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Scoping Document for Landscape Contractor

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									Contractor Control Plan                         23 May 2003
Landscape Management – Georgia
Final




                                 FINAL

                      CONTRACTOR CONTROL PLAN

                         LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT

                                 GEORGIA
Contractor Control Plan                                                                                              23 May 2003
Landscape Management – Georgia
Final




                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.0      Introduction .............................................................................. 3
   1.1     Purpose............................................................................................................3
   1.2     Objectives ........................................................................................................3
   1.3     Performance-based approach to impact mitigation.........................................3
   1.4     Scope ...............................................................................................................4
   1.5     Links with other plans .....................................................................................4
   1.6     IFC Guidance Note C ......................................................................................7
2.0      Policy and legislative requirements for landscape management8
   2.1     Policy...............................................................................................................8
   2.2     Legislation.......................................................................................................8
      2.2.1       The Host Government Agreement................................................................ 8
      2.2.2       National legislation ..................................................................................... 9
      2.2.3       European and international legislation and guidelines ................................... 9
   2.3     Project Standards ...........................................................................................10
3.0      Impact avoidance and impact mitigation................................ 11
   3.1     Introduction...................................................................................................11
   3.2     Description of impact avoidance measures and impact mitigation measures
           .......................................................................................................................12
      3.2.1       Reinstatement of temporary work areas...................................................... 12
      3.2.2       Reducing visual intrusion.......................................................................... 13
      3.2.3       Control of access...................................................................................... 15
4.0      Roles and responsibilities........................................................ 16
5.0      Verification and monitoring.................................................... 17
   5.1     Objectives ......................................................................................................17
   5.2     Verifying contractor performance .................................................................17
      5.2.1       Site inspections ........................................................................................ 18
      5.2.2       E&S audits............................................................................................... 18
      5.2.3       Key performance indicators....................................................................... 18
      5.2.4       Action Tracking System............................................................................ 19
   5.3     Monitoring the success of mitigation measures ............................................19
      5.3.1       Contractor role and responsibility .............................................................. 19
      5.3.2       Mitigation success criteria ......................................................................... 19
   5.4     Contractor reporting procedures....................................................................20
Appendix 1: Commitments Register................................................ 21
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1.0        Introduction


1.1        Purpose


The Contractor Control Plans (CCP) are management control documents that fulfil the
following purpose:

      •    They serve as an important part of the process to translate project commitments
           originally developed during the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA)
           and contracting processes1 (Appendix 1) into contractor actions (in this regard the
           construction contract is an integral part of these processes);
      •    They serve as a key tool by which BTC Co. can check the Contractor Implementation
           Plans and Procedures (“CIPP”s). This includes the procedures and method statements
           that specify how the activities described in the contractor’s contracts will be carried
           out to ensure compliance with project commitments; and
      •    They provide transparency and assurance to the Lenders that commitments made
           through the ESIA process are being translated through to the construction contractor
           who is responsible for implementation.

As management control documents the CCPs typically do not provide site specific details.
This information, which is critical to the execution phase of the process as it highlights
sensitive areas potentially affected by the project, has been drawn from the ESIA-Draft for
Disclosure and related documents, and is provided in the CIPPs.

1.2        Objectives

The objectives of this Landscape Management CCP are to:

      •    Describe the approach and procedures that will be used to ensure that the
           environmental and social impact avoidance and mitigation measures described in the
           various Source Documents (see Section 1.4), generated as part of the Georgia ESIA
           and contracting processes, are successfully applied during the construction phase of
           the BTC Project;
      •    Assist BTC Co. in ensuring that the intended outcomes of the proposed landscape
           management impact avoidance and mitigation measures are achieved, thereby, at a
           minimum, reducing the environmental and social impacts to the levels predicted in
           the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure, ESIA-Response to Comments and Supplementary
           Lender’s Information Pack (“SLIP”); and
      •    Provide a mechanism for legal and policy obligations, including Lender requirements,
           to be implemented.


1.3        Performance-based approach to impact mitigation


The approach has been to describe the performance criteria to be met by the contractor when
implementing the mitigation measures described in the Source Documents, and monitoring its


      1
       As defined in the following documents: the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure, ESIA-Response to Comments, SLIP, the AGT
      HSE Requirements-Major contracts (refer to Section 1.4) and the Reinstatement Specification.



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success or effectiveness.2 The approach also includes an outline of the procedures BTC Co.
intends to adopt to verify that these criteria are met or exceeded.

Where possible and appropria te, the performance criteria are defined in terms of numerical
standards that are described in the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure or complementary Source
Documents (see Section 1.4), or contained within legislation, regulations or guidelines
referred to therein. In instances where such standards have not been developed or are not
defined, qualitative measures based on industry best practice form the basis of an auditing
programme. This is in accordance with the project’s Health, Safety and Environmental
(“HSE”) principles that outline the expectation for the project to improve on current best
industry practice (AGT HSE Requirements-Major Contracts, Section 1.1; see Section 1.4
below).

The means by which these performance criteria are met will be determined by the individual
contractor, and are described in detail in the CIPP for Landscape Management, a ‘mirror’
document to this CCP. The CIPP is also based on the Commitments Register and is subject to
review and approved by BTC Co.

