State of Wisconsin 1 SBA – Small Business Administration 1 by cuiliqing

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									State of Wisconsin                                                                1
SBA – Small Business Administration                                               1
  Wisconsin District Office                                                       1
   Wisconsin SCORE Chapters                                                       1
   Wisconsin Small Business Development Centers                                   1
   Wisconsin Women's Business Centers                                             3
   Wisconsin Patriot Express Lenders                                              4
   SBAExpress Lenders for Wisconsin                                               8
   Community Express Lenders For Wisconsin                                       23
   Certified Lenders (CLP) in Wisconsin                                          25
   Preferred Lenders Program (PLP)                                               27
   WI Certified Development Companies (CDC)                                      31
Department of Commerce                                                           34
  Business Development in Wisconsin                                               34
    Entrepreneurs and Start-ups                                                   35
    Trade Show Grant Program                                                      36
       Travel Grant                                                               38
    Financial Assistance                                                          38
       Early Planning Grant (EPG)                                                 38
       Entrepreneurial Training Program (ETP)                                     38
       Direct Lending                                                             39
       Special Tax Credit Programs                                                39
       Agricultural Development Zones                                             39
       Community Development Zones                                                40
       Dairy Manufacturing Facility Investment Credit                             41
       Enterprise Development Zones                                               42
       Wisconsin Manufacturing Investment Credit Program (MIC)                    43
       Technology Zones                                                           44
       Wisconsin's Industrial Revenue Bond Program                                44
    Employee Training                                                             45
       Customized Labor Training (CLT)                                            45
       Business Employees Skills Training (BEST)                                  45
    Minority Business Development (MBD) Loan Program                              45
    Small Business Clean Air Assistance Program                                   47
    Community Development Block Grant for Economic Development Revolving Loan Fund
    (CDBG-ED/RLF)                                                                 49
    Wisconsin Diesel Truck Idling Reduction Grant Program                         50
    Agriculture Businesses                                                        51
       Dairy 2020 Initiative                                                      51
       Dairy 2020 Early Planning Grant (EPG)                                      51
       Milk Volume Production                                                     51
       Tax Credits                                                                52
  Division of Housing & Community Development (DHCD)                              52
    Blight Elimination and Brownfield Redevelopment Program (BEBR)                53
    CDBG-Emergency Assistance Program (CDBG-EAP)                                  54
  CDBG Grant Planning Grant Program (CDBG-PLNG)                          55
     Regional Economic Development Planning Grants                       55
     Community Planning Grants                                           55
     Site Specific Planning Grants                                       56
     Functional Planning Grants                                          56
  CDBG-Small Cities Housing Program                                      57
  Community Development Block Grant For Public Facilities (CDBG-PF)      59
  ESG/THP/HPP                                                            61
     Emergency Shelter Grant                                             61
     Transitional Housing Program                                        61
     Homelessness Prevention Program                                     61
  HCRI Homebuyer Program                                                 62
  HOME-Homebuyer and Rehabilitation Program (HHR)                        63
  Project for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness (PATH)      64
  Rental Housing Development                                             65
     Wisconsin Business Retention and Expansion Study Program (WIBRES)   65
  Wisconsin Neighborhood Stabilization (WNS) Program                     66
  Community-Based Economic Development Program (CBED)                    67
  Critical Assistance Program (CA)                                       68
  HOME- Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program (TBRA)                    69
  Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS                             70
  Interest Bearing Real Estate Trust Accounts Program (IBRETA)           71
  Wisconsin Main Street Overview                                         71
  State Shelter Subsidy Grant Program                                    72
  Wisconsin Fresh Start                                                  73
  Health Professions Loan Assistance Program (HPLAP)                     74
 Housing Services                                                        75
  Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)                               75
  Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME)                            76
     HomeBuyer and Rehabilitation Program (HHR)                          76
  Rental Housing Development (RHD)                                       76
  Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program (TBRA                           76
     Wisconsin Fresh Start Program (WFS)                                 76
  Homeless Programs/Initiatives                                          76
Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection                   77
   The 2008 Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative Grant Program          77
   2008 Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative Grant Opportunities:       78
     Grazing Grants For Technical Assistance And Education               78
     Grazing Grants For Research                                         78
   Dairy Investment Tax Credit                                           78
   Value Added Dairy Initiative                                          79
     Grow Wisconsin Dairy Team                                           79
     Dairy Business Innovation Center                                    79
     2008 VADI Dairy Processor Innovation Grants                         79
   Loans                                                                 79
     USDA - Farm Service Agency                                          79
     Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority                                  80
     Wisconsin Department of Commerce                                                      80
     Wisconsin Small Business Administration                                               80
   Grants                                                                                  80
     Dairy 2020                                                                            80
     Agricultural Development and Diversification Grant Program                            80
     Grow Wisconsin Dairy Team Grants                                                      80
   Educational                                                                             80
     University of Wisconsin-Extension Cooperative Extension                               80
     Wisconsin Technical College System                                                    80
     UW-Madison, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences                                 80
     Program on Agricultural Technology Studies                                            81
     University of Wisconsin Center for Dairy Profitability                                81
     University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Animal Science                          81
     Beginning Farmer Center of Iowa State University Extension                            81
     Social Sciences Unit of Missouri University's College of Agriculture, Food and Natural
     Sciences                                                                              81
   Governmental                                                                            81
     Wisconsin Farm Service Agency                                                         81
     Farmland Preservation                                                                 81
     Wisconsin Stewardship Program                                                         81
Women’s Business Initiative Corporation                                                   82
   WWBIC Micro Loans                                                                      82
   West Allis Small Business Development Program                                          83
Urban Economic Development Association (UEDA) of Wisconsin                                83
 Technical Assistance and Programs                                                        84
   UEDA Member Training                                                                   84
   Technical Assistance Grants                                                            84
   Making Connections Milwaukee (MCM)                                                     84
   Business Assistance Caucus of Milwaukee (BACOM)                                        85
   Milwaukee Community Development Intervention Team (McDIT)                              85
   Renewal Community Tax Credits                                                          86
     Renewal Community Wage Credit                                                        86
     Commercial Revitalization Deduction                                                  86
     Increased Section 179 Deduction                                                      87
     Capital Gain Exclusion                                                               87
Department of Natural Resources                                                           87
 Community Financial Assistance (CFA)                                                     88
   Environmental Loans                                                                    88
   The Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP)                                                    88
     Hardship Financial Assistance                                                        89
     Small Loan                                                                           89
   The Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP)                                           92
   Land Recycling Loan Program (LRLP)                                                     93
   Grants                                                                                 93
     Brownfield Site Assessment Grant                                                   93
     Brownfields Green Space and Public Facilities Grant                                94
     Dry Cleaning Environmental Response Program                                        95
Farm Service Agency                                                                     96
   Direct Farm Loans                                                                    96
   Direct Ownership Loans                                                               96
   Direct Operating Loans                                                               97
   Emergency Farm Loans                                                                 97
   Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Loans                                                 98
   Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers                                          99
   Youth Loans                                                                         100
   Guaranteed Farm Loans                                                               100
   Emergency Conservation Program                                                      101
   Farmable Wetlands Program                                                           102
   Grassland Reserve Program                                                           104
Housing & Economic Development Authority                                              106
   Tax-Exempt Bond Financing                                                           106
   Stand-Alone Bond Financing                                                          107
   Tax Credit Development Financing                                                    107
   Construction Plus Loan                                                              108
   Preservation of Affordable Housing                                                  109
   Section 8 Contract Administration                                                   109
   Tax Credit Allocating Program                                                       109
   Neighborhood Business Revitalization Guarantee (NBRG)                               111
   Contractors Loan Guarantee (CLG)                                                    111
   WHEDA Small Business Guarantee (WSBG)                                               112
   Linked Deposit Loan (LiDL) Subsidy                                                  113
   Agribusiness Guarantee                                                              113
   Credit Relief Outreach Program (CROP)                                               114
   Farm Asset Reinvestment Management (FARM) Guarantee                                 115
   Housing Choice Voucher Program                                                      116
   Home Loan                                                                           117
   Home Loan for Veterans                                                              117
   Major Rehabilitation Loan                                                           118
   Partnership for Homeownership                                                       118
   Home Loan                                                                           119
   Partnership Neighborhood Initiative                                                 120
Wisconsin Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency                                    121
 Financial Incentives                                                                  121
   Alliant Energy-WP&L - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs                             121
   Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industry Energy Efficiency Lighting Rebates
                                                                                       122
   Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program       123
   Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program      124
   Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Energy Efficient Retrofit Lighting Rebate Program   125
 Energy Independence Fund Grant and Loan Program                                        125
 Focus on Energy - Commercial/Industrial Efficiency Incentives                          127
 Focus on Energy - Efficient Heating and Cooling Cash-Back Rewards                      129
 Focus on Energy - Energy Star Products Cash-Back Rewards                               130
 Focus on Energy - Home Performance with Energy Star                                    131
 Focus on Energy - Renewable Energy Cash-Back Rewards                                   131
 Focus on Energy - Renewable Energy Grant Programs                                      133
 Madison Gas & Electric - Clean Power Partner Solar Buyback Program                     135
 Madison Gas & Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program                     136
 Marshfield Utilities - Commercial/Industrial/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate
 Program                                                                                137
 Marshfield Utilities - Energy-Efficient Motor Rebate Program                           138
 Marshfield Utilities - Ground-Source Heat Pump Rebate Program                          139
 Marshfield Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program                    139
 Riverland Energy Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program                    140
 Solar and Wind Energy Equipment Exemption                                              141
  We Energies - Biogas Buy-Back Rate                                                    142
  We Energies - Custom Energy Efficiency Incentive Program                              143
  We Energies - Direct Financial Incentives for Not-for-Profits                         144
  We Energies - Livestock and Dairy Farm Electrical Re-wiring Program                   145
  We Energies - Multi-family, Non-Profit, and Small Business Energy Efficiency Rebate
 Program                                                                                146
  We Energies - Prescriptive Incentive Program                                          147
  We Energies - Solar Buy-Back Rate                                                     148
  We Energies - Solar Thermal Incentives for Non-Profits                                150
 Xcel Energy - Farm Rewiring Incentives                                                 151
 Xcel Energy - Farm Rewiring Loan Program                                               151
 Xcel Energy - Renewable Energy Buy-Back Rates                                          152
 Xcel Energy - Residential Conservation Programs                                        153
Rules, Regulations & Policies                                                           154
 Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings                     154
 Focus on Energy Program                                                                156
 Interconnection Standards                                                              158
 Madison - Contractor Licensing                                                         159
 Madison - Green Power Purchasing                                                       160
 Madison - Solar in City Planning Guidelines                                            161
 Renewable Portfolio Standard                                                           162
 Solar and Wind Access Laws                                                             163
  Wisconsin - Green Power Purchasing                                                    165
  Wisconsin - Net Metering                                                              166
  Wisconsin Energy Conservation Code                                                    167
State of Wisconsin

SBA – Small Business Administration
Wisconsin District Office
740 Regent Street, Suite 100
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 441-5263 Fax (608) 441-5541
310 West Wisconsin Ave. Room 400
Milwaukee, WI 53203
(414) 297-3941 Fax (414) 297-1377

Wisconsin SCORE Chapters
 South East Wisconsin     Madison                     Fox Cities             Central WI
Chapter 28            Chapter 145                 Chapter 382            Chapter 535

