Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

montague_econ_dev_plan

VIEWS: 42 PAGES: 96

									             T O WN O F M ONT A GUE

 2004 E C O N O M I C D E V E L OP M E N T PL A N




                      Prepa red by the

             Economic Development T ask Force
                  Jay DiPucchio, C hair

with Robin Sherman, Montague Town Planner/Conservation Agent

             for the Montague Board of Selectmen

                        Patricia Allen
                        Patricia Pruitt
                         Allen Ross
              Montague Economic Development T ask Force, 2003-2004

*Jay DiPucchio, Chair      Montague Economic Development & Industrial Corporation

Frank Abbondanzio          Montague Town Administrator
Mark Abramson              Benchmark & Pratt Realty
Jessica Atwood             Franklin Regional Council of Governments
Ken Adams                  Adams Direct Mail Service
Michael Bosworth           The Brick House
Ingrid Bredenberg          Human Resource Innovations
Suzanne Castello           Franklin County Community Development Corporation
Tim DeChristopher          Sculptor
*Denise DiPaolo            Turners Falls Resident
Paul Douglas               Franklin Regional Housing & Redevelopment Authority
*Doug Dziadzio             Montague Planning Board
Don Girard                 Greenfield Savings Bank (retired)
Dick Haas                  Hillside Plastics
Ariel Jones                Ariel Jones Photographer
Brian McGowan              Blue Meadow Farm
*Marty Pappas              Carroll’s Market
*Deb Radway                Lightlife Foods
Robert Reid                Stewart’s Nurseries
*Robin Sherman             Montague Town Planner/Conservation Agent
*Allen Ross                Montague Board of Selectmen
*Don Valley                Turners Falls Resident
Betty Waidlich             Waidlich Farm, Montague Board of Assessors
Henry Waidlich             Waidlich Farm, former Selectman




*Elected Member of Montague Town Meeting
                                       T A B L E O F C O N T E N TS

SECTION 1 Summary...............................................................................................1-1
SECTION 2 Introduction...........................................................................................2-4
  2.1     History ..........................................................................................................2-4
  2.2     Purpose of Plan .............................................................................................2-5
  2.3     Planning Process ...........................................................................................2-5
  2.4     Organization of Plan .....................................................................................2-5
SECTION 3 Assets and Challenges ...........................................................................3-6
  3.1     Assets ...........................................................................................................3-6
  3.2     Challenges ....................................................................................................3-7
SECTION 4 Community Vision and Needs ...............................................................4-9
  4.1     Community Vision ........................................................................................4-9
  4.2     Economic Development Needs .....................................................................4-9
SECTION 5 Goals and Objectives ........................................................................... 5-11
  5.1     Promote Retention and Growth of Existing Businesses ............................... 5-11
  5.2     Recruit new businesses in key sectors, including manufacturing, the arts,
  agriculture, tourism and pedestrian-oriented retail and service enterprises............... 5-12
  5.3     Improve the climate for business in villages ................................................ 5-13
  5.4     Promote Montague’s historic villages, cultural attractions and natural resources 
  to tourists................................................................................................................ 5-13
SECTION 6 Action Plans ........................................................................................ 6-14
  6.1     Retention, Growth and Recruitment of Businesses ...................................... 6-14
  6.2     Preservation and Revitalization of Historic Villages .................................... 6-16
  6.3     Agricultural Businesses ............................................................................... 6-17
  6.4     Tourism ...................................................................................................... 6-17
SECTION 7 Appendix A: Community Resources.................................................... 7-19
  7.1     Regional Context ........................................................................................ 7-19
  7.2     Human Resources ....................................................................................... 7-19
  7.3     Natural Resources ....................................................................................... 7-30
  7.4     Infrastructure .............................................................................................. 7-34
  7.5     Land for Development ................................................................................ 7-47
SECTION 8 Appendix B: Montague Businesses ..................................................... 8-62
  8.1     List of Businesses in Montague, April 2004 ................................................ 8-67
SECTION 9 Appendix C: Other Planning Efforts, 1998-2003 ................................. 9-76
  9.1     Industrial Development ............................................................................... 9-77
  9.2     Village revitalization and redevelopment of historic industrial sites ............ 9-81
  9.3     Agricultural Businesses ............................................................................... 9-86
  9.4     Promotion of tourism based on natural and cultural resources ..................... 9-88
SECTION 10           Appendix D: Resources ................................................................. 10-91
  10.1 Public Agencies and Organizations ........................................................... 10-91
                                           T A B L E O F F I G U R ES

Figure 3-1: Montague Population, 1970-2000 ............................................................. 7-20
Figure 3-2: State, Regional and Local Incomes, 2000 ................................................. 7-22
Figure 3-3: Unemployment Rate in Montague, 1993-2003 ......................................... 7-23
Figure 3-4: Employment by Sector in Montague, 1991-2001 ...................................... 7-23
Figure 3-5: Average State, County and Local Weekly Wages, 2000 ........................... 7-24
Figure 3-6: Place of work for Montague Residents, 1999 ............................................ 7-26
Figure 3-7: Place of Residence for People who Work in Montague, 1999 ................... 7-26
Figure 3-8: Levels of Education in Montague compared to state and region, 2000 ...... 7-28
Figure 3-9: Percentage of Students with "proficient" or Better Scores on MCAS Exams,
     2002 ................................................................................................................... 7-29
Figure 3-10: Drop-out rates for Area High Schools, 2000 ........................................... 7-29
Figure 3-11: Plans of High School Graduates, 2002 .................................................... 7-30
Figure 3-12: State Chapter 90 Funding, 1989-2004 (constant 2003 dollars) ................ 7-37
Figure 3-13: Annual Budget for Montague DPW, Fiscal Year 1989-2004 (Constant 2003
     Dollars) .............................................................................................................. 7-37


                                            T A B L E O F T A B L ES
Table 3-1: State, Regional and Local Population Growth, 1970-2000 ......................... 7-20
Table 3-2: Projected State, Regional and Local Population Growth, 2000-2020.......... 7-21
Table 3-3: State, Regional and Local Poverty Statistics, 2000 ..................................... 7-22
Table 3-4: Average State & Local Weekly Wages for Top Ten SIC Codes in Montague,
    2000 ................................................................................................................... 7-25
Table 3-5: Participation in outdoor activities by Massachusetts Residents, 2002 ......... 7-32
Table 3-6: Economic Impacts of Turners Falls Municipal Airport .............................. 7-40
Table 3-7: Available Land Zoned Industrial in Montague, 2003 (continued on next page)
     ........................................................................................................................... 7-51
Table 3-8: Available Land Zoned Historic Industrial in Montague, 2003 .................... 7-54
Table 3-9: Available Land Zoned General Business in Montague, 2003 ..................... 7-56
Table 3-10: Available Land Zoned Central Business in Montague, 2003 .................... 7-58
Table 3-11: Available Land in Montague Zoned Rural Business, 2003 (continued on next
    page) .................................................................................................................. 7-60
Table 4-1: Montague Businesses by Area of Town ..................................................... 8-62
Table 4-2: 2002 NAICS Codes and Description .......................................................... 8-63
Table 4-3: Montague Businesses by NAICS Category ................................................ 8-64
Table 4-4: Retail stores by village .............................................................................. 8-65
SE C T I O N 1        SU M M A R Y
The 2004 Montague Economic Development Plan is intended to promote local economic
growth consistent with the Town’s 1999 Comprehensive Plan, 2003 Open Space and 
Recreation Plan and other local and regional plans developed over the past several years.
The plan includes an analysis of the town’s assets and challenges with respect to 
economic development, goals and objectives and specific action plans to facilitate
growth, as well as an inventory of Montague’s resources for economic growth and a 
review of past planning efforts.

Montague has a remarkable wealth and diversity of resources for economic development,
including:

       An existing industrial park with a wide variety of manufacturing and other
       businesses that provide good jobs for hundreds of residents
       Pedestrian-oriented mixed-use downtown areas in Turners Falls and Millers Falls,
       with commercial and retail businesses that provide jobs and a variety of goods
       and services to local residents
       A growing cluster of arts-oriented businesses
       Prime farmland and working agricultural businesses
       Extensive areas of vacant land that is planned and zoned for future industrial
       and/or commercial development
       Scenic, historic and cultural attractions and natural resources that provide
       outstanding opportunities for outdoor recreation
       Abundant available and potential drinking water supplies
       A regional airport with capacity to expand if desirable
       A permitted landfill with room for expansion if desirable
       A regional technical school that provides vocational education and training
       Proximity to high-quality post-secondary educational institutions
       A community culture that is generally supportive of the desirability of economic
       growth

The wealth and diversity of the Town’s resources create great potential for economic 
growth in Montague. The Town has seen impressive growth in jobs and the value of
commercial and industrial property over the past two decades, as its investments in
development of the Airport Industrial Park and in the revitalization of downtown Turners
Falls and Millers Falls have borne fruit.  The Town’s needs for jobs and tax revenue 
remain significant, however, and are unlikely to be met under “business as usual” 
conditions in the public and private sectors.

Achieving further gains in employment and property values will require significant
investments in the Town’s built infrastructure, improvements in local government 
capacity to support growth in the private sector, increased civic participation and
leadership by business owners and cooperation with regional and state entities.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         1-1
Members of the Economic Development Task Force have identified the most important
actions necessary to create an improved climate for economic growth in Montague.
These actions can be divided into two categories: government and civic infrastructure,
and physical infrastructure for business retention and development.

Government and C ivic Infrast ructu re
The Town of Montague does not have the appropriate resources and systems in place to
support retention of existing businesses and recruit new enterprises and employers. To
address this problem, the Economic Development Task Force recommends improved
services to assist businesses, including:

       Creation of a volunteer “business support team,” with a formal relationship to the 
       Franklin County Chamber of Commerce to serve as a resource and support system
       for new and existing businesses in Montague.
       Designation of a key person at Town Hall as a central point of first contact for
       business inquiries, and creation of a system to ensure appropriate communication,
       follow up and referrals within and outside of Town government.
       Comprehensive evaluation and improvement of the Town government
       communications system, including signage, municipal phone system and Town
       website to help businesses, residents and visitors understand Town resources and
       access local government services.
       Better coordination of the land use permitting functions between departments.
       Creation of a downtown initiative based on the National Main Street Model for
       Turners Falls, and continuing attention to revitalization of Millers Falls.
       Creation of a volunteer Agricultural Commission that will advocate for the needs
       of commercial agriculture and work to remove obstacles to the survival and
       profitability of agricultural businesses.

Physical Infrast ructure
The 1999 Montague Comprehensive Plan identified a long list of Town infrastructure
needs. The need to “carefully plan our capital improvements” was one of the four major 
themes of the plan. The Economic Development Task Force also recognized the
importance of the Town’s physical infrastructure to growth and development, but focused 
specifically on infrastructure needed to retain existing businesses and recruit new ones.
The Task Force identified the following physical infrastructure projects as key to future
growth and development:
           Begin a conversation with Northeast Utilities to start the process of
           development of a new industrial Park on Millers Falls Road. Investigate
           regionalization and industrial ecology as guiding principles for this project.
           Apply for predevelopment funding to guide the planning process.
           Investigate the feasibility of redevelopment of the Strathmore Mill, with
           commercial and/or industrial enterprises as the primary use of the property.
           Work closely with the property owner, the Franklin Regional Council of
           Governments, the Franklin Regional Housing and Redevelopment Authority,
           state agencies and private developers to pursue all options consistent with the

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         1-2
         Town’s plans and interests for preservation and productive reuse of this historic
         industrial building.
         Pursue redevelopment of the Cumberland Farms building on Avenue A as a
         regional arts-oriented cultural tourism center.
         Invest in the long-term protection of prime agricultural land for continued
         agricultural use.

The members of the Economic Development Task Force encourage the Board of
Selectmen to adopt these recommendations, and challenge business owners and residents
in the Town of Montague to get involved in implementing them.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         1-3
SE C T I O N 2        INTRODUC TION

2.1     H IST O R Y
The Town of Montague has been proactive in planning for economic development for the
past twenty-five years. In the late 1970s, the Town began work on development of a new
industrial park and revitalization of downtown Turners Falls. Planning for the Great Falls
Discovery Center and Canalside Rail Trail began shortly thereafter. At the same time,
farmers and town boards recognized the importance of agriculture to the Town’s 
economy, landscape and culture, and advocated for the protection of Montague’s prime 
farmland.

Most of the projects conceived by the Town in 1970s and 1980s have come to fruition.
The Airport Industrial Park is almost at capacity for large manufacturing businesses.
Restoration of the historic streetscape and buildings in downtown Turners Falls has
increased property values, and is generating significant private investment. The Great
Falls Discovery Center is open, and the Canalside Rail Trail is under construction.
Restoration of the streetscape in downtown Millers Falls will begin in 2004. Nearly
1,000 acres of farmland have been permanently dedicated to agricultural use, and the
town has many thriving agricultural businesses.

Despite this record of success, however, the Town faces serious economic challenges.
Poverty is a persistent problem. Many of the Town’s residents do not have access to well-
paying jobs. The recession and state fiscal crisis of the early 2000s have made it very
difficult for the Town to provide the services needed by its residents, including but not
limited to education, public safety and public works. Steady increases in property tax
bills over the past decade have made housing less affordable. A split tax rate, with a
higher rate for commercial uses, also create a disincentive for business investment in
Montague.

The Town’s successes and challenges have been addressed in several plans developed 
over the past five years, including the Comprehensive Plan, an Economic Development
Plan and downtown revitalization plan in 1999, and the Open Space and Recreation Plan
in 2003. These plans identify four themes for economic development:
   Retention, growth and recruitment of manufacturing businesses;
   Preservation and revitalization of historic villages, including reuse and redevelopment
   of historic industrial sites, especially in downtown areas in Turners Falls and Millers
   Falls;
   Retention and growth of agricultural business
   Promotion of tourism based on natural and cultural resources.

The 1999 Comprehensive Plan included a Future Land Use Map that represents a vision
of how the Town can maintain its natural, agricultural and cultural resources while
developing its economy and growing to accommodate new residents. The Town has
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          2-4
developed goals, objectives and action steps to achieve this vision. Without clear
priorities or institutional systems to ensure accountability, however, it is unlikely that the
Town’s goals will be achieved.


2.2     P U RPOSE O F P L A N
To address these problems, the Board of Selectmen appointed an Economic Development
Task Force in August 2003 to review past plans and current trends and conditions and,
taking into consideration the limited resources available for economic development and
public support for the “four themes” that emerge from recent plans, develop a realistic 
plan for how the Town should invest its time and resources over the next five years to
achieve the vision outlined in the Comprehensive Plan, with a focus on retaining and
creating jobs for the Town’s residents and increasing the Town’s tax base. The Action 
Plan in Section 6 is intended to serve this purpose.


2.3     P L A N N I N G P R O C ESS
The 24-member Economic Development Task Force included business, civic and
community leaders, as well as town staff, representatives of town boards and regional
organizations. The group held eight meetings between October 2003 and June 2004. The
task force studied previous plans and research done by the Montague Planning &
Conservation Department. To prepare action plans, the task force divided itself into four
working groups focused on each of the major economic development themes. Due to the
large size of the task force, the number and diversity of interests represented, the planning
timeline, and the fact that the Task Force agreed to build on the findings and
recommendations of previous plans, additional public outreach strategies were not
pursued.


2.4    O RG ANI Z A T I O N O F PL AN
The 2004 Montague Economic Development Plan is organized in the following sections:
      An executive summary
      Introduction
      Assessment of assets and challenges
      Goals and objectives
      Action Plans
      Appendices providing data and background information, including an overview of
      community resources, an inventory of businesses currently located in the town,
      and a review of past planning efforts




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                              2-5
SE C T I O N 3        A SSE TS A N D C H A L L E N G ES
The Economic Development Task Force identified strengths, problems, opportunities and
threats pertaining to economic development in Montague. This analysis found that the
Town has very strong assets for growth, but continues to face significant challenges.


3.1     A SSE TS
   A strong base of manufacturing businesses and extensive industrially-zoned land that
  is feasible to develop.

   Outstanding natural, scenic and recreational resources contribute to a high quality of
  life for residents and are a potential draw for new residents and tourists.

   High-quality agricultural land supports many agricultural businesses, and there is
  room for growth in the agricultural sector.

   Historic structures contribute to the beauty of the Town and are a draw for new
  residents, businesses and potentially tourists.

   A growing community of artists, who are creating businesses, improving property
  values and drawing new energy and talent, especially in Turners Falls. The Hallmark
  Institute of Photography is becoming a major draw for photographers.

   Strategic location with respect to Routes 91 & Route 2, high-quality public and private
  educational institutions and population centers.

  The Turners Falls Airport is a resource for economic development.

   The permitted landfill site on Turnpike Road presents a variety of opportunities for
  economic development—as a source of income for investment in Town infrastructure,
  as a potential disposal site for town brownfields sites and/or industrial waste and
  ultimately, as an area to redevelop for commercial or industrial use.

  Abundant groundwater resources to support future growth.

   A newly-renovated middle school and high school and the regional technical high
  school.

   Relatively affordable real estate, compared to eastern Massachusetts, the suburban
  communities around Interstate 495 and Hampshire County communities.



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           3-6
   The success of past economic development efforts, especially in downtown
  revitalization in Turners Falls, is creating momentum and a positive climate for growth.

   Community support for economic growth and relative agreement about the types of
  businesses residents would like to attract and appropriate locations for future growth.

  Good regional organizations and structures (Franklin County Housing and
  Redevelopment Authority, Franklin Regional Council of Governments, Franklin
  County Community Development Corporation and Franklin County Chamber of
  Commerce) that can facilitate economic development in Montague.

   The Strathmore Mill represents either an opportunity for economic development if
  access and parking issues can be successfully addressed, or a threat to downtown
  Turners Falls if these issues cannot be addressed and the structure is left to decay.


3.2    C H A L L E N G ES

   Physical infrastructure, including roads, bridges, sewer system and street lighting, is in
  serious disrepair and will require significant expenditures to maintain and improve.

   The Town’s financial resources are increasingly inadequate to pay for essential 
  services, including public works, health & safety, education, culture and protection of
  natural resources.

   Poverty, drugs, crime and public nuisances are persistent, especially in Turners Falls
  and Millers Falls, and make these areas less attractive for economic development and
  contribute to an image problem for the Town.

   There is limited space available for new commercial businesses, especially in
  downtown Turners Falls. Long-term residential use of street-level commercial space in
  Turners Falls is undesirable.

   The actual and perceived quality of education available in local schools is a problem,
  both in terms of workforce development and in terms of attracting new businesses and
  residents to the Town.

   Montague’s split tax rate, with a much higher rate for businesses, is a disincentive for
  business retention, growth and recruitment. This is especially true of agricultural
  businesses, which typically have lower profit margins than other commercial
  enterprises.

  The Town’s tax base is very vulnerable to loss of a large industrial taxpayer.

  Inadequate telecommunications services are an obstacle to business development.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                             3-7
  Our current form of government—three person Board of Selectmen, Town
 Administrator and representative Town Meeting, with a variety of independent special
 districts—is not responsive enough to economic opportunities and threats and may be
 an obstacle to economic development.

  Lack of community cohesion within and between villages, low levels of civic
 participation and lack of an active business association are obstacles to economic
 development.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         3-8
SE C T I O N 4           C O M M U N I T Y V ISI O N A N D N E E DS
Appendix C of this plan summarizes the intensive community planning efforts that the
Town of Montague has sponsored and participated in over the past five years. The
Economic Development Task Force was not intended to duplicate or question the results
of previous planning efforts, but to build on them. This section therefore illustrates the
vision for the Town that has emerged from many years of planning, and clarifies the
needs for economic development initiatives to achieve that vision.


4.1     C O M M U N I T Y V ISI O N
Montague residents’ vision for community development is expressed in the Future Land
Use Map developed for the 1999 Comprehensive Plan and included at the beginning of
this plan. The fundamental elements of that vision include:

      Maintaining and enhancing the five villages as centers of population and commercial
      activity.
      Encouraging industrial use and development in designated areas.
      Maintaining and protecting connected corridors of forest for its ecological, scenic
      and recreational values and promoting sustainable forestry that is compatible with
      those values
      Protecting prime farmland along the Connecticut and Sawmill Rivers and supporting
      the vitality and growth of agricultural businesses.
      Allowing limited commercial development on high traffic roads consistent with rural
      character and scenic values.
      Allowing limited rural residential development in areas not identified as critical to
      commercial agriculture, water supply protection or forested habitat.

This vision is intended to maintain and preserve the agricultural, natural, cultural and
historic resources that make Montague special, while promoting growth that is consistent
with community values to raise the standard of living for town residents.


4.2      E C O N O M I C D E V E L O PM E N T N E E DS

Montague needs economic development for two primary reasons:  to increase the town’s 
tax base, and to provide new and improved employment opportunities.

The Town has a long backlog of expensive infrastructure and capital projects. Residents
consistently express support and demand for a variety of town services, including
education, parks and recreation, libraries and other cultural programs, public health and
environmental protection services, police and fire protection and waste disposal. The
cost of providing these services has increased dramatically, which is reflected in rising
property tax bills. The Town cannot afford to continue to raise the tax rate indefinitely.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           4-9
Montague’s low-income residents, many of whom are elderly, cannot afford to pay
higher taxes and the higher commercial tax rate is a disincentive to business development
and expansion. This is especially true in the Turners Falls Fire District, where the
combined town and fire district commercial tax rate is approaching $30 per thousand.
The Town needs to attract businesses that make a significant net positive contribution to
the tax base.

This plan supports increasing the tax base through retention, growth and recruitment of
businesses in the areas identified for commercial, industrial and agricultural development
in the Future Land Use Map. The Task Force recommends a focus on manufacturing,
agriculture, and businesses that are compatible with and make non-consumptive use of
the Town’s natural, scenic, cultural and historic resources. 

Creating new employment opportunities for Montague residents is also critical to
improving quality of life in the community. Unemployment, underemployment and
poverty are persistent problems in Montague and in the neighboring town of Greenfield.
Residents need access to well-paying jobs, with benefits, to be able to maintain their
property and pay taxes to support public services. The manufacturing sector is a good fit
with Montague residents’ needs for employment. Manufacturing businesses typically 
offer relatively high wages and good benefits for workers who do not have a college
education.

Entrepreneurship and self-employment are important sources of economic activity in
Montague. Small and home-based businesses should be nurtured and encouraged to
grow. The Town needs to develop systems and promote programs to support small
businesses and ensure that there is adequate space within the community for them to
expand.

This plan presents a positive vision for the future of Montague. While the Town
welcomes economic development, it is important that new businesses are compatible with
that vision. Types of growth that would detract from the community’s goals should be
discouraged. The Task Force believes that proposals for development that would result
in pollution of the air, surface or groundwater, heavy commercial traffic, development of
prime farmland or forest outside areas designated for growth, erosion of the Town’s 
historic resources and weakening of downtown commercial areas are not in the Town’s 
long-term interest.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         4-10
SE C T I O N 5        G O A LS A N D O BJ E C T I V ES

5.1    PR O M O T E R E T E NT I O N A ND G R O W T H   OF   E X IST I N G B USI N ESSES

5.1.1 Maintain, repair and improve critical infrastructure
       Advocate with state agencies and legislators for timely repair of the Montague’s 
       substandard bridges, especially the Gill-Montague, General Pierce and Greenfield
       Road bridges. Without access to the Town, economic development efforts will be
       unsuccessful.

5.1.2 Improve local government capacity to respond to the needs of existing
    businesses
       Improve communication with business owners; create mechanisms to encourage
       dialogue between business owners and town officials.
       Provide business owners with assistance and referrals to facilitate expansion in
       Montague.
       Increase participation by business owners on town boards and committees
       Create an Agricultural Commission to represent and address the needs and
       concerns of agricultural businesses.