This inherently flexible approach is essential to accommodating individual contractor
preferences and experience, and in recognising the critical importance of accounting for local
conditions in the design and implementation of the mitigation measures.


1.4        Scope

This document specific ally relates to landscape management mitigation measures described in
the Georgia version of the following documents:

      •    ESIA-Draft for Disclosure,
      •    ESIA-Response to Comments,
      •    SLIP, and
      •    Contract requirements contained in the Invitation to Tender (“ITT”).

These documents are collectively termed the “Source Documents”.

The scope of this CCP applies to the Georgia section of the project. It also specifically relates
to construction activities. Separate plans will be prepared for the operations phase of the
project prior to commissioning.

The CCPs only refer to commitments cited in the Source Documents. In some instances these
commitments refer to laws and regulations that in turn have specific requirements that are not
always detailed in the above documents. As these requirements are legally binding, they form
part of the scope of the CCP and the CIPP.


1.5          Links with other plans

This CCP should be read in conjunction with the Georgia version of the Reinstatement CCP,
Community Liaison CCP and Transport CCP as well as relevant Health and Safety
Management Plans developed for the project. Cross-references are provided throughout this
CCP where relevant.


      2
        The CCP draws a distinction between actions that are designed to prevent or avoid an impact, and those that are designed
      to mitigate an (unavoidable) impact (see Section 3.1).



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The corresponding Landscape Management CIPP will cover all of the landscape management
issues identified in this CCP and, in the same manner as this CCP, will include cross
references to the other CIPPs where appropriate.

Table 1.1 is a guide to the key issues covered in the CCPs (contractor-related issues) and BTC
Co. plans (i.e. those plans which fall under the responsibility of BTC Co.). All CCPs should
be read in conjunction with the ESMS.

Table 1.1: Scope and Links Matrix (a) Contractor CCPs (b) BTC Co. Plans


    (b) CCP                       SCOPE OF CCP                          LINKS WITH OTHER
  (Contractor)                                                                CCPS
Waste            (1) Waste Management Strategy                         Pollution Prevention
Management       (2) Duty of Care                                      Transport Management
                 (3) Handling procedures including hazardous wastes Community Safety
                     (identification, pre -treatment, sorting, trans- Employment & Training
                     portation and storage)
                 (4) End-use management (re-use, re-cycling or treat-
                     ment/disposal, e.g., waste water treatment plant,
                     incineration, landfill)
                 (5) Reporting and documentation
Pollution        (1) Protection of surface water and groundwater Transport Management
Prevention           (permanent fuel and chemical storage, wastewater Waste Management
                     dis charges)                                      Reinstatement
                 (2) Pipeline watercourse crossings                    Employment and Training
                 (3) Controlling dust and other emissions to air (dust Community Liaison
                     suppression, vehicle maintenance, noise and
                     emission standards; emissions from stationary
                     combustion plant and incin erators)
                 (4) Controlling noise
Community        (1) Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Programme Community Liaison
Safety           (2) Personal Health Programme                         Employment & Training
                 (3) Awareness raising on communicable diseases to Waste Management
                     communities Preventing injury to animals          Construction Camps
                 (4) Trench and right-of-way safety                    Infrastructure & Services
                 (5) Construction Traffic Hazards                      Transport Management
                 (6) Blasting
                 (7) Transportation of Explosives
Infrastructure & (1) Community liaison                                 Construction Camp
Services         (2) Employment of practical methods of good Community Liaison
                     practice                                          Commu nity Safety
                 (3) Reinstatement of Infrastructure                   Reinstatement
                 (8) Compensation for affected private property        Procurement & Supply
                                                                       Transport Management
Landscape        (1) Reinstatement of temporary work areas             Reinstatement
                 (2) Reducing visual intrusion                         Community Liaison
                 (3) Control of Access                                 Transport Management
Community        (1) Establishment and maintenance of positive Community Safety
Liaison              community relations                               Pro curement & Supply
                 (2) Training of construction workers                  Employment & Training
                 (3) Community Safety and Health Provision             Transport Management
                 (4) Establishment and implementation of a Construction Camp
                     complaints procedure




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    (b) CCP                              SCOPE OF CCP                             LINKS WITH OTHER
  (Contractor)                                                                          CCPS
Reinstatement           (1) Soil (topsoil removal, handling, storage; interim    Waste Management
                            erosion control measures; erosion control devices    Pollution Prevention
                            and measures; sediment interceptors)                 Transport Management
                        (2) Biorestoration (agricultural/developed areas, un-    Employment & Training
                            developed areas, selection of plant species,         Pro curement & Supply
                            scheduling,     planting   method     statements,    Landscape
                            protection of planted materia ls, aftercare,         Community Liaison
                            monitoring and corrective action)
                        (3) Third party properties
                        (4) Hydrology and water courses
                        (5) Clean-up of the site (existing contamination,
                            waste disposal sites)