 Reuss Federal Bldg.      505 South Rosa          125 North Superior     P.O. Box 868
 310 West Wisconsin       Road                    St                     Marshfield, WI 54449
 Ave., Room 425           Room 37                 P.O. Box 1855
 Milwaukee, WI 53203      Madison, WI 53719       Appleton, WI 54912     info@marshfieldcham
                                                                         ber.com
 score@scoresewisconsin   scoreoffice@scorem      score@foxcitiesbusin   715-384-3454
 .org                     adison145.org           ess.com
 414-297-3942             608-441-2820            920-734-7101
 www.scoresewisconsin.
 org
 Counties Served:         Counties Served:        Counties Served:       Counties Served:
 Dodge, Fond du Lac,      Dane, Columbia,         Calumet, Green         Adams, Clark, Juneau,
 Kenosha, Jefferson,      Grant, Green, Iowa,     Lake, Marquette,       Portage, Taylor, Wood
 Milwaukee, Racine,       Lafayette, Richland,    Outagamie,
 Ozaukee, Sheboygan,      Sauk                    Waupaca, Waushara,
 Walworth, Washington,                            Winnebago
 Waukesha

Wisconsin Small Business Development Centers
Wisconsin SBDC State Office
State Director
University of Wisconsin-Extension
432 North Lake Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53706
Office 608-263-7794, Fax 608-263-7830
Website: www.wisconsinsbdc.org

Small Business Development Center - Eau Claire
UW Eau Claire Continuing Education
210 Water Street, Eau Claire, WI 54702-4004
(715) 836-5811 Fax: (715) 836-5263
Email: Ask-SBDC@uwec.edu


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Small Business Development Center - Green Bay
University of Wisconsin Green Bay
2701 Larsen Road, Suite A3, Green Bay, WI 54303
(920) 496-2117 or (800) 940-7232
Fax: (920) 496-6009

Small Business Development Center - La Crosse
University of Wisconsin La Crosse
Room 120, W. Carl Wimberly Hall, La Crosse, WI 54601
(608) 785-8782 Fax: (608) 785-6919

Small Business Development Center - Madison
University of Wisconsin Madison
Neil Lerner, Director
Grainger Hall, 975 University Avenue, Room 3260, Madison, WI 53706
(608) 263-7680 or (800) 940-7232 Fax: (608) 263-0818

Small Business Development Center - Milwaukee
UWM School of Continuing Education
Tim Peterson, Director
161 West Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 6752, Milwaukee, WI 53203
(414) 227-3240 or (800) 222-3623 Fax: (414) 227-3142

Small Business Development Center - Oshkosh
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
347 City Center, Oshkosh, WI 54901-4825
(920) 424-1453 or (800) 232-8939 Fax: (920) 424-2005

Small Business Development Center - Parkside
Renaissance Business Park
2320 Renaissance Blvd., Sturtevant, WI 53177
(262) 898-7414 Fax: (262) 898-7401

Small Business Development Center - Platteville
University of Wisconsin Platteville
510 Pioneer Tower, Platteville, WI 53818-3099
(608) 342-1038 Fax: (608) 342-1599

Small Business Development Center - River Falls
University of Wisconsin River Falls
410 South Third Street, South Hall Room 128, River Falls, WI 54022
(715) 425-0620 Fax: (715) 425-0707

Small Business Development Center - Stevens Point
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
2100 Main Street, 032 Main Building, Stevens Point, WI 54481-3897



2
(715) 346-3838 or (800) 898-9472 Fax: (715) 346-3504

Small Business Development Center - Superior
University of Wisconsin-Superior
305 Erlanson, Belknap Street & Catlin Avenue
P.O. Box 2000, Superior, WI 54880-4500
(715) 394-8351 or (800) 410-8351 Fax: (715) 394-8592

Small Business Development Center - Whitewater
University of Wisconsin Whitewater
402 McCutchan Hall, Whitewater, WI 53190
(262) 472-3217 Fax: (262) 472-1600

Specialty Centers
Center for Advanced Technology and Innovation (CATI)
2320 Renaissance Blvd., Sturtevant, WI 53177
262-898-7512. 262-898-7401 fax

Center for Innovation and Development (CID)
UW-Stout
278 Jarvis Hall, Menomonie, WI 54751
715-232-1548 or 866-880-2262 Fax 715-232-1105

Wisconsin Innovation Service Center (WISC)
UW-Whitewater
402 McCutchan Hall, Whitewater, WI 53190

Wisconsin Women's Business Centers
Northeast Entrepreneur Fund
8355 Unity Drive, Suite 100, Virginia, MN 55792
Telephone: 218-749-4191 or 800-422-0374 FAX: 218-749-5213
Website: entrepreneurfund.org

Western Dairyland Women's Business Center (WDWBC)
23122 Whitehall Road, P.O. Box 125, Independence, WI 54747
Telephone: 715-985-2391 Ext. 211 or 800-782-1063 Ext. 211
Fax: 715-985-3239
Website: successfulbusiness.org

Wisconsin Women's Business Initiative Corporation (WWBIC)
Milwaukee Location
Wendy K. Baumann, President
2745 N. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53212
Telephone: (414) 263-5450 FAX: (414) 263-5456
Email: info@wwbic.com
Website: wwbic.com



                                                                3
Wisconsin Women's Business Initiative Corporation (WWBIC)
Madison Location
2300 S. Park Street, Madison, WI 53713
Telephone: (608) 257-5450 FAX: (608) 257-5454
Email: info@wwbic.com
Website: wwbic.com

Wisconsin Women's Business Initiative Corporation (WWBIC)
Kenosha Chamber of Commerce
600 52nd Street, Kenosha, WI 53140
Telephone: 262-654-1234 Ext. 114 Fax: 262-654-4655
Email: info@wwbic.com
Website: wwbic.com

Wisconsin Patriot Express Lenders
American National Bank - Fox Cities
(920) 739-1040
Fax (920) 739-9216
Vice President at (920) 739-1040

Associated Bank, N.A., Kimberly
Contact: Vice President/SBA Program Manager
(920) 727-5480
Fax (920) 727-5487

Bank of Galesville, Galesville
Contact: Senior Loan Officer
(608) 582-2233 Fax (608) 582-4511

Bank of Mauston, Mauston
Contact: Executive Vice President
(608) 847-6200 ext. 230 Fax (608) 847-5372

Baraboo National Bank, Baraboo
Contact: VP, Credit Administration
(608) 356-7703 or (800) 559-0011
Fax: (608)356-3044

Branch Banking and Trust Company, GA
(770) 522-0582
Fax (770) 551-8781

Bremer Bank, NA, Menomonie
Contact: President/Market Manager
(715) 235-2144




4
Citizens Bank, Flint, MI
Contact: Vice President
(800) 946-2264 or (810) 471-4510 Fax: (810) 768-4822

Citizens State Bank of Clayton, Clayton
Contact: Loan Officer
(715) 948-2142

CIT Small Business Lending
Inverness, IL (847) 934-0559
Livingston, NJ (800) 713-4984 Ext. 6004
Golden, CO (303) 232-2212

Comerica Bank, IL
Contact: BD Officer Wisconsin Contact
(847) 381-5959 Fax: (847) 381-2536

Commerce Bank, NA
Contact: Vice President
(908) 237-4758 or (800) 722-2005

Community First Credit Union, Appleton
Contact: Vice President/Business Services
(920) 830-7200 or (866) 273-2328

Community State Bank, Union Grove
Contact: Vice President
(262) 878-3763 Fax (262) 878-3637

Eagle Valley Bank, N.A., St. Croix Falls
Contact: Business Banking
(715) 483-3241 Fax: (715) 483-3114

Evergreen State Bank, Stoughton
Contact: Vice President
(608) 877-7756 Fax (608) 873-6920

Farmers & Merchants Bank, Tomah
Contact: Senior Vice President
(608) 372-2126 Fax (608) 372-5385

First Citizens State Bank, Whitewater
Contact: President
(262) 473-2112 Fax (262) 473-3039




                                                       5
First National Community Bank, New Richmond
(715) 246-6901 Fax (715) 246-7181

First State Bank, New London
(800) 994-2500 or (920) 982-3300 Fax: (920) 982-4998

Foundations Bank, Pewaukee
(262) 691-9400

Great Wisconsin Credit Union, Madison
Contact: Dana Hoffman, Vice President Business Services
(608) 244-2400 x2139 Fax: (608) 271-6982

GuarantyBank, Milwaukee
SBA Lending Manager/AVP
(952) 854-5366
Fax: (888) 677-2985

Heartland Credit Union, Madison
(608) 282-7000 or (800) 362-3944

Johnson Bank, Racine
Contact: AVP/Corporate Credit Manager II
(414) 287-6488
Fax: (414) 287-6458
SVP-Corporate Credit Services
(262) 619-2659 Fax: (262) 619-8403

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA Wisconsin
SBA Product Manager
(614) 248-7163 Fax: (614) 244-8794

Ladysmith Federal Savings & Loan Association, Ladysmith
Contact: CEO/President
(715) 532-3389 or (888) 532-5375
Fax (715) 532-7680

Marshfield Savings Bank
Contact: CEO/President
(715) 387-1122
Fax (715) 387-3035

McFarland State Bank, McFarland
Contact: Commercial Lending
(608) 838-5026
Fax (608) 838-2275



6
(608) 838-5025 Commercial Lending

Merchants Bank, Onalaska
(608) 779-8200
Fax (608) 779-8282

M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Milwaukee
Vice President/SBA Finance Manager
(414) 443-3303 Fax (414) 443-3396

Mound City Bank, Platteville
Sr. Vice President of Lending
(608) 348-2685 or 888-622-6069 Fax (608) 348-8035

National City, IN
Contact: Scott Burns, Senior Vice President
(317) 267-8887 Fax: (317) 267-3613

Newtek Small Business Finance, Inc., Milwaukee
Sr., Vice President/Loan Processing
(800) 749-8707

Oak Bank, Fitchburg
Contact: AVP/Credit Administrator
(608) 441-6000 or (877) 625-2265
Fax (608) 441-6001

Park Bank (The), Madison
Contact: Vice President Business Banking
(608) 845-0205

Park Bank, Milwaukee & Brookfield
Contact: Vice President
(414) 466-8000 Fax (262) 827-1077

Peoples Bank of Wisconsin, Hayward
Contact: Vice President
(715) 634-2674 or (800) 575-8528 Fax: (715) 634-8027

Peoples State Bank, Prairie du Chien
Contact: Loan Officer
(608) 326-3500 or (800) 280-1074 Fax (608) 326-2928

Peoples State Bank, Wausau
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(715) 847-4041



                                                       7
Fax (715) 842-3418 or
Senior Vice President (715) 847-4077

River Bank, La Crosse
Contact: Vice President
(608) 788-6300 Fax (608) 788-3607

River Cities Bank, Wisconsin Rapids
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(715) 422-1100 or (877) 525-7155 Fax (715) 422-1150

Royal Credit Union, Eau Claire
Contact: Vice President
(715) 833-8111 or (800) 341-9911

Southwest Bank of St. Louis, MO
Contact: Executive VP & Chief Credit Officer
(314) 621-0000 or (800) 558-9840 Fax (314) 621-1217