5.1.3 Ensure adequate areas for the expansion of existing businesses in
    town
       Ensure that there is adequate land zoned for commercial use (retail and service
       businesses and professional offices) in village centers.
       Expand areas zoned for general business use on high-traffic roads outside village
       centers, subject to controls to ensure that development is consistent with
       Comprehensive Plan.
       Expand areas zoned and available and served with appropriate infrastructure (i.e.,
       water, sewer, gas, telecommunications) for industrial use to meet the needs of
       existing manufacturers to expand.
       Promote permanent protection of prime agricultural land and discourage efforts to
       convert such land to non-agricultural use.

5.1.4 Strengthen Montague ties to regional economic development agencies
    and initiatives
       Improve representation of Montague business interests at the Franklin County
       Chamber of Commerce.
       Maintain high level of participation and involvement by Montague officials and
       residents in the Greater Franklin County Comprehensive Economic Development
       Strategy (CEDS).
       Work closely with the Franklin County Community Development Corporation to
       provide services to business owners in Montague; maintain involvement of
       Montague business owners and residents on CDC Board.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                              5-11
       Work closely with “Northern Tier” project efforts to promote economic growth in
       towns along Route 2 corridor.

5.1.5 Develop municipally-driven participation in regional employment and
    training efforts
       Cultivate partnerships with Franklin-Hampshire Regional Employment Board,
       Franklin County Technical School, Greenfield Community College and relevant
       departments at the University of Massachusetts to prepare an appropriately trained
       workforce in industries desired/likely to be attracted.

5.1.6 Investigate impacts of split tax rate on businesses and feasibility of
    moving toward a unified tax rate


5.2     R E CRUI T      N E W B USI N ESSES I N K E Y SE C T O RS , I N C L U D I N G
M A N U F A C T U R I N G , T H E A R TS, A G R I C U L T U R E , T O U R ISM A N D PE D EST R I A N -
O R I E N T E D R E T A I L A N D SE R V I C E E N T E RPR ISES

5.2.1 Improve marketing of available commercial and industrial space
       Attract restaurants to downtown Turners Falls.
       Use “commercial homesteading” concept to transfer commercial tax title 
       properties to private owners for reuse and redevelopment.
       Increase efforts to market vacant town-owned land in Industrial Park.

5.2.2 Increase the supply of industrially-zoned land with infrastructure to
    accommodate new manufacturers
       Begin dialogue with Northeast Utilities about industrial development of utility-
       owned land on the Plains.
       Insure that land planned for future industrial development is appropriately zoned.
       Investigate regionalization and industrial ecology as guiding concepts for new
       industrial park development.
       Investigate options for redevelopment of a future landfill to provide space for
       industrial use.

5.2.3 Encourage redevelopment of Strathmore Mill and other brownfield
    sites for commercial and industrial use
       Work with property owner, regional and state agencies to improve access and
       parking for Strathmore.
       Research models of other successful mill redevelopment project in the region and
       state.
       Work with property owner to attract a developer with the experience, resources
       and capacity to redevelop the mill.
       Promote redevelopment of other brownfield sites by private investors.



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                       5-12
5.3     I M PR O V E   T H E C L I M A T E F O R B USI N ESS I N V I L L A G ES

5.3.1 Implement National Main Street model to support and enhance
    downtown revitalization in Turners Falls and Millers Falls

5.3.2 Encourage and facilitate preservation and restoration of historic
    buildings
       Develop design guidelines appropriate to individual villages.
       Recruit an architect to the Planning Board.
       Seek funding for continuation of façade restoration program.
       Promote participation in state and federal historic tax credit programs.
       Promote preservation of historic barns.

5.3.3 Improve streetscapes in downtown areas
       Implement “alleyscape” improvements in Turners Falls.
       Complete improvements of streetscape in Millers Falls.
       Take advantage of all opportunities to encourage the conversion of street-level
       apartments in Turners Falls and Millers Falls to commercial use.


5.4     P R O M O T E M O N T A G U E ’S H IST O R I C  V I L L A G ES , C U L T U R A L
A T T R A C T I O NS A N D N A T U R A L R ESO U R C ES T O T O U R ISTS

5.4.1 Connect to and capitalize on existing efforts to promote tourism in the
    region
       Ensure that Montague sites are promoted on tourism websites, for example,
       MassCountryRoads.com.

5.4.2 Develop a marketing concept or “brand” specific to Montague that will
    help draw visitors to town
       Learn from successes of other towns, for example Shelburne Falls.

5.4.3 Work to redevelop the Cumberland Farms building on Avenue A as a
    center for cultural tourism and the arts.

5.4.4 Develop and promote a series of events with themes relating to the
    arts, culture and natural resources to draw visitors to Town

5.4.5 Promote development of a passenger rail station in Millers Falls




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                              5-13
SE C T I O N 6         A C T I O N P L A NS
The Action Plans that follow represent the priorities identified by the Economic
Development Task Force to promote economic growth in Montague over the next three
to five years. They are not intended as a comprehensive economic development program,
but as a set of short-term actions necessary to create an institutional and community
climate favorable to growth, and a few key projects that will establish a foundation for
the types of growth consistent with the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.  

Implementation of these recommendations will require strong leadership from the Board
of Selectmen and increased involvement from the business community in civic affairs.

6.1    R E T E N T I O N , G R O W T H A N D R E C R U I T M E N T O F B USI N ESSES
Goal: To retain existing commercial and industrial businesses within the Town of
Montague, support and encourage their growth and recruit new businesses to town.

6.1.1 Improve Business Assistance Services

6.1.1.1 Develop Business Support Team
The Board of Selectmen should appoint volunteers to serve as a support system for
business development. The team should include the Town Administrator, Town Planner,
representatives from the Montague Economic Development & Industrial Commission,
the Massachusetts Office of Business Development, the Franklin-Hampshire
Employment and Training Consortium, the Franklin County Community Development
Corporation, and members “on call” representing banking, real estate, the arts and
manufacturing. The team should have a formal relationship with the Franklin County
Chamber of Commerce—a member of the team should represent Montague on the FCCC
Board.

The business support team will serve as a resource to residents and others seeking to
maintain, grow and locate businesses in Montague. It may offer assistance with siting,
permitting, financing and marketing. The team should work to develop appropriate
outreach, solicitation and marketing materials to promote Montague as a good location
for businesses. It should develop strategies to promote cooperation between Montague
businesses on issues of mutual interest, and may make policy recommendations to the
Board of Selectmen to promote economic growth.

Timeline:             2005

Lead:                 Board of Selectmen
Implementation:       MEDIC, Town Planner

6.1.1.2 I mprove Business Promotion at Town Hall
The Board of Selectmen should designate a key staff person at Town Hall to serve as the
first point of contact for business inquiries. This person should serve as a friendly
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          6-14
“welcomer” who will promote the Town as a good location for business growth and 
development and provide technical assistance and referrals to other offices, boards and
service providers within the Town and the region. The Town’s communications systems 
(e.g., website, signs, promotional materials, etc.) should clearly identify the contact
person for business inquiries. The Task Force recommends that this function be located
in the Planning Office and coordinate closely with the Town Administrator.

Timeline:             Summer 2004

Lead:                 Board of Selectmen
Implementation:       Town Planner

6.1.1.3 I mprove Town Communication Systems
The official Town government communications system, including signage, the municipal
phone system and the Town website should be evaluated and redesigned to help current
business owners and residents understand Town resources and access local government
services. The communications system should also promote the Town to visitors; both
tourists and people considering relocation of their homes and businesses to the area.

Timeline:             Spring 2005

Lead:                 Board of Selectmen
Implementation:       Selectmen’s Secretary

6.1.1.4 I mprove Coordination of Permitting
The Town needs to improve coordination of the various permits required for business
development, including permits from the Planning Board, Board of Appeals,
Conservation Commission, Board of Health and Board of Selectmen. At the very least,
applicants should be able to get a prompt and clear explanation of what permits are
required, the cost and timeline to obtain them and assistance with negotiating the process.
A “developer’s kit” explaining the process and providing contacts should be developed. 
The Town should look for opportunities to streamline and reduce the cost of permitting.
Staff responsible for the various permitting functions should communicate regularly and
cooperate to provide the most efficient service to applicants. A similar philosophy
should apply to applications for Tax Increment Financing (TIF) arrangements. It is
important that applicants understand the process for making decisions and be informed of
any opportunities to advocate for their proposal before decision-making entities.

Timeline:             2004

Lead:                 Board of Selectmen
Implementation:       Town Administrator




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         6-15
6.1.2 Begin Industrial Park Pre-Development
The Town should begin a conversation with Northeast Utilities to start the process of
development of a new industrial Park on the utility’s property on Millers Falls Road. The
Town and the utility should investigate the possibility of regional cooperation in
industrial park development.  The park’s developers should use sustainable development 
and industrial ecology as guiding principles for this project; seeking companies that
minimize resource use and pollution and maximize recycling of waste streams. Montague
should seek an Economic Development Administration Planning Grant for industrial park
pre-development through the CEDS process, and approach Northeast Utilities for
matching funds for this purpose.

Timeline:               2004

Lead:                   Board of Selectmen
Implementation:         MEDIC, Town Administrator, Town Planner

6.2    P R ESE R V A T I O N A N D R E V I T A L I Z A T I O N O F H IST O R I C V I L L A G ES
Goal: To maintain the vitality of Montague’s five historic villages and centers of
population and commercial activity, with a special focus on the village of Turners Falls,
and continue current efforts to revitalize Millers Falls.


6.2.1 Initiate Turners Falls Main Street Program
The Town should seek funding for a comprehensive program to promote downtown
Turners Falls, based on the “National Main Street” model developed by the National 
Trust for Historic Preservation. This will require funding for a downtown manager
position for a minimum of three years to organize a permanent volunteer downtown
organization.

Timeline:               2005-2006

Lead:                   Town Administrator
Implementation          Grant-funded position



6.2.2 Promote Redevelopment of Strathmore Mill and other brownfields
    sites
The Town should be proactive in investigating all feasible options for the redevelopment
of historic industrial properties, with a special focus on the Strathmore Mill. Commercial
and/or industrial enterprises should be the primary and preferred uses of the Strathmore
and other historic industrial properties. The Town should work closely with the property
owner, the Franklin Regional Council of Governments, the Franklin Regional Housing
and Redevelopment Authority, state agencies and private developers to pursue all options
for preservation and productive reuse of the Strathmore Mill and other historic industrial
buildings, including seeking funding and partners, investing in infrastructure

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                               6-16
improvements and assisting with permitting and tax relief for proposals determined by
the Board of Selectmen to be in the interest of the Town.

Timeline:             2004, ongoing

Lead:                 Board of Selectmen
Implementation:       Town Planner


6.3    A G R I C U L T U R A L B USI N ESSES
Goal: To maintain and enhance the viability of the Town’s existing agricultural 
businesses and promote Montague as a good location for commercial agriculture.

6.3.1 Form Local Agricultural Commission
The Town should create and institutionalize a permanent volunteer commission that will
advocate for the needs of commercial agriculture and work to remove obstacles to the
survival and profitability of agricultural businesses. The Commission should be
explicitly authorized by Town Meeting vote. It should include a majority of
representatives who are actively involved in commercial agriculture.

Timeline:     Steering committee to be appointed by October 2004
              Commission to be included on Annual Town Meeting warrant 2005

Lead:                 Agricultural business owners TBD
Implementation:       Town Planner


6.3.2 Secure Permanent Protection of Prime Farmland
The Town should invest in the long-term protection of prime agricultural land for
continued agricultural use, seeking public and private funds and dedicating tax revenues
toward the purchase of Agricultural Preservation Restrictions (APRs) on Montague’s 
most productive agricultural land as identified by soil maps and the Town’s Future Land 
Use map.

Timeline:             Ongoing

Lead:                 Agricultural Commission
                      Conservation Commission

Implementation:       Town Planner


6.4     T O U R ISM
Goal: To promote Montague as a destination for tourism based on the Town’s natural, 
cultural and historic resources.


Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                       6-17
6.4.1 Great Falls Center for the Arts
The Town should support and advance redevelopment of the old Cumberland Farms
building, located at the intersection of Avenue A and Second Street in Turners Falls on
the site of the Great Falls Discovery Center, as a center to promote the arts and cultural
heritage tourism in Turners Falls and the region as a whole.

Timeline:              2004, ongoing

Lead:                  MEDIC
Implementation:        MEDIC, Town Planner




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           6-18
SE C T I O N 7        A PP E N D I X A : C O M M U N I T Y R ESO U R C ES
This section places the Town of Montague in a regional context and describes its human
and natural resources, infrastructure, and current patterns of economic development.


7.1    R E GIONA L C ONT E X T
The Town of Montague is located in central Franklin County in western Massachusetts.
Montague is bordered by the Millers River and the towns of Gill and Erving on the north
and northeast; Wendell on the east and the towns of Leverett and Sunderland on the
south. The Connecticut River and the towns of Deerfield and Greenfield form
Montague’s western boundary.

The Massachusetts Department of Revenue classifies Montague as a Rural Economic
Center. The town is a regional employment center, with an industrial park, a few
outlying manufacturing businesses and two downtown commercial areas. The town’s 
general aviation municipal airport also serves as a regional resource.

7.2    H U M A N R ESO U R C ES

7.2.1 Population
Montague’s current population of 8,489 residents has been relatively stable for the past 
several decades. According to the U.S. Census, during the ten-year period 1970-1980, the
Town of Montague saw a decrease in population of 440 residents or 5.2 percent of its
total population. Over the next two decades, 1980-2000, the number of Montague
residents increased 5.7 percent, for a net gain of 38 residents between 1970 and 2000
(See Figure 7-1).




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                       7-19
Figure 7-1: Montague Population, 1970-2000




Source: United States Census, 2000

Slow population growth in Montague is in sharp contrast to Franklin County, which
experienced a 20.8 percent increase in population from 1970-2000 and the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which saw an 11.6 percent increase (see Table 7-1).


T able 7-1: State, Regional and Local Population G rowth, 1970-2000

                    Population G rowth, Percent G rowth,    Population G rowth, Percent G rowth,    Percent G rowth,
                    1970-1980            1970-1980          1980-2000            1980 - 2000        1970-2000
M assachusetts                     47660              0.84%              612060              10.67%              11.60%
F ranklin County                    5084              8.60%                 7218             11.22%              20.80%
Montague                            -440             -5.20%                  478              5.96%               0.45%
Source: Unites States Census, 2000

The Massachusetts Institute of Social and Economic Research (MISER) develops
population projections for all Massachusetts towns. MISER, located at the University of
Massachusetts, serves as the U.S. Census Bureau’s main data center for the 
Commonwealth.  MISER’s 2003 projections forecast population levels through 2020, and 
are based on 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census data and on current birth, death and migration
trends. In forecasting future populations, MISER creates low, middle, and high
population projections, each with slightly different assumptions.  MISER’s projections 
for Montague for 2010 and 2020 and forecasted population change between 2000 and
2020 are shown in Table 3-2.  MISER projects that Montague’s population will grow 
between 2000 and 2020. The middle projection predicts that the town will increase to
8,881 (5% growth) by 2020.



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                     7-20
T able 7-2: Projected State, Regional and Local Population G rowth, 2000-2020

                   Projected G rowth, Projected Percent             Projected G rowth, Projected Percent
                   2000-2010             G rowth, 2000 - 2010 2000-2020                 G rowth, 2000-2020
 M assachusetts                  207904                     3.30%                418615                6.60%
 F ranklin County                   840                     1.20%                  2271                3.20%
 Montague                           132                     1.55%                   393                4.60%
Source: Projection data from the Massachusetts Institute of Social and Economic Research (M.I.S.E.R.),
July, 2003. MISER develops high, middle and low projections, each with slightly different projections.
The middle projections are noted here. The data for Montague uses revised census figures.

It is not clear why Montague’s population grew more slowly than that of neighboring 
towns over the past several decades. Montague does have a slightly higher percentage of
senior citizens than the county, so one explanation is that young people are leaving town
and not replacing elderly residents; but the population of Montague residents in the 18-24
and 25-44 age groups is very similar to the percentages for the rest of Franklin County.

Another possibility is that the Gill-Montague Regional School District is less attractive to
potential new residents than schools in surrounding towns.

Finally, it is possible that the slow population growth in Montague is due to the lack of
availability of housing. Prices for existing homes and land in Montague trail housing
costs in the neighboring Franklin County towns of Leverett, Sunderland and Deerfield, as
well as the larger Hampshire County housing markets in Amherst and Northampton.
While local realtors can document strong demand for housing in town, Montague has not
had a subdivision or major residential development project for more than a decade. If
large tracts of land were to become available for development, Montague’s population 
could increase dramatically, confounding recent trends and projections.


7.2.2 Income
Incomes in Franklin County are generally lower than in the rest of the state, and
Montague has experienced persistent poverty. This is particularly true of the village of
Turners Falls. Median household income in Turners Falls is less than half of the state
median.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                     7-21
Figure 7-2: State, Regional and Local Incomes, 2000


   $70,000
   $60,000
   $50,000                                          Massachusetts
   $40,000                                          Franklin County
   $30,000                                          Montague
   $20,000                                          Turners Falls

   $10,000
          $0




Source: United States Census, 2000

The Town of Montague has a high poverty rate, with 13.1% of residents living below the
poverty line. In Turners Falls, the poverty rate is 18.9%, with 28.6% of children under
age 18 living below the poverty line.


T able 7-3: State, Regional and Local Poverty Statistics, 2000


                   % under poverty        % under poverty % under poverty,
                   line, all ages         line, children  age 65+
Massachusetts                      9.3%            11.6%               8.9%
Franklin County                    9.4%            10.5%               8.8%
Montague                          13.1%            17.5%              10.1%
Turners Falls                     18.9%            28.6%               8.9%
Source: United States Census 2000



7.2.3 Employment
In 2002, Montague had a labor force of 4664 residents, with 4,451 employed and 213
unemployed. The unemployment rate has fluctuated between 2.9 percent and 6.7 percent
over the past decade. Unemployment was high following the recession of the early 1990s,
fell steadily in the late 1990s to a low in 2000, then began a gradual increase in 2001.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                      7-22
Figure 7-3: Unemployment Rate in Montague, 1993-2003




Source: Massachusetts Department of Employment and Training. Data not seasonally adjusted.

The Manufacturing, Government, Services and Trade sectors are major employers of
Montague residents. While employment in each sector fluctuates with the local, state and
national economy, some trends are clear. Employment in manufacturing increased nearly
50% between 1991 and 2000, before falling slightly in 2001. Employment in the
Government sector rose steadily during the same period, increasing by 27%. While the
Transportation, Construction and Public Utilities sector employs a relatively small
number of residents, employment in this sector increased by 70% during the 1990s.

Figure 7-4: E mployment by Sector in Montague, 1991-2001




Source: Massachusetts Division of Employment and Training, 2003.

Employment statistics by sector are not available for the past two years; however, due to
trends in the state and national economy, it is likely that such statistics would show recent
job losses in the Government sector. The University of Massachusetts, which is a major

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                7-23
employer of Franklin County residents, has experienced large staff reductions in 2002
and 2003. These layoffs likely affected some Montague residents. There have also been
layoffs in manufacturing businesses in Montague in the past few years, including Judd
Wire, which is the Town’s largest employer. Anecdotal information suggests that 
employment in manufacturing is recovering again in 2004.

Other employment sectors tracked by the Massachusetts Division of Employment and
Training include Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Construction; and Fire, Insurance and
Real Estate. These sectors employ relatively small numbers of residents—an average of
58, 53 and 50 residents respectively between 1991 and 2001; and the number of jobs in
each of these sectors has remained moderately stable during the period.

The Massachusetts Division of Employment and Training also tracks wages by
employment sector. Based on income statistics from the U.S. Census, it is reasonable to
expect that wages in Montague would be lower than in the state in general, and lower
than in Franklin County as a whole. DET weekly wage statistics for 2000 indicate that
the average weekly wage for Montague residents was just 64 percent of the state weekly
wage. However, the average wage in Montague was slightly higher than that for Franklin
County.

DET weekly wage statistics for 2000 are broken out by North American Industry
Classification System code. Looking at the ten NAICS codes that employ the greatest
number of Montague residents, the gap between the local and state wages shrinks
considerably—for these top industries, the average local weekly wage is 87% of the state
wage.

Figure 7-5: A verage State, County and Local W eekly W ages, 2000


   $1,200

   $1,000         $866
     $800                                          $652                       Massachusetts
                          $535   $555                     $559   $569
     $600                                                                     Franklin County
     $400                                                                     Montague
     $200

       $0
             Avg. weekly wage, all industries   Average weekly wage, top 10
                                                   industries in Montague

Source: Massachusetts Division of Employment & Training

The NAICS codes employing the greatest number of Montague residents includes both
high and low wage industries. The high-wage industries include primary metal
industries, paper products, plastics products, and food products. While statistics on
wages for individual employers are confidential, Montague has major industrial

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                 7-24
employers in each of these higher-wage categories, including Judd Wire Manufacturing
(primary metal industries), Esleeck Manufacturing Company (paper and allied products),
Hillside Plastics and New England Extrusion (rubber and misc. plastic products) and
Lightlife Foods (food and kindred products). The statistics on state and local wages in
Table 7-4 are a good illustration of the critical importance of these Montague businesses
to the local economy. The Town needs to find strategies to facilitate the retention and
expansion of its existing major employers, as well as recruiting new businesses in higher-
wage sectors.

T able 7-4: A verage State & Local Weekly Wages for Top T en SI C Codes in Montague, 2000

SIC Code Industry Title                                   State Wage Montague Wage State/Town Ratio
         33   Primary Metal Industries                          $844           $884          104.74%
         30   Rubber and Misc. Plastic Products                 $824           $671           81.43%
         83   Social Services                                   $423           $538          127.19%
         20   Food and Kindred Products                         $731           $674           92.20%
         59   Misc. Retail                                      $478           $383           80.13%
         41   Local & Interurban Passenger Transit              $433           $364           84.06%
         58   Eating and Drinking Places                        $281           $206           73.31%
         34   Fabricated Metal Products                         $919           $647           70.40%
         26   Paper and Allied Products                         $866           $813           93.88%
         80   Health Services                                   $721           $514           71.29%
              Average                                           $652           $569           87.33%
Source: Massachusetts Division of Employment & Training

While Social Services is generally a low-wage sector, average weekly wages in
Montague are substantially higher for this sector than the state average. Montague has
several major employers in the Social Services sector, including the Franklin Regional
Housing and Redevelopment Authority, the Farren Care Center, and Franklin County
Home Care Corporation.


7.2.4 Commuting
The U.S. Census tracks statistics on place of work and place of residence. Average travel
time to work for Montague residents is 23 minutes. Approximately 68 percent of
residents work in Franklin County. These statistics illustrate the importance of job
retention in the region.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                               7-25
Figure 7-6: Place of wor k for Montague Residents, 1999

                                                                             Greenfield
           Hampden County            Other
                6%                    4%
                                                   Greenfield                Montague
         Hampshire County,
                                                     26%
              Other
              10%                                                            Franklin County, Other
                   Amherst
                    12%
                                                                             Amherst
                                                  Montague

                 Franklin County, Other
                                                    22%                      Hampshire County,
                          20%                                                Other
                                                                             Hampden County
Source: United States Census, 2000
                                                                 Other
Nearly 76 percent of Turners Falls residents work in Franklin County, and 19.4 percent of
households in Turners Falls lack access to an automobile. Because public transportation
is limited, continued availability of jobs within walking distance of downtown Turners
Falls is very important to these households.