Construction            (1)   Drinking Water Assessment                          Pollution Prevention
Camps                   (2)   Ecological management                              Community Liaison
                        (3)   Landscaping                                        Commu nity Safety
                        (4)   Emissions control                                  Infrastructure & Services
                        (5)   Community liaison                                  Waste Management
                        (6)   Waste management                                   Employment & Training
                        (7)   Implementation of Camp Code of Conduct             Transport
                                                                                 Landscape
                                                                                 Reinstatement
Transport               (1)   Transport management planning                      Pollution Pre vention
Management              (2)   Access route selection and management              Community Liaison
                        (3)   Traffic management (road crossings, parking Waste Management
                              facilities)                                        Community Safety
                     (4)      Driver training                                    Reinstatement
                     (5)      Highway main tenance                               Construction Impacts
                     (6)      Vehicle management and maintenance                 Employment & Training
                     (7)      Community safety and liaison
Empl oyment        & (1)      Employment strategy (identification of candidates Commu nity Liaison
Training                      and application process [semi-skilled and skilled Pro curement & Supply
                              workers], integrity of employment policy and Community Safety
                              recruitment process, distribution of informa tion All      CCPs      for   training
                              on employment and optimising local employment component
                              opportunities)
                        (2)   Training (assessment and delivery, facilities, HSE
                              induction, specialist training)
                     (3)      Secondary employment opportunities
Procurement        & (1)      Enhancing local procurement opportunities          Community Safety
Supply               (2)      Local produce supply and neglect of farmland       Employment & Train ing
                     (3)      Development of an Employment Strategy              Waste Management
                     (4)       Implementation of procurement HSE standards Pollution Prevention
                              defined for the project                            Community Liaison




                   (a) BTC Co.                                                 SCOPE
  Pre-construction surveys                                (1) Pipeline right-of-way

  Land acquisition                                        (1) Internal RAP monitoring
                                                          (2) Expert RAP monitoring
                                                          (3) RAP Completion audit
  Cultural Heritage Plan                                  (1) Pre-clearance Cultural Heritage Studies (Phase I,
  Cultural Heritage Late Finds Protocol                       II, III)
                                                          (2) Protocol for late finds
  Additionality Plans                                     (1) Environmental Investment Programme



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                                              (2)   Community Investment Programme
  Offsets                                     (1)   Natural habitat
  Health and Safety                           (1)   Right-of-way
                                              (2)   Facilities
                                              (3)   Construction sites




1.6      IFC Guidance Note C

This CCP has been prepared in fulfilment of IFC OP 4.01 Environmental Assessment (1998),
Guidance Note C (Outline of an Environmental Action Plan) insofar as the CCPs are a
component of the Environmental and Social Action Plans (“ESAP”s) and specifically deal
with contractor-related issues. The CCPs also recognise the requirements of OPIC
(Environmental Handbook, April 1999, Appendix C) and other relevant International Finance
Institution (“IFI”) policies and guidelines.




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2.0       Policy and legislative requirements for landscape management


2.1       Policy

Landscape management has been an important component of the ESIA process in Georgia.
Consideration of landscape issues has been ongoing since the scoping stage of the ESIA. The
principles and standards have been sourced from a number of policy documents and
legislation as listed in Table 2.1. These same principles and standards will guide all contractor
landscape management activities in the future and will form the foundation of the Landscape
Management CIPP. Key sources included:

      •   The Host Government Agreement (“HGA”);
      •   Guidelines established by IFIs, including the World Bank, International Finance
          Corporation (“IFC”), and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development
          (“EBRD”);
      •   European Commission Directives; and
      •   BP Policy Documents.

The following approach and principles reflect the project’s approach to landscape
management as set out in the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure:

      •   To limit visual intrusion along the right-of-way through the adoption of mitigation
          measures such as the grading and benching of the right-of-way, restoration of the
          original contours and implementation of Reinstatement Plan (synonymous with
          Reinstatement CIPP);
      •   To minimise the impact of the linear nature of the pipeline on the landscape through
          the adoption of avoidance and mitigation measures, including the avoidance of side-
          slopes, and minimisation of sight lines through the use of dog-legs in the right-of-way
          and through the incorporation of scalloped edges to tree-cut-lines;
      •   To minimise the impact of permanent above ground facilities on the landscape
          through the adoption of a series of mitigation measures including implementation of
          planting schemes, minimisation of areas cleared for construction, and use of colours
          sympathetic to the surrounding environment; and
      •   To review the effectiveness of mitigation measures implemented through monitoring
          and surveillance.


2.2       Legislation


2.2.1     The Host Government Agreement

The contractual terms set for the construction programme require that all project activities
shall conform with the “environmental standards and practices set forth in this Appendix 3
(the Georgia Host Government Agreement; refer Appendix B Annex 1, ESIA-Draft for
Disclosure) as well as those generally observed by the international community with respect
to petroleum pipeline projects…”.




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2.2.2    National legislation

Several national laws are relevant to the mitigation of landscape impacts in Georgia as listed
in Table 2.1. They relate primarily to the protection of soil resources, forests and the
introduction of harmful organisms.


2.2.3    European and international legislation and guidelines

It is a requirement of the HGA that the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure and associated documents
comply with relevant World Bank and (by implication) “IFC” and other IFI guidelines.

The legislation and guidelines listed below in Table 2.1 will be used as reference standards for
the purposes of implementing this CCP and forms the basis of the CIPP.