Stearn’s Bank, St. Cloud
Contact: SBA Operations Supervisor
(877) 320-2899 Fax: (320) 258-4815

Superior Financial Group, Walnut Creek, CA
(877) 675-0500 toll free or (925)296-0500 FAX (925)296-0510

Timberwood Bank, Tomah
Contact: Vice President/Commercial Lending
(608) 372-2265 Fax: (608) 372-3757

U.S. Bank, National Association
Contact: U.S. Bank - SBA Division
(888) SBA-EZ4U (722-3948) or
(414) 765-6061

Wells Fargo Bank Wisconsin, NA, Milwaukee & La Crosse
Contact: Business Development Officer
(414) 224-7152 Fax (414) 224-3796

Patriot Express Loan Program - http://www.sba.gov/patriotexpress/index.html

SBAExpress Lenders for Wisconsin
AbbyBank, Abbotsford
Contact: Vice President/Loans
(715) 223-2345 Ext. 229 Fax (715) 223-6385




8
Altra Federal Credit Union, La Crosse, WI
Contact: Vice President, Business Lending
(608) 787-4500 or (800) 755-0055
Fax (608) 787-4556

Amcore Bank, National Association
Contact: VP & Gov't Guaranteed Lending Manager
(815) 961-2792 Fax (866) 451-1147

American Alliance Bank, Eau Claire
Contact: Credit Analyst
(715) 834-5327 Fax (715) 834-3818

American Bank & Trust Wisconsin, Platteville
Contact: Senior Vice President
(608) 348-4300

American National Bank - Fox Cities
Contact: President
(920) 739-1040
Fax (920) 739-9216 or Vice President at (920) 739-1040

AnchorBank, fsb, Madison
(608) 259-4101 Fax: (608) 252-8833

Associated Bank, N.A., Kimberly
Contact: VP/ SBA Program Manager
(920) 727-5480 Fax (920) 727-5487

Bank First National, Manitowoc
Contact: Vice President
(920) 652-3115 Fax (920) 652-3140

Bank Mutual, Milwaukee
(414) 371-8272 Fax (414) 371-8305

Bank of Galesville, Galesville
Contact: Senior Loan Officer
(608) 582-2233 Fax (608) 582-4511

Bank of Luxemburg, Luxemburg
Contact: Senior Vice President
(920) 845-2345 Fax (920) 845-5759

Bank of Mauston, Mauston
Contact: Executive Vice President



                                                         9
(608) 847-6200 ext. 230 Fax (608) 847-5372

Bank of Prairie du Sac, Prairie du Sac
Contact: Senior Vice President
(608) 643-3393

Bank of Wausau, Wausau
Contact: AVP of Operations and Administration
(715) 845-8680 or (800) 721-0777
Fax: (715) 849-4252

Bank of the West, Spooner
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 635-7713 Ext. 227
Fax (715) 635-8905

Baraboo National Bank, Baraboo
Contact: VP, Credit Administration
(608) 356-7703 or (800) 559-0011
Fax: (608)356-3044

Bay Bank, Green Bay
Contact: Vice President
(920) 490-7600 Fax (920) 490-0930

Baylake Bank, Sturgeon Bay
Contact: President/CEO or (920) 743-5551
(800) 267-3610
Fax (920) 743-7422

Blackhawk Bank, Beloit
Contact: Senior Vice President of Business Banking
(815) 986-7173 or (800) 209-2616

BLC Community Bank, Little Chute
Contact: President
(920) 788-4141 Fax (920) 788-4592

Branch Banking and Trust, Atlanta, GA
(770) 522-0682 or (800) 226-5228 Fax (770) 551-8781

Bremer Bank, Menomonie
President/Market Manager
(715) 235-2144




10
Business Bank of the Fox River Valley (The), Appleton
Contact: Commercial Loan Officer
(920) 739-2660
Fax (920) 739-2698

Capitol Bank, Madison
Contact: President/Commercial Loan Officer
(608) 836-1616
Fax (608) 836-9045

Capital One, F.S.B
Contact: SBA Loan Manager
(804) 284-1035 Fax (804) 284-1866

Charter Bank, Eau Claire
Contact: Vice President
(715) 832-4254

Citizens Bank, Flint, MI
Contact: Vice President
(800) 946-2264 or (810) 766-7685

CitizensFirst Credit Union, Oshkosh
Contact: Vice President
(920) 236-7040 or (800) 448-9228 Fax (920) 236-7703

Citizens State Bank, Cadott
Contact: Financial Officer and Commercial Loan Officer
(715) 289-4253 Fax (715) 289-4323

Citizens State Bank, Hudson
Contact: Assistant Vice President/Commercial Lending
(715) 386-9050 Fax (715) 386-1051

Citizens State Bank of Clayton, Clayton
Contact: Loan Officer
(715) 948-2142

Citizens State Bank of Loyal, Neillsville
Contact: Vice President
(715) 743-7494 or (866) 743-7494 Fax (715) 743-7495

Commerce State Bank
Contact: Commercial Lender
(262) 247-2800 Fax (262) 247-2888




                                                         11
Community Bank of Central Wisconsin, Colby
Contact: Vice President
(715) 223-3998 or (888) 464-1122 Fax (715) 223-8899

Community Bank & Trust, Sheboygan
Contact: Senior Vice President
(920) 459-4444 Fax (920) 459-4450

Community Business Bank, Sauk City
Contact: Loan Quality Officer
(608) 643-6300 Fax (608) 643-5444

Community First Bank, Rosholt
Contact: President/CEO
(715) 677-4523
Fax: (715) 677-4099

Community First Credit Union, Appleton
Contact: Vice President, Business Services
(920) 830-7200
Fax: (920) 968-1051

Community South Bank, Appleton
Contact: First Vice President/Business Development Officer
(920) 560-4506
Fax (920) 560-4508

Community State Bank, Union Grove
Contact: Vice President
(262) 878-3763
Fax (262) 878-3637

Cornerstone Community Bank, Grafton
Contact: Vice President
(262) 375-9150 Fax (262) 375-9484

Coulee Bank, La Crosse
Contact: Vice President/Senior Loan Officer
(608) 784-9550 Fax (608) 784-1069

CoVantage Credit Union, Antigo
Contact: AVP Commercial Lending
(715) 627-4336 or (800) 398-2667 Fax: 715-623-3219




12
Cumberland Federal Bank, Cumberland
Loan Officer
(715) 822-2249
Fax (715) 822-2279

DMB Community Bank, DeForest
Contact: Sr. Vice President
(608) 846-3711     Fax: (608) 846-9677

Eagle Valley Bank, N.A., St. Croix Falls
Contact: Business Banking
(715) 483-3241
Fax: (715) 483-3114

Evergreen State Bank, Stoughton
Contact: Vice President
(608) 877-7756
Fax (608) 873-6920

Farmers & Merchants Bank (The), Berlin
Contact: Vice President
(920) 361-1454 ext. 2226
Fax: (920) 361-0500

Farmers & Merchants Bank, Tomah
Contact: Senior Vice President
(608) 372-2126
Fax (608) 372-5385

Farmers & Merchants Bank & Trust, Marinette
Contact: Assistant VP/Commercial Loan Officer
(715) 735-6617 or (800) 789-6617
Fax (715) 735-4234

Farmers & Merchants State Bank, Waterloo
Contact: Vice President, Commercial Lending
(920) 478-2181
Fax (920) 478-3592

First American Bank, Hudson
Contact: Vice President
(715) 381-8330
Fax (715) 377-5330

First Bank of Baldwin
Contact: Commercial Lender



                                                13
(715) 684-3366 or (800) 499-4362
Fax (715) 684-2624

First Bank Financial Centre, Oconomowoc
(262) 569-9900
Fax (262) 567-5734

First Banking Center, Kenosha
Contact: Vice President
(262) 697-9110
Fax (262) 697-9635

First Citizens State Bank, Whitewater
Contact: President
(262) 473-2112
Fax (262) 473-3039

First Community Bank, Milton
Contact: President & CEO
(608) 868-7644
Fax (608) 868-7746

First National Bank Fox Valley, Menasha & Neenah
Contact: Vice President Commercial Lending
Menasha (920) 729-6900
Neenah (920) 729-6901
Fax (920) 729-6999

First National Bank of Hartford
Contact: Vice President & Senior Loan Officer
(800) 945-0195 or (262) 673-5800 Fax (262) 673-8925

First National Bank of River Falls (The)
Contact: Vice President
(715) 425-2401
Fax (715) 425-9018

First National Bank & Trust, Barron
Contact: Commercial Lending Officer
(715) 537-5681
Fax (715) 537-9297

First National Community Bank, New Richmond
(715) 246-6901
Fax (715) 246-7181




14
First State Bank, New London
Contact: Senior Vice President
(920) 982-3300 or (800) 994-2500
Fax (920) 982-4998

Fortress Bank Minnesota, Houston, MN
Contact: President/CEO
(507) 896-3179
Fax (507) 896-3243

Foundations Bank, Pewaukee
Contact: First Vice President
(262) 691-9400

Fox Communities Credit Union, Appleton
Contact: Vice President
(920) 882-8400
Fax (920) 882-8399

Grafton State Bank, Grafton
Contact: Vice President
(262) 377-5511
Fax (262) 377-6328

Great Wisconsin Credit Union, Madison
Contact: Vice President Business Services
(608) 244-2400 x2139 Fax: (608) 271-6982

GuarantyBank, Milwaukee
Contact: SBA Lending Manager/AVP
(952) 854-5366
Fax: (888) 677-2985

Heartland Business Bank, Sheboygan
Contact: Market President
(920) 803-6816
Fax (920) 793-6001

Heartland Credit Union, Madison
Contact: Vice President of Lending
(608) 282-7000 or (800) 362-3944

Heritage Bancshares Group, Inc., Wilmar, MN
(800) 344-7048 Ext. 108 Fax (320) 235-2234




                                              15
Hometown Bank, St. Cloud/Fond du Lac
Contact:
(920) 906-9405
Fax: (920) 907-8743
St. Cloud Office (920) 999-3563

Horicon Bank, Horicon
Contact: Vice President
(920) 485-3040 Fax: (920) 485-3056

Innovative Bank, Oakland, CA
Contact: Headquarters, 360 14th St. Oakland, CA 94612
(866) 812-1216 or (888) 960-0700

Investors Community Bank, Manitowoc
Contact: CEO or Tim Schneider, Vice President
(920) 686-9998 Fax (920) 686-5688

Johnson Bank, Racine
Contact: AVP/Corporate Credit Officer
(414) 287-6488 Fax: (414) 287-6458

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, Dallas, TX
Contact: Senior Vice President
(877) 717-6738 or (877) 422-1696

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA Wisconsin
Contact: SBA Product Manager - East/Midwest/Central
(614) 248-7163
Fax (614) 244-8794

KimCentral Credit Union, Neenah
Contact: President/CEO
(920) 720-2572 or (800) 236-5228 Fax (920) 720-2538

Ladysmith Federal Savings & Loan Association, Ladysmith
Contact: CEO/President
(715) 532-3389 or (888) 532-5375 Fax (715) 532-7680

Lakeview Credit Union, Neenah
Contact: Vice President of Lending
(920) 729-5100
Fax: (920) 729-5110