The 2000 census also provides commuting data for 2,988 workers employed in
Montague. Approximately 31 percent of these workers are Montague residents; and
nearly 55 percent live in other towns in Franklin County.

Figure 7-7: Place of Residence for People who Wor k in Montague, 1999


                                                                Montague
                          Other
      Hampden County
                           8%
           2%
                                                                Greenfield
          Hampshire
                                             Montague
           County
                                               30%
             5%                                                 Franklin County,
                                                                other
   Franklin County,                                             Hampshire County
        other
        31%
                                     Greenfield                 Hampden County
                                       24%
                                                                Other


Source: United States Census, 2000




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                    7-26
Figures 7-6 and 7-7 demonstrate the extent to which Montague and Greenfield are
economically interdependent. Approximately a quarter of Montague residents work in
Greenfield, and vice versa. These figures represent more than 2,000 people who travel
back and forth between the two communities every day.


7.2.5 Education
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has a reputation for high levels of educational
achievement, and the state’s educated work force is one of its primary strengths.  Western 
Massachusetts is well-known for the quality of its public and private elementary and
secondary schools and colleges. Montague is located within 25 miles of the area’s “Five 
Colleges:” The University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst College, Hampshire 
College, Smith College and Mount Holyoke College. Greenfield Community College in
neighboring Greenfield offers a variety of two-year degrees, and many of its graduates go
on to attain a four-year degree at UMASS and other area colleges. High-quality private
schools close to Montague include Bement, Eaglebrook and Deerfield in Old Deerfield,
The Greenfield Center School, and Stoneleigh-Burnham school for girls in Greenfield,
and Northfield-Mount Hermon Academy in Gill. Montague has one private religious
school, Jonathan Edwards Academy, located in the Airport Industrial Park.

Montague is part of the Gill-Montague Regional School District. The Montague schools
in the District currently include Montague Center School and Hillcrest School, serving
grades K-2, Sheffield School serving grades 3-6, Great Falls Middle School for grades 7-
8, and Turners Falls High School. Great Falls Middle School and Turners Falls High
School share a campus. All classrooms, including science and technology, as well as
other amenities, including performing arts space, playing fields, and the only pool located
at a public school in Franklin County, have been upgraded to state-of-the-art facilities
through a major renovation project in 2002-2004.

The Franklin County Regional Technical High School is also located in Turners Falls.
Approximately 80 students from Montague attend the Technical School, which offers
vocational education in the following programs:

            auto body repair                                 heating, ventilation, air
            automotive technology                            conditioning and
            carpentry                                        refrigeration
            child care                                       landscaping and horticulture
            health services                                  machine technology
            computer technology                              office technology
            cosmetology                                      plumbing
            culinary arts                                    welding/metal fabrication
            electrical
Technical School students spend about a half-year in academics and a half-year in shop.
Successful completion of this dual program and state requirements leads to both an
academic diploma and a certificate of vocational proficiency. Technical School Seniors

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         7-27
with at least a “B” average are eligible for apprenticeships in their trade in area
businesses. Students in a trade that requires a state license, such as plumbing, receive
hours toward the license requirement during their apprenticeship. Montague businesses
that have sponsored apprenticeships for FCTS students include New England Extrusion,
Heat-Fab, Kustom Auto Body and Sirum Equipment. According to Superintendent
Steve Johnson, most FCTS graduates find jobs in small, non-union businesses in the
area. Johnson has found that transportation to work is a significant problem for many
graduates of the Technical School, who have not yet earned enough money to afford a
car. Many seniors and graduates rely on limited public transportation to get to work.
The Franklin Regional Technical School was built in the 1970s and the facilities and
equipment are in need of renovation, expansion and replacement. According to
Superintendent Steve Johnson, the estimated cost of planned upgrades is approximately
$50 million, to be financed by state assistance and the 19 towns in the district.

The Hallmark Institute of Photography, located in the Turners Falls Airport Industrial
Park, offers a 10-month private post-secondary course of instruction in commercial
photography. Hallmark is currently in the process of expanding its state-of-the-art
educational facility and planning for construction of dedicated student housing to allow
for expansion of enrollment from the current 170 to 250 by 2005.

Residents of Montague have lower levels of education than residents of Franklin County
and Massachusetts. While 84 percent of Montague residents have a high school degree
or equivalent, only 19 percent have a four year degree, compared to 29.1 percent of
Franklin County residents and 33.2 percent of Massachusetts residents with at least a 4-
year college degree. In Turners Falls, only 13.2 percent of residents have a 4-year
degree. These statistics emphasize the importance of retaining and creating jobs that do
not require a college education, as well as working with Montague schools and parents to
encourage students to prepare for post-secondary education.

Figure 7-8: L evels of E ducation in Montague compared to state and region, 2000


   45.0%
   40.0%
   35.0%                                                                     Massachusetts
   30.0%
   25.0%                                                                     Franklin County
   20.0%                                                                     Montague
   15.0%
   10.0%                                                                     Turners Falls
    5.0%
    0.0%




Source: United States Census, 2000


Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                  7-28
Massachusetts uses the statewide Comprehensive Academic System to track performance
and progress of public elementary and secondary school students. Montague MCAS
scores are on the low end of average for area schools, but are showing improvement over
time.

Figure 7-9: Percentage of Students with " proficient " or Better Scores on M C AS E xams, 2003


   100%                                                                                      Gill-Montague
    80%                                                                                      Amherst
    60%                                                                                      Deerfield
    40%
                                                                                             Greenfield
    20%
     0%                                                                                      Erving
               Grade 3          Grade 6         Grade 8      Grade 10,     Grade 10          Leverett
               Reading           Math            Math         English        Math            Northampton
                                                             Language                        Sunderland
                                                               Arts                          Wendell
Source: Massachusetts Department of Education

Drop-out rates for Gill-Montague Regional High School are relatively high compared
with other schools in Franklin and Hampshire County.

Figure 7-10: D rop-out rates for A rea H igh Schools, 2000


   10.0%
    8.0%
    6.0%
    4.0%
    2.0%
    0.0%




Source: Massachusetts Department of Education

Academic performance in the Montague schools, as suggested by MCAS scores and
relatively high drop out rates, may be an obstacle to economic development in town.
Montague students may be inadequately prepared for the workplace and higher
education.

More Montague students plan to get a job following graduation than the state average.
This is particularly true of graduates of the Franklin County Technical School.
Therefore, it is important that these students have the skills necessary to succeed in the
workplace.



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                    7-29
Figure 7-11: Plans of H igh School G raduates, 2002


    60.00%

    40.00%                                            Massachusetts
                                                      GMRSD
    20.00%
                                                      FCRTS
    0.00%
               Attend 4- Attend 2-       Work
                 year      year
                college college

Source: Massachusetts Department of Education

Mathematical skills are increasingly important for jobs in many fields, particularly
science and technology, but also in business and manufacturing. Finally, schools are an
important component of a community’s quality of life, and one of the factors that 
businesses and families consider when deciding where to relocate.

7.3     N A T U R A L R ESO U R C ES
The Town of Montague is blessed with a remarkable wealth of natural resources,
including large blocks of forest; prime agricultural soils; abundant supplies of high-
quality ground and surface waters; three major rivers as well as a profusion of other
streams and wetlands; the Montague Plains with its unusual flora and fauna; public parks
and wildlife management areas; and scenic and historic landscapes. The 2003 Montague
Open Space and Recreation Plan contains a very detailed inventory of these resources
and plans for their conservation. This section therefore provides only a brief review of the
Town’s natural resources with an emphasis on their significance for economic 
development.


7.3.1 Agricultural Resources: Farms and Forests
Commercial agriculture is a relatively small but very important part of the economy in
Franklin County. More than 14 percent of the farmland in Massachusetts is in Franklin
County, totaling 75,134 acres on 543 farms. In 1997, market value of agricultural
products sold in the county was more than $40 million. Franklin County ranks 45 th
among all of the counties in the nation in direct sales of farm products to consumers, with
a total value of $1.7 million in direct sales in 1997 (Massachusetts Department of Food &
Agriculture, http://www.state.ma.us/dfa/facts/franklin.htm).

Privately-owned farm and forest land constitutes approximately one third of Montague’s 
land area, more than 6300 acres.1 Approximately 43 percent of this property is land in
farms. Montague has at least 20 working farms, which produce and market a variety of

1
 This figure includes agricultural and forested land owned by individuals. It does not include land owned
by Northeast Utilities.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                        7-30
agricultural products, including vegetables, livestock, milk and meat, fish, hay, maple
syrup, honey, tobacco, nursery plants and trees. At least three of these farms are large
operations with land and sales outlets located in other area towns.

Commercial agriculture provides jobs in Montague. More than a dozen Montague
residents list their primary occupation as “farmer;” and the Massachusetts Division of 
Employment & Training reports approximately 55 Montague residents working in
agricultural production and agricultural services.

Montague’s farms also support agricultural service businesses, including veterinarians,
equipment and feed dealers in town and in the region at large.  The health of Montague’s 
farm businesses is therefore important to the viability of the agricultural sector in
Franklin County as a whole.

Finally, Montague’s farms are an important draw for visitors. Blue Meadow Farm, a 
specialty nursery, attracts customers from as far away as Boston, Connecticut, New York,
and even Maryland. Owner Brian McGowan reports that his out-of-town customers
greatly appreciate the scenic beauty of Montague’s agricultural landscapes and often ask 
for suggestions of other places to visit and businesses to patronize in the area.

While there are few statistics available on forest-related economic activity, it is clear that
Montague’s forests are also a source of income and jobs for residents. Wood is still used
to heat homes in Franklin County, and at least three of Montague’s farms offer cordwood 
for sale. There is a specialty sawmill offering custom-cut local timber in town. The
W.D. Cowls Company of North Amherst, a family-owned lumber company in continuous
operation for more than 250 years, owns more than 120 acres of working forest in
Montague.

Approximately 1330 acres of land in Montague are enrolled in Chapter 61. This
provision of state law, also known as the Forestland Act, allows for reduced property tax
assessments in exchange for a commitment to maintain land in active forestry use. Any
timber or cordwood cut from Chapter 61 lands is subject to a local forest products tax.
Between 1993 and 2003, Montague Assessors’ records show timber harvests from 
Chapter 61 lands with a total value of approximately $73,000. This figure significantly
understates revenue from timber sales in Montague because it does not include sales from
more than 2,200 acres of privately-owned forest not enrolled in Chapter 61, or from
property owned by the Turners Falls Fire District, which maintains an active forestry
program on its 1310 acres of watershed lands.

In addition to its privately-owned woodlots, the Town of Montague also encompasses an
extensive network of public forest, totaling nearly 3,750 acres. The majority of this land
is located east of Route 63 and on the Montague Plains, and connects with state-owned
land in other towns to form a forested corridor that extends from the Quabbin Reservoir
to the Connecticut River. This wild and scenic landscape is excellent habitat for wildlife,
and offers outstanding potential for outdoor recreation, including hiking, cross-country
skiing, snowshoeing, mountain biking, wildlife-watching, hunting and fishing.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                            7-31
Outdoor recreation is an important industry in Massachusetts. According to the Outdoor
Industry Foundation, 61.2 percent of Massachusetts residents, more than 3,000,000
people, participate in at least one outdoor activity, not including hunting.

T able 7-5: Participation in outdoor activities by M assachusetts Residents, 2002

                                  Number of Residents % of residents
All outdoor activities                        3064900           61.2%
Hiking                                        1477362           29.5%
Bicycling, paved roads                        1432290           28.6%
Bicycling, trail                              1021633           20.4%
Bicycling, dirt roads                          987577           19.7%
Cross country skiing                           891425           17.8%
Trail running                                  886417           17.7%
Canoeing                                       716145           14.3%
Kayak touring                                  440705            8.8%
Bird watching                                  375601            7.5%
Snowshoeing                                    240384            4.8%
Fly fishing                                    205328            4.1%
Kayaking, recreational                         205328            4.1%
Whitewater kayaking                            135216            2.7%
Rock climbing                                  100160            2.0%
Telemark skiing                                 90144            1.8%

The Foundation estimates that Massachusetts residents spend $222 million annually on
equipment for outdoor athletic equipment. (Outdoor Recreation Participation and
Spending Study, A State By State Perspective, Outdoor Industry Foundation, 2002,
www.outdoorindustry.org.)

The 2001 National Survey of Hunting, Fishing and Wildlife-Association Recreation for
Massachusetts conducted by the U.S. Census for the U.S. Departments of Interior and
Commerce reported that 2 million people over age 16 participate in wildlife-related
recreation in Massachusetts. This figure includes 521,000 MA residents over age 16 who
hunted or fished in 2001, as well as 542,000 residents and non-residents over age 16 who
traveled more than a mile from home to watch wildlife. The study calculated total
expenditures on wildlife-related recreation in Massachusetts at $1.1 billion in 2001,
including $390 million in trip-related expenses and $607 million in expenditures on
equipment.

While there are no statistics on use of Montague’s public lands, anecdotal evidence from 
residents suggests that they are highly underutilized. There are few trails, fewer signs, no
on-site maps and limited parking. Development of such amenities and greater publicity
could enhance visitation to these areas.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-32
7.3.2 Water Resources
Montague is rich in water resources, including rivers, streams, ponds, wetlands and
aquifers. From the beginning of the Colonial Era in the 17 th century to the present, these
waters have been critical to the Town’s economic development.


7.3.2.1 Hydropower
Montague is bordered to the north and west by the Connecticut River. Until the 19 th
century, there was a massive waterfall on the Connecticut between Montague and the
Town of Gill. When a large dam was built on the site to capture the tremendous energy
of the river, the village of Turners Falls acquired the nickname “Powertown,” the home 
of “white coal.” The village was developed as a planned industrial community, laid out 
around the canal that provided hydropower to a series of mills.

While hydropower is no longer used directly in manufacturing, hydroelectricity is still a
critical part of the Town’s economy.  Northeast Generation Services, a subsidiary of 
Northeast Utilities, owns and operates two hydroelectric facilities on the Connecticut
River in Montague, and is by far the Town’s largest taxpayer.  Station One and Cabot 
Station, located along the power canal in Turners Falls and Montague City, provide
stable, well-paying jobs for local residents and generate approximately 1.2 million dollars
annually in property tax revenue. NGC employs additional Montague residents at its
pumped storage electric generation facility in the neighboring town of Erving.


7.3.2.2 Agriculture
Surface water is very important for the Town’s agricultural businesses, several of which
use water from the Connecticut River or Sawmill River for irrigation. Montague also has
two aquacultural businesses that have federal Clean Water Act permits to discharge
treated wastewater to these rivers.


7.3.2.3 Recreation
Finally, surface waters have important recreational value. Bartons Cove, across the river
from Turners Falls in Gill, has both public and private boating facilities. The stretch of
the Connecticut River between Montague City and the Sunderland Bridge has restricted
speeds for motorboats, and offers beautiful scenery for flatwater canoeist and kayakers.
In early spring, the Millers River from the Town of Erving to its confluence with the
Connecticut offers a challenging whitewater run for experienced boaters. Further up the
Millers River, the Town of Athol has capitalized on water-based recreational activities
with the River Rat Race, an annual whitewater event held in early spring that draws
hundreds of contestants and thousands of spectators from around Massachusetts and
beyond.

The Great Falls Discovery Center opened in 2003 after 20 years of planning. This
museum, located in an historic industrial building in Turners Falls, interprets the natural
and cultural history of the Connecticut River. It is expected to draw more than 50,000

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           7-33
visitors annually (David Ziomek, personal communication). A three-mile off-road bike
path that follows the Connecticut River from downtown Turners Falls to Montague City,
and crosses the river into Deerfield will begin construction in summer 2004. The bike
path is also expected to bring an influx of visitors to Montague.

Promotion of the outstanding recreational opportunities offered by Montague’s natural 
resources, including forests, rivers and wetlands, could create significant opportunities
for new and expanded businesses in town, such as food, lodging and retail establishments
catering to outdoor enthusiasts. Even without aggressive promotion, Montague scenic
resources are unlikely to remain a secret forever. If Montague fails to plan for increased
tourism, the economic benefits of this activity may go to other neighboring communities
with better services for visitors.


7.3.2.4 Domestic Use
Montague’s public water supply currently comes from groundwater wells operated by the
Turners Falls Water District and Montague Center Water District. Virtually all of the
town’s industrial facilities are served by the Turners Falls Water District.  According to 
the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Geographic Information Service,
Montague contains a portion of a large, high-yield aquifer, defined as an underground
water source with the potential to provide twenty five to 1,000 gallons per minute.

Historically, surface water from Lake Pleasant was used as the primary public water
supply for Montague. The Lake has a storage capacity of approximately 150 million
gallons, and is connected to Green Pond, which holds an additional 40 million gallons.
Both bodies of water and their watersheds are owned by the Turners Falls Fire District
and protected by the Turners Falls Water Department, whose commissioners believe that
the Lake will eventually be used for domestic water supply in the future.

These public water facilities will be addressed in greater depth below. The good news is
that the Town of Montague has ample public water supplies that could be developed for
commercial and industrial use if necessary.


7.3.3 Mineral Resources
Large areas of Montague are underlain by sand and gravel deposits with commercial
value. There are currently two active gravel mining operations in Town.


7.4     I N F R AST R U C T U R E
Traditional infrastructure includes roads, bridges, rail and other transit, water, sewer and
gas. In addition, telecommunications services are becoming increasingly important for
the development of new businesses. This section provides an overview of Montague’s 
physical infrastructure for economic development, and identifies deficiencies that need to
be addressed.


Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-34
7.4.1 Transportation
Montague’s transportation system consists of three state highways, bridges, a network of
town roads, two rail lines, a limited regional bus system and a small airport. Both on-
and off-road bike paths are planned for construction in the next few years.


7.4.1.1 State Roads
State Route 2 runs along the northern boundary of the Town, connecting Montague with
Greenfield and Route 91 to the west and Erving to the east. Lack of good roads for truck
traffic has been consistently mentioned as a barrier to industrial development in
Montague. Improvements to Route 2, including the addition of new lanes, could remove
this barrier and promote the development of the Town’s remaining industrial land. 

State Routes 63 and 47 are the major commuter roads connecting Montague to larger
cultural and employment centers to the south. Easy access to Amherst (20 minutes) and
Northampton (30 minutes) has made Montague Center an attractive bedroom community
for professionals and students.


7.4.1.2 Bridges
Bridge maintenance is a major problem in Massachusetts, and Montague is no exception.
There are currently several bridges in town that are closed and several others in dire need
of repair. The Massachusetts Highway Department is responsible for repair, replacement
and maintenance of most of these structures. The following discussion focuses on bridges
that carry commercial traffic; there are additional maintenance problems with bridges in
residential neighborhoods.

The Gill-Montague Bridge over the Connecticut River and Power Canal, constructed in
1937, is in need of major reconstruction. The Massachusetts Highway Department rates
bridge structural integrity from 100 (perfect) to 0 (closed). Any rating under 50 means
that the bridge is eligible for replacement. The Gill-Montague Bridge has a rating of 37.
Design work is under way, with the work projected to start in 2006 at an estimated total
cost of $30 million. This 700-foot long bridge is critical for industry, commerce and
public safety in Montague and residents and officials are anxious to see it repaired.

The General Pierce Bridge over the confluence of the Connecticut and Deerfield Rivers
on Montague’s border with Greenfield is classified as “structurally deficient” by the 
MassHighway, which is a severe designation meaning that the bridge's structural integrity
is declining. MassHighway’s Boston office gives the General Pierce Bridge a rating of 
39.6, while the District office in Northampton rates the bridge at 45. In either case, it is
clear that the structure is in need of major repair. Current plans for repair include deck
replacement and repainting. Unfortunately, however, this work is not currently under
design, and according to the Franklin Regional Council of Governments Planning
Department, it doesn't seem to be close to the design phase.



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-35
Major structural problems with two of the three bridges in Turners Falls that cross the
Connecticut River, the high cost of repairing the structures, and the fact that they cannot
be under construction at the same time are cause for serious concern. Both bridges are
critical routes for business traffic in and out of town and between Montague and
Greenfield on a daily basis. Closing of either or both of these structures, even
temporarily, would have devastating impacts on public safety and the town’s economy. It 
is critical that the Town work closely with the Massachusetts Highway Department and
state and federal legislators to ensure that the Gill-Montague and General Pierce Bridges
are repaired as soon as possible.

The Greenfield Road Bridge over the B&M Railroad tracks failed and was dismantled in
1999, closing the road to through traffic. Traffic is currently detoured around the bridge
onto Turners Falls Road and Hatchery Road. The detour has created serious problems for
businesses in the Montague Mill and farms on Meadow Road, as customers and drivers
of delivery trucks have a more difficult time reaching their destination. The detour is also
extremely inconvenient for farmers who need to move equipment between fields on
either side of the bridge. Design on a new bridge is under way; the project is currently
scheduled to go out to bid in 2006.

The Bridge Street bridge connects the Montague and Erving sides of the village of
Millers Falls across the Connecticut River. This bridge is in desperate need of painting.
In its current condition, it is an eyesore that detracts from efforts to revitalize the village.
Failure to paint the bridge is also likely to lead to more serious structural problems.

The town-owned Sixth Street bridge in Turners Falls, which is the primary access for the
Railroad Salvage property, is closed. There is limited one-way access over a temporary
bridge. There are currently no plans or designs for replacement. The temporary bridge is
likely to be a constraint to any large-scale redevelopment of the Railroad Salvage site.


7.4.1.3 Town Roads
Major town roads used by commercial traffic include Avenue A/Montague City Road,
connecting Turners Falls and Montague City; Millers Falls Road, connecting Turners
Falls and Millers Falls; Turners Falls Road connecting Montague Center and Turners
Falls; and Greenfield Road, connecting Montague Center to Montague City. All of these
roads have limitations for commercial/industrial traffic.

Montague City Road continues over the General Pierce Bridge into Greenfield, where a
railroad bridge with low clearance is a barrier to truck traffic headed for Routes 5 & 10 or
Route 91. Truck traffic on Millers Falls Road is constrained by a dense settlement and a
difficult intersection in the village of Millers Falls. Trucks traveling north on Turners
Falls Road encounter difficulty with turning onto either Turnpike Road or Avenue A. In
addition to the closed bridge on Greenfield Road, the road is in need of resurfacing and
major improvements to drainage.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                               7-36
Like many towns in the Commonwealth, Montague is struggling to maintain its
infrastructure. Massachusetts Chapter 90 funding for road maintenance is a critically
important source of revenue for this purpose.  Montague’s Chapter 90 allocations 
increased steadily during the early 1990s, fell to zero in 1994, reached a peak in 1995 and
have been falling ever since, with a steep drop in fiscal year 2002. The unpredictability
of Chapter 90 allocations is a major problem in planning for road maintenance.
Figure 7-12: State C hapter 90 Funding, 1989-2004 (constant 2003 dollars)




Source: Montague Town Accountant

In addition to the decrease in revenue from Chapter 90, the budget for the Town’s 
Department of Public Works has decreased approximately 35 percent from 1989 levels.

Figure 7-13: A nnual B udget for Montague DPW , Fiscal Y ear 1989-2004 (Constant 2003 Dollars)




Lack of adequate staff and funding for public works is beginning to take a toll in the form
of increased cracks and potholes, unswept streets, unpainted crosswalks, overgrowth of
brush along rights-of-way, longer times to clear streets of snow and ice, and inability to

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                7-37
provide amenities in downtown areas, including festive lights for December holidays and
a summer fountain in downtown Turners Falls.