Table 2.1: Applicable legislation, guidelines, and project documents

            Applicable Landscape Legislation, Guidelines, and Project Documents
  International
  World Bank Group - Environmental Assessment Policy - OP 4.01, Jan 1999.
  European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), Environmental Policy,
  Environmental Procedures and the Public Information Policy
  European Commission, 1985 Directive (85/337/EEC) as amended by Directive 97/11/EEC
  Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP): Guidelines for the Reclamation of Pipeline
  Rights of Way. ID: 1990-0015
  The International Convention to Combat Desertification –acceded by Resolution #711 of Cabinet
  Ministers of Georgia
  CAPP: Guidelines for the Reclamation of Linear Disturbances. ID: 1985-0002
  American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME): ASME B31.8 - Gas Transmission and
  Distribution Piping Systems
  ASME B31.4 - Liquid Transportation Systems for Hydrocarbons, Liquid Petroleum Gas,
  Anhydrous Ammonia and Alcohols
  API 1102 - Recommended Practice for Liquid Petroleum Pipeline Crossings of Railways and
  Highways
  British Standards (BS): BS6031 - Code of Practice for Earthworks
  American Gas Association (AGA): AGA PR-237-9428 - Water-Crossing Design and Installation
  Manual
  National
  Forestry Code of Georgia, 1999
  Law of Georgia Regulation – On Protection of Plants from Harmful Organisms, 1994
  Law of Georgia Regulation – On Soil Protection, 1994
  Presidential Decree #493 - First Aid Treatment of the Topsoil Damaged by Erosions, October 22,
  1998
  Subsoil Law of Georgia, 1996
  Law on Protection of Soil, 1994 (as amended September 16, 1997)
  Project




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           Applicable Landscape Legislation, Guidelines, and Project Documents
  BP Getting HSE Right
  AGT HSE Requirements - Major Contracts. Document No. 410088/00/L/SA/SP/006
  AGT Pipelines Project - Reinstatement Specification. Document No. 410088/10/L/PL/SP/025
  AGT Pipelines Project - Biorestoration Information Note. Document No. 410088/10/L/SA/TN/002



2.3       Project Standards

The HSE requirements within the contracts awarded to the construction contractors requires
all contractors to fully comply with the following BP documents and standards:

      •   Getting HSE Right - which details the overarching HSE expectations for all BP
          projects; and
      •   AGT HSE Requirements - Major Contracts.




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3.0      Impact avoidance and impact mitigation


3.1      Introduction

A priority throughout the project pla nning, design and ESIA process has been the avoidance
of potential environmental and social impacts. This has resulted in many design modifications
and the definition of a suite of measures that, when implemented by BTC Co. and the
contractor, will avoid many potential impacts.

There are, however a range of impacts that either remain likely to occur or are unavoidable.
For these impacts, mitigation measures have been developed to minimise the likelihood,
extent or duration of occurrence, and any associated adverse effects.

Table 3.1 summarises potential impacts and proposed avoidance and mitigation measures
associated with landscape management. These measures have been re-produced from the
various Source Documents that form the basis of this CCP. As their form and context have
passed through a formal public disclosure and approval process, they have been re-packaged
for the purposes of the CCP but not re-interpreted.

The proposed avoidance and mitigation measures have, along with other project undertakings
contained in various Source Documents such as the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure, been
consolidated in the form of a Commitments Register. Commitments from within the register
that relate specifically to landscape management are presented in Appendix 1. These have
been reproduced verbatim.

Table 3.1: Summary of impacts and mitigation measures (as described and presented in the
ESIA-Draft for Disclosure)

        Receptor/potential impact                          Proposed avoidance and mitigation
                                                                      measures
Visual intrusion                                       Visual intrusion
•   Short term visual impact as a result of            a) Reinstatement
    right-of-way, Worker Camp, Pipe Lay                Reinstate the right-of-way with suitable floral
    Down Area and road construction activities         species to reflect endemic characteristics and overall
•   Permanent landscape modification when              habitat characteristics; apply site-specific
    clearing through forests, grading on ridges        reinstatement provisions depending on the sensitivity
    and on side slopes                                 of the area to soil erosion; reinstate any temporary
•   Permanent modification of the landscape            access roads or temporary facilities to pre-existing
    on side slopes, steep slopes with drainage         conditions in ecologically sensitive areas. In non-
    features and other conspicuous earth or            ecologically sensitive areas, roads may be left for
    artificial structures installed as part of final   community use as agreed as part of the community
    reinstatement programme                            investment/community relations strategy. A
•   Permanent land use change and visual               temporary reinstatement plan will be developed for
    intrusion at Above Ground Installations            sections of the right-of-way that are likely to undergo
    (“AGI”s)                                           severe erosion during the winter season if no
                                                       temporary measures are adopted. A permanent
                                                       reinstatement plan will be adopted to the entire right-
                                                       of-way based on the site-specific soil conditions and
                                                       topography (see Reinstatement CCP).

                                                       b) Landscaping:
                                                       Implement landscaping plan for all AGIs and for all
                                                       areas where high landscape value and visual
                                                       vulnerability to the proposed right-of-way clearance



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          Receptor/potential impact                   Proposed avoidance and mitigation
                                                                 measures
                                                  warrants site-specific landscape restoration
                                                  measures.