16
Landmark Credit Union, New Berlin
Contact: Senior vice President
(262) 796-4500
Fax: (262) 796-4532

Layton State Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: Senior Vice President
(262) 821-6200
Fax: (414) 645-9870

Lincoln State Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: Executive Vice President
(414) 671-6510
Fax (414) 671-5622

Marine Bank, Pewaukee
Contact: Senior Vice President
(262) 695-4303

Marshfield Savings Bank
Contact: CEO/President
(715) 387-1122 Fax (715) 387-3035

McFarland State Bank, McFarland
Contact: Commercial Lending
(608) 838-5026
Fax (608) 838-2275 orCommercial Lending (608) 838-5025

Merchants Bank, Onalaska
(608) 779-8200
Fax (608) 779-8282

M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: VP, SBA Finance Manager
(414) 443-3303
Fax (414) 443-3396

Middleton Community Bank, Middleton
Contact: Senior Vice President/Senior Lender
(608) 824-3200 Fax (608) 831-3738

Mid-Wisconsin Bank, Medford
Contact: Loan Operations Officer
(715) 748-8300 or (800) 643-9472 Fax: (715) 748-6574




                                                         17
Milwaukee Western Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: (414) 442-5800 or
(800) 980-9277
Fax (414) 449-8032

Mitchell Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: President
(414) 645-0600 Fax (414) 645-4020

Monona State Bank, Monona
Contact: Vice President Business Banking
(608) 223-5159 Fax (608) 223-3007

Mound City Bank, Platteville
Contact: Sr. Vice President of Lending
(608) 348-2685 or 888-622-6069 Fax (608) 348-8035

National Bank of Commerce, Superior
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 394-5531

National City, IN
Contact: Senior Vice President
(317) 267-8887 Fax: (317) 267-3613

Newtek Small Business Finance, Inc., Milwaukee
Contact: Sr. VP/Loan Processing Operations
(800) 749-8707

North Shore Bank, FSB, Brookfield
Contact: Senior Vice President
(262) 797-3858

Northern State Bank, Ashland
Contact: Vice President
(715) 682-2772

Oak Bank, Fitchburg
Contact: AVP/Credit Administrator
(608) 441-6000 or (877) 625-2265 Fax (608) 441-6001

Oostburg State Bank, Oostburg
Contact: Vice President
(920) 564-2336 Fax (920) 564-3889




18
Palmyra State Bank, Palmyra
Contact: Vice President
(262) 495-2101
Fax (262) 495-2104

Park Bank (The), Madison
Contact: Vice President Business Banking
(608) 845-0205

Park Bank, Milwaukee & Brookfield
Contact: Vice President Commercial Banking
(262) 827-5105 Fax (262) 827-1077

Peoples Bank, Elkhorn
Contact: Vice President
(262) 723-4200 or (866) 923-4200 Fax (262) 743-1500

Peoples Bank of Wisconsin, Hayward
Contact: Vice President
(715) 634-2674 or (800) 575-8528 Fax: (715) 634-8027

Peoples State Bank, Wausau
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(715) 847-4041 Fax (715) 842-3418 or
Patrick Heier, Senior Vice President at (715) 847-4077

Peoples State Bank, Prairie du Chien
Contact: Loan Officer
(608) 326-3500 Toll Free - (800) 280-1074 Fax (608) 326-2928

Pigeon Falls State Bank, Pigeon Falls
Contact: President
(715) 983-2295 Fax: (715) 983-5898

Pioneer Credit Union, Green Bay
Contact: VP/Lending
(920) 494-2828 Toll Free (800) 728-4294 Fax (920) 494-5720

Port Washington State Bank, Port Washington
Contact: Vice President/Senior Loan Officer (262) 284-4416 Ext. 1105 or
AVP/Business Lending (262) 284-4416 Ext. 1108

Premier Community Bank, Marion
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(715) 754-2535 or (877) 835-2262 Fax (715) 754-5905




                                                                          19
PyraMax Bank, fsb, South Milwaukee
Contact: Vice President Business Banking
(414) 571-6900

RidgeStone Bank, Brookfield
Contact: Chairman & CEO
(262) 789-1011
Fax (847) 805-9806

River Bank, La Crosse
Contact: Vice President
(608) 788-6300 Fax (608) 788-3607

River Cities Bank, Wisconsin Rapids
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(715) 422-1100 or (877) 525-7155 Fax (715) 422-1150

River Valley Bank, Wausau
Contact: Business Banking Officer
(715) 845-5522

Royal Credit Union, Eau Claire
Contact: Vice President
(715) 833-8111 or (800) 341-9911

Rural American Bank, Luck
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 472-2161 Fax (715) 472-2170

Securant Bank & Trust, Milwaukee
Contact: Commercial Lending
(414) 442-5800 Fax (414) 449-8032

Shoreline Credit Union, Manitowoc
Contact: Commercial Loan Officer
(920) 482-3721

State Bank of Arcadia, Arcadia
Contact: EVP Commercial/Ag Lending
(608) 323-3331 or (800) 869-8021

State Bank of Cross Plains, Cross Plains/Waunakee
Contact: Vice President
(608) 826-3502 Fax (608) 826-3535
or Senior Vice President (608) 849-2710




20
State Bank Financial, La Crosse
Contact: Chief Lending Officer/EVP
(608) 784-4600

State Bank of Viroqua, Viroqua
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(608) 637-3127 Fax (608) 637-3394

Stearns Bank, St. Cloud, MN
Contact: SBA Operations Supervisor
(877) 320-2899 Fax (320) 258-4815

The First National Bank of Park Falls, Park Falls
Contact: President
(715) 762-8311

The First National Bank and Trust Company, Clinton
Contact: AVP/Commercial Loan Officer
(608) 676-5552 or (800) 667-4401 Fax (608) 363-8174

The Peoples Community Bank, Mazomanie
Contact: First Vice President
(608) 795-2120 or (800) 795-2151 Fax (608) 795-2133

The Reedsburg Bank, Reedsburg
Contact: Senior Vice President
(608) 524-8251 or (888) 253-1277 Fax (608) 524-8375

Timberwood Bank, Tomah
Contact: Vice President/Commercial Lending
(608) 372-2265 Fax: (608) 372-3757

Tomahawk Community Bank S.S.B., Tomahawk
Contact: Chief Operating Officer
(715) 453-5354 Fax (715) 453-8135

Town Bank, Delafield
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(262) 646-6888 or (800) 433-3076 Fax (262) 646-6889

Town and Country Bank, Watertown
Contact: Vice President
(920) 262-2900 Fax (920) 262-2963




                                                      21
Union Bank & Trust Company, Evansville
Contact: Teri Martin, Loan Support Officer
(608) 882-5200 Ext. 1123 Fax (608) 882-6889

Union State Bank of West Salem, West Salem
Contact: Steven L. Zeman, Vice President
(608) 786-0600 or (608) 786-6200 Fax: (608) 786-0603

UPS Capital Business Credit, Hartford, CT
Contact: Credit Underwriting Manager
(800) 637-0620

U.S. Bank, National Association
Contact: U.S. Bank - SBA Division
(888) SBA-EZ4U (722-3948) or (414) 765-6061

WaterStone Bank SSB, Wauwatosa
Contact: Vice President
(414) 761-1000 or (888) 686-7272

Waukesha State Bank, Waukesha
Contact: Vice President
(262) 549-8551 Fax (262) 574-4104

Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, NA
Contact: Vice President
(612) 667-2753 Fax (612) 667-3558

Wells Fargo Bank Wisconsin, NA, Milwaukee & La Crosse
Contact: Business Development Officer
(414) 224-7152 Fax (414) 224-3796

West Bend Savings Bank, West Bend
Contact: Senior Vice President
(262) 334-5563 Fax (262) 334-5306

WESTconsin Credit Union, Menomonie
Contact: Business Loan Manager
(800) 924-0022 or (715) 235-3403 Fax (715) 232-4999

Wisconsin State Bank, Random Lake
Contact: Senior Vice President
(920) 994-4362 or (800) 419-7324 Fax ( 920) 994-9679

WoodTrust Bank, N.A., WI Rapids
Contact: Vice President



22
(715) 423-7600 Fax: (715) 422-0300

Woodford State Bank, Monroe
Contact: Vice President
(608) 325-7766
Fax (608) 325-7895

Community Express Lenders For Wisconsin
Associated Bank, N.A., Kimberly
Contact: VP/SBA Program Manager
(920) 727-5480 Fax (920) 727-5487

Community Bank & Trust, Sheboygan
Contact: Senior Vice President
(920) 459-4444 Fax (920) 459-4450

First Banking Center, Kenosha
Contact: Vice President
(262) 697-9110 Fax (262) 697-9635

Innovative Bank, Oakland, CA
Contact: VP & SBA Department Manager, Ext. 6880 or
SBA Lending Officer, Ext. 6862
(888) 960-0700 or (866) 812-1216

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, Dallas, TX
Contact: Senior Vice President
(877) 717-6738 or (877) 422-1696

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA Wisconsin
Contact: SBA Product Manager - East/Midwest/Central
(614) 248-7163 Fax (614) 244-8794
or Vice President (414) 765-3412 Fax (414) 765-2464

Ladysmith Federal Savings & Loan Association, Ladysmith
Contact: CEO/President
(715) 532-3389 or (888) 532-5375 Fax (715) 532-7680

Lincoln State Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: Executive Vice President
(414) 671-6510 Fax (414) 671-5622

McFarland State Bank, McFarland
Contact: Commercial Lending
(608) 838-5026 Fax (608) 838-2275
or Commercial Lending (608) 838-5025



                                                          23
M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: Vice President/SBA Finance Manager
(414) 443-3303 Fax (414) 443-3396

Mitchell Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: President
(414) 645-0600
Fax (414) 645-4020
Website: http://www.mitchellbank.com

National Bank of Commerce, Superior
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 394-5531

National City, Indianapolis, IN
Contact: Senior Vice President
(317) 267-8887 Fax (317) 267-3613

Park Bank, Milwaukee & Brookfield
Contact: Vice President Commercial Banking
(262) 827-5105 Fax (262) 827-1077

Peoples State Bank, Wausau
Contact: Andy Kochendorfer, Assistant Vice President
(715) 847-4041 Fax (715) 842-3418 or
Patrick Heier, Senior Vice President (715) 847-4077

Super Financial Group, Danville, CA
(925) 899-8449 Fax (925) 831-3217

The First National Bank of Park Falls, Park Falls
Contact: President
(715) 762-8311

Town Bank, Delafield
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(262) 646-6888 or (800) 433-3076 Fax (262) 646-6889

U.S. Bank National Association
Contact: U.S. Bank - SBA Division
(888) SBA-EZ4U (722-3948) or
(414) 765-6061

Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, NA
Contact: Vice President
(612) 667-2753 Fax (612) 667-3558



24
Wells Fargo Bank Wisconsin, NA - Milwaukee & La Crosse
Contact: Business Development Officer
(414) 224-7152 Fax (414) 224-3796

Certified Lenders (CLP) in Wisconsin
Amcore Bank, National Association, Illinois
Contact: VP & Gov't Guaranteed Lending Manager
(815) 961-2792 Fax (866) 451-1147

American National Bank - Fox Cities
Contact: President
(920) 739-1040 Fax (920) 739-9216 or
Vice President (920) 739-1040