Failure to maintain roads and streets hurts existing businesses and can be a major obstacle
to commercial and industrial growth and expansion. At the most basic and obvious level,
if streets are not plowed, employees, customers and deliveries cannot reach their
destination in a safe and timely manner. And street sweeping, lights and mowing are
more than aesthetic issues. They establish a climate for business.  If the town’s arteries 
and downtown streets are poorly maintained, it is hard for existing businesses to attract
customers, and even more difficult for the town to recruit new businesses.


7.4.1.4 Railroads
Both the New England Central and Boston & Maine railroad tracks run through the
Town. Neither rail line serves the existing Industrial Park, or the remaining large areas of
industrially-zoned land. Both railroads pass by sections of land zoned Rural Business.
This could be an asset for some types of businesses allowed in the district; one example
could be a feed processor.

In 1999, a private developer proposed the development of a railroad spur to serve
undeveloped industrial land on the Montague Plains, but did not pursue the proposal. A
railroad spur, if constructed, could greatly increase the value and attractiveness of this
land for industrial development. More research would be needed to determine whether
the businesses that would be likely to locate on a railroad spur are the types of industry
that the Town would like to attract.

The Amtrak passenger train connecting Vermont to points south passes through the
village of Millers Falls. A group of residents is advocating for a passenger rail stop in
Millers Falls. If passenger rail service were developed along an east-west rather than a
north-south route, it could bring new residents and businesses to Montague by making
travel to the Boston area more viable.


7.4.1.5 Public Transit
 The Greenfield-Montague Transportation Area provides limited bus service in Turners
Falls and between the villages of Montague and the towns of Greenfield and Amherst.
Bus service is available to downtown areas and the industrial parks in Greenfield and
Turners Falls and to the University of Massachusetts. GMTA also provides demand-
response transportation service for the elderly and residents with disabilities in Greenfield
and Montague. Between 1996 and 2003, GMTA served an average of approximately
82,440 riders per year (statistics provided by Jim Haine, Operations Supervisor, GMTA).
The agency does not keep statistics on ridership by route, so there are no records of the
number of Montague residents that rely on GMTA for transportation to work or
shopping.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           7-38
7.4.1.6 Air Transportation
The Turners Falls Municipal Airport is one of only two airports in Franklin County. It
currently offers a 3,013-foot long, 75-foot wide runway that can accommodate small
single-engine and two-engine planes. It is a General Aviation airport, used for
transportation, business, recreation, tourism, flight instruction and civil defense. There is
currently space for 81 aircraft: 58 outdoor parking spaces on tie-downs and aprons, and
19 privately-owned hangars with capacity for 23 aircraft.

The Airport’s sole runway was last reconstructed in 1978 and had an expected life of 20
years. The pavement is deteriorated and in need of replacement. Recent improvements to
the facility include construction of a security fence along Millers Falls Road and an
Airport administration building.

A Master Plan for the Airport was developed in 1990 and updated in 1999. In 1989,
there were 65 aircraft based in Turners Falls, including 62 single engine and three twin
engine planes. The 1990 Master Plan projected an increase in aircraft of approximately
29% by 2000. However, by 1989, there were only 48 aircraft based at the airport, a
decline of more than 30% over the previous decade. According to the Master Plan
Update, the decline was due to a combination of factors, including economic slowdown
and loss of aircraft to other small airports in the region with better facilities.

The Airport Master Plan Update projects 3% annual growth rate between 1998 and 2019,
yielding a 12% increase in the number of aircraft based at the airport in 2004, and a 27%
increase by 2009, when the study predicts a total of 61 resident aircraft. These projections
are based on the premise of recapturing aircraft previously located at the airport
following significant improvement in facilities.

Work recommended by the Master Plan Update and the 2002 Runway and Terminal Area
Study and Airport Layout Plan for the 2003-2009 period include the following:
           Archaeological study and tree obstruction survey
           Terminal area fence and gates
           Tree removal
           Reconstruction, marking, lighting, signage and extension of runway to 4200
           feet.
           Install obstruction beacon on Country Hill
           Expand main apron
           Construct box hangar taxilane, vehicular parking and pave Hadley Grant
           Road
           Reconstruct parallel taxiway
           Construct equipment garage
           Install beacons and instruments
           Install additional perimeter fencing.

Extension of the runway is justified, according to the Master Plan Update, based on the
needs of existing aircraft, the desire to attract new aircraft, and to improve safety. The
analysis used for the study states that a runway of 3,700 linear feet is needed to
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                            7-39
accommodate 100 percent of small airplanes with less than 10 passenger seats, while the
minimum runway length to serve small aircraft with more than 10 seats is 4,150 linear
feet. The existing runway is adequate to serve between 75 percent and 95 percent of
small airplanes with less than 10 passenger seats.

The total cost of improvements recommended between 2003-2009 is estimated at
approximately $8.4 million. Federal and state grant funding is available to cover 97% of
this cost, leaving the Town’s share at approximately $270,000. 

The Airport Master Plan Update includes a discussion of the current and projected
economic impact of the airport. The analysis includes direct economic benefits from
activities at the airport, indirect benefits from off-site activities attributable to the airport,
and a multiplier effect known as induced impact.

Estimates of current and projected economic impacts of the airport on the local economy
are shown in Table 7-6.

T able 7-6: Economic Impacts of T urners Falls M unicipal A irport

                          1998 Annual    Projected Long-term Annual
Direct Impacts             $270,000               $317,250
Indirect Impacts           $317,600               $373,200
Induced Impacts            $293,800               $345,200
Total Impacts              $881,400              $1,035,650
Source: Gale Associates, 1999

The study predicts that the construction of a runway extension will generate a 17.5
percent increase in annual economic activity related to the airport, largely due to the fact
that higher performance aircraft will be able to use the facility. It is important to note that
many of the figures used by Gale Associates in this analysis were estimates based on
national averages.

Direct economic impacts as calculated by Gale Associates are in the form of salaries paid
to workers directly employed in aviation at the airport, while indirect benefits are
expenditures by pilots and passengers. These figures do not include revenue paid directly
to the Town of Montague.

At the present time, municipal expenses required to operate and maintain the airport
exceed direct revenues generated by the facility. In Fiscal Year 2003, airport expenses
were approximately 41,000, while revenues were approximately 17,000, yielding an
annual deficit of $24,000.

The cost of operating and improving the airport has been raised as a concern by Town
Meeting members and other Montague residents. Site-specific information on the current
economic benefits of the facility, as well as better information about the direct costs and
anticipated revenues expected from the proposed expansion would help Town officials
make an informed decision on the future of this facility.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                 7-40
7.4.1.7 Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation
Montague is a very popular area for bicycling. In addition to recreational cyclists, there
are a small number of residents and employees in the town who commute by bicycle on a
seasonal basis. Relatively flat topography makes commuting by bike between Montague
and Greenfield and Montague and Amherst a possibility. Better signage, improved road
maintenance and installation of bicycle racks could increase the use of this mode of
transportation. Construction of the three-mile off-road section of bicycle path between
Turners Falls and the Town of Deerfield may dramatically increase the attractiveness of
bicycle commuting for people who live and work on or near the path in Turners Falls,
Montague City, Deerfield and Greenfield.

As discussed previously, a significant number of households in downtown Turners Falls
do not have access to an automobile. It is reasonable to assume that members of these
households either rely on the GMTA bus service, or travel to work and go shopping on
foot. It is therefore very important to retain both employers and providers of essential
goods and services in the downtown area, including a supermarket, pharmacy, hardware
and discount stores, banks, etc.


7.4.2 Public Water Supply
The Town of Montague has three developed sources of municipal drinking water. There
are two public wellfields located in the village of Montague Center. A single shallow
well serves the village of Montague Center and is owned and operated by the Montague
Center Water District, which is composed of 189 member households in the village
center. In 2000, the District provided an average annual daily amount of 42,425 gallons
to approximately 450 people. This well is only twelve feet deep and is thus highly
vulnerable to contamination.

The Turners Falls Water Department owns and operates two wells in the Tolan Farm well
field, with a maximum capacity of approximately 1.8 million gallons per day. Water
from the wells is piped to storage tanks with approximately 6.3 million gallons of
capacity on top of Wills Hill. In 2000, the Turners Falls Water Department supplied
7,057 people with drinking water, which included residents of the Lake Pleasant Water
District.

The Turners Falls and Montague Center wells are hydrologically connected. During
drought or times of high demand, pumping the Tolan Farm wells drains the Montague
Center well. There is a valve connecting the two systems that allows the Turners Falls
Water Department to supply Montague Center when necessary.

The third source of water is the Lake Pleasant Reservoir, which was the Town’s main 
source of water until 1965. Lake Pleasant is owned by the Turners Falls Fire District. It
covers 53 acres and has a storage capacity of approximately 150 million gallons. It is


Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         7-41
connected to Green Pond, a 15-acre reservoir that holds approximately 40 million
gallons.

In 1994, the Department of Environmental Protection downgraded the Lake Pleasant and
Green Pond reservoirs to an emergency water supply. Under current law, these sources
cannot be brought back online for regular use unless the Water Department builds a
filtration plant. The cost associated with this project is a significant issue for residents of
the district; voters have so far been unwilling to approve funds for filtration.

The Turners Falls Water Department is concerned about its ability to provide water for
new industrial users or large-scale residential developments without a new source.
According to the Water Commissioners, summer water use in the 1990s was approaching
the capacity of the Tolan Farm wells at 1.5 million gallons per day. In addition, says
Water Department Superintendent Mike Brown, the department is worried about “having 
all of its eggs in one basket.”  With all of the Town’s three municipal domestic water
wells in the same aquifer, an incident that contaminated the aquifer would leave the
Town without any useable drinking water.

To address this problem, the Turners Falls Water Department is currently in the
permitting process for a new groundwater well, to be located near Lake Pleasant.
According to Mike Brown, development of this well is likely to cost at least $500,000,
and could be completed by 2006 pending approval of funding by voters in the water
district.

Municipal water lines serve the downtown commercial areas in Turners Falls and Millers
Falls, the Airport Industrial Park, and the existing manufacturing facility and landfill
expansion area on Turnpike Road. A water line is available to serve undeveloped land
zoned for industrial use on the Montague Plains.


7.4.3 Sewer Service

Montague has a municipal wastewater treatment facility on Greenfield Road with a
capacity of 1.83 million gallons per day of flow; 7,200 pounds Biological Oxygen
Demand (BOD) per day and 5,725 pounds Total Suspended Solids (TSS) per day.
Treated effluent is discharged to the Connecticut River; sludge is shipped out of town for
disposal.

All of the densely developed areas of town are served by the sewer system, including the
five village centers and the Airport Industrial Park off Millers Falls Road. Sewer service
is also available at the landfill site on Turnpike Road.

Lack of sewer service presents a possible constraint to industrial development on
privately-owned land zoned for industrial use along Millers Falls Road on the Montague
Plains. According to the Montague Department of Public Works, the current sewer line
on Millers Falls Road is almost at capacity and cannot be extended. Extending sewer

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                              7-42
service to new industrial development on the Plains would likely require the construction
of a new line across the Plains to connect with the line serving Montague Center.

In 1999, sewer users generated approximately 1.03 million gallons per day average flow
(56% of capacity), 4,036 lbs. per day average BOD (56%) and 4,203 lbs. per day average
TSS (72%). Under the NPDES permit, the WWTP is required to do a facilities study
when 80% of flow capacity or BOD is reached.

In 2002, the Town began a study of its sewage treatment system. The study was designed
primarily to assess a Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) on Greenfield Road
approximately 600 feet upstream of the Water Pollution Control Facility. CSOs are
structures that discharge a mixture of sanitary sewage and stormwater to surface waters
during wet weather. They are a significant source of water pollution and are strictly
regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Massachusetts
Department of Environmental Protection. Montague is under pressure from DEP to
develop plans to control its CSOs.

The CSO study identified two additional CSOs that discharge to the Connecticut River in
downtown Turners Falls. Through field investigation and computer modeling, the authors
of the study concluded that there is currently a low level of control for treating combined
sanitary and stormwater flows during storm events (Camp, Dresser and McKee, 2002).

As a followup to the CSO study, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental
Protection will require the Town to develop a plan to control, and eventually eliminate its
CSOs. Implementation of the plan is likely to be expensive, which may reduce funds
available for investment in other infrastructure projects.


7.4.4 Gas
Berkshire Gas provides natural gas in the Town of Montague. Service is available in
downtown Turners Falls, at the industrial area on Turnpike Road, and at the Airport
Industrial Park. There is no service east of the Industrial Park on Millers Falls Road,
including the villages of Millers Falls, Lake Pleasant and Montague Center.

7.4.5 Telecommunications
Telecommunications is the transmission by wire or wireless means of voice, data, graphic
or video images, including the physical equipment and software required for
transmission. Telecommunications infrastructure includes but is not limited to metallic
and optical fiber cables, cellular and PCS networks and satellite communications.


7.4.5.1 Broadband
Development of telecommunications infrastructure is generally driven by population
density, which puts rural areas like Franklin County at a disadvantage. A 2000 study
conducted by the Donahue Institute at the University of Massachusetts reported that most
areas of Franklin County lack access to affordable high speed internet service, also

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                             7-43
known as “broadband” internet. (Donahue Institute, 2000). Broadband is necessary for
website hosting and efficient transfer of large files and digital and video images.
Information on telecommunications infrastructure is very difficult to obtain, as the
companies that provide telecommunications services consider their service areas to be
proprietary information, and because the status of service changes frequently. At the
current time, high speed internet is available to some areas of Montague via DSL, or
digital subscriber lines, offered by Verizon Communications. Generally, DSL is
available to residents and businesses located along Verizon’s existing lines within 18,000 
linear feet of Verizon’s central offices located in Turners Falls and Montague Center.  
This leaves many areas of Montague, including some of Montague City, virtually the
entire villages of Millers Falls and Lake Pleasant, as well as substantial areas of
Montague Center east of Route 63, most of Meadow Road and most of Greenfield Road
without access to DSL. According to Michael Pequignot, former Regional Director of
Public Affairs for Verizon, the company has plans to expand availability of DSL pending
resolution of regulatory issues (M. Pequignot, personal conversation with Robin
Sherman, September 25, 2003).

Areas with access to cable television can also obtain broadband internet services through
cable. Unfortunately, neither DSL nor cable is currently available to businesses located
in the Airport Industrial Park.

Lack of affordable broadband internet service may be an inconvenience to many
residents, but it is a serious disadvantage for businesses. The 2000 study for the Donahue
Institute found that Franklin County has a very low intensity of businesses that are based
on information technology compared to the region and the state, and most IT jobs in the
county were based in Greenfield and Deerfield. Given the fact that the Industrial Park
lacks broadband service, the fact that the study found only 8 IT-related jobs in Montague
in 1999 is not surprising, but it is troubling for the future development of this important
sector of the economy in Town.

Business located in the Airport Industrial Park have had to either make to with dial-up
service on regular phone lines, or investigate other options for broadband, including
satellite communication and T-1 lines.

According to Mark Beaubien, owner of Yankee Environmental Systems, a high-tech
Research & Development firm on Industrial Boulevard, the search for affordable
broadband has been both time consuming and expensive. The company started with a
dedicated dialup line to a local Internet Service Provided located in Greenfield, but found
that the connection was too slow due to antiquated equipment at the telephone company’s 
central office in Turners Falls. They then added a satellite link for one computer, which
was expensive, relatively slow, and unreliable—it could be disrupted by weather. More
recently, Beaubien has signed up for bundled voice and data services on a T-1 line, which
he describes as an enormous improvement over the previous arrangements. He
recommends that other businesses in the Industrial Park investigate this option. While
the availability of more affordable high-speed communications is good, information on



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         7-44
these services is still not readily available to local businesses (R. Sherman, personal
communication with Mark Beaubien, September 15, 2003).

While there are a few high-tech companies in Montague’s Industrial Park, and others 
have developed offices in downtown areas of Greenfield, Amherst and Northampton and
along the I-91 corridor in Greenfield, Deerfield and Whately to take advantage of cable
modem and DSL service available at these locations, there is a parallel trend of growth in
home-based IT business in residential areas with access to high-speed internet. Amherst-
based consultant and writer Amy Zuckerman calls this trend “Hidden Tech,” which she 
describes as “virtual companies operated by one or two individuals, who develop and sell
products or services from a home or small office and leverage the Internet/Web, along
with a wide array of advanced technologies, to drive their businesses” (Zuckerman, 
2003).

Based on sample of 75 home-based businesses in Franklin and Hampshire Counties,
Zuckerman describes the following main categories of businesses that depend on
technology to advance their business needs:
                         Software/hardware developers
                         E-commerce retailers
                         Web designers and hosting services
                         Management and organizational development consultants
                         Content providers
                         IT/trainers and strategists
                         Marketing specialists

According to Zuckerman, many owners of these Hidden Tech companies have moved to
Western Massachusetts from large cities to take advantage of the high quality of life
offered by the region, bringing with them both capital and expertise. Zuckerman found
that approximately 70 percent of these businesses have access to high speed internet.
Forty percent of her sample cited improved or additional high-speed Internet access or
broadband as important to their future growth and success.

Montague has its own home-based business sector, which is discussed in greater detail
later in Appendix B. It is worth noting, however, that growth of this type of business
may be limited in Montague in the large areas of town without access to advanced
telecommunications services.

There are several efforts underway to bring better voice and data telecommunications to
the region. Pioneer Valley Connect is a demand aggregation model initiative with the
goal of creating an advanced telecommunications landscape that will have affordable,
reliable and redundant broadband services available throughout Franklin, Hampshire and
Hampden Counties. In general terms, the model works by having businesses and
organizations align their purchasing decisions to receive superior pricing and services
while encouraging infrastructure deployment in the region by their selected service
provider. This effort is coordinated by the Franklin Regional Council of Governments
along with other partners in the three counties. Pioneer Valley Connect is an evolution of

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                             7-45
the Franklin-Hampshire Connect effort that successfully implemented a Request for
Proposal process and contract negotiation with the partnership of Global Crossing and
Equal Access Networks in 2001. However, due to the crisis of the telecommunications
industry in early 2002, the contracts were not signed.

Franklin-Hampshire Connect and business community leaders in Hampden County
agreed to be part of a renewed and expanded aggregation effort, Pioneer Valley Connect,
in December 2003. Recent changes in the telecommunications industry, and the
emergence of multiple telecommunications service providers in the region, among other
factors, presented an atmosphere ready for such an initiative. Presently, Pioneer Valley
Connect is in the Request for Proposal process and anticipates a provider or partnership
of providers to be selected for contract negotiations to begin by Fall 2004. More
information about Pioneer Valley Connect is available at www.pioneervalleyconnect.org.

In 2003, State Senator Stanley Rosenberg proposed $10 million in new state spending on
grants and loans, planning studies and infrastructure to increase broadband Internet
access to underserved communities. The program would be overseen by the 12-member
Massachusetts Broadband Access Oversight Council within the Massachusetts
Technology Collaborative. The Council would include one designee from the following
organizations: Franklin-Hampshire (now Pioneer Valley) Connect, Berkshire Connect,
the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies, the Massachusetts
Municipal Association, the Secretary of Economic Affairs, the Chief of Commonwealth
Development, the Chair of the Department of Telecommunications and Energy, and one
representative from the telecommunications industry appointed by the Governor (The
Rosenberg Report, September 15, 2003).

A group of residents in neighboring rural towns have formed the Shutesbury-Leverett
Broadband Committee to bring high-speed Internet to Shutesbury and Leverett. The
SLBC is taking the lead in:

             Researching and following the latest internet and associated technologies
             (including TV/video and telephone/voice when there are implications for
             internet services), including other towns' solutions

             Analyzing costs and financing options for various approaches;
             Interacting with providers, experts, and the media

             Creating two-way communication with residents

             Consulting with, advising, and working closely with Shutesbury and
             Leverett Select Boards

             Gathering information from prospective providers

             Making recommendations to the Select Boards regarding prospective
             providers



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                       7-46
              Placing special emphasis on internet and technology access for the
              schools, libraries, town halls, police and fire departments, home-bound
              residents, disabled residents, and seniors. ( http:&&slbc.,esternmass.us3
The Town of Montague may want to consider joining residents of Leverett and
Shutesbury in this effort.


7.4.5.2 Cellular Communications
Cellular mobile communications systems use a large number of low-power wireless
transmitters to create “cells”—the basic geographic service area of a wireless
communications system. Variable power levels allow cells to be sized according to the
subscriber density and demand within a particular region. As mobile users travel from
cell to cell, their conversations are handed off between cells to maintain seamless service
(International Engineering Consortium website, http://www.iec.org).

Cellular communication systems consist of four major components that work together to
provide mobile service to subscribers: the public switched telephone network (PSTN), the
mobile telephone switching office (MTSO), cell sites with antenna systems and mobile
subscriber units (MSU). The PSTN is made up of local networks, the exchange area
networks, and the long-haul network that interconnect telephones and other
communication devices on a worldwide basis. The MTSO is the central office for mobile
switching. It houses the mobile switching center, field monitoring, and relay stations for
switching calls from cell sites to the PSTN. The term cell site is used to refer to the
physical location of radio equipment that provides coverage within a cell. A list of
hardware located at a cell site includes power sources, interface equipment, radio
frequency transmitters and receivers, and antenna systems. The mobile subscriber unit is
a handset consisting of a control unit and a transceiver that transmits and receives radio
transmissions to and from a cell site (International Engineering Consortium website,
http://www.iec.org).

While cellular telephones are universally available, development of mobile
communication networks has not kept pace with marketing of handsets. As is true of
other infrastructure, development of cellular networks is most lucrative in areas with high
demand—population centers and high-traffic roads. Cellular telephone service is
mediocre to nonexistent in many rural communities in Western Massachusetts, and
Montague is no exception. Two cellular sites were constructed in Town in 2003, one in
Turners Falls and one along Route 63 near the village of Montague Center. Some service
is available from cell sites in Deerfield, Greenfield and Erving, but there are still large
areas of town where reception is simply unavailable.

7.5     L A N D F O R D E V E L O PM E N T
There are hundreds of acres of undeveloped land in Montague that are zoned and planned
for eventual commercial and industrial use.  Following completion of the Town’s 
Comprehensive Plan in 1999, the Planning Board began a process of reviewing the
town’s business zoning, with the goals of (1) providing adequate space for the growth 
and expansion of business in Town, and (2) creating safeguards to ensure that

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                             7-47
environmental and community interests are protected. As a result of this process, the
Planning Board proposed, and Town Meeting has approved major changes to Montague’s 
commercial and industrial zoning districts in the past several years. As of 2003, the
Town of Montague has two industrial zoning districts and three commercial districts.
The following discussion reviews the uses allowed in these districts and provides an
inventory of land currently available in each category and an assessment of its potential
for development.


7.5.1 Land Zoned for Industrial Use
.

7.5.1.1 Industrial District
The Industrial (ID) district allows offices, manufacturing, processing, research, bulk
storage, warehousing and distribution. Facilities in these categories that are less than
5,000 square feet are permitted by right. Industrial buildings between 5,000 and 10,000
square feet require site plan review, and greater than 10,000 feet require a special permit.
Retail sales and services, self-storage facilities, motels and hotels, earth removal, open
recreational enterprises and public utilities are also allowed by special permit.
Montague’s zoning is unusual in that it does not specify minimum lot size, frontage or lot 
coverage for commercial or industrial uses. These dimensional issues are usually
dictated by site constraints and are addressed through the site plan review process.