                                                  c) Tree replanting
                                                  A suitable number of trees will be replanted for
                                                  every tree felled as part of the right-of-way (or AGI
                                                  locations) clearance operations. To ensure the
                                                  restoration of ecological balance, compensation
                                                  planting will be carried out.

Illegal logging                                   Illegal logging
In forest areas illegal logging could result in   In forest areas contractor will implement measures
secondary visual impacts                          below to prevent access to right-of-way and illegal
                                                  logging:
                                                  •    Security patrols along the right-of-way both
                                                       during construction and operation
                                                  •    Physical barriers at specific locations along the
                                                       right-of-way to restrict illegal access
                                                  •    Use of Community Liaison Team to encourage
                                                       people to raise awareness of importance of forest
                                                       and to report incidents of illegal logging to
                                                       authorities
                                                  •    Reinstatement of new access roads in
                                                       ecologically sensitive areas
                                                           Source: Georgia ESIA – Draft for Disclosure


3.2        Description of impact avoidance measures and impact mitigation measures

Table 3.1 above outlines the avoidance and mitigation measures as presented in the ESIA-
Draft for Disclosure. In accordance with IFC Guidance Note C, Section 1B(ii) the following
section describes, with technical details where appropriate, each impact avoidance and
mitigation measure.

The proposed avoidance and mitigation measures will involve a combination of:

      •    Reinstatement of temporary work areas;
      •    Reducing visual intrusion of permanent facilities and reinstated right-of-way; and
      •    Controlling use of access roads.

The essential features of each element are outlined below.


3.2.1      Reinstatement of temporary work areas

Effective and prompt reinstatement is fundamental to reducing the landscape impacts
associated with installation of the BTC Pipeline system. Grading and benching of the right-of-
way, and subsequent re-grading and restoration of original contours will minimise landscape
impact. Continued erosion control will be implemented through the use of diverter berms, silt
fences and trench breakers. Reinstatement measures including biorestoration proposals are
covered in detail in the Reinstatement CCP; to avoid duplication they are not reiterated in this
document.




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3.2.2    Reducing visual intrusion

The contractor is required to undertake the design of permanent and temporary facilities in
accordance with the landscape harmonisation concepts developed during the ESIA process.
This will include:

    •    No soil, grass, shrubs or trees will be cleared beyond a carefully defined boundary
         commensurate with construction requirements;
    •    The height and mass of buildings will be minimised, for example by using pitched
         roofs where possible;
    •    Within the perimeter of the AGI, consideration will be given to interspersing
         administration and/or accommodation buildings with open grass cover and, where
         practicable and where not a safety hazard, shrubs and trees;
    •    Use of local materials where possible for construction of perimeter fencing/walls;
    •    Use of claddings that minimise the visual impacts;
    •    Use of colours that are sympathetic to the natural landscape;
    •    Reinstatement of the boundary areas of the facilities to minimise visual impact (i.e.
         contouring as appropriate);
    •    Facility walls will be screened with trees and shrubs as appropriate to blend with the
         surrounding natural landscape;
    •    Planting to offset any shrubs or trees removed to construct the facility (for every tree
         removed, three shrubs or trees shall be planted as part of the final reinstatement at the
         site); and
    •    Site lighting (where applicable) shall be designed and located to reduce off-site glare
         to a minimum and reduce impact on visual amenity at night, having regard to security
         requirements.

The contractor is required to submit a Landscape Management CIPP that will develop
procedures to implement the above requirements. The CIPP will be subject to approval by
BTC Co.

The linear character of the pipeline route will be disguised through the avoidance of side-
slopes. Sight-lines will be avoided where possible through the use of dog-legs in the right-of-
way and through the incorporation of irregular scalloped edges to tree-cut-lines. At the entry
and exit points to forested areas, dog-legs will be considered as a means of reducing visual
impact caused by the linear nature of the cleared right-of-way. Delivery of these measures
will be detailed in the CIPP which will be subject to review and approval by BTC Co.


Site-specific planting schemes

Planting schemes for some of the permanent facilities are proposed in the ESIA-Draft for
Disclosure (Appendix E, Annex 1) and summarised below.

Planting schemes will be developed by the contractor following completion of the pre-
construction surveys and will be subject to approval by BTC Co.




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Table 3.2: Proposed planting scheme for PSG2 (20 ha)

   Common Name of                 Latin Name of Proposed      Maximum              Planting
    Proposed Plants                       Plants               Height          density/distance
                                                                                between whips
                                                                  (m)
                                                                                     (m)
 High-Mountainous Oak            Quercus macranthera              18                1.2 – 1.5
 Hawthorn                        Crataegus spp.                  2 – 15             0.8 – 1.2
 Dog-rose                        Rosa canina                       5                1.0 – 1.2

Note: At PSG2, screening elements (local shrubs and trees) will be planted around the
construction area, especially between the access road and the site and between the railway and
the site.