Associated Bank, N.A., Kimberly
Contact: Vice President/SBA Program Manager
(920) 727-5480 Fax (920) 727-5487

Bank First National, Manitowoc
Contact: Vice President
(920) 652-3115 Fax (920) 652-3140

Bank of the West, Spooner
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 635-7713 Ext. 227 Fax (715) 635-8905

Baylake Bank, Sturgeon Bay
Contact: President/CEO or Jamie Alberts
(920) 743-5551 (800) 267-3610 Fax (920) 743-7422

CIT Small Business Lending, Livingston, NJ
Contact: VP Business Development
(800) 713-4984 Ext. 6004 Fax (973) 422-6130
Golden, CO - Western Region Processing (303) 232-2212 Fax (303) 202-3789
Inverness, IL - Richard Trotter (847) 934-0559 Fax (847) 934-0594

Comerica Bank
Contact: Executive Vice President
(408) 556-5129 or (800) 521-1190 Fax (408) 556-5397

Community Bank & Trust, Sheboygan
Contact: President/CFO or Joel Sandee, Senior Vice President
(920) 459-4444 Fax (920) 459-4450

Community First Credit Union, Appleton
Contact: VP Business Services



                                                                           25
(920) 830-7200 or (866) 273-2328 Fax: (920) 968-1051

Cornerstone Community Bank, Grafton
Contact: Vice President
(262) 375-9150 Fax (262) 375-9484 or
(262) 251-9050 Fax: (262) 253-5810

First Bank Financial Centre, Oconomowoc
(262) 569-9900 Fax (262) 567-5734

First Business Bank, Madison
Contact: President or Senior Vice President
(608) 238-8008 Fax (608) 232-5920

First National Bank Fox Valley, Menasha & Neenah
Contact: Vice President Commercial Lending
Menasha (920) 729-6900 Neenah (920) 729-6901 Fax (920) 729-6999

Heartland Business Bank, Sheboygan
Contact: Market President
(920) 803-6816 Fax (920) 793-6001

Heritage Bancshares Group, Inc., Wilmar, MN
(800) 344-7048 Ext. 108 Fax (320) 235-2234

Hometown Bancorp, LTD, St. Cloud
Contact: Fond du Lac Office (920) 907-0788
         St. Cloud Office (920) 999-3563

Investors Community Bank, Manitowoc
Contact: Vice President
(920) 686-9998 Fax (920) 686-5688

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA Wisconsin
Contact: SBA Product Manager - East/Midwest/Central
(614) 248-7163 Fax (614) 244-8794

M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: Vice President/SBA Finance Manager
(414) 443-3303 Fax (414) 443-3396

National Exchange Bank & Trust, Fond du Lac
Contact: Assistant Credit Manager
(920) 921-7700 Fax (920) 923-7013




26
Peoples State Bank, Wausau
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 842-2191 or (888) 929-9902 Fax (715) 842-3418

Stearns Bank, St. Cloud, MN
Contact: SBA Operations Supervisor
(877) 320-2899 Fax (320) 258-4815

U.S. Bank, National Association
Contact: U.S. Bank - SBA Division
(888) SBA-EZ4U (722-3948) or
Dominic Karaba at (414) 765-6061

Waukesha State Bank, Waukesha
Contact: Assistant Vice President
(262) 549-8500 or (262) 549-8551 Fax (262) 574-4102

Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, NA
Contact: Vice President
(612) 667-2753 Fax (612) 667-3558

Wells Fargo Bank Wisconsin, NA, Milwaukee & La Crosse
Contact: Business Development Officer
(414) 224-7152 Fax (414) 224-3796

Wisconsin Community Bank, Sheboygan
Contact: SBA Contact
(920) 803-6005 Fax (920) 803-6010

Preferred Lenders Program (PLP)
Amcore Bank, National Association
Contact: VP & Gov't Guaranteed Lending Manager
(815) 961-2792 Fax (866) 451-1147

American National Bank Fox Cities, Appleton
Contact: Vice President
(920) 739-1040 Fax (920) 739-9216

Associated Bank, N.A., Kimberly
Contact: VP/SBA Program Manager
(920) 727-5480 Fax (920) 727-5487

Bank First National, Manitowoc
Contact: Vice President
(920) 652-3115 Fax (920) 652-3140




                                                        27
Bank of the West, Sacramento CA
Contact: Applicant inquiries: (866) 306-7254

Bank of the West, Spooner
Contact: Senior Vice President
(715) 635-7713 Ext. 227 Fax (715) 635-8905

Baraboo National Bank, Baraboo
Contact: VP, Credit Administration
(608) 356-7703 or (800) 559-0011 Fax: (608)356-3044

Baylake Bank, Sturgeon Bay
Contact: President/CEO or Jamie Alberts
(920) 743-5551 (800) 267-3610 Fax (920) 743-7422

Branch Banking and Trust Company, Atlanta, GA
(770) 522-0582 Fax (770) 551-8781

Bremer Bank, Menomonie
Contact: President/Market Manager
(715) 235-2144

Business Lenders, LLC, Hartford CT
Contact: President & CEO
(877) 345-6267 or (860) 244-9202

Citizens Bank, Flint, MI
Contact: Vice President
(800) 946-2264 or (810) 766-7685

CIT Small Business Lending, Livingston, NJ
Contact: National Account Manager (973) 535-3782 Fax (973) 422-6130
Regional Account Manager (480) 784-9668 Fax (480) 784-9681

Commerce Bank, NA, Flemington, NJ
(908) 237-4758 or (800) 722-2005

Comerica Bank, IL
Contact: Business Development Officer, WI Contact
(847) 381-5959 Fax (847) 381-2536

Community Bank & Trust, Sheboygan
Contact: Senior Vice President
(920) 459-4444 Fax (920) 459-4450




28
Community First Credit Union, Appleton
Contact: Vice President Business Services
(920) 830-7200 or (866) 273-2328

Community South Bank, Appleton
Contact: First Vice President/Business Development Officer
(920) 560-4506 Fax (920) 560-4508

Cornerstone Community Bank, Grafton
Contact: Vice President (PLP Contact) or Craig Bauer, Vice President
(262) 375-9150 Fax (262) 375-9484

First Bank Financial Centre, Oconomowoc
(262) 569-9900 Fax (262) 569-9909

Foundations Bank, Pewaukee
Contact: Christopher Brock, First Vice President
(262) 691-9400

GuarantyBank, Milwaukee
Contact: SBA Lending Manager/AVP
(952) 854-5366 Fax: (920) 854-5729

Heartland Business Bank, Sheboygan
Contact: Market President
(920) 803-6816 Fax (920) 793-6001

Heritage Bancshares Group, Inc., Wilmar, MN
(800) 344-7048 Ext. 108 Fax (320) 235-2234

Hometown Bank, St. Cloud
Contact: Fond du Lac Office (920) 906-9405 Fax (920) 907-8743
          St. Cloud Office (920) 922-1640 Fax (920) 922-1740

Investors Community Bank, Manitowoc
Contact: William C. Censky, CEO or Tim Schneider, Vice President
(920) 686-5604 Fax (920) 686-5688

Johnson Bank, Racine
Contact: AVP Corporate Manager II (414) 287-6488 Fax (414) 287-6458
SVP Corporate Credit Services (262) 619-2659 Fax (262) 619-8403

JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, Dallas, TX
Contact: Senior Vice President
(877) 717-6738 or (877) 422-1696




                                                                       29
JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA Wisconsin
Contact: SBA Product Manager - East/Midwest/Central
(614) 248-7163 Fax (614) 244-8794

M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Milwaukee
Contact: Vice President/SBA Finance Manager
(414) 443-3303 Fax (414) 443-3396

Midwest Business Capital
Contact: President and CEO
(614) 638-1954 or (877) 751-4622 Fax (614) 225-9728

National City, Indianapolis, IN
Contact: Senior Vice President
(317) 267-8887 Fax (317) 267-3613

Newtek Small Business Finance, Inc., Milwaukee
Contact: Sr. VP/Loan Processing Operations
(800) 749-8707

RidgeStone Bank, Brookfield
Contact: Chairman & CEO
(262) 789-1011 or (888) 789-1012 Fax (262) 860-2099

River Valley Bank, Wausau
Contact: Business Banking Officer
(715) 845-5522

Southwest Community Bank, Carlsbad, CA
Contact: Senior Vice President
(877) 792-7722 Fax (760) 431-2171

Stearns Bank, St. Cloud, MN
Contact: SBA Operations Supervisor
(877) 320-2899 Fax (320) 258-4815

Temecula Valley Bank, National Association, CA
Contact: SVP/SBA Operations Manager
(888) 722-8821 or (800) 939-3736

Temecula Valley Bank, National Association, OH
Contact: Senior Vice President
(440) 892-5900 Toll Free Nationwide (888) 722-8821




30
The RiverBank, Osceola
Contact: Commercial Loan Officer
(715) 294-5901 or (888) 294-2183

United Central Bank, Garland, TX
Contact: Vice President
(972) 487-1505 Fax (972) 276-3972

UPS Capital Business Credit, Hartford, CT
Contact: Credit Underwriting Manager
(800) 637-0620

U.S. Bank, National Association
Contact: U.S. Bank - SBA Division
(888) SBA-EZ4U (722-3948) or
 (414) 765-6061

Wachovia SBA Lending, Inc., Washington, D.C.
Contact: Senior Vice President
(800) 566-3862 or (800) 922-4684

Waukesha State Bank, Waukesha
Contact: Vice President
(262) 549-8551
Fax (262) 574-4104

Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, NA
Contact: Vice President
(612) 667-2753 Fax (612) 667-3558

Wells Fargo Bank Wisconsin, NA, Milwaukee & La Crosse
Contact: Business Development Officer
(414) 224-7152 Fax (414) 224-3796

WI Certified Development Companies (CDC)
Great Lakes Asset Corporation
CONTACT: Loan Officer/Manager
1317 Lombardi Access Road, Suite 103, Green Bay, WI 54304
(920) 499-6444 or 800-281-6444     Fax (920) 499-7331
AREA OF OPERATION: Statewide
E-Mail @ cdcglac@aol.com

Milwaukee Economic Development Corporation
CONTACT: Senior Loan Officer
809 North Broadway, P.O. Box 324 Milwaukee WI 53201-0324
(414) 286-5840   Fax (414) 286-5778



                                                            31
AREA OF OPERATION: Statewide
E-Mail @ mmorri@mkedcd.org

Racine County Economic Development Corporation
CONTACT: Executive Director
2320 Renaissance Boulevard, Sturtevant, WI 53177
(262) 898-7432   Fax (262) 898-7401
AREA OF OPERATION: Statewide
E-Mail @ info@racinecountyedc.org

Southeastern Minnesota 504 Development Inc.
CONTACT: President
220 South Broadway, Suite 100, Rochester, MN 55904
(507) 288-6442   Fax (507) 282-8960
AREA OF OPERATION: La Crosse

SPEDCO
CONTACT: Executive Director
2459 15th Street NW, New Brighton, MN 55112
(651) 631-4900 Fax (651) 631-9498
AREA OF OPERATION: Barron, Buffalo, Dunn, La Crosse, Pepin, Pierce, Polk, St. Croix, and
Trempealeau