There are currently approximately 740 acres of undeveloped or underutilized acres of
land zoned Industrial in Montague (see Table 7-7). Approximately one-third of this land
is owned by the Town or the Turners Falls Water District; the remainder is privately
owned. Publicly-owned land in the Industrial District is located at the Airport Industrial
Park and at the landfill site on Turnpike Road. An additional parcel owned by the Turners
Falls Fire District is located on Millers Falls Road.

There are six Town-owned parcels of Industrial land remaining at the Airport Industrial
Park, ranging in size from one acre to nearly 15 acres. One of these parcels is located in
the approach to the Turners Falls Airport and may be constrained. Another lacks access
to the roadway. The remaining four parcels have access to the road as well as water,
sewer and gas connections, and are easily developable. However, according to Realtor
Mark Abramson of Benchmark & Pratt Realty, who markets industrial and commercial
real estate for the Town, these remaining lots in the Industrial Park are not big enough to
meet the needs of most manufacturers, or have shapes or topography that limit their use.

The Town owns approximately 130 acres of land zoned Industrial between Turnpike
Road and Greenfield Road.  A capped landfill and an uncapped “burn dump” occupy 
portions of this land. The area has a site assignment from DEP for use as a landfill. The
Town developed plans for a regional solid waste facility at the site during the 1990s but
ultimately rejected funding for the proposal. This land could still be used for solid waste
disposal. As of 2004, there were several companies that had expressed active interest in
negotiating with the Town to construct a new landfill at the site.

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-48
An alternative use of the Turnpike Road property is for industrial or office park
development. Water, sewer and gas service could relatively easily be extended to serve
the site. Access is more problematic; additional land would likely need to be acquired to
improve it. There is one perennial stream and several intermittent streams that might
limit the area that could be developed, and significant grading would be required to reach
maximum development potential. Graduate students at the Conway School of Design
prepared several concept plans for industrial park development at this location in 2000;
these plans are available at Town Hall.

The Town also owns approximately 34 acres of industrially-zoned land on the Montague
Plains.  This property is designated as “Priority Habitat of Rare Species” and “Estimated 
Habitat of Rare Wildlife” by the Natural Heritage Program of the Massachusetts Division
of Fisheries and Wildlife, and is surrounded by the Montague Plains Wildlife
Management Area. The location and designation, lack of infrastructure, and the small
size of the parcels make industrial development unlikely.

Turners Falls Fire District owns 19 acres of industrially-zoned land on Millers Falls
Road. This land is easily accessible from the frontage. Water service is available; sewer
and gas lines would need to be extended to serve the site. As of 2004, the Fire District
was negotiating sale of a portion of this property.

Quinnehtuk Company, a holding company for Northeast Utilities, owns approximately
324 acres of industrially-zoned land on the Montague Plains. Water service is available
on Millers Falls Roads, sewer and gas lines would have to be extended. Most of this
property is designated as “Priority Habitat of Rare Species” and “Estimated Habitat of 
Rare Wildlife” by the Natural Heritage Program of the Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. This designation could constrain development.

There are an additional 135 acres of industrially-zoned land owned by other private
parties. The most significant are several tracts totaling approximately 75 acres, owned by
three different families, on West Mineral Road abutting the airport, currently in
agricultural use. There are approximately 25 acres of undeveloped industrial land
abutting Hillside Plastic’s existing factory on Millers Falls Road. Lightlife Foods owns 
seven acres of undeveloped land abutting its manufacturing facility in the Industrial Park.
There is a nine-acre tract of industrially-zoned land owned by a private individual on the
edge of the Montague Plains on Plains Road and Turners Falls Road. The old Montague
City School in the Rod Shop area is on a 5-acre parcel zoned Industrial, and Montague
Machine owns another small parcel of underdeveloped industrial land next to its facility
on M Street in Turners Falls.

A butting lands
In addition to the land currently zoned for industry, Quinnehtuk Company owns 184
acres of undeveloped land on the Plains zoned Agricultural-Forestry 4-acre. The current
zoning would not allow commercial or industrial development, but would allow
residential development on large lots. Much of this land is identified as estimated or

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                         7-49
priority habitat, and there are two certified vernal pools in the area, which could constrain
development. Water, sewer and gas are not currently available. There is also a 96-acre
parcel of privately-owned land located at the end of West Mineral Road, currently used
for residential and agricultural purposes. This tract was rezoned from Industrial to
Agricultural-Forestry 4-acre in the mid-1990s. Wetlands might be a constraint on
development at this site.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           7-50
T able 7-7: A vailable L and Zoned Industrial in Montague, 2003 (continued on next page)
 M ap   Lot   A cres   O wnership            O wner               Zoning        Use           W ater      Sewer        G as        A ccess   RR   frontage   E nvironmental Constraints
   5    146     2.3      Private       Montague Machine             ID       Industrial         Y           Y           A             Y             N                     N
   5    148    1.99      Private       Montague Machine             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           A             Y             N                     N
   9     4     3.67      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant            A           A           A             N             N                     N
  13     68    27.8      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            N           N           N        Constrained        N                     N
  17     19    1.01      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                     N
  17     38    7.99      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                 Flight Path
  17    13A   14.68      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                     N
  17    13B     3.4      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                     N
  17    13C     2.3      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                     N
  17    13D     5.2      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                     N
  17    15A   11.80      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            A           A           A             N             N                     N
  18     6     47.3      Private            Luippold                ID      Agricultural        N           N           N         Frontage          N                Flight Path?
  18     7      3.4      Private            Luippold                ID      Agricultural        N           N           N         Frontage          N                Flight Path?
  18     18    7.43      Private         Lightlife Foods            ID        Vacant         Available   Available   Available    Available         N                     N
  19     12    4.95      Private        Mechanics Lodge             ID      Old School          Y           Y           N         Frontage          N               Wetlands Act
  20     27   24.15      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant            N           N           N             N             N                     N
  21     6      5.6      Public        Town of Montague             ID       Old dump        Available   Available   Available    Available         N             Uncapped landfill
  21     7     37.1      Public        Town of Montague             ID     Capped landfill   Available   Available   Available    Available         N        Capped landfill, Wetlands Act
  21     24    64.5      Public        Town of Montague             ID        Vacant         Available   Available   Available        N             N          Wetlands Act, Rivers Act
  23     50   19.02      Public     Turners Falls Fire District     ID         Office           Y           Y           Y         Frontage          N                     N
  24     5     17.2      Private              Haas                  ID        Vacant            Y           N           N         Frontage          N                     N
  24     7     8.28      Public     Turners Falls Fire District     ID        Vacant            Y           N           N         Frontage          N               Wetlands Act
  24     10    8.76      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant            Y           N           N         Frontage          N                   Habitat
  24     15     7.8      Private           Champoux                 ID        Vacant         Available      N           N             N             N                     N
  24     21    2.80      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant            N           N           N             N             N                  Habitat??
  24     22   16.50      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant         Available      N           N             N             N                   Habitat
  24     23    8.00      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant         Available      N           N             N             N                   Habitat
  24     24    5.00      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant         Available      N           N             N             N                   Habitat
  24     25   23.19      Private     Quinnehtuk Company             ID        Vacant            Y           N           N             Y             N                   Habitat
  25     1     7.29      Private              Toth                  ID        Vacant            N           N           N         Frontage          N                Flight Path?
  25     2     15.3      Private             Kozik                  ID      Agricultural        N           N           N         Frontage          N                Flight Path?
  26     15    9.17      Private             Mann                   ID        Vacant            N           Y           N         Frontage          N                   Habitat
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                                                   7-51
T able 7-7: A vailable L and Zoned Industrial in Montague, 2003 (continued from previous page)
  27   7        3.6    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  27   8       6.99    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  27   9      39.39    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  27  10        22     Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  27  11        2.8    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N               N
  27  12       20.8    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  27  13      35.79    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  27  14       32.7    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  27  15       8.49    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  27  16       8.19    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  27  17       3.89    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N   Frontage   N           Habitat
  27  18       9.29    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N   Frontage   N           Habitat
  27  19      10.99    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N   Frontage   N           Habitat
  27  20       5.65    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N   Frontage   N           Habitat
  27  30       4.09    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  27 14A        0.9    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  27  8A       0.29    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  28   1      15.29    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  28   2      18.89    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  28   3       9.49    Private     Quinnehtuk Company        ID        Residential      N        N   N      Y       N           Habitat
  32   4        7.2    Private            Lucas              ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       Y   Rivers Act, Wetlands Act
  32   5        3.3    Private          WMECO                ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       Y        Wetlands Act
  33  31       8.39    Public       Town of Montague         ID         Vacant          N        N   N   Frontage   N           Habitat
  40   8        5.3    Public       Town of Montague         ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  40  17        9.4    Private             Reil              ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       Y           Habitat
  40  20      19.09    Public       Town of Montague         ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  40  26       0.59    Public       Town of Montague         ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  40  27       0.54    Public       Town of Montague         ID         Vacant          N        N   N      N       N           Habitat
  42  19        4.9    Private    Mountain Research LLC      ID         Vacant          N        N   N      Y       N          Rivers Act
TOTAL        743.11
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                            7-52
7.5.1.2 Historic Industrial District
The Historic Industrial Zone was proposed by the Planning Board and approved by Town
Meeting in 2001.  Its purpose is to “encourage adaptive reuse of historic industrial 
buildings and sites.”  Currently, the HI zone is limited to land in downtown Turners Falls
abutting the power canal and several small properties on Rod Shop Road and Masonic
Avenue in Montague City. Several mills were developed in this area beginning in the
1870s; there is currently only one in operation. Offices, retail and service businesses,
manufacturing, processing and research, bulk storage, warehousing and distribution, craft
workshops and light assembly shops less than 5,000 square feet in area are allowed by
right. Facilities in these categories between 5,000 and 10,000 square feet are permitted
upon site plan review and approval. Larger businesses require a special permit. The
following uses are also allowed by special permit in the HI District: hotels, residential
uses, public utilities and self-service storage facilities. Water, sewer and gas are available
in the HI District.

The Strathmore Mill, encompassing more than 250,000 square feet of space in more than
ten connecting buildings, was used for paper production until 1994. It then housed dozens
of small businesses until 1999, when the tenants were evicted. It was recently purchased
from International Paper by a private individual, who runs a recycling business, which
currently occupies only a small fraction of the mill. The owner has stated that he bought
the property as an investment. The mill was well-maintained by International Paper and
is in good condition. Vehicular access and parking are severely constrained.

In 1988, Indeck Energy Services constructed a coal-fired cogeneration plant next to the
Strathmore Mill on slightly over 3 acres of land owned by International Paper. The
facility operated for only six years, until it closed in 1996. It is currently not operational.

Northeast Generation Services owns a small parcel (2.8 acres) of land abutting Indeck,
the Strathmore Mill and the Power Canal. Limited access and environmental laws may
be constraints to development on this property.

The former Griswold Cotton Mill is better known as the Railroad Salvage Building, after
the name of the retail business that operated there in the 1980s and early 1990s. The
main building is approximately 80,000 square feet and is located on nearly three acres of
land. It is vacant and in very poor condition, with extensive damage from a leaking roof.
There is a much smaller building on the 2.9 acre property in better condition. This
property is owned by a private individual who lives out of state.

There is a small (.9 acre) parcel of land in the HI district owned by a private individual,
abutting another 2.8 acre parcel owned by Northeast Generation Services on Tenth Street.
This land could provide some space for a small business.

As of spring 2004, two town-owned properties in the Rod Shop Historic Industrial Zone,
including an old mill building, were currently being offered to the public through a
“commercial homesteading” program. 

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                              7-53
T able 7-8: A vailable L and Zoned H istoric Industrial in Montague, 2003
Map Lot Acres Ownership        Owner                      Use                      Water   Sewer   Gas   Access        RR access   Environmental Constraints
    2  1  2.85 private         Jones                      Strathmore Mill          Y       Y       A     constrained   N           Rivers Act, possible Brownfield
    2  6  3.19 private         International Paper        Mothballed Power Plant   Y       Y       A     constrained   N           Rivers Act
    2  4     3 private         Northeast Generation Co.   vacant                   A       A       A     constrained   N           Rivers Act, possible Brownfield, Habitat
    3 27  2.91 private         Kosudaville LLC            Abandoned industrial     Y       Y       A     constrained   N           Rivers Act, possible Brownfield, Habitat
    3 47   2.8 private         Northeast Generation Co.   vacant                   Y       Y       A     frontage      N           Wetlands Act, Rivers Act, Habitat
    3 48  0.91 private         Ruggeri                    vacant                   Y       Y       A     frontage      N           N
  19 57   0.42 public          Town of Montague           vacant                   Y       Y       N     frontage      N           Bikeway
  19 64   0.69 public          Town of Montague           Abandoned industrial     Y       Y       N     frontage      N           N
Total    16.77
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                                             7-54
7.5.2 Land Zoned for Commercial Use
Montague has three commercial districts: General Business, Central Business and Rural
Business, with a total of approximately 450 acres available for development. The
Neighborhood Business district also allows limited commercial uses, but is primarily a
residential district and is therefore not addressed in this section.


7.5.2.1 General Business
The General Business district was the Town’s primary commercial district until 1999.  
There are now only a few small areas zoned GB, including land in downtown Turners
Falls, parcels on Turnpike Road across from Judd Wire, Inc., land on Millers Falls Road
and a small area in downtown Millers Falls. All of this property is privately owned.

The largest parcel of land zoned GB is a tract of approximately 14 acres off Millers Falls
Road. The property was historically used as a junkyard. There were several plans for
residential development there in the 1980s and 1990s. One four-unit condominium unit
was constructed before the developer went bankrupt and abandoned the project. The site
has been extensively investigated for hazardous waste, and contaminated soil has been
removed. Wetlands and steep slopes may constrain development.

There is a small area of undeveloped prime commercial space on Avenue A. The 3.5 acre
privately-owned parcel is currently occupied by a shopping center, but has enough area
and adequate access to allow additional commercial development. Also in downtown
Turners Falls, Montague Machine has a small undeveloped parcel currently used by the
Town for parking public works vehicles.

There are three small parcels totaling slightly more than one acre located on Letourneau
Way under a power line and next to the Park Villa senior citizen apartments.

International Paper Company, Guilford Transportation Industries and New England
Central Railroad each own several small parcels of land zoned for General Business in
Millers Falls. This land is located along the railroad tracks and the Millers River.

The Planning Board is currently in the process of reviewing and recommending changes
to the General Business district, with the goal of making it a more useful designation for
commercial areas that are not necessarily pedestrian-oriented. In 2004, the Board
proposed and Town Meeting approved a change requiring a special permit for single
family residential uses in the district. Future changes may involve fine-tuning of the
permitted and special permit uses in the district.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-55
T able 7-9: A vailable L and Zoned G eneral B usiness in Montague, 2003
Map     Lot Acres    Ownership   Owner                     Use            Water   Sewer   Gas   Access     RR Access   Environmental Constraints
    3     73   3.5   Private     Pilgrim Leasing           Commercial     Y       Y       Y     Frontage   N           N
    5    126  0.73   Private     Montague Machine          Parking Lot    Y       Y       Y     Frontage   N           N
   14     92  0.28   Private     Letourneau                Vacant         A       A       A     Frontage   N           Power ROW
   14    108  0.43   Public      Town of Montague          Vacant         A       A       A     Frontage   N           Power ROW
   14    109  0.36   Private     Letourneau                Vacant         A       A       A     Frontage   N           Power ROW
   23     66 14.47   Private     Evans                     Residential    Y       Y       A     Frontage   N           Wetlands Act
   29    114  0.42   Private     NE Central RR             Railyard       A       A       N     Frontage   Y           Possible Brownfields
   29    115  0.16   Private     NE Central RR             Railyard       A       A       N     A          Y           Possible Brownfields
   31      1  0.05   Private     Guilford Transportation   Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   N           Rivers Act, Habitat
   31      2  0.52   Private     Guilford Transportation   Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act, Habitat
   31      3  0.63   Private     International Paper       Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act, Habitat
   31      4  1.23   Private     International Paper       Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   N           Rivers Act, Habitat
   31      5  1.14   Private     Guilford Transportation   Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act, Habitat
   31      6   3.9   Private     International Paper       Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act, Habitat
   31      7  0.71   Private     Guilford Transportation   Vacant         A       A       N     N          Y           Possible Brownfields
   31      8  1.88   Private     Guilford Transportation   Vacant         A       A       N     Frontage   Y           Possible Brownfields
Total        26.91
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                      7-56
7.5.2.2 Central Business
The Central Business District was created in 1999.  Its purpose is “to provide for 
pedestrian-oriented downtown areas with mixed-use buildings and a range of retail and
commercial services.” Offices, retail sales and services with less than 10,000 square feet 
of floor area; non-profit clubs and lodges; and mixed-used buildings with first floor
commercial space are allowed by right. Multi-family housing with street level
commercial use; large retail sales and service business; craft workshops and light
assembly shops with a retail component; hotels; public utilities; parking lots; parking
garages; and drive-through and loading docks are allowed by special permit. Land
zoned CB is located in downtown Turners Falls, downtown Millers Falls and in
Montague City.

There are approximately six (6) acres of land available for development or redevelopment
in the CB district. Most of this land is located in the Rod Shop area of Montague City,
encompassing a privately-owned parcel nearly 4 acres in size that is vacant. The Central
Business zoning may not be appropriate for this area and the Planning Board is
considering the possibility of rezoning this property to General Business.

 In addition, there are several small parcels zoned Central Business in Turners Falls.
These include a privately-owned abandoned garage in extremely poor condition on Third
and Canal Streets, a commercial building in poor condition on Avenue A that the Town
recently took for taxes, and another, privately-owned commercial building on Avenue A
that was formerly occupied by a dry cleaner and has restricted uses due to hazardous
materials.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-57
T able 7-10: A vailable L and Zoned Central B usiness in Montague, 2003
Map     Lot Acres          Ownership   Owner                      Use
                                                                  Zoning                 Water   Sewer   Gas   Access     Rail Access   Environmental Constraints
    3     15        0.16   public      Town of Montague           CB
                                                                  Abandoned Commercial   Y       Y       Y     Frontage   N             N
    4    155        0.06   private     Scott/Tognarelli           CB
                                                                  Vacant Commercial      Y       Y       Y     Frontage   N             Brownfields AUL
    4    178        0.42   private     DuBois                     CB
                                                                  Abandoned Garage       Y       Y       Y     Frontage   N             Brownfields
    4    179        0.14   private     DuBois                     CB
                                                                  Abandoned Garage       Y       Y       Y     Frontage   N             Brownfields
   12     52        3.85   private     Morawski                   CB
                                                                  Vacant                 Y       Y       N     Frontage   N             Rivers Act, Wetlands Act
   19      1        1.16   private     Northeast Generation Co.   CB
                                                                  Vacant                 Y       Y       N     Frontage   N             N
Total               5.79
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                                   7-58
7.5.2.3 Rural Business
The Rural Business District, created in 2001, is the Town’s newest and by far its largest 
commercial district, with more than 400 acres of land available for development
(considering only undeveloped parcels of land and developed parcels exceeding 5 acres).
Its purpose is “to allow small and natural resource-based businesses that are compatible
with existing agricultural and residential uses and scenic character.” The RB District is 
located along Federal Street (Route 63), from Green Pond Road to the southern town line.
Permitted uses include agriculture and forestry and single family homes, as well as retail
sales and services, craft workshops and light assembly shops and open recreational
enterprises, with up to 5000 square feet of buildings. The following uses are allowed by
Special Permit: two family dwellings, multi-family dwellings up to four units,
agricultural and forestry products processing, offices, motels, earth removal, loading
docks, public utilities, self-service storage facilities, and permitted uses exceeding 5,000
square feet of building area.

There is no water, sewer or gas service in the RB zone, and extension of these services to
the area would be very expensive. A large portion of the southern section of the RB zone
is located in the recharge area to the Turners Falls and Montague Center wells, which
may constrain some types of business development.

The current character of the area zoned RB is residential and agricultural, with few
commercial uses, including an agricultural equipment dealer, a repair garage, a sawmill,
and a gravel mining operation. There are five farm businesses located in the district.

All developable land in the district is privately owned. Approximately 183 acres are
currently in use for agriculture, or in mixed agricultural/residential or
agricultural/commercial use. Parcel size ranges from less than two acres to more than 35
acres, with an average size of 14 acres and median size of 12 acres. An additional 120
acres are in low-density residential use, with homes on lots ranging in size from
approximately 7 to approximately 24 acres, with an average and median of approximately
ten acres.

There is slightly more than 100 acres of vacant land in the RB district, with parcel sizes
ranging from one acre to more than 25 acres, with an average of nine acres and a median
of 5 acres.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          7-59
T able 7-11: A vailable L and in Montague Zoned Rural B usiness, 2003 (continued on next page)
Map Lot Acres        Ownership   Owner                 Use
                                                       Zoning              Water   Sewer   Gas   Access      RR Access   Environmental Constraints
  34 67        3     Private     Hunting               Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           N
  40 38     23.7     Private     Graves                Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Rivers Act, Wetlands Act
  40 39      7.9     Private     McGowan/Arvidson      Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     N           Y           Rivers Act, Wetlands Act
  40 40      5.2     White       White                 Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     N           N           Rivers Act
  40 41      4.9     Private     WMECO                 Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Available   Y           N
  40 42      3.5     Private     Reil                  Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           Power ROW
  40 43      5.1     Private     White                 Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     N           N           N
  40 44      6.2     Private     Sirum                 Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Available   N           N
  40 45     11.3     Private     Sirum                 Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           N
  40 47      8.5     Private     Sirum                 Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           Power ROW
  40 49      9.8     Private     Kuklewicz             Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           N
  40 52   12.85      Private     Stone                 Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           N
  40 53       17     Private     Guilford Transport.   Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     N           Y           N
  40 57     35.3     Private     Sirum                 Commercial
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Power ROW, Rivers Act
  40 62     1.01     Private     WMECO                 Vacant
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Power ROW
  40 70      8.8     Private     Ball                  Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           N
  44 17     15.9     Private     Perkins               Agricultural
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           N
  44 32     15.2     Private     Lang                  Res./Agric.
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Wetlands Act
  44 35     7.66     Private     Perkins               Agricultural
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Wetlands Act
  44 36   11.71      Private     Peura                 Agricultural
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           N
  44 37     10.4     Private     Clapp                 Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           N
  44 43      7.1     Private     Campbell/Fuller       Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           N
  44 59      7.1     Private     O'Hara                Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           Wetlands Act; Zone II
  44 61   16.86      Private     Jiang                 Res./Agric.
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           Wetlands Act, Rivers Act, Zone II
  44 65     6.79     Private     Sarlat/Pool           Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Wetlands Act
  44 66     7.89     Private     Yeager/Roney          Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    Y           Wetlands Act
  48 140  12.77      Private     Ewell                 Residential
                                                       RB                  N       N       N     Frontage    N           Rivers Act, Wetlands Act, Zone II
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                                7-60
Figure 7-141: A vailable L and in Montague Zoned Rural B usiness, 2003 (continued from previous page)
Map Lot Acres       Ownership   Owner               Use
                                                    Zoning              Water               Sewer   Gas   Access     RR Access   Environmental Constraints
  49   1     23     Private     Kretzenger          RB
                                                    Agricultural        N                   N       N     Frontage   N           Rivers Act, Wetlands Act, Zone II
  49   3    1.6     Private     Kretzenger          RB
                                                    Agricultural        N                   N       N     Frontage   N           N
  49   5  13.26     Private     Yeager/Roney        RB
                                                    Vacant              N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act
  49   6    9.2     Private     Kretzenger          RB
                                                    Agricultural        N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act
  49   8  24.21     Private     Kretzenger          RB
                                                    Res./Agric.         N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Wetlands Act, IWPA
  49 16    25.5     Private     Canedy/Cote         Vacant
                                                    RB                  N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Wetlands Act, Zone II
  49 27   17.56     Private     Stone               Gravel mine
                                                    RB                  N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Zone II
  49 34    5.95     Private     Williams            Lumber mill
                                                    RB                  N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Zone II
                                                    R
   51   49     6.03 Private     Bourbeau            R
                                                    B es., Cell Tower   N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Zone II, Wetlands Act, Habitat
  51    39     8.24 Private     Cardinal            Agricultural
                                                    RB                  N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Rivers Act, Zone II, Habitat
  51    29    17.84 Private     Podlenski           Vacant
                                                    RB                  N                   N       N     Frontage   Y           Wetlands Act, Zone II, Habitat
Total        435.83
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                                        7-61
SE C T I O N 8           A PP E N D I X B : M O N TA G U E B USI N ESSES
Montague has a diverse mix of businesses located in its Industrial Park, downtowns and
village centers, as well as more than 100 businesses run by residents from their homes.
In 2003 and 2004, the Montague Planning and Conservation Department compiled a list
of for-profit businesses in town. The list was compiled from the following sources:

       A town business directory published in 1995
       A listing of businesses maintained by the Montague Board of Assessors
       A list of members of the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce in Montague
       Records of permits for home-based businesses issued by the Building Inspector’s 
       office
       Records of “doing-business-as” certificates issued by the Town Clerk
       A list of businesses on the “MontagueMA.net” privately-managed community
       website
       The Yellow Pages
       The “Hidden Tech” mailing list 

This research yielded a total of approximately 300 businesses located in the Town of
Montague. Approximately seven percent of these businesses are farms and 45 percent are
other home-based enterprises. Table 8-1 shows all businesses located by area of town.
The geographical data is organized by zip code. Montague City does not have its own
zip code. Businesses along Montague City Road in the area of the Farren Hospital are
listed as being in Turners Falls; businesses located in the Randall Road/Randall Woods
neighborhood are included in the Montague Center zip code.