Table 3.3: Proposed planting scheme for IPS G1 BTC (2 ha)

    Common Names of               Latin Name of Proposed     Maximum              Planting
     Proposed Plants                      plants              Height           density/distance
                                                                               between whips
                                                                 (m)
                                                                                     (m)
 Beech                            Fagus orientalis                40                1.2 – 1.5
 Goat Willow                      Salix caprea                    8             75,000 whips/ha
 Hazelnut                         Corylus avellana                6                 0.6 – 1.0


At block valve stations G -B14 and G-B15 the existing pattern of plots of land, fences, and
windbreak (shrub/tree) lines will be maintained.

Route corridor sections
Planting schemes for specific sections of the route corridor are proposed in the ESIA-Draft for
Disclosure (Appendix E, Annex 1) and summarised below. The development of detailed
schemes will be addressed in the contractor’s CIPP, and will be subject to approval by BTC
Co.

    •    When crossing forested areas, the right-of-way width will be reduced
    •    When crossing forested areas, the linear character of the right-of-way will be
         “hidden” through irregular planting of trees and shrubs in the middle zone of the
         corridor and maintaining meadows within forests adjacent to the corridor;
    •    In the Sakire section, the pipeline corridor will be built to maximize reinstatement
         potential. This could result in two terraces screened behind tree lines that will not
         contrast with the existing character of landscape pattern, or could result in one
         reduced right-of-way;
    •    The steep slope section at Tskhratskaro will be restored fully including soil,
         herbaceous cover and shrubs (see Tables 3.4 and 3.5); and
    •    The floodplain forest within the 100m corridor of the Mtkvari River crossing will be
         replanted in accordance with the project replanting scheme (see Table 3.6);




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Table 3.4: Proposed planting scheme for Eastern Part, KP 182 – KP 183

   Common Names of                 Latin Name of        Maximum Height            Planting
    Proposed Plants                Proposed Plant                              density/distance
                                                               m
                                                                              between whips (m)
 Pine                            Pinus sylvestris              35                10,000 whips/ha
 Goat Willow                     Salix caprea                  8                 75,000 whips/ha
 Hazelnut                        Corylus avellana              6                    0.6 – 1.0

Table 3.5: Proposed planting scheme for Western Part, KP 182 – KP 183

   Common Names of                  Latin Name of       Maximum Height            Planting
    Proposed Plants                Proposed Plants                             density/distance
                                                               m
                                                                              between whips (m)
 Beech                           Fagus orientalis              40                    1.2 - 1.5
 Goat Willow                     Salix caprea                  8                 75,000 whips/ha
 Hazelnut                        Corylus avellana              6                    0.6 – 1.0

Table 3.6: Proposed planting scheme for Mtkvari Crossing 2 (4.5 ha)

   Common Names of                    Latin Name of         Maximum                Planting
    Proposed Plants                  Proposed Plants         Height             density/distance
                                                                               between whips (m)
                                                                    m
 Black Poplar                    Populus nigra                 30 - 40               1.0 – 1.2
 Willow                          Salix spp.                         15               1.1 – 1.3
 Tamarisk                        Tamarix ramosissima                5                0.7 – 0.9
 Sea Buckthorn                   Hipopphaë rhamnoides               7             1,100 whips/ha


3.2.3     Control of access

In forest areas there is a risk that illegal logging may occur as a consequence of opening up
the access routes to the right-of-way. The Landscape Management CIPP will contain
protocols and procedures relating to the following measures:

    •     Provision of security patrols along the right-of-way both during construction and
          operation;
    •     Installation of physical barriers at appropriate locations along the right-of-way to
          restrict illegal access;
    •     The use of the Community Liaison Team to encourage people to raise awareness of
          the importance of forests and to report incidents of illegal logging to authorities; and
    •     Reinstatement of new access roads in ecologically sensitive areas after construction.

The Landscape Management CIPP will define the criteria that will be used to determine
whether or not new access roads are within ecologically sensitive areas. The CIPP will be
subject to review and approval by BTC Co.




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4.0       Roles and responsibilities

The roles and responsibilities with respect to this CCP are described below.

The contractor will be responsible for the following:

      •   Development of the Landscape Management CIPP to implement the relevant
          commitments and contractual requirements;
      •   Implementation of, and adherence to, all of the requirements and mitigation measures
          outlined in this CCP and the CIPP;
      •   Communicating to the workforce the contents and requirements of the CIPP;
      •   Workforce training and ensuring that all personnel are aware of their responsibilities;
      •   The performance of all subcontractors with respect to the requirements of the CIPP;
      •   Compliance with all relevant project standards, relevant international guidelines,
          statutory requirements, and permits and license conditions (see Table 2.1);
      •   Implementation of an appropriate inspection and monitoring programme including
          inspection of plant condition on receipt and the condition of plants prior to and after
          planting; and
      •   Implementation and upkeep of an Action Tracking System.


Specific individual contractor personnel roles and responsibilities will be provided in the
CIPP.

BTC Co. will be responsible for the following:

      •   Communicating the contents and requirements of this CCP to the contractor;
      •   Advising the contractor on the management of landscape issues and bio-restoration;
      •   Assisting the contractor with developing its CIPP prior to construction start-up;
      •   Review and approval of contractor CIPP;
      •   Assurance of contractor performance with respect to the requirements of this CCP;
      •   Identifying breaches of the CIPP and recommending corrective action and stop work
          in the event of serious breaches that may cause serious visual impacts or on the
          reputation of the project;
      •   Monitoring contractor performance; and
      •   Coordination and supervision of the BTC Co. inspection and audit programme.