Twin Cities Metro Certified Development Company
CONTACT: Vice President/Assistant Executive Director
3495 Vadnais Center Drive, Vadnais Heights, MN 55110
(651) 481-8081 Ext. 13 or (888) 481-4504   Fax (651) 481-8280
AREA OF OPERATION: Barron, Buffalo, Dunn, La Crosse, Pepin, Pierce, Polk, St. Croix and
Trempealeau Counties
E-Mail @ pete.ingebrand@tcmcdc.com

Western Wisconsin Development Corporation
CONTACT: General Manager or Vice President
147 Lake Almena Drive, Almena, WI 54805
(715) 357-6282     FAX (715) 357-6233
AREA OF OPERATION: Statewide
E-Mail @ impact@chibardun.net

Wisconsin Business Development Finance Corporation
CONTACT: President; Senior Vice President; or
VP/ Loan Officer; or VP/Loan Officer
100 River Place, Suite 1, Monona, WI 53716
(608) 819-0390 or (800) 536-6799 Fax (608) 819-0393
AREA OF OPERATION: Statewide
E-Mail @ wbd@wbd.org




32
Additional Locations for Wisconsin Business Development Finance Corporation
CONTACT: Loan Officer or Jeremy Price, Loan Officer
3610 Oakwood Mall Dr., Suite 201, Eau Claire, WI 54702-1417
(715) 834-9474 Fax: (715) 834-9482

CONTACT: VP/Loan Officer
2701 Larsen Road, Green Bay, WI 54303
(920) 496-2109 Fax: (920) 496-5909

CONTACT: VP/Loan Officer
1810 Crest view Drive, Unit 5B, Hudson, WI 54016
(715) 381-6719 Fax: (715) 381-6776

CONTACT: Executive VP, VP/Loan Officer, or Economic Development Loan Officer
2930 State Highway 44, Suite C, Oshkosh, WI 54904
(920) 231-5570 Fax: (920) 231-5474

CONTACT: VP/Loan Officer
2417 Post Road, P.O. Box 940, Stevens Point, WI 54481
(715) 343-9082 Fax: (715) 343-9083

CONTACT: Senior VP/Loan Officer, VP/Loan Officer, or Loan Officer
W229 N1433 Westwood Dr., Suite 206, Waukesha, WI 53186
(262) 970-8533 Fax: (262) 970-8535

Wisconsin Micro Loan Lenders
  Micro Loan Lender                                Service Area
  Advocap                                          Fond du Lac County
  19 West First Street, P.O. Box 1108
  Fond du Lac, WI 54936
  920/922-7760 Fax: 920/922-7214
  Advocap                                          Winnebago and Green Lake Counties
  2929 Harrison Street
  Oshkosh, WI 54901
  920/426-0150 Fax: 920/426-3071
  First American Capital Corp.
  Subsidiary of the American Indian                Adams, Ashland, Barron, Bayfield,
  Chamber of Commerce of Wisconsin                 Brown, Burnett, Columbia, Douglas,
  Contact: President Jeff Bowman                   Fond du Lac, Forest, Iron, Jackson,
  10809 West Lincoln Avenue, Ste 102, West         Juneau, Langlade, Menominee,
  Allis, WI                                        Milwaukee, Outagamie, Portage, Sauk,
  414/604-2044 Fax: 414/604-2070                   Sawyer, Shawano, Trempealeau,
                                                   Vilas, Washburn, Waukesha & Wood
                                                   Counties



                                                                                          33
   Impact Seven, Inc.                                 Service Area: Statewide with the
   147 Lake Almena Drive                              exceptions of Fond du lac, Green
   Almena, WI 54805                                   Lake, Kenosha, Milwaukee, Ozaukee,
   715/357-3334 Fax: 715/357-6233                     Racine, Walworth, Waukesha,
   E-Mail: impact@impactseven.org                     Washington, Winnebago Counties and
                                                      inner City of Milwaukee
   Lincoln Neighborhood Redevelopment                 Milwaukee County
   2266 South 13th Street
   Milwaukee, WI 53215
   414/671-5619 Fax: 414/385-3270
   Northeast Entrepreneur Fund                        Douglas County in Wisconsin
   1401 Tower Avenue, Suite 302
   Superior, WI 54880
   800/422-0374 Fax: 715/392-6131

   Workshop Location
   Superior Business Center
   1423 North 8th Street
   Superior, WI 54880
   WI Women's Business Initiative Corp.               Brown, Dane, Dodge, Jefferson,
   Contact: 2745 N. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.        Kenosha, Milwaukee, Ozaukee,
   Dr.                                                Racine, Rock, Walworth, Washington
   Milwaukee, WI 53212                                and Waukesha Counties
   414/263-5450 Fax: 414/263-5456
   or
   Contact: 2300 S. Park St., Suite 21, Villager
   Mall
   Madison, WI 53713
   608/257-5450 Fax: 608/257-5454

Department of Commerce
Business Development in Wisconsin
The mission of the Division of Business Development is to help Wisconsin businesses prosper in
a marketplace that is subject to constant change.

To accomplish this task, the Division utilizes a combination of technical and financial assistance
programs that have been designed to assist businesses at all points of the continuum including:
business planning, site selection, initial capitalization, permitting, employee training, research
and development, and business expansion.




34
There are a wide range of resources available to businesses in Wisconsin, whether initiating a
new idea or expanding a business. The following links will guide you to all the important
resources to help grow your business.

Entrepreneurs and Start-ups
What is the first step you need to take to start or expand your business?
Make sure you've got a plan.
If you've got a great idea for a business but are not sure how to get started, the best contact for
you is the Wisconsin Entrepreneurs' Network. The Wisconsin Entrepreneur's Network will help
you find products, services, publications and websites that will assist in the development, growth
and success of your business.

There is an on-line resource Tool-kit available any time of day or night for Entrepreneurs
interested in starting a business in Wisconsin.

Business Hotlines are available by calling the Department of Commerce Help Business Line at
1-800-HELP-BUSiness (1-800-435-7287) or the Small Business Development Center (SBDC)
AnswerLine Call 1-800-940-7232. They're available to give free answers to your business start-
up or management questions from Monday to Friday, 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. You may also submit
questions on-line to the SBDC.

The mission of the Wisconsin Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) is to enhance the
success of Wisconsin small business through management education. By providing advice,
training, and resources for entrepreneurs and small companies, SBDC's help businesses create
jobs and connects entrepreneurs and small business owners with knowledge, tools, and resources
from here and around the world. Through Wisconsin's Technical College System entrepreneurs
will also find a number of programs and services designed to assist with business start-up.

If you have a plan, but need more detailed information...
Business incubators can play a nurturing role in helping young businesses survive and grow
during the start-up period when they are most financially vulnerable. Business incubators are
facilities that provide small, entrepreneurial businesses with affordable space and shared support
and business development services, such as financing, marketing, and management. From the
list of Wisconsin incubators you can find out the information about the space currently available
and the amenities and services offered by a particular incubator.

Small and merging businesses throughout Wisconsin can receive up to two hours of free legal
counseling services from a Business Lawyer at no cost. This public service is offered by the
Business Assistance lawyers from the State Bar of Wisconsin. You can find the names of
participating lawyers through the Wisconsin Entrepreneur's Network Resource Connection.

If you're thinking about starting a technology-related business, go to the Commerce
Technology Business Development page for resources specific to the industry.

Entrepreneurs interested in starting an import/export business will find assistance through the
Department of Commerce's International Trade Division. Area Trade Specialists, Outreach



                                                                                                 35
Consultants and the experienced staff of the International Division will work one-on-one with
beginning and experienced exporters to assess the demand for Wisconsin-made products. A
trade show grant program has been created to help small- and medium-sized firms travel to new
markets and exhibit their products.

For investment solutions, you can check out the resources offered at the Wisconsin Angel
Network (WAN).

The Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) provides counseling to new and expanding
businesses. You can find a local SCORE volunteer by providing your state and a keyword on
your business question at www.score.org\index.html.

Permits and Licenses
Most businesses need some form of permit or license before they can open their doors. Be sure
and obtain the necessary documents at the proper stage in your business development.

To obtain a list of state permits or licenses your business may need before you get started, go to
the Business Wizard.

If you are starting a business that might have air pollution, waste or water pollution issues,
there are certain obligations you must meet before you start any form of construction or
installing machinery. Review the Environmental Information Summary to determine if any
environmental permits are required.

Do you need to register your new business? Not necessarily. Check out the business
registration information.

Trade Show Grant Program
This program is designed to encourage Wisconsin companies to seek out new international
markets. Under the program, Wisconsin companies can be reimbursed up to $5,000 for specific
expenses for participating in an approved trade show or matchmaker trade delegation event.
Eligible shows must be outside the United States with one exception. Wisconsin companies
marketing new hi-tech products with worldwide application may be approved for shows held
within the United States which have significant international participation. A company can be
approved for no more than $5,000 in a 12-month period and no more than a maximum of
$15,000 under this program. A company must apply to the trade show grant program and be
approved prior to attendance; the program is not designed to reimburse companies for attendance
at trade shows prior to signature of a grant contract.

Purpose
The primary purposes of the Wisconsin Trade Project are to encourage smaller Wisconsin
companies (defined as companies, together with its affiliates and subsidiaries, with annual sales
of less than $25 million) to become exporters and to help existing smaller exporters seek out new
markets. The program encourages Wisconsin companies to approach export markets in a
planned, logical fashion. It allows the International Division of the Department of Commerce to
assist companies which we have not been able to assist through past state-sponsored programs



36
because of the uniqueness of their products or markets. It also allows us to assist Wisconsin
companies marketing new hi-tech products with worldwide application.

International Trade Consultants
Companies who wish to participate in the program can utilize the services of the international
trade consultants of the Department of Commerce, Department of Agriculture, Trade and
Consumer Protection and the Department of Natural Resources. Our consultants work without
charge and can help you evaluate if you should seek foreign markets and which markets hold the
best potential for your products. They can also help you with specific market research and in
developing global marketing plans. They can also inform you about the wide variety of services
available through the Department and its international offices.

Reimbursement
The Department will reimburse approved grantees up to $5,000 for certain expenses for
participating in a trade event certified by the Wisconsin Department of Commerce, the U.S.
Commercial Service, or the U.S. Foreign Agricultural Service. Reimbursable expenses include:
    • trade show or matchmaker trade delegation participation fees;
    • costs associated with shipping displays, samples, catalogs, or advertising materials;
    • costs incurred at a trade show or matchmaker trade delegation event for utilities, booth
        construction, or necessary modification, repairs or other reasonable expenses associated
        with displays;
    • costs associated with first time foreign language translation of brochures and product
        literature or the use of translation services and interpreters at a trade show or matchmaker
        trade delegation event.

The following may not be reimbursed:
   • travel costs
   • lodging
   • employee salaries
   • meals and entertainment

Approval for reimbursement of expenses will be based upon extent to which the export
development plan demonstrates export potential and the extent to which the proposed
reimbursable activities relate to the potential success of the product or service to be exported.
This program is not designed to support the existing, productive export markets of a company. A
Wisconsin-based employee of the company (not a representative or agent!) must participate in
the event.