T able 8-1: Montague B usinesses by A rea of Town

                                                          Other Home-based
                     Total Businesses        Farms        businesses
Lake Pleasant                            3            0                   3
Millers Falls                           24            2                  13
Montague Center                        105           17                  62
Turners Falls                          170            1                  57
Total                                  302           20                 135

Detailed information on home-based businesses is not available. However, it is believed
that the vast majority of these businesses provide full or part-time employment for only
one person.

The United States Census uses the North American Industry Classification System
(NAICS) to collect statistics about business activity. NAICS classifies industries and
describes businesses through a system of two to six digit codes. The two-digit NAICS
codes, summarized in Table 8-2, define broad industry categories.



Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                       8-62
T able 8-2: 2002 N A I CS Codes and Description


N A I CS
Code C ategory                                          Description


     11 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
     21 Mining                                          Including sand and gravel operations
     22 Utilities
     23 Construction
     31 Manufacturing                                   Food & Textiles
     32 Manufacturing                                   Wood products, Paper, Plastics, Chemicals
     33 Manufacturing                                   Metals
     42 Wholesale trade
                                                        Motor vehicles, home furnishings, electronics and appliances,
                                                        building material, garden equipment, lawn & garden, food &
                                                        beverage, health & personal care, gas stations, clothing &
     44 Retail Trade                                    accessories
                                                        Sporting goods, hobbies, toys, games, books & periodicals, art
     45 Retail Trade                                    dealers, mail order
                                                        Air, water, rail transportation, transit, charters, pipelines, scenic,
     48 Transportation & Warehousing                    support activities, inc. towing
     49 Transportation & Warehousing                    Postal service, couriers, warehousing
                                                        Publishing, software, sound recording, broadcasting, internet,
     51 Information                                     telecommunications, ISPs, data processing
     52 Finance & Insurance                             Banking, investment, insurance

     53 Real Estate, Rentals & Leasing                  Real estate, property manangement, self-storage, rental of goods

                                                        Attorneys, accountants, engineers, surveyors, inspection services,
                                                        architects, designers, computer services, public relations,
     54 Professional, Scientific & Technical Services   management consulting, photographic services, veterinary services
     55 Management of Companies
        Administrative and Support and Waste            Mail centers, travel agencies, extermination, janitorial, locksmiths,
     56 Management and Remediation Services             lanscaping, cleaning, waste management
     61 Educational Services
     62 Health Care and Social Assistance               Medical and dental services, mental health, child care
     71 Arts, Entertainment, Recreation
     72 Accomodation and Food Services                  Restaurants & Bars
                                                        Auto repair, general repair & maintenance, cosmetic & beauty
                                                        services, funeral homes, laundry, pet care, religious & civic
     81 Other Services                                  institutions

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                   8-63
The Montague Planning Department assigned a two-digit NAICS code to each of the
businesses located in the town. This information is summarized in Table 8.3. The
complete inventory of businesses follows in Section 8.1. An analysis of the business
inventory suggests several “industry clusters” in Montague.  

T able 8-3: Montague B usinesses by N A I CS C ategory


NAICS                                                        Number of Home-based % of Businesses
Code         NAICS Category                                  Businesses Businesses based in homes
11           Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting               22          1           4.5%
22           Utilities                                                 2          1          50.0%
23           Construction                                             37         32          86.5%
31, 32, 33   Manufacturing                                            22          4          18.2%
42           Wholesale trade                                           1          1         100.0%
44, 45       Retail Trade                                             46         14          30.4%
48           Transportation & Warehousing                              5          1          20.0%
51           Information                                              10          6          60.0%
52           Finance & Insurance                                       9          2          22.2%
53           Real Estate, Rentals & Leasing                            8          5          62.5%
54           Professional, Scientific & Technical Services            27         22          81.5%
55           Management of Companies                                   2          1          50.0%
56           Admin, support, waste management services                15          9          60.0%
61           Educational Services                                      4          1          25.0%
62           Health Care and Social Assistance                        20          9          45.0%
71           Arts, Entertainment, Recreation                          15          7          46.7%
72           Accomodation and Food Services                           19          4          21.1%
81           Other Services (except Public Administration)            38         15          39.5%
             Total                                                   302        135          44.7%



Agricultu re
There are 22 businesses in Montague that fall into the “Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and 
Hunting” NAICS code.  This category does not include farms that grow crops in 
Montague but have their principal place of business or sales location in another town—
there are at least two farms in this category, each with substantial acreage in Montague.
It does include two fish farms—a trout hatchery located along the Sawmill River, and an
indoor aquacultural facility located in the Airport Industrial Park.

Construction
The Town has more than 35 construction companies, including builders (10),
plumbers/HVAC contractors (7), painters (7), excavation/paving contractors (4),
electricians (2), as well as businesses that specialize in cabinet work, drywall and tile.
The majority of these businesses are home-based.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                            8-64
M anufacturing
There are 22 businesses in Montague that fall under the NAICS codes for manufacturing,
including food products (2), wood products (1), paper products and printing (4), plastics
(2), metal products, including machinists, welders, engravers and tool companies (11)
and others, including specialty instruments and soap.  Almost all of the Town’s largest 
private sector employers fall into this category, including Judd Wire, Hillside Plastics,
New England Extrusion and Lightlife Foods.  Several of the Montague’s large 
manufacturing businesses, including Hillside Plastics, Lightlife Foods and Mayhew Steel,
started as smaller businesses in other towns, and relocated to Montague to take advantage
of available industrially-zoned space with public services.

Retail Sales
There are at least 45 businesses in Montague that sell products to the public at retail.
Approximately one-third of these operations are home-based, mostly mail-order
businesses. The remaining commercial businesses are shown by category and village in
Table 8-4. Given the large number of construction-related businesses in town, it is not
surprising that the largest single category of retail businesses is hardware/home
improvement/building materials.  All of Montague’s retail businesses are neighborhood-
scale and virtually all are located within the villages. The Town has no large or big-box
retailers, and no “strip”-type retail development.

T able 8-4: Retail stores by village
                                       Turners Falls Montague Center Millers Falls
Hardware/Home Improvement                           7
Convenience                                         3               1
Art/antiques/gifts                                  2               2
Sporting goods                                      2                              1
Liquor                                              2
Secondhand merchandise                              2
Grocery                                             1                              1
Pharmacy                                            1
Books                                                               1
Equipment                                                           1
Nurseries                                           1               2
Other                                               3
Total                                              24               7              2

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services
This broad category includes attorneys, accountants, engineers, surveyors, inspection
services, architects, designers, computer services, public relations, management
consulting, photographic services and veterinary services. Most of the Montague
businesses in this category are small home-based operations. Many are one-person
consulting operations that fit the “Hidden Tech” model described by Amy Zuckerman. 

H ealth C are and Social Assistance
The twenty Montague businesses in the “health care and social assistance” category range 
from the Farren Care Center, which is a large long-term care and rehabilitation facility

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                          8-65
located in a former hospital, to physicians’ and dentists’offices, mental health 
professionals, massage therapists and day care providers. The majority of these
businesses are located in and around the Farren Care Center in Montague City.

A rts, E ntertainment and Recreation
This category includes recreational businesses, such as the Thomas Memorial Golf
Course, as well as individual artists, including sculptors, painters and ceramic artists.
Because many artists working in their homes or renting a small studio do not require any
town permits and do not advertise, the business inventory likely understates the number
of artists working in Montague. Also, NAICS classifies photographers with professional
and technical services, so they do not appear in the “arts” category.

A ccommodation and Food Services
For a town with nearly 8,500 residents, Montague has few dining establishments and no
commercial lodging. Of the twenty businesses in the “Accommodation and Food
Services,” only four are restaurants. The category includes eight bars or pubs with limited 
menus, a sandwich shop, a coffee shop and four home-based caterers. A restaurant
survey conducted by the Franklin Regional Council of Governments and the Montague
Planning Department in 2003 identified a market for additional restaurants in town. The
lack of lodging and dining options may present a challenge to the Town’s efforts to 
promote Montague as a destination for tourists.

O ther services
Most of the businesses in this “catch-all” provide either personal care services, such as 
hair and nail salons, or automotive maintenance and repair.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                           8-66
8.1   L IST   OF   B USI N ESSES I N M O N T A G U E , A PR I L 2004




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                          8-67
NAICS                                     Business Name                                    Street             City    State     Zip Phone            Home-
 Code                                                                                                                                                based?
    42                                        A Likely Story                            Box 359         Montague       MA     01351   367-9208         Y
    81                     A Turning Point (Beauty Salon)                         29 Fifth Street    Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-9408         N
    52                     A.H. Rist Insurance Agency Inc                          P.O. Box 391      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-4373         N
    56                            A+ Transcription Service                      8 Norman Circle      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-9869         Y
    81                                   A1 Enterprise.com                          P.O. Box 10         Montague       MA     01351   863-8130         Y
    62                  Abele, Anna, Naturopathic Doctor                        58 Swamp Road           Montague       MA     01351   367-9800         Y
    54                    About Face Computer Solutions                                                 Montague       MA     01351   367-0025         Y
    81                               Absolutely Organized                            5 Center St.       Montague       MA     01351   367-2033         Y
    56                         Adams Direct Mail Services               370 Avenue A Extension       Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-1060         N
    54                           Adams Home Decorators                             91 Fifth Street   Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-8073         Y
    54                                AirTyme Corporation                       44 Center Street        Montague       MA     01351   367-0143         Y
    45                Alejandro & Martin Oliventures, LLC                           P.O. Box 937        Montague       MA     01351   877-346-3645     Y
    81                          Alexandra's Hair and Nails            49 Walnut St Turners Falls     Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-4936         N
    54                          Ames Electrical Consulting                    7 Randall Wood Dr         Montague       MA     01351   863-2286         Y
    62                         Andreas, James A., Dentist                      7 Burnham Street      Turners Falls     MA     01376   774-6553         N
    11                                    Applecrest Farms                98 West Mineral Road        Millers Falls    MA     01349   659-2620        Farm
    54                           Aquatic Consultants LLC                          71 Main Street        Montague       MA     01351   367-9234         Y
    32                      Architectural Components Inc.                  26 North Leverett Rd.        Montague       MA     01351   367-9441         N
    53                                     Area Real Estate                        10 Oak Street     Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-4020         Y
    54                  Ariel Jones Studio (photographer)           106 Avenue A Turners Falls       Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-0167         N
    81                                 Arlene's Hair Studio                 100 Montague Street      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-9238         Y
    44                                   Arnie's Wholesale                         102 Avenue A      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-3704         N
    44                                 Aubuchon Hardware                           200 Avenue A      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-2100         N
    51                                            AV House                         151 Avenue A      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-8677         N
    44                                  Baby Love Designs              57 Old Sunderland Road           Montague       MA     01351   unlisted         Y
    81                                Barbara's Beauty Bar     18 Willmark Avenue Turners Falls                        MA     01376   863-4000         Y
    23      Barlow Tree Landscaping Excavation & Paving                             P.O. Box 386     Turners Falls     MA     01376   772-2155         Y
    45                                    Basically Bicycles                      88 Third Street    Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-3556         N
    81                                      Bella The Salon            312 Montague City Road        Turners Falls     MA     01376   774-4003         N
    11                                          Bitzer Farm                    16 Hatchery Road         Montague       MA     01351   367-2329        Farm
    53                                      Blessed Homes                  506 Turners Falls Rd.        Montague       MA     01351   367-7579         Y
    72                                 Blue Heron Catering                        39 Main Street        Montague       MA     01351   367-2101         Y
    11                                  Blue Meadow Farm                        184 Meadow Rd.          Montague       MA     01351   367-2394        Farm
    81                               Bob's Auto Body, Inc.                         303 Avenue A      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-2112         N
    44                                    Booska's Flooring                        169 Avenue A      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-3690         N
    44                               Brian's Custom Blinds                         5 Kingsley Av     Turners Falls     MA     01376   774-7669         Y
    23                                 Briar Patch Painting                      6 Burnett Street    Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-9236         Y
    44                                    Brooks Pharmacy                          206 Avenue A      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-3109         N
    23                        Brunelle Plumbing & Heating                       W. Mineral Road       Millers Falls    MA     01349   659-3897         Y
    23                                   Busy Bee Painting               181 Turners Falls Road      Turners Falls     MA     01376   863-0212         Y
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                        8-68
    23                      Burek Brothers Construction                4 Burek Drive          Montague      MA   01351   367-0029     Y
    55                            Caddie Consulting, Inc.       36 Randall Wood Dr.           Montague      MA   01351   863-3795     Y
    81                              Candy's Canine Cuts          159 Millers Falls Rd.     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9080     Y
    23                                      Carey Drywall     438 Turners Falls Road          Montague      MA   01351   367-2372     Y
    81                               Carol's Beauty Nook                  29 G Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2888     Y
    44                           Carousel Country Store            48A Randall Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-0231     Y
    44                                    Carroll's Market            29 Main Street        Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3312     N
    81                           Castine's Hair Creations            74 Prospect St.       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2022     Y
    48                  Chapin & Sadler (Bus Company)                                         Montague      MA   01351   367-2618     N
    23               Chevalier Plumbing & Electrical Co       38 Randall Wood Drive           Montague      MA   01351   863-8171     Y
    81                                 Chick's Automotive               151 3rd Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2254     N
    72                             Chinatown Restaurant                   57 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8988     N
    81                        Chris & Co (Beauty Salon)                  38 Dell Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2111     Y
    81                             Cindy's Hair Fashions                17 Dunton St.      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9798     Y
    62                     Circle of Light Healing Center          83 Greenfield Road         Montague      MA   01351   774-2409     Y
    23                                         Ciolino Tile          91 Second Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376                Y
    71                               CK Promotions, LLC               3 Church Street       Millers Falls   MA   01349   522-3371     Y
    11                                   Cold Brook Farm         300 Greenfield Road          Montague      MA   01351   367-9653    Farm
    71                       Comical Mystery Tour, The                  370 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376                N
    31              ConAgra Foods DBA Lightlife Foods              153 Industrial Blvd.    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8500     N
    62                       Connecticut River Internists               8 Burnham St       Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-3751     N
    54                       Conservation Land Surveys            1 South High Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-3756     Y
    72                              Country Cremee, Inc.       256 Millers Falls Road      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3529     N
    44                                 Couture Bros., Inc.               P.O. Box 270      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4346     N
    44                                  Crestview Liquors             106 High Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4454     N
    56                                    Cruise & Travel         30 Montague Street       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3143     Y
    44                                Cumberland Farms         1 Montague City Road        Turners Falls    MA   01376                N
    72                                         Cup O' Joe               111 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2800     N
    81                                      D & D Motors                  34 Bridge St      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3425     N
    54            D.E.F. Diamond Consultants & Brokers                      P.O. Box R    Lake Pleasant     MA   01347   367-2169     Y
    62                               Dee Dee's Day Care           41 Montague Street       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8605     Y
    54                         Dancing Star Productions           32 N. Taylor Hill Rd.       Montague      MA   01351   367-9416     Y
    71                           David Kaynor, musician                    P.O. Box 30        Montague      MA   01351   367-9380     Y
    61                  DC Dodds Technology Educator          405 Montague City Rd.        Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-5799     Y
    23               Demers Landscaping & Excavating               136 Turnpike Road       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3652     N
    81                             Doggie Dips and Clips                  62 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4444     N
    54                         Dolan & Dolan, Attorneys                 174 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-0165     N
    62                                 Donna's Foot Care                  7 Warner St.     Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-4036     N
    23                                         Doug Sena                   P.O. Box 81        Montague      MA   01351   367-2606     Y
    54                       Dr. Lauralyn J. Brown DVM           196 Millers Falls Rd.     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-0025     N
    23                                         Dream Tile                  13 H Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9994     Y
    23                              Duane Jenks, builder                                      Montague      MA   01351   367-2862     Y
    81                           Duda's Sales & Service            31 Turnpike Road        Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-8737     N
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                       8-69
    23                      Eagle Construction Company                   83 Sunderland Road          Montague      MA   01351   367-7507       Y
    48                              East Coast Limousine                194 Millers Falls Road    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9124       Y
    62                     East Wind Acupuncture Center                   54 Greenfield Road         Montague      MA   01351   774-4515       Y
    23                            Eastern Weatherization                            17 Dell St.   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9409       Y
    81                                   Ed's Barber Shop                       115 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2085       N
    44                                        Equi's Candy                      125 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9588       N
    72                            Equi's Spanish Gardens                        35 Main Street     Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3391       N
    32                         Esleeck Manufacturing Co.                         P.O. Box 717     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4326       N
    62                              Ewell, Emily, Daycare                  487 Federal Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-7576       Y
    44                                         Exotic Traya                     26 Newton St.      Millers Falls   MA   01349   not listed     Y
    44                           F.L. Roberts & Company                      132 Third Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9064       N
    23                  Farley, John (General Contractor)                    34 School Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-2057       Y
    62                                 Farren Care Center              340 Montague City Rd.      Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-3111       N
    23                      Felton Construction Company                     35 Federal Street      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3013       N
    23                              Ferris Quality Painting                                          Montague      MA   01351   863-0100       Y
    81                                   Fido Dog training                      31 11th Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8545       Y
    71                                           Fit Figures                                       Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3483       N
    44                                            Food City                     250 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9591       N
    11                           Foster's Animal Removal                       29 Fosters Rd.        Montague      MA   01351   367-9521       Y
    52                  Four Rivers Federal Credit Union                        296 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9353       N
    56                   Franklin County Chimney Sweep          66 Sunderland Road Montague                        MA   01351   367-0000       Y
    52           Franklin County Home Care Corporation         330 Montague City Road Suite 1     Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-5555       N
    62                      Franklin Hampshire Eye Care                     7 Burnham Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   772-2571       N
    23               Froebel's Painting and Construction                                          Turners Falls    MA   01376                  Y
    52                      Full Circle Home Health Care                   15 Unity St. Apt #2    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8350       Y
    11                                        Garbiel Farm                  41 Meadow Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-2368      Farm
    11                              Gardner, Gary (Farm)                 442 Greenfield Road         Montague      MA   01351   267-2021      Farm
    23                         Gere, Jonathan, contractor                    133 Ripley Road         Montague      MA   01351                  Y
    44                                      Gifted Baskets                 133 Federal Street      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3547       Y
    81                                       Glam a Salon                        49 Walnut St     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4936       N
    81                                        Glorious Day                         5 Bangs St.     Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-2545       N
    71                               Good Dirt (Ceramics)                         P.O. Box D5        Montague      MA   01351   367-0155       Y
    44                                      Great Lighting                     38 Third Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3913       N
    51            Green Mountain Post Film Productions                           P.O. Box 229     Turners Falls    MA    1376   863-4754       Y
    52                           Greenfield Savings Bank                         P.O. Box 150     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3416       N
    81                                 Hair By Phase One                            44 J Street   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4440       N
    61                  Hallmark Institute of Photography                        P.O. Box 308     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2478       N
    33                                     Hassay Savage                    10 Industrial Blvd.   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4352       N
    56                       Health Care Reimbursement                        110 Third Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9991       N
    72                         Healthy Japanese Cooking                 3 North Leverett Road        Montague      MA   01351   367-0099       Y
    33                                      Heat-Fab, Inc.                 130 Industrial Blvd.   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2242       N
    61              Hemmendinger, Lucy, yoga instructor               27 East Taylor Hill Road       Montague      MA   01351   367-7538       Y
    32                                     Hillside Plastics                     P.O. Box 490     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2222       N
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                8-70
    54                                       Holbeck Group                   78 Eleventh Street       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3542       N
    23               Hot Sapp Woodworks & Handy Andy                                Third Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9383       N
    71                           Hotties Home Office Party                     67 Fourth Street       Turners Falls    MA   01376   not listed     Y
    54                       Human Resource Innovations                            P.O. Box 128          Montague      MA   01351   367-2204       Y
    11                                          Hunting Hills                         Route 63           Montague      MA   01351   367-2267      Farm
    54                  Independent Computer Specialists               380 Montague City Road         Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-5580       Y
    32                        Ink & Paint Printing & Design                        P.O. Box 534       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8615       N
    81                            Inside Out Auto Detailing                  6 Nadeau Avenue          Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9778       Y
    23                                J.L. Senn, Excavating                    240 Wendell Rd.         Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3490       Y
    71                                Jack Nelson, sculptor                     65 Canal Street       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9299       N
    72                                         Jake's Tavern                       66 Avenue A        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8938       N
    52                              James Grubman, Ph.D.        356 Montague City Rd. Suite 100       Turners Falls    MA   01376   775-0557       N
    44                                  Jarvis Pools & Spas                      72 Unity Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9541       N
    33                     Jarvis Welding & MFG Co., Inc.                        72 Unity Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9541       N
    44                                       Jay K's Liquors                       59 Avenue A        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9900       N
    54                                Jenson Consultations                    27 Laurel Hill Rd.         Montague      MA   01351   367-9661       Y
    52             Jerry's Massage Therapy - Jerry Girard                          7 Warner St.       Turners Falls    MA   01376   834-2735       N
                             Jiang Export and Import Corp.                      405 Federal St.          Montague      MA   01351   367-2338       Y
    11                                           Jiang Farm                     405 Federal St.          Montague      MA   01376   367-2338      Farm
    56                                JLS Tree Service Inc.                         P.O. Box 35        Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3555       Y
    23                  John H. Fuller, General Contractor                       48 Randall Rd.          Montague      MA   01351   863-4229       Y
    23                          Joseph Holubecki, Plumber                    60 Oakman Street         Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4015       Y
    23                                      JSK Enterprises                  10 Pleasant Street       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8067       Y
    33                                        Judd Wire Inc.                  124 Turnpike Rd.        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4357       N
    54                                JWeintraub Solutions                           P.O. Box 7          Montague      MA   01351   367-9923       Y
    44                                           KB Flooring                      108 Avenue A        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9039       N
    23                                    Kells Construction                  44 Old Stage Rd.           Montague      MA   01351   367-0290       Y
    44                                      Koch Auto Sales              321 Millers Falls Road       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2770       Y
    81                            Kostanski Funeral Home                    1 Kostanski Square        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2447       N
    81                      Kustom Auto Body, Mike Fuller                      48 Randall Road        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3780       N
    72                                   Lady Killigrew Café                                             Montague      MA   01351                  N
    48         Laidlaw Education Services (School buses)                 44 Industrial Boulevard      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9332       N
    53                                 Lapointe Apartments                  12 Montague Street        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4533       Y
    11                             former Little Creek Farm             119 Old Sunderland Rd.           Montague      MA   01351                 Farm
    44                                            Livin' Easy                         22 X Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9668       Y
    71                          Lume de Luna Photography                             38 First Ave.   Lake Pleasant     MA   01347   367-9132       Y
    54                                        MacAssemble              29 W. Chestnut Hill Road          Montague      MA   01351   367-9389       Y
    81                             McCarthy Funeral Home                      14 Prospect Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-4808       N
    33                                 Magafor-Keyline Inc.              10 Industrial Boulevard      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9052       N
    56                                           Mail Master                   21 W. Main Street       Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3818       N
    48                                     Maintain-a-Plane                    Millers Falls Road     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4505       N
    54                     Mandica Illustration and Design                           P.O. Box 34         Montague      MA   01351   367-2741       Y
    23                               Markol Custom Homes                           31 Dry Hill Rd.       Montague      MA   01351   367-2875       Y
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                    8-71
    81                                         Mark's Auto         Federal St. Route 63         Montague      MA   01351   367-2611     N
    33                                     Martin Machine       9 Airport Industrial Park    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3094     N
    11                             Mass. Fins Technology        15 Industrial Boulevard      Turners Falls    MA   01376                N
    52                                  Massage Therapy                   15 Laurel Park        Montague      MA   01351                Y
    33                       Mayhew Steel Products, Inc.             199 Industrial Blvd.    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4860     N
    81                              Merriam's Pet Service               5 Hatchery Road         Montague      MA   01351   367-0145     Y
    23        Michael Smith-Porter Painting & Restoration      43 E. Chestnut Hill Road         Montague      MA   01351   367-9810     Y
    11                                  Mieczkowski Farm              8 Wills Ferry Road        Montague      MA   01351               Farm
    71                                    Millworks Studio              Greenfield Road         Montague      MA   01351   367-2800     N
    44                                 Miskinis Television                 294 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2166     N
    51                                 Money Manual.com       384 Montague City Road         Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-3330     Y
    45                                 Montague Bookmill              440 Greenfield Rd         Montague      MA   01351   367-9206     N
    62                                   Montague Dental                        4 Dell St    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9656     Y
    81                                  Montague Garage      10 Station Street Extention        Montague      MA   01351   367-2700     N
    51                                  Montague Institute                 P.O. Box 9-18        Montague      MA   01351   367-0245     Y
    33                      Montague Machine Company                  15 Rastallis Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4301     N
    33                             Montague Metal Works                      40 M Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2152     N
    44                                Montague Mini Mart                  21 Main Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-9551     N
    62                 Montague Psychological Associates      356 Montague City Road         Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-2981     N
    51                                 Montague Reporter                    24 3rd Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8666     N
    32                          Montague Soap Company                    5 Burnett Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8263     Y
    71                                    MP3J Digital DJ                   38 First Ave.   Lake Pleasant     MA   01347   222-9837     Y
    81                                         Mr. Service                                   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9291      ?
    23                          MSD Plumbing & Heating             47 Old Stage Road            Montague      MA   01351   367-9330     Y
    23                                       MSJ Builders               20 Newton St.         Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3997     Y
    71                                   MST Productions           12 Greenfield Road        Turners Falls    MA   01351   772-2552     Y
    72         MTA Enterprises, Inc d/b/a 2nd Street Café                 23 Avenue A        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2882     N
    51                                Muller Technologies             28 Center Street          Montague      MA   01351   320-9226     Y
    81                                       Nails By Pam     312 Montague City Road         Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-4771      ?
    55        New England Medical Practice Management             432 Greenfield Road                         MA   01351   367-9246     N
    62                 Neurosurgical & Neurological Group            1 Burnham Street        Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-5104     N
    32                             New England Extrusion                 P.O. Box 420        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3171     N
    23    New England Landscaping and Wall Construction              32 Turnpike Road        Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-7910     N
    71                          New England Stoneworks              141 Second Street        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9573     N
    54             New Kenmore Online Communications                     P.O. Box 207           Montague      MA   01351   367-9719     Y
    23                            Newth, Gregory Building       59 E. Taylor Hill Road          Montague      MA   01351   367-2811     Y
    11                                 Old Depot Gardens       514 Turners Falls Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-2395    Farm
    11                               Old Homestead Farm             388 Federal Street          Montague      MA   01351   367-2802    Farm
    54                                     P.K. Industries                 32 High St.       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8544     Y
    62                                 Paglia Nancy CMT                    14 Court St          Montague      MA   01351   367-9487     N
    44                                    Pampered Chef                  4 Burek Drive          Montague      MA   01351   367-2867     Y
    32                                   Paper Edge, The                 36 Canal Rd.        Turners Falls    MA   01376                N
    52          Partridge-Zschau Insuragnce Agency, Inc.                 P.O. Box 312        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4331     N
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                         8-72
    45                               Pipione's Sport Shop                            101 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4246       N
    48                                    Pioneer Aviation   Turners Falls Airport, Industrial Blvd.    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9391       N
    54                             Plain Talk Consultants                                5 Ninth St.    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8107       Y
    56                          Plow Frau and Bow Wow                                88 High Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   834-7569       Y
    11                                     Podlenski Farm                    26 Sunderland Road            Montague      MA   01351   267-2406      Farm
    62                   Prehospital Emergency Care Ed.                        313 Wonsey Road             Montague      MA   01351   367-9250       Y
    62           Process Imagery Health Care Counseling                               P.O. Box 108      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4325        ?
    45                                  Pure Light Gallery                               37 Third St    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9625       N
    56                               Queen of Clean, The                            19 Franklin St.      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3455       Y
    81                 Rau's Sunoco Service and Towing                      531 Turners Falls Rd.          Montague      MA   01351   367-2475       N
    31                                        Real Pickles                              P.O. Box 40        Montague      MA   01351   863-9063       Y
    11                      Redwing Meadow Trout Farm                          528 Federal Street          Montague      MA   01351   367-9494      Farm
    53                                  Regal Real Estate                            131 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9555       N
    23                              Renaissance Painting                       240 Greenfield Rd.          Montague      MA   01351   367-9896       Y
    72                                  Rendezvous (Pub)                            78 Third Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   no listing     N
    53                                           Rentway                             230 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9500       N
    53                                Reynolds Properties                  62 East Taylor Hill Rd.         Montague      MA   01351   367-2425       Y
    44                               Rick Dodge Antiques                     436 Greenfield Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-2885       N
    11                               Ripley's Sugarhouse                     195 Chestnut Hill Rd.         Montague      MA   01351   367-2031      Farm
    72                                  Roamin' Chef, The             16 West Main Street Apt. 1         Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3903       Y
    72                       Roberto's Family Restaurant                  196 Turners Falls Road        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-0022       N
    81                  Rocky Top Guru, Saab Specialist                29 W. Chestnut Hill Road            Montague      MA   01351   367-9389       Y
    44                             Romco Rubber Stamp                     9 Airport Industrial Park     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3094       N
    54    Room to Manuver/Sustainable Step New England                             31 South Street         Montague      MA   01351   367-2878       Y
    44                                  Room with a Loom                     440 Greenfield Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-2062       N
    72                         Route 63 Roadhouse, The                                32 Federal St      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3384       N
    81                               Rubin's Auto Service                       Millers Falls Road      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2236       N
    45                                    RWCO Products                                   7 H Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   522-1550       Y
    54                                        Safe Pledge                 255 Federal St. Apt. #2          Montague      MA   01351   367-0223       Y
    45                                Salvage Specialists                          5 Lyman Street        Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3552       Y
    44                        Salvation Army Thrift Store                            206 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8726       N
    56                       SanSoucie, Brian Locksmith                       28 Montague Street        Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2471       Y
    44                                            Scotty's                         106 High Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9634       N
    44                                Second Hand Rose                               131 Avenue A       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9703       N
    72                          Senn's Gourmet Catering                          240 Wendell Rd.         Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3490       Y
    44                 Senior Citizen Craft and Gift Shop                     Farren Care Center       Montague City     MA   01376   863-2847       N
    72                            Shady Glen Restaurant                                 7 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9636       N
    44                             Shanahan Companies                                 P.O. Box 168      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4322       N
    62                           Shari O'Brien (therapist)                  35 E. Taylor Hill Road         Montague      MA   01351   367-0307       Y
    71                Shea Community Theater, Inc., The                                71 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2281       N
    62                Shulman, Paula B., Psychotherapist                  536 Turners Falls Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-9894       Y
    32                               Silver Screen Design                  194 Millers Falls Road       Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9523       N
    54                      Simons & Simons (Attorneys)                           77 Fourth Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9506       N
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                                      8-73
    44                    Sirum Equipment Company, Inc.            310 Federal St. RT 63         Montague      MA   01351   367-2481       N
    11                                     Smiarowksi Farm             263 Meadow Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-2751      Farm
    53                                     Sokolosky Realty              56 Fourth Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4393       N
    23                          Starbuck, George and Sons                   115 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4757       N
    11                               Stewart's Nursery, Inc.              Millers Falls Rd.   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2510       N
    23                                      Stone By Design           23 E. Mineral Road       Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-2239       Y
    81                           Stone's Equipment Repair              484 Federal Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-2441       N
    23                                  Stoney's Excavating                18 West Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-2053       N
    81                                         Style Inn, The              1 George Ave.      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4348       Y
    72                                               Subway                   57 Avenue A     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9694       N
    56                                   Superior Landscape     394 Montague City Road        Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-7571       Y
    81                        Suzee's Third Street Laundry                 82 Third Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   no listing     N
    61                                Suzuki Piano Lessons        37A North Leverett Rd.         Montague      MA   01351   367-2766       Y
    45                                               Tack Up            41 E. Main Street      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-2276       N
    81                            Tari's Tender Loving Kare                    5 "M" Street   Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4559       Y
    51                                 Tecapp Media Works                  30 Oakman St.         Montague      MA   01376   863-8680       Y
    72                                    The Montague Inn             485 Federal Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-9371       N
    71            Thomas Memorial Golf and Country Club                        P.O. Box 83    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8003       N
    23            Thomas W. Wyman Electrical Contractor               3 South High Street     Turners Falls    MA   01376   773-0432       Y
    45                                             3-D Bikes         11 West Main Street       Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-9914       Y
    45                        Tibetan Yung Drung Bon Arts            27 N. Leverett Road         Montague      MA   01351   367-9229       Y
    44                                   Timeless Treasures        194 Millers Falls Road     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-2058       Y
    23                          TkB Painting, Sandblasting                  67 Park Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9977       Y
    33           Tool & Instrument Specialties, Ted Armen                  68 Main Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-2010       Y
    54                                       Tracknology Inc.                     Box C60        Montague      MA   01351   367-0149       Y
    51                                  Tradesman Software          65 Millers Falls Road     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8152       Y
    62                             Turners Falls Oral Health                173 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4250       N
    72                           Turners Falls Pizza House                  119 Avenue A      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8000       N
    22                             Turners Falls Hydro LLC                 20 Canal Road      Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-8566       N
    56                                     Turn's Lawn Care                45 Main Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-0230       Y
    54                Up and Running Computer Services                         PO Box 205        Montague      MA   01351   367-0183       Y
    33                                   Village Engraving II              6 Carlisle Ave.    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-4269       Y
    11                                         Waidlich Farm                 Mineral Road      Millers Falls   MA   01349   659-3497      Farm
    22                                       Waterwright Co.           323 Federal Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-2379       Y
    11                                         Watroba Farm                31 West Street        Montague      MA   01351   367-2723      Farm
    56                              Western Properties LLC       146 Pleasant View Ave.       Longmeadow       MA   01106                  N
    23                   Whitney, Jim Plumbing & Heating                       21 H Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-9335       N
    62    Wilkerson & Golden Physical Therapy Associates                7 Burnham Street      Turners Falls    MA   01376   774-7988       N
    54                      Windy Hollow Veterinary Clinic          66 Sunderland Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-0062       Y
    51                         Winrock Ecological Services                 22 Third Street    Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-3087       N
    71                                     Woodland Village         152 Greenfield Road          Montague      MA   01351   773-8250       Y
    11                                       Xenophon Farm          80 Sunderland Road           Montague      MA   01351   367-9828      Farm
    33                Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc.             Industrial Boulevard     Turners Falls    MA   01376   863-0200       N
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                            8-74
    53                                    Yankee Tents            55 Swamp Road          Montague      MA   01351 367-2210      Y
    72                                       Yesterday's   487 Four Mile Brook Rd.     Millers Falls   MA   01376               N
    23                           York Heating & Cooling      194 Millers Falls Road   Turners Falls    MA   01376 863-3717      Y
    51               Your Story Matters: Video and DVD                      13 H St   Turners Falls    MA   01376 863-4480      Y
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                                                8-75
SE C T I O N 9         A PP E N D I X C : O T H E R P L A N N I N G E F F O R TS, 1998-2003
Over the past five years, the Town of Montague and the Franklin Regional Council of
Governments have produced a variety plans that address economic development issues in the
town and region. These plans include the following:

