship insures that funding is available to main-
                            tain habitat improvements and landscape features.

     Timescale              Match funding secured                2009/2010

                            Agreement with NE                    Q3 2009/2010

                            Agreement with Bingley Moor
                            Estates                              Q3 2009/2010

                            Consultation                         2009/2010

                            Tendering of works                   Q1 2010/2011

                            Award of contracts/ agreement
                            of final brief                       Q2 2010/2011

                            Contract period                      Q3/Q4
                                                                 2010/2011

                            Ecological/hydrological surveys      Q2 2010/2011
                            [tarn]

				
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