Priority
The legislature has earmarked $100,000 for this program; companies will be approved on the
merits of their application. Priority for reimbursement under this program will be given to firms
and companies whose products and markets have not been serviced by our programs. All other
applications will be considered on their merits. Applicants will be contacted by a Department of
Commerce consultant within 15 working days of your application. The Department will
reimburse grantees for all approved budget items. Copies of receipts or canceled checks are
required. A completed evaluation form of the event and results must be submitted with the


                                                                                                 37
request for reimbursement. The Department will not guarantee payment of unbudgeted items.
Please check with the Program Manager (phone: 608/267-0639) if you have questions.

Travel Grant
The University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for International Business Education and Research
(CIBER) has developed a Hi-tech and Biotech Travel Grant Program that complements the
Wisconsin Department of Commerce Trade Show Grant Program. The purpose of CIBER's grant
program is to assist small Wisconsin hi-tech and biotech companies to explore and engage
opportunities to export their products internationally by helping to subsidize the travel portion of
trade show attendance costs. Applicants wishing to be considered for this grant should submit a
supplementary application along with their completed Department of Commerce Trade Show
Grant Program application. For more information about the Hi-tech and Biotech Travel Grant
Program and the application form, please visit the CIBER website
(http://www.bus.wisc.edu/ciber/business/Biotech_grants.asp).

Financial Assistance
Early Planning Grant (EPG)
The EPG program allows applicants to hire an independent third party to help them prepare a
comprehensive business plan. Although this program typically provides grants for 75% of
eligible project costs up to $3,000, there are limited funds available. As such, only those
businesses that fall within the following established Industrial Clusters are eligible for EPG
assistance. These clusters include:
    • Manufacturing
    • Automation
    • Paper/Forest Products
    • Agriculture/Food Products
    • Printing
    • Medical Devices
    • Biotechnology
    • Information Technology
    • Tourism
    • Childcare (does NOT include in-home childcare)

Entrepreneurial Training Program (ETP)
For entrepreneurs that would rather prepare their business plan in a more formal setting and for
those businesses that fall outside the identified Industrial Clusters, Commerce offers the ETP
program. Under this program, applicants are provided with a grant to cover up to 75% of the
tuition costs associated with enrolling in an approved course at their local Small Business
Development Center (SBDC).

This program represents a partnership between the SBDC and Commerce and was developed in
recognition of the need to support all types of entrepreneurial development. Meeting once-a-
week over an 8 to 10 week period, participants will be provided instruction on how to prepare a
comprehensive business plan. The goal is for participants to "graduate" with a professional plan
that can be used to pursue start-up capital.



38
Selecting A Consultant To Assist With Your Business Start-Up: As entrepreneurs make the
decision to start a new business or expand an existing business, they may employ the services of
experienced professionals to develop a comprehensive business plan.

Direct Lending
Commerce has a number of programs in which the agency makes direct loans to businesses.
Operationally, these programs are characterized by below market rate financing (typically 4%)
and flexible repayment terms. However, given the high level of demand and the limited funds
available, Commerce should not be considered a source of primary financing. In fact, for the
projects that are funded, the agency's participation rate rarely exceeds the lesser of 25% of
project costs or $250,000.

In addition, much like our private sector counterparts, Commerce prepares an extensive
evaluation of all applicants prior to funding. This underwriting process, which includes a SWOT
analysis of the applicant's Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats, serves as the
foundation for developing terms and conditions that will include specific collateral requirements
and the personal guarantees of all individuals with an ownership interest of 20% or more.

Special Tax Credit Programs
Agricultural Development Zones
The Department of Commerce has established an Agricultural Development Zone (ADZ)
program to help attract, promote, retain and encourage the expansion of agricultural businesses
in Wisconsin. This program is designed to assist Wisconsin in regaining its prominence in the
dairy industry and in dairy processing production.

Following is a brief overview of the
program:
   • Four regions have been designated
      as Wisconsin's Agricultural
      Development Zone.
   • $5 million in tax credits have been
      allocated to the zone.
   • Tax credits will be available for
      new and expanding businesses.
   • Agribusinesses can apply tax
      credits against their Wisconsin
      income tax.
   • Unused tax credits can be carried
      forward for 15 years.

Tax credits can be earned through:
   • Capital investments for real and
       personal property (3% of eligible
       expenses)
   • Job creation and retention
   • Environmental remediation (50% of eligible expenses)


                                                                                              39
Program Benefits
Development Zone tax credits include:

A non-refundable jobs credit for new, full-time jobs. Approximately one-fourth of the new
employees hired to fill these jobs must come from one of Wisconsin's Target Groups. The actual
amount of job credits is dependent upon wages and benefits. Starting wages for new positions
must be at least $9.75 per hour. Full-time jobs are defined as regular, non-seasonal positions in
which employees are scheduled to work at least 2,080 hours per year.

A non-refundable environmental remediation credit of 50% of all investigation and remediation
costs affected by environmental pollution in a Brownfield, defined as an industrial or commercial
facility, the expansion or redevelopment of which is complicated by environmental
contamination.

At least 25% of all credits allocated must be for creating full-time jobs.

Agribusinesses planning to expand existing operations in a designated ADZ area, individuals
planning to start a new business in an ADZ area or businesses considering a relocation to an
ADZ area from outside Wisconsin may be eligible for ADZ tax credits. Additional information
about Wisconsin's Agricultural Development Zone program may be obtained by contacting the
local ADZ region coordinators listed at the right. Local ADZ personnel will discuss the proposed
project and, if it is appropriate for the ADZ program, will assist the business in beginning the
application process

Community Development Zones
The Community Development Zone (CDZ) program can help if you plan to expand your
business, start a new one or relocate your business to Wisconsin. The CDZ program is a tax
benefit initiative designed to encourage private investment and to improve both the quality and
quantity of employment opportunities in Wisconsin. The program offers more than $38 million
in tax benefits to assist businesses that meet certain requirements and are located or are willing to
locate in one of Wisconsin's 22 Community Development Zones.

In order to participate in the program, a business should work with one of the appropriate local
CDZ managers and complete a Prospect Data Sheet to submit to the Department...

The Department will determine if a project is eligible for an Enterprise Development Zone
designation based on information about the economic impact of the project, the prospective site
and the distress of the area.

Businesses can earn income tax credits by creating new, full-time jobs filled by Wisconsin
residents and by conducting environmental remediation on a Brownfield site.




40
Program Benefits
Development Zone tax credits include:
   • A non-refundable jobs credit for new, full-time jobs. Approximately one-fourth of the
      new employees hired to fill these jobs must come from one of Wisconsin's Target
      Groups.
   • The actual amount of job credits is dependent upon wages and benefits.
   • Starting wages for new positions must be at least $9.75 per hour.
   • Full-time job means regular, non-seasonal and scheduled to work at least 2,080 hours per
      year.
   • A non-refundable environmental remediation credit of 50% of all investigation and
      remediation costs affected by environmental pollution in a Brownfield, defined as an
      industrial or commercial facility, the expansion or redevelopment of which is
      complicated by environmental contamination.
   • At least 25% of all credits allocated must be for creating full-time jobs.
   • All tax credits have a carry-forward provision for up to 15 years.

Dairy Manufacturing Facility Investment Credit
The Dairy Manufacturing Facility Investment Credit is a refundable credit for businesses that
have invested to modernize or expand dairy manufacturing facilities in Wisconsin.

Businesses – other than cooperatives – that are engaged in the processing of milk into dairy
products or processing dairy products for sale commercially are eligible to apply for tax credits
under this program.

"Dairy product" is defined as a value-added, saleable product resulting from processing milk or
another dairy product - and includes beverage milk products; soft milk products such as yogurt,
ice cream and cottage cheese; butter; non-fat dried milk; whole milk powder; dried whey; whey
protein concentrate or isolates; casein; and dairy waste that can be used to produce energy, fuel
or industrial products.

Application Process
Eligible businesses interested in applying for the Dairy Manufacturing Facility Investment Credit
should contact Dairy 2020 Executive Director at 920/322-1888 or 608/267-0762 or or one of the
Department of Commerce's Area Development Managers.

Businesses must submit an application form, available through the Department of Commerce, as
well as a Department of Revenue Tax Schedule DM, listing the eligible expenses for the project.
Each application must be completed and either postmarked or delivered to the Department of
Commerce after the end of the applicant's taxable year in which the eligible capital investment
occurred, and no later than March 31 of the subsequent taxable year.

Allocation of Tax Credits
Commerce will certify applicants that have met the eligibility criteria and will allocate tax
credits. In determining the allocation of tax credits, the Department will consider the following:
    1. The jobs created by the project;
    2. The salaries, wages and other employee benefits of the jobs created by the project;


                                                                                                41
     3.   The impact of the project on the dairy industry in Wisconsin;
     4.   The extent to which the area served by the project is economically distressed;
     5.   The amount of new, eligible capital investment in the project;
     6.   The impact of the project on business in Wisconsin; and
     7.   Any previous assistance from the Department.

The Department may prorate some or all of the allocations in order to broaden the potential for
promoting economic development and addressing the above criteria.

Enterprise Development Zones
The Enterprise Development Zone (EDZ) program provides tax incentives to new or expanding
businesses whose projects will affect distressed areas.

Based on the economic impact of a proposed business project, the Department of Commerce
may designate a site-specific Enterprise Development Zone. The maximum amount of credits per
zone is $3 million. Zones can exist for up to seven years. The Department can vary zone benefits
to encourage projects in areas of high distress.

In order to participate in the program, a business should work with one of Commerce's Area
Development Managers and complete a Prospect Data Sheet to submit to the Department.

Projects must affect distressed areas suffering from at least some of the following: High
unemployment, low incomes, declining population, declining property values, plant
closings/layoffs and high numbers of people on public assistance.

The Department will determine if a project is eligible for an Enterprise Development Zone
designation based on information about the economic impact of the project, the prospective site
and the distress of the area.

Businesses can earn income tax credits by creating new, full-time jobs filled by Wisconsin
residents and by conducting environmental remediation on a Brownfield site.

Program Benefits
Development Zone tax credits include:
   • A non-refundable jobs credit for new, full-time jobs. Approximately one-fourth of the
      new employees hired to fill these jobs must come from one of Wisconsin's Target
      Groups.
   • The actual amount of job credits is dependent upon wages and benefits.
   • Starting wages for new positions must be at least $9.75 per hour.
   • Full-time job means regular, non-seasonal and scheduled to work at least 2,080 hours per
      year.
   • A non-refundable environmental remediation credit of 50% of all investigation and
      remediation costs affected by environmental pollution in a Brownfield, defined as an
      industrial or commercial facility, the expansion or redevelopment of which is
      complicated by environmental contamination.
   • At least 25% of all credits allocated must be for creating full-time jobs.


42
    •   All tax credits have a carry-forward provision for up to 15 years.

Wisconsin Manufacturing Investment Credit Program (MIC)
2003 Wisconsin Act 99 provided for a new individual and corporate income tax credit for fuel
and electricity used in manufacturing effective for taxable years beginning on or after January 1,
2008, for taxpayers with more than $25,000 of carry forwards. The credit is nonrefundable and
is equal to 100% of total unused manufacturers’ sales tax credit carry forwards. The credit is
amortized over 15 years, and any unused credit amounts in any one year may be carried forward
to subsequent years.

Business having more than $25,000 in unused income and franchise tax credit carry forwards
based on the sales and use tax paid on fuel and electricity used in manufacturing prior to taxable
years beginning after December 31, 2005.