          The Montague Comprehensive Plan (1999)
          The Montague Economic Development Plan (1999)
          The Downtown Turners Falls and Millers Falls Neighborhood Revitalization Plan and
         Strategy (1999)
          The Montague Open Space & Recreation Plan (2003)
          The Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway Corridor Management Plan (1998)
          The Greater Franklin County Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (2000,
         updated annually)
          Growing Together: A Strategic Plan for Integrating Agriculture and Growth
         Management in the Connecticut River Valley of Massachusetts (2001)

The Montague Comprehensive Plan was prepared by the Montague Planning Board in 1999 and
endorsed by Town Meeting after three years of public discussion. As its title suggests, it is a
master plan to guide Town policy, designed for a 10-year period.

The Economic Development Plan was prepared by a consultant for the Montague Economic
Development & Industrial Corporation. MEDIC is a quasi-public agency, with members
appointed by the Board of Selectmen, which is authorized to plan and implement economic
development projects in areas zoned for industrial use in Montague.

The Downtown Turners Falls and Millers Falls Neighborhood Revitalization Plan and Strategy
was prepared by a consultant for the Town under a Massachusetts Municipal Incentive Grant. It
is specific to economic, social and quality of life issues in the two villages.

The Open Space & Recreation Plan was prepared by the Montague Planning & Conservation
Department and the Franklin Regional Council of Governments. It provides a comprehensive
inventory of the Town’s natural, agricultural and recreational resources and sets goals, objectives 
and priorities for their conservation.

The Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway Corridor Management Plan was prepared by the
Franklin Regional Council of Governments. It contains an inventory of scenic, historic and
agricultural resources and infrastructure along the Scenic Farm Byway, which includes Routes
47 and 63 in the Town of Montague, and identifies strategies for promotion of the Byway’s 
economic assets.

The Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy was prepared by the Franklin Regional
Council of Governments in 2000, and is updated annually. The CEDS is supervised by a
committee of town officials and community leaders, including representation from the Town of
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                  9-76
Montague. Every five years, the CEDS committee solicits suggestions for economic
development projects from each of the towns in the region. The town projects are used to
generate a regional priority list, according to criteria created by the CEDS committee. The
CEDS priority list is very important, because it determines eligibility for federal Economic
Development Administration funding.

Growing Together was prepared by the Franklin Regional Council of Governments, Pioneer
Valley Planning Commission, Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, Franklin and
Deerfield Land Trusts, American Farmland Trust and the New England Small Farm Institute.
The document is an analysis and strategic plan for agriculture in the context of other land uses in
Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden counties.

In addition to the plans prepared by the Town and the FRCOG, Mt. Auburn Associates recently
updated its analysis of economic conditions and development needs for the “Northern Tier” of
Massachusetts, which includes communities located on or near Route 2 from the Leominster-
Fitchburg area to North Adams.

Each of these local and regional plans contains goals and objectives designed to promote
economic development. A review of the plans reveals several common themes or strategies
relevant to economic growth in Montague:

      1. Retention, growth and recruitment of manufacturing businesses
      2. Preservation and revitalization of historic villages, including reuse and
         redevelopment of historic industrial sites, especially in downtown areas in T urners
         F alls and M illers F alls
      3. Retention and growth of agricultu ral business
      4. Promotion of tourism based on natural and cultural resou rces

This section explores the goals, objective and implementation strategies related to these themes,
as expressed in plans developed over the past five years.


9.1      I N D UST R I A L D E V E L O PM E N T

9.1.1 Goals for Industrial Development
The first goal of the 2000 CEDS is to !support the retention- moderni0ation- and e2pansion of
manufacturing com panies4 in the region. Objectives related to this goal include the following:

            Expand available financial resources for manufacturers
            Address labor force skills by developing technical and occupational training in
           cooperation with regional technical schools and public and private colleges
            Address physical barriers to modernization and expansion including lack of water,
           sewer, and telecommunications infrastructure in town centers or land identified as
           appropriate for industrial use


Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                   9-77
          Assist towns which act as regional employment centers to address zoning and other
         regulatory issues related to commercial and industrial development

The 2004 CEDS also identifies nine “traditional and emerging clusters of note” in the greater 
Franklin County area, selected due to their “prominence, need or support or opportunity for
facilitation.  “Precision and Cutting Tools Manufacturing and Metalwork” and “Plastics and 
Polymer Manufacturing” are among the clusters chosen for special regional focus. The Northern 
Tier analysis also identified the manufacturing sector for special focus, support and investment.

The Montague Comprehensive Plan identifies !improving our climate for 9uality commerce
and industry4 as one of eight goals for the 2000s. Action steps related to encouraging
manufacturing include:

             Institutionalize capital improvements planning in Montague
             Inventory town-owned lands for their economic development potential
             Create a physical plan for the Turnpike Road landfill area
             Develop Phase Three of the Airport Industrial Park
             Establish an industrial use zone on the northern portion of the Montague Plains
             while establishing protective tools for the southern portion
             Coordinate Airport Plan with other planning efforts
             Ensure adequate infrastructure to supply the needs of appropriate development
             Develop incentive tools for attracting and retaining employers in our commercial
             and industrial areas
             Pursue industrial uses that complement each other in the Airport Industrial Park
             Develop an eco-industrial park that is established to attract environmentally
             sensitive businesses to the town.
             Encourage freight rail stop in Millers Falls to benefit Airport Industrial Park
             tenants

The Future Land Use map included in the Comprehensive Plan identifies three areas for future
industrial development: a “small industrial” area at the Turnpike Road landfill, a “medium 
industrial” zone at the Turners Fall Airport and West Mineral Road, and a “large industrial” area 
on the northern section of the Montague Plains along Millers Falls Road.

The 1999 Economic Development Plan was written after the Comprehensive Plan and reflects
the Future Land Use map. It identifies four geographic areas for MEDIC involvement. The
industrial development zones include the Airport Industrial Park expansion area on privately
owned land zoned for industry along West Mineral Road, and land on the north end of the
Montague Plains along Millers Falls Road owned by Northeast Utilities. The goal of industrial
development in this area would be:

          To build on the current success of the Airport Industrial Park by expanding the
         industrial activities on both sides of Millers F alls Road
          To protect valuable natural resources on the Montague Plains, while also
         enhancing existing industrial development, and
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                9-78
          To further cluster industrial development at the airport area and separate it from
         non-compatible uses.

The plan recognizes that this project would require enhancement and expansion of existing
infrastructure to serve new industrial development, and notes that “policies are needed to govern
industrial development” in these areas.  

The MEDIC plan also identifies the town-owned Turnpike Road landfill area as a site for small-
scale industrial development.

The 2000 CEDS regional list reflects the Town’s economic development strategies as outlined in
the Comprehensive Plan and the MEDIC Plan. The CEDS includes three industrial development
projects in the Town of Montague.

   (1) Development of infrastructure for a new industrial park on Turnpike Road and/or an
       expanded industrial park at the Turners Falls Airport.

   This was the third most important out of nine project submitted to the CEDS committee by
   the Town. Its cost was estimated at between $2 million and $2.5 million per park in 2000.
   The project scored a total of 41 points (the top-scoring project in the region received 69
   points).

   (2) Development of a new industrial park on privately-owned land on the Montague Plains

       The Town ranked this project 6th out of its nine submissions. It received a regional score
       of 44 points. Cost was estimated at $3.5 million.

   (3) Development of a railroad spur to serve new industrial development on the Montague
       Plains

       This was the Town’s seventh priority, and it received a regional score of 41, with an 
       estimated cost of $2 million.


9.1.2 Progress on Industrial Development Goals, 1998-2003

C apital Imp rovements Planning
The Town has formed a Capital Improvements Committee. To date, however, the committee has
been more reactive than proactive. It reviews and makes recommendations on requests for
capital spending, but has not to date developed a multi-year capital improvements plan or
priorities. Work on a capital improvements plan will begin in 2004.

T urnpi ke Road Industrial Pa r k
In 2000, the Town contracted with graduate students at the Conway School of Landscape Design
to prepare a conceptual plan for a new Industrial Park at the landfill site on Turnpike Road. The
students found that of the 163 acres owned by the Town, 59 are easily developable without
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                   9-79
constraints. An additional 23 acres were found to be buildable with constraints, including the
capped landfill and the burn dump. The remaining 81 acres are believed to be severely
constrained due to a combination of steep slopes, erodable soils and wetlands. The students
generated design guidelines for an industrial park on the site. Based on the findings and design
guidelines, the team developed three development scenarios: a “Smart Growth” plan, maximum 
build-out scenario, and reduced fill option.

Under the “Smart Growth” scenario, 54.5 acres of land with no development constraints were
planned for industrial use and a DPW garage, and 102 acres would be devoted to a Town park
and recreational trails and facilities. The maximum build-out scenario devoted 114 acres to
industrial and DPW use, although only 77 were deemed to be buildable. This plan involved
extensive excavation and fill. The reduced fill option reserved 82 acres for industrial and DPW
use, with 47 acres within building envelopes. All the plans identified a need for improved access
and egress.

Since this plan was prepared, there has been renewed interest in developing a new landfill at the
Turnpike Road site. Three companies submitted proposals to the Town for a privately-managed
landfill on town property in 2003 and 2004. The Board of Selectmen is currently considering
these proposals and other options for landfill development.

Industrially-zoned land on Montague Plains
Approximately 1500 acres of land on the Plains was purchased by the Massachusetts Division of
Fisheries and Wildlife for conservation as a wildlife management area. Northeast Utilities
retained title to approximately 500 acres, although not all of this land is zoned for industrial use.
This land remains available for development. The Town has no information to suggest that the
utility has any near-term plan for development or sale of this land.

A irport Industrial Pa r k
Since 1998, there have been some growth and changes in the existing Airport Industrial Park.
Lightlife Foods and New England Extrusion expanded their facilities during this time; and
Mayhew Steel Products, Inc. built a new manufacturing and shipping facility in 2001. There has
also been growth and expansion of non-industrial uses in the Industrial Park: Hallmark Institute
moved into space vacated by Geka Brush in 2002, and Jonathan Edwards Academy, a private
religious school, moved into another vacant facility in 2003. There has been no effort or
discussion about expanding the industrial park onto vacant abutting land.