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5.0       Verification and monitoring


5.1       Objectives

The principal objectives of the monitoring and verification programme are to provide
assurance that:

      •   The contractor is adhering to the requirements of the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure and
          associated Source Documents, contracts, legislation, method statements, Lender
          institutio n requirements, BTC Co. environmental and social objectives, and BP’s
          corporate requirements; and
      •   The contractor is in compliance with its approved CIPP.

The monitoring and verification programme will generate tangible evidence to demonstrate
whether all relevant project commitments are being discharged effectively and that the desired
intent of the commitments - that of avoiding and minimising environmental and social
impacts - is, or has been, achieved.

The specific objectives of the programme can be summarised as follows:

      •   Monitor the timely completion of contractor method statements, where relevant, and
          CIPPs (the definition of timely completion is to be determined by the contractor in
          agreement with BTC Co.);
      •   Verify the performance of the contractor in implementing appropriate avoidance and
          mitigation measures in accordance with the commitments register and the appropriate
          method statements;
      •   Measure the success of the mitigation measures in minimising environmental and
          social impacts;
      •   Monitor the need for, and implementation of, corrective action in the event that the
          prescribed avoidance measure does not work, or that the mitigation measure does not,
          or appears unlikely to, meet the nominated level of performance; and
      •   Provide a mechanism for implementing new avoidance and mitigation measures, or
          altering existing practices, based on performance monitoring, thus facilitating
          continual improvement.


5.2       Verifying contractor performance

                                                                        n
The contractor is contractually bound to implement the commitments contai ed in the various
Source Documents and HSE Requirements-Major Contracts (Section 1.4), and reproduced in
Appendix 1. Many of these are impact avoidance measures whose successful implementation
will be assessed by BTC Co. through informal site inspections, audits against the
Commitments Register, and spot check monitoring where results appear questionable, as
described below.

In addition, environmental and social performance will be compared against a set of KPIs, as
described below. Finally, an Action Tracking System will be introduced to facilitate the
execution of the above actions.




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5.2.1    Site inspections

Site inspections at the temporary and permanent facilities and along the right-of-way will be
employed to visually assess the evidence of landscape management practices adopted by the
contractor with respect to all construction activities and sites.

Inspections will include periodic assessments of the health of new plants both before and after
planting. Inspection activities may also include talking to people to determine implementation
of commitments for those that are not assessable by visual inspection only. The frequency of
inspections will vary with the stage of construction, the time of year, the weather and the
location. Site inspection programmes may or may not be formalised in each country
depending on country needs.


5.2.2    E&S audits

A formal internal audit programme is in place in each country to evaluate compliance with the
CCPs and CIPPs. The audit programme will involve regular auditing by BTC Co. of
contractor field operations, as well as reporting and documentation.

BTC Co.’s audit programme will provide assurance that the contractor is complying with the
requirements set down in this CCP. In addition, the contractor is responsible for developing
and implementing audit programmes consistent with BTC Co.’s requirements to gain
assurance that its activities comply with the environmental and social requirements in the
ESIA-Draft for Disclosure and CCP.

The auditing results will be used to indicate areas of non-compliance and to allow for
corrective measures to be implemented.


5.2.3    Key performance indicators

BTC Co. has developed a series of environmental and social KPIs and related targets that
address the mitigation of impacts or additionality programmes. For the Georgia construction
phase, the majority of these KPIs relate to mitigation activities and fall under the domain of
the contractor. BTC Co. is responsible for ensuring that these KPIs are measured and
reported.

Performance against the indicators will be measured on a monthly basis. The KPIs are similar
across the project although there may be slight variations that enable country specific issues to
be captured.

Each contractor is required to monitor environmental and social performance against KPIs
and report performance to BTC Co.’s in-country management on a monthly basis. The
contractor is also required to ensure that these KPIs are communicated to all relevant parties
prior to the start of construction.

BTC Co. will monitor KPIs as part of its overall assessment of the contractor’s performance.

There is a contractual mechanism in place that enables BTC Co. to withhold up to 5% of an
invoice if HSE performance is unsatisfactory. The KPIs will be used as part of t is    h
performance assessment.




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There are no specific landscape management KPIs due to the nature of the topic. Some of the
reinstatement KPIs will be applicable but these are addressed in the Reinstatement CCP and
CIPP.


5.2.4     Action Tracking System

An Action Tracking System has been established by BTC Co. for the project to provide a
mechanism to record and track health, safety and environmental related actions derived from
design through to construction and commissioning. This includes corrective actions arising
from audits and field inspections. This system is described in detail in the ESMS.

The contractor is responsible for managing and tracking its own actions.


5.3       Monitoring the success of mitigation measures


5.3.1     Contractor role and responsibility

BTC Co. and the contractor will be responsible for monitoring the success of the mitigation
measures, and will implement its own quality system to ensure appropriate rigor and control.

The contractor will detail the protocol and procedures for fulfilling its monitoring obligations
in its CIPPs.

BTC Co. will be responsible for monitoring the contractor’s performance and may, in
addition to the inspection and audit functions described above, conduct random, independent
checks.


5.3.2     Mitigation success criteria

The performance of the mitigation measures will be monitored against their effectiveness in
minimising the prescribed environmental or social impact (i.e., their intended purpose). In the
case of landscape management, most of the proposed actions (defined by the commitments)
during construction are designed to reduce the adverse effects rather than to prevent the
occurrence of a problem.

The principal measure of the success of this approach will be by the measurement and
monitoring of the variety of supporting activities set down in Table 3.1 and the project
commitments in Appendix 1. The checklist below provides a guide of the landscape
management issues that need to be monitored. It should be noted however that the list is a
guide only and that further inspection and audit points would be developed as necessary.

      •   The visibility of the temporary works and permanent facilities. This is an inherently
          qualitative assessment and will be achieved through maintaining an archive of
          photographs of sensitive locations taken from recorded locations along the right-of-
          way and around permanent facilities;
      •   Community satisfaction with the visual appearance of the facilities;
      •   The number of incidents of illegal logging associated with the BTC Pipeline right-of-
          way, temporary access routes or permanent new access routes;
      •   The number of unauthorised vehicles using the pipeline right-of-way or access routes;
      •   The timely completion of planting (dates to be agreed between contractor and BTC
          Co.);


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      •   The use of a high proportion of native species in planting mixes; and
      •   Establishment of indigenous plant species on temporary work areas following
          reinstatement.


5.4       Contractor reporting procedures


The contractor shall ensure all findings are legible and traceable to the activity/process
involved. All corrective action shall be recorded in the contractor’s Action Tracking System.
The contractor shall report to BTC Co. on a regular basis and shall report monthly on audit
results and close out of audit actions (Table 5.1).

Details of the reporting requirements between BTC Co. and its contractor are outlined in the
ESMS Manual.


Table 5.1: Reporting

                   Reporting Parameter                                   Frequency
 KPIs and Measures                                           Monthly
 Environmental and Social Incidents                          Monthly (immediately if severe)
 Monitoring Results                                          Monthly
 Audit Findings (based on monthly audit results, as stated   Annual
 above)




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Appendix 1: Commitments Register

 ID                                            Commitment
G1      The contractor shall develop a Landscape Management Plan that sets out specific actions to
        mitigate and minimize visual landscape impacts, and meets the following objectives:
         •   Minimise visual intrusion along the right-of-way through adoption of mitigation
             measures such as grading and benching of the right-of-way, restoration of original
             contours, and implementation of reinstatement plan;
         •   Minimise the impact of the linear character of the pipeline through the adoption of
             mitigation measures including the avoidance of side slopes, minimisation of site lines
             through the use of dog-legs in the right-of-way and through the incorporation of
             scalloped edges to tree-cut lines;
         •   Minimise the impact of AGIs through the adoption of mitigation measures including
             planting schemes, minimising areas cleared for construction, use of colours
             sympathetic to the surrounding environment; and
         •   Review the effectiveness of mitigation measures implemented through monitoring and
             surveillance.
        The BTC Landscape Assessment and Management Plan is contained in Appendix E Annex
        I of the ESIA-Draft for Disclosure.
G2      Landscape restoration of the variety and distribution pattern of the original plant species,
        with the long-term objective of restoration of the local ecology, shall be conducted by the
        contractor.
G3      Long-term cover shall be the indigenous flora. The biorestoration strategy (included in
        Landscape Management Plan) is based on supplementing the seed bank of local species.
G4      Suitable treatment of rare/endangered floral species shall ensure their conservation.
G6      BTC Co. shall give more extensive consideration to biodiversity protection measures, with
        special focus to be placed on the specific issues concerning management of the protected
        and highly sensitive areas, including Bedeni Plateau, Santa, Mt Tavkvetili, Narianis Veli.
G7      The contractor shall restore landscape, as far as reasonably practicable, in areas where there
        would be a significant visual impact.
G8      Sensitive habitats outside of the FCI-right-of-way shall not be adversely impacted from
        construction activities and in particular when forming cuts on side slopes.
G9      Contractor will develop stock of appropriate species for landscape restoration following
        reinstatement activities.
G10     Implement landscaping plan for all AGIs and for all areas where high landscape value and
        visual vulnerability to the proposed right-of-way clearance warrants site-specific landscape
        restoration measures.
G11     In forest areas contractor will implement measures below to prevent access to right-of-way
        and illegal logging:
         •    Security patrols along the right-of-way both during construction and operation;
         •    Physical barriers at specific locations along the right-of-way to restrict illegal access;
         •    Possible use of Community Liaison Team to encourage people to raise awareness of
              importance of forest and to report incidents of illegal logging to authorities; and
         •    Reinstatement of new access roads in ecologically sensitive areas.
G12     Visual intrusion in high quality landscape to be minimised during establishment and
        operation of storage yards and worker camps at Andezit and Tsiksjvari. All other sites are
        located in areas of low to medium quality landscape.
                                   Source: 28th February 2003 version of the Azerbaijan Commitments Register




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