Department of Revenue has posted this article summarizing tax benefits available to taxpayers
who have unused manufacturer's sales tax credits: Manufacturing Investment Credit is Available
for 2008.

See http://www.legis.state.wi.us/rsb/code/comm/comm130.pdf to view the entire Administrative
Rule accompanying the Manufacturing Investment Credit program.

Eligibility Criteria
In order to claim the new credit, an eligible taxpayer must be certified by the Department of
Commerce that it has met one of the following three criteria:
    • The business has retained 100% of full-time 1 jobs that it employed in Wisconsin from
        December 23, 2003, through either December 31, 2006, or December 31, 2007; or
    • The business’s average annual investment 2 in Wisconsin from January 1, 2003, through
        either December 31, 2006, or December 31, 2007, is equal to no less than 2 percent of the
        total book value3 of the business’s depreciable assets in facilities that are based in
        Wisconsin; or
    • The business’s average annual investment 2 in Wisconsin from January 1, 2003, through
        either December 31, 2006, or December 31, 2007, is no less than $5,000,000.
1
Under s. 560.28 (1), Stats., “full-time job” means a regular, nonseasonal full-time position in
which an individual, as a condition of employment, is required to work at least 35 hours in a
week.
2
 “Annual investment” means the purchase price of depreciable, tangible personal property, and
the amount expended to acquire, construct, rehabilitate, remodel, or repair real property, for all
of the taxpayer’s facilities that are based in Wisconsin, in each calendar year.
3
 “Book value” means an asset's cost minus the accumulated depreciation since the asset was
acquired.




                                                                                                  43
Eligibility Question
I, the taxpayer, have more than $25,000 in unused manufacturer's sales tax credit for taxable
years beginning after December 31, 2005.

Technology Zones
Wisconsin's Technology Zone program offers tax credit incentives to new and growing
businesses in the state's high-technology sectors.

High technology businesses planning to expand existing operations in a designated Technology
Zone area, individuals planning to start a new business in a Technology Zone area or businesses
considering a relocation to a Technology Zone area from outside Wisconsin may be eligible for
Technology Zone tax credits. Additional information about Wisconsin's Technology Zone
program may be obtained by contacting the local Technology Zone region coordinators listed at
the right. Local Technology Zone personnel will discuss the proposed project and, if it is
appropriate for the Technology Zone program, will assist the business in beginning the
application process.

Following is a brief overview of the program:
   • Eight zones have been designated.
   • $5 million in income tax credits has been allocated to each zone.
   • Tax credits will be made available for high-technology businesses locating or expanding
      in a designated Technology Zone.
   • Technology Zone businesses can apply tax credits against their Wisconsin income tax.
   • Unused tax credits can be carried forward for 15 years.
   • Tax credits can be earned through:
      o Capital investments for real and personal property (10% of eligible expenses)
      o Job creation (15% of first-year wages earned by individuals filling new positions that
          pay at least $13/hour)
      o Any increase in property taxes paid directly by the certified business

Wisconsin's Industrial Revenue Bond Program
Wisconsin's Industrial Revenue Bond (IRB) program now has more than $200 million available
to assist small manufacturers with expansion projects through low-interest financing. The
Department of Commerce grants the bonding authority (volume cap allocation) to cities, villages
and towns to issue the bonds on behalf of a business. This site provides business representatives,
municipal officials, bond counsel and others with up-to-date information on the IRB program,
the process of applying for volume cap, the availability of volume cap and the latest forms.

Industrial Revenue Bond (IRB) Program Overview
The Department of Commerce's Industrial Revenue Bond (IRB) Program allows all Wisconsin
cities, villages and towns to support industrial development through the sale of tax-exempt
bonds. The proceeds from the bond sale are loaned to businesses to finance capital investment
projects at, primarily, manufacturing facilities. Even though IRBs are municipal bonds, they are
not general obligations of the municipality. The company or business that will use the facilities
provides the interest and principal payments on the loan. The local government is in partnership
with the business, lending its name, but not its credit, to the bond issue.



44
Employee Training
Commerce has two types of training programs

Customized Labor Training (CLT)
First authorized in 1983, the CLT program can provide grants to help cover a portion of the costs
associated with training employees on new technologies, industrial skills or manufacturing
processes. Given the high demand for these grant funds, eligibility is typically limited to those
companies that are making capital investments new technologies that subsequently necessitate
the training of existing or new employees. To be eligible, the training must be provided in a
classroom setting or on the shop floor during periods of non-production. Costs associated with
orientation, basic skills, and on-the-job training is not eligible.

Business Employees Skills Training (BEST)
The Business Employees' Skills Training (BEST) program was established by the Wisconsin
Legislature to help small businesses (less than 25 employees) upgrade the skills of their
workforce. Under the BEST program, Commerce can provide applicants with a grant to cover a
portion of the course fees or tuition costs associated with employee training. To be eligible, the
training must have a direct and positive impact upon the employees ability to carry out his or her
work assignment.

Minority Business Development (MBD) Loan Program
The Minority Business Development (MBD) loan program is designed to provide financial
assistance for the start-up and expansion of minority- owned businesses in Wisconsin. This
program provides low interest loans to assist in the development of minority-owned companies.

Eligible Applicants:
Eligible applicants are Minority Businesses that have a comprehensive business plan fully
describing the proposed project.
    • Minority Businesses are defined as businesses 51% owned and controlled by any of the
        following: Black, Hispanic, American Indian, Eskimo, Asian Pacific, Asian Indian,
        Aleut, or Native Hawaiian.
    • If you do not currently have a business plan, the Early Planning Grant (EPG) program
        may be able to provide you with a grant to develop a comprehensive business plan.
    • If you do not qualify for an Early Planning Grant you may qualify for an Entrepreneurial
        Training Grant (ETG). The Department of Commerce can provide applicants with a grant
        to help cover a portion of the cost of attending Small Business Development Center's
        (SBDC) new Entrepreneurial Training course

Eligible Activities:
Eligible Project Costs are limited to fixed asset financing and working capital. Examples of
Eligible Project Costs include:
    • Land
    • Construction
    • Acquisition of Existing Businesses
    • Purchase of Equipment
    • Working Capital


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Note: Refinancing is not an eligible activity.

Finance Terms And Conditions:
Interest Rate:
The Department of Commerce will provide below market interest at a fixed rate for the life of
the loan. (Typically 4%)

Terms:
   • Real Estate: 10 to 15 years
   • Equipment: 5 to 10 years
   • Working Capital: 5 to 7 years

Collateral:
The Department of Commerce will seek the best collateral position possible to ensure that all
MBD loans are adequately secured.

Repayment:
Monthly payments of the principal and interest are required.

Guarantees:
Personal guarantees are required.

Funding Availability:
A loan review process that uses the underwriting criteria detailed below determines the level of
participation by Commerce. The goal of Commerce is to encourage partnerships among
organizations and businesses to promote economic development in the state. Applicants should
work with a bank and a local development corporation to structure a loan package. The MBD
loan may not be the sole source of financing, which makes this a gap financing loan program.
Ideally, applicants should have some equity in the project.

An ideal example of a $100,000 capital investment requirement
Personal Equity 5,000
Bank 45,000
Development Corporation 25,000
MBD Loan 25,000
TOTAL$100,000

Underwriting Criteria:
Underwriting criteria considered in the loan review process are:

Project Viability
   • Work Experience
       o Does the applicant have at least 2 years of relevant work experience?
   • Education/Training
       o Is the applicant's education and/or training relevant to the proposed business venture?
   • Available Capital/Funding


46
       o   Does the applicant have the cash reserves (equity) necessary to invest in the proposed
           business?
   •   Has a local bank and/or other local organization made a funding commitment to the
       project?

OTHER FACTORS
  • Community Benefit
    o Will there be a positive economic impact upon the local community?
  • Jobs
    o How many jobs will be created/retained and what will be the wage rate and benefit
       package?
  • Competition
    o Will the proposed business have a negative impact upon other local businesses?
  • Area Demographics
    o Will the proposed business be located in a target area?

The Application Process:
The MBD loan application process involves three steps:
   1. Interested applicants must meet the definition of a Minority Business described above.
   2. The applicant will contact a Commerce Bureau of Minority Business Representative (see
       below) to discuss the project and obtain application materials.
   3. The applicant will submit the application to Commerce where a Finance Specialist will
       underwrite the project and make a funding recommendation to the Minority Business
       Development Board. The Minority Business Development Board will:
   • Approve the MBD loan, in which case the applicant will enter into a written loan
       agreement with Commerce.
OR
   B. Deny the proposal, in which case the applicant will receive a letter outlining the reasons
       for denial.
To receive further information about the Minority Business Development (MBD) loan program,
you may contact the Bureau of Minority Business Development at:

Bureau of Minority Business Development
201 West Washington Avenue
P.O. Box 7970
Madison, WI 53707-7970

Phone: (608) 267-9550
Fax: (608) 264-6151

Small Business Clean Air Assistance Program
Wisconsin's Small Business Clean Air Assistance Program (SBCAAP) helps small businesses
understand and comply with state and federal air pollution regulations. Section 507 of the 1990
Clean Air Act Amendments requires each state to operate a small business assistance program.




                                                                                              47
Are you starting or expanding a business?
Does the business include operations that will have emissions of air pollution?
Will starting or expanding your business involve construction that includes new buildings or
installation of new equipment in an existing building?
Permits may be required under the different environmental regulations in Wisconsin. Some
permits must be issued BEFORE you begin construction.
We can help you figure out how your business is affected by the environmental regulations.

The SBCAAP serves as a free, confidential, and non-regulatory resource to small business
owners throughout the state. Through the program, Clean Air Specialists work as a liaison
between small businesses and state (Department of Natural Resources or DNR) and federal (US
Environmental Protection Agency or EPA) regulators. The staff creates "plain language"
publications, answers compliance questions, conducts on-site consultations, responds to written
and verbal regulatory inquiries, coordinates environmental compliance workshops and directs
businesses to other pertinent technical assistance providers.

Projects have included outreach efforts to small industries and businesses employing 100 or
fewer employees involved in such activities as:
   • Chromium Electroplating                       • Motor Vehicle Refinishing
   • Fiberglass Reinforced Plastics                • Solvent Degreasing
   • Dry Cleaning                                  • Spray Painting and Coating
   • Industrial Adhesives                          • Wood Finishing
   • Lithographic Printing                         • Wood Furniture Manufacturing

There are many new rules coming out of USEPA affecting many small businesses.

If you refinish motor vehicles, paint plastic and/or metal parts, have a gasoline station, and
perform plating, polishing or metal fabrication (including welding) then you may be affected by
these rules.

Go to our Air Toxics page, and look under "Area Source Standards" for more details.

The SBCAAP reaches thousands of businesses each year through meetings, speaking
engagements, workshops, and publications. The program currently offers more than 70 different
fact sheets, rule summaries, record keeping and reporting forms and other documents designed to
make environmental compliance easier for Wisconsin businesses. The majority of this
information is available on the SBCAAP web pages, which you can get to by using the
navigation menu on the left side of this page.

Here are a few key resources you can use to figure out if environmental regulations apply
to your business:
    • Go through DNR's Permit Primer to find out which of their environmental permits might
       be required. This is a detailed series of questions and answers that walk you through each
       of their permit programs. Be prepared to spend a good deal of time to go through all
       sections of the Primer.



48
   •   Complete the