9.1.3 Trends and Future Directions for Industrial Development
In 2003, the Franklin Regional Council of Governments conducted a survey of all of the
industrial park properties in Franklin County to determine capacity for accommodating
expansion and new businesses. The study found a total of 81 acres or 11 percent of planned
industrial land in the county to be vacant and ready for development. However, a significant
portion of this land is owned by companies that expect to use it for expansion, leaving less land
available to accommodate new businesses.

The FRCOG estimated a timeline for development of remaining vacant land in the county’s six 
established industrial parks using an average rate of industrial development over the last few
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                    9-80
decades. Considering only publicly-owned land, the study estimated that remaining capacity in
existing industrial parks should accommodate approximately 11 years of growth. However,
capacity to accommodate large-scale or extensive operations is more limited. The FRCOG
survey predicts that the supply of parcels greater than five acres in size will meet the county’s 
needs for six to 12 years. Furthermore, almost all of the remaining large parcels are located in
the Randall Pond Industrial Park in Orange. These findings are significant, because the timeline
for development of a new industrial park is five to ten years. If Montague is not proactive in
developing a new industrial park, manufacturers looking to start or expand a business in the
region will have to look to Orange, or move outside the region.


9.2       VILLAGE   R E V I T A L I Z A T I O N A N D R E D E V E L OPM E N T O F H IST O R I C I N D UST R I A L
SI T ES

9.2.1 Village Revitalization Goals
One of the five goals of the 2000 CEDS is to !support the vitality of downtown areas or village
centers and the reuse and redevelopment of underutilized or vacant commercial or industrial
buildings and sites by developing and implementing reuse strategies=4 Objectives related to this
goal include:

            Foster the reuse of older commercial and industrial buildings so that they do not
           become or remain a blight and maximize use of existing infrastructure
            Support the clean up and re-use of contaminated “brownfield” sites.

Two of the four “overriding themes” of the Montague Comprehensive Plan relate directly to 
village revitalization, historic preservation and industrial redevelopment. The 1999 plan states
that !the health of our downtown areas must be improved-4 and !the vitality of all five of our
villages must be retained and enhanced=4 The plan’s first goal is to !preserve and enhance the
historic, architectu ral and cultural character of our town=4

The Comprehensive Plan contains more than a dozen action steps related to enhancing
downtown areas and promoting redevelopment of historic industrial properties. Action steps
include:

               Plan for a Farren area “medical services cluster” and former “Rod Shop 
               Revitalization” area
               Develop adequate parking facilities in commercial areas
               Develop parking facilities for canal industrial area in Turners Falls
               Develop downtown streetscape plans
               Promote adaptive reuse of historic buildings by providing technical, fiscal and
               regulatory support
               Seek redevelopment of “brownfield sites”
               Develop incentive tools for attracting and retaining employers in our commercial
               and industrial areas
               Amend General Business zoning districts to guide future use
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                              9-81
             Create mixed use zoning in downtown areas
             Develop Village Business designations
             Maintain or establish zoning to support medical facilities
             Study potential industrial areas for exemption from the Rivers Act
             Attract and retain preferred businesses through programs to market the downtown
             areas
             Encourage Downtown Business Associations through training and other resources
             Study possibilities for a regional crafts micro-industry training center
             Establish an “art-stead” district in Montague to attract artisans and craftspeople to
             our urban villages

The Future Land Use map delineates an “Historic Industrial” area along the Power Canal in 
downtown Turners Falls.

The MEDIC plan identifies several areas for economic development that fall into the category of
village revitalization and redevelopment of historic resources. The Great Falls Discovery Center
(GFDC), which has been MEDIC’s focus for most of the agency’s 20-year history, is located in
an historic industrial building.  The MEDIC plan’s description of the Discovery Center includes
a 60-car parking lot, natural and industrial history exhibits, the Canalside Rail Trail and site
improvements to the grounds of the Center. The goals of the Discovery Center project include
!to provide an economic stimulus to the area through an increase in tourism=4

MEDIC’s other “Historic Industrial Restoration” areas include the “Canal Industrial Area” 
between the Power Canal and the Connecticut River in Turners Falls, encompassing the
Strathmore and Griswold Cotton mills, and the “Rod Shop/Farren” area in Montague City.  
Goals include:

          Improve the physical condition of historic industrial buildings
          Recycle these historic buildings to new modern uses, and
          Remediate environmental problems at these old industrial sites, in order to remove
         barriers to private redevelopment

The Downtown Turners Falls and Millers Falls Neighborhood Revitalization Plan and Strategy
emphasizes communication and collaboration between town officials and residents to improve
the quality of life and promote economic vitality in downtown Turners Falls and Millers Falls.
The Plan recommends a variety of action steps to promote these goals, including:

             Treat daily destination stores as anchors
             Increase mass transportation and improve schedules
             Form village business associations and improve the Montague Business
             Association
             Improve parking in Millers Falls
             Market the business areas better, e.g. through an historic theme
             Consider changing the name of Turners Falls, perhaps to Great Falls
             Support efforts for a railroad spur
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                 9-82
             Get Amtrak passenger service to Millers Falls
             Improve Route 2 signage, e.g. “Turners Falls Historic District”
             Recruit a small deli for downtown Turners and downtown Millers
             Establish decent public restrooms in the villages

Among the purposes of the Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway Corridor Management Plan is
a goal to !protect the character of historic districts and village centers along the corridor=4
Montague-specific strategies listed in the plan include:

          Undertake a streetscape improvement program for Millers Falls
          Pursue funding for detailed inventory of historic structures and creation of a
         nomination package for Millers Falls to the National Register of Historic Plans
          Develop conceptual designs for vacant or underutilized sites in Millers Falls village
         center

The Byway Plan also made a variety of recommendations for land use controls along the corridor
in Montague. These suggestions include:

          Consider creating a Village Center District for Millers Falls and related zoning bylaws
         including design guidelines to protect the character of the village center
          Consider creating design guidelines to ensure that future development and
         redevelopment in the village center of Millers Falls are consistent with the historic
         character

The 2000 CEDS included several Montague projects that fall into the category of village
revitalization and redevelopment of historic industrial sites. Rehabilitation of the Colle Opera
House for retail and commercial use was the Town’s top-rated project and ranked second among
all of the projects submitted to the CEDS in the region with a score of 67.

Cleanup and redevelopment of the Strathmore Mill was the Town’s second-ranked CEDS
project. It also scored high on the regional priority list with a total of 53 points. Redevelopment
of the blighted industrial area at the Rod Shop in Montague City, the town’s 4 th priority, scored
37 points on the regional list. Development of a multi-modal transportation facility, including a
passenger rail stop in Millers Falls was the Town’s 5th priority and scored 39 points in the CEDS;
and the Town’s 8th priority, cleanup and redevelopment of the Griswold Cotton Mill to provide
space for storage, warehousing and small manufacturing, scored 36 points.


9.2.2 Progress on Village Revitalization and Redevelopment of Historic Industrial
    Sites

Pa r king in Commercial A reas & Downtown Industrial A rea
Since 1998, the Town of Montague and its partners have built several new parking lots in
downtown Turners Falls: a 62-car lot on Second Street, designed to serve the Great Falls
Discovery Center and the Strathmore Mill, a 50-car lot on the corner of Third and L Streets to

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                 9-83
serve the Cutlery Apartments, and lots providing 39 spaces between Second and Third Streets to
serve the Colle Opera House and Shea Theater. In addition, with support from a state Municipal
Brownfields Grant, the Town developed conceptual plans for a parking lot on the site of the
abandoned garage on Third and Canal Streets.

Downtown Streetscape Plans
The Town has developed a streetscape plan for downtown Millers Falls, which has dedicated
federal funding through the Transportation Enhancements program, and is scheduled for
construction in 2004.

Promote A daptive Reuse of H istoric Buildings
The Town of Montague and its partners have made major progress in the revitalization of
historic buildings since 1998. During this time, the Franklin County Regional Housing and
Redevelopment Authority leveraged private financing to restore the dilapidated Cutlery Block
apartments and the fire-ravaged Crocker Building in downtown Turners Falls. In 2003, the
Town completed renovation of the historic Colle Opera House; the building is expected to be
fully occupied by the end of 2004. The Great Falls Discovery Center opened in restored
industrial buildings along Avenue A in 2003. The Housing Authority is currently working on a
$2 million renovation of the Moultenbrey building on Third Street and Avenue A.

With funding from a Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development
Ready Resources Grant, the Town offered technical and financial assistance to private owners of
commercial buildings in downtown Turners Falls and Millers Falls for façade restoration and
accessibility improvements. This program resulted in investment of $320,750 in five buildings
in the two villages.

A ttract and Retain Prefer red Businesses
One of the Town’s goals for the newly-renovated Colle Opera House is to attract a new
restaurant to downtown Turners Falls. A new restaurant would serve people who work in the
downtown, patrons of the Shea Theater, and the influx of visitors the Town expects to be
generated by the opening of the Great Falls Discovery Center and the Canalside Rail Trail.

In 2003, the Town of Montague collaborated with the Franklin Regional Council of
Governments on a survey to determine the market for a new restaurant in Turners Falls.
Approximately 3,750 surveys were mailed to households in Montague, Greenfield, Deerfield and
Gill and distributed to members of the Chamber of Commerce and select businesses in Turners
Falls. Close to 500 surveys were returned. The survey found that 45 percent of respondents
went out for lunch between one and three times per week, and 41 percent went out to dinner one
to three times per week. Patrons of the Shea Theater ate out more frequently, and spent more on
dinner than other survey respondents. Overall, analysis of survey results concluded that Turners
Falls could support additional food service businesses. The Town is using the results of the
survey and analysis in its efforts to recruit a restaurant tenant for the Colle.

Seek Redevelopment of B rownfield Sites
In 2002, the Town received a Massachusetts Municipal Brownfields grant to prepare a
conceptual plan for the redevelopment of a brownfields site located on the corner of Third and
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                               9-84
Canal Streets as a public parking lot. The plan was prepared by Tighe & Bond, Inc. The Town
has been working with the Franklin Regional Council of Governments to assess hazardous
substances on this property, as well as at the Strathmore Mill, under a grant from the United
States Environmental Protection Agency. In 2003, the Town applied for another EPA grant to
demolish the abandoned garage and clean up the property on Third and Canal. The Brownfields
Assessment of the Strathmore Building found that there was no contamination on the site
requiring cleanup under federal or Massachusetts law. The Town has expressed interest in
working with the new owners of the Strathmore to facilitate redevelopment of the mill. The
Town, the Franklin Regional Council of Governments and the owner of the Strathmore have
requested predevelopment assistance from MassDevelopment to investigate options for access
and on-site parking at the Strathmore complex.

Commercial Zoning
Until 1999, General Business was the Town’s only commercial zone.  It permits a wide variety 
of commercial uses, as well as multifamily housing. Since 1999, the Planning Board proposed,
and Town Meeting approved the creation of several new business zones, including Central
Business, Neighborhood Business, and Rural Business. The Central Business prohibits
residential uses at the street level. It was applied to the commercial cores of Turners Falls and
Millers Falls, as well as the Rod Shop area. The Neighborhood Business zone, which applies to
areas of downtown Turners Falls, Millers Falls and Montague City Road allows limited business
uses and two-family houses by right. The Rural Business zone applies to the Route 63 corridor,
and allows agricultural and small-scale businesses and single-family residential use by right.
General Business zoning now only applies to small areas in downtown Millers Falls, along
Millers Falls Road and along Turnpike Road.

E ncourage Downtown Business Associations T hrough T raining and Other Resou rces
The Town has worked with the Franklin County Community Development Corporation
(FCCDC) to encourage and support a downtown business association in Turners Falls. This
effort has been somewhat less than successful; the business association is not currently active.

FCCDC also worked with residents of Millers Falls on a variety of issues, including business
growth and development as well as quality of life issues in the village. This effort resulted in the
formation of the Millers Falls Community Connection, a civic group made up of Millers Falls
residents. This group is still active, and organizes annual cleanups and block parties. It is not,
however, specifically focused on business.

Establish an “Art-stead” District in Montague to A ttract A rtisans and C raftspeople to our
U rban V illages
While the Town has not enacted specific zoning or provided targeted incentives to attract
artisans, a significant number of artists have opened studios and/or galleries in downtown
Turners Falls since 1998, including at least two sculptors, two photographers, a woodworker, a
lighting designer and a fine art gallery. Several of these businesses have received technical
support and/or loans from the FCCDC.

Inventory of H istoric Structu res

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                  9-85
In 2001, the Town applied for state funding to prepare an application to nominate downtown
Millers Falls to the National Register of Historic Places. This application was not funded. In
2003, however, the Town of Montague was chosen to receive direct assistance from the
Massachusetts Historical Commission to prepare an inventory of historic properties. This work
is currently under way and is expected to be complete by the end of 2004.


9.3    A G R I C U L T U R A L B USI N ESSES

9.3.1 Agricultural Business Goals
The 2000 CEDS addresses agriculture as an economic development strategy in its goal to
“support the expansion of growth industries including specialty food products, environmental
companies- and information and technology based businesses=4 Related objectives include:

          Support the creation of cooperatives to produce and market specialty food products
          Provide resources to support farming and production of specialty food products

The 2004 CEDS update identifies “Agriculture and Food Processing” as one of the key economic 
clusters in the greater Franklin County region.

Growing Together recommends a variety of strategies to link agriculture, economic development
and planning, including but not limited to the following actions that can be taken at the local
level:

          Include agriculture in municipal planning documents
          Adapt and incorporate local and regional business retention and enhancement tools
          and strategies for agricultural businesses
          Create economic development incentives for agricultural businesses
          Consider modifications to local excise taxes on farm animals, machinery and
          equipment
          Exempt agricultural land from betterment taxes

The Montague Comprehensive Plan also recognizes the economic value of agriculture. Its goal
to !improve our climate for 9uality commerce and industry,4 specifically includes agriculture
and forestry. The plan recommends that the Town:

             Establish an Agricultural Advisory Committee to provide feedback to town
             officials regarding agricultural issues
             Participate in regional and state programs to help stabilize farm businesses
             Leverage all resources to maximize participation in the Massachusetts Agricultural
             Preservation Restriction Program
             Encourage local farmers to participate in MassDFA’s Farm viability program that 
             merges business planning, land restrictions and cash grants
             Revise zoning and subdivision regulations to allow for more flexible residential
             development that maintains viable agricultural parcels
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                              9-86
             Utilize all available technical resources including the Natural Resources
             Conservation Service and UMASS Cooperative Extension Service.

The Future Land Use map designates a “Prime Agricultural” area that extends along the 
Connecticut River, Meadow Road and Greenfield Road, encompassing land along Hatchery
Road and the southwestern section of Turners Falls Road.

The importance of agriculture is also emphasized in the Open Space and Recreation Plan, which
identifies ensuring !the continued viability of commercial agriculture and forestry in the Town
of Montague and to conserve prime farmland soi ls4 as a key goal. Objectives related to this
goal include:

          Educate Montague residents about the role of commercial agriculture and forestry in
         ensuring the Town’s fiscal stability and continued high quality of life
          Develop an Agricultural Advisory Committee to study and recommend local policies
         to promote the viability of agricultural businesses in Montague
          Enhance the public visibility to agricultural business in Montague and promote
         purchase of local farm and forest products
          Promote conservation of valuable agricultural soils and permanent protection of
         farmland through the APR program, consistent with the plans and desires of
         landowners
          Offer assistance to farmers and woodlot owners who wish to plan for the conservation
         of their land
          Support statewide policies and participate in state programs designed to promote
         agriculture and enhance the viability of agricultural businesses.

E xpanding economic opportunities for farm-related businesses is one of the purposes of the
Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway. The plan recommends that the Byway Committee:

          Establish a limited and targeted marketing program that is focused on promoting the
         sale of locally grown products in coordination with the Massachusetts Department of
         Food and Agriculture, the Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism and the
         Franklin County and Hampshire County Chambers of Commerce
          Create a regional farmer’s market

The plan also promotes participation in the state Agricultural Preservation Restriction and Farm
Viability programs.

The Town of Montague did not submit any economic development projects to the CEDS related
to agriculture in 2000. The top-ranked project on the regional list that year, however, was the
Food Processing Center in Greenfield, a business incubator for specialty food processors,
caterers and farmers.

9.3.2 Progress on Agricultural Businesses


Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                9-87
Pa rticipation in the M assachusetts Agricultu ral Preservation Rest riction Program
The Montague Conservation Commission has voted to support several applications to the APR
program with donations from the Town’s Conservation Fund. The Planning & Conservation 
Department actively works with landowners, state officials and non-profit land trusts to promote
and facilitate participation in the APR program.

Revise zoning and subdivision regulations to allow for more flexible residential
development that maintains viable agricultu ral parcels
In 2003, the Planning Board proposed and Town Meeting approved the creation of an
Agricultural Business overlay district that allows the development of limited or zero-frontage
residential lots on land that is not valuable for agriculture in exchange for the permanent
protection of valuable agricultural land with frontage.

M arketing
In 1999, the Franklin Regional Council of Governments produced a brochure identifying
agricultural businesses along the Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway, which runs along
routes 47 and 63 in Montague.

Food Processing C enter
The Franklin County CDC’s Food Processing Center opened in 2001.  It encompasses a 
commercial kitchen, storage space with a loading dock and a co-packing facility. As of 2004, at
least three Montague residents were running businesses that use the Food Processing Center’s 
facilities. One of these businesses obtains the majority of its ingredients from local farms.

9.4    PR O M O T IO N   O F T O U R ISM B ASE D O N N A T UR A L A N D C U L T U R A L R ESO U R C ES


9.4.1 Tourism Goals
All recent local and regional plans emphasize the importance of natural and cultural resources to
economic development in Montague and Franklin County. The 2000 CEDS expresses this in its
goal to !E2pand and protect the natural- recreational- civic and cultural resources of the
CEDS Region and support economic development initiatives relating to those resources=4
CEDS objectives related to this goal include:

          Support collaborative marketing projects
          Develop infrastructure to support the tourism and natural resource-related industries
          Nurture and support art-related and creative industries.

The 2004 CEDS update identifies “Tourism and Hospitality” and “Arts, Crafts and the Creative
Cluster” in its priority sectors for economic development. The Northern Tier update also flags 
the creative cluster as a growth industry for the region.

Preservation and development of historic, cultural and natural resources improves quality of life
for residents and provides a basis for tourism.  Both purposes are recognized in Montague’s 1999 
Comprehensive Plan. The goals section of the plan recommends that the community !Preserve
and enhance the historic, architectural and cultural character of our town ; Improve our active
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                9-88
and passive recreational opportunities; Guide appropriate use of regionally significant
resources of our town; and Guide appropriate use of our open space and sensitive natural
resources=4 Action steps to implement these goals include:

             Preserve historic viewsheds
             Promote the Montague section of the Connecticut River Regional Heritage
             Corridor Project
             Inventory all historic, architectural and cultural elements/sites
             Develop incentives to facilitate a variety of historic preservation efforts for priority
             Support establishment of the Scenic By-way
             Create scenic view bylaws/overlays
             Establish an “art-stead” district in Montague to attract artisans and craftspeople to 
             our urban villages
             Maintain and enhance the Shea Theater
             Design and build a new outdoor performance space
             Foster the continued establishment of a Montague wildlife corridor that forms a
             ‘necklace’ of open space adorning the town
             Support continued operation of the state fish hatchery
             Cooperate with plans for the development of the Conte Fish and Wildlife Refuge
             Support development of the Franklin County Bikeway

The Future Land Use map identifies scenic woodland areas east of Route 63, north of Montague
Center and between East and West Mineral Roads. It also recommends that the lower 2/3 of the
Montague Plains be protected for its ecological value.

The Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway Plan recommends that Byway towns !Promote a
low impact approach to tourism based on agricultural, recreational and historic resources that
minimi0es traffic congestion=4 Strategies for achieving this goal include:

          Create a brochure which identifies berry picking operations, orchards, Christmas tree
         farms, and other agricultural retail operations as well as existing businesses along the
         corridor which provide tourism services including restaurants, inns, museums, and
         retail establishments which are unique and consistent with the rural character of the
         scenic farm Byway.
          Review the logo and sign system adopted in New Hampshire and Vermont for
         possible adoption in Massachusetts

To protect scenic views along the Byway in Montague, the Byway plan suggests a “Ridge 
Protection Overlay District,” and design guidelines for development along the corridor. 

The 2003 Open Space and Recreation Plan contains an extensive inventory of the Town’s 
natural, scenic and recreational resources, and recommends that the Town !Promote
MontagueFs historic and rural character and outdoor recreational opportunities to tourists=4
The plan notes, however, that the Town currently lacks the support services, such as dining and
lodging establishments, that would generate direct economic benefits from increased tourism.
Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                   9-89
9.4.2 Progress on Tourism

Support establishment of the Scenic By-way
The Connecticut River Scenic Farm Byway was established in 2000.

Support continued operation of the state fish hatchery
Governor Mitt Romney proposed closing the Bitzer State Fish Hatchery in 2003; it has been kept
open due to the efforts of sportsmen and women, Montague officials and the Town’s legislative 
delegation.

Support development of the F ran klin County Bikeway
The Town of Montague has strongly supported development of the Bikeway since its inception.
Construction of the Canalside Rail Trail in Turners Falls began in summer 2004.

C reate F a rm B rochu re
This was produced in 1999; it would be good to update it periodically as funding is available.


9.4.3 Trends and Future Directions
In 2004, with the encouragement of State Senator Stanley Rosenberg, MEDIC began a process of
planning for the development of a cultural tourism facility on the grounds of the Great Falls
Discovery Center. The facility would be located in a former Cumberland Farms Convenience
Store on Avenue A that was acquired by eminent domain in the early 1990s and served as
interim offices of the Discovery Center until 2003. Funding has been awarded to the University
of Massachusetts Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning Department to assist the town
in planning for this facility.




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                                                9-90
SE C T I O N 10         A PP E N D I X D: R ESO U R C ES
10.1   P U B L I C A G E N C I ES A N D O R G A N I Z A T I O NS

Town of Montague
One Avenue A
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Web: www.montague.net

Board of Selectmen & Town Administrator
Phone: (413) 863-3204
Fax:(413) 863-
Email:selectscty@montague.net

Planning Department
Phone: (413) 863-3208
Fax: (413) 863-3222
Email: planner@montague.net


F ranklin County C hamber of Commerce
395 Main Street
Greenfield, MA 01301
Phone: (413) 773-5463
Fax: (413) 773-3008
Email: fccc@crocker.org
Web: http://www.co.franklin.ma.us

F ranklin County Community Development Corporation
324 Wells Street
Greenfield, MA 01301
Phone: (413) 774-7204
Fax: (413) 773-3562
Email: amys@fccdc.org
Web: http://www.fccdc.org

F ranklin-H ampshi re Regional E mployment Board
One Arch Place
Greenfield, MA 01301
Phone: (413) 773-1835
Fax: (413) 784-1765
Email: fhreb@crocker.com
Web: http://www.fhcc-onestop.com/reb.html

Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004                      10-91
F ranklin County Housing and Redevelopment A uthority
42 Canal Road, P.O. Box 30
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Phone: (413) 863-3781
Fax: (413) 863-9289
Email:
Web: http://www.fchra.org/top_about_hra.htm

M assachusetts O ffice of Business Development
436 Dwight Street, Suite B-40
Springfield, MA 01103
Phone: (413) 784-11580
Fax: (413) 739-9175
Email: Arthur.Levin@state.ma.us

W estern M assachusetts Economic Development Council
255 Padgette Street, Suite One
Chicopee, MA 01022
Phone: (413) 593-6421
Toll Free: (888) 593-6421
Fax: (413) 593-5126
Email: feedback@westernmassedc.com
Web: http://www.westernmassedc.com




Montague Economic Development Plan, June 2004           10-92

								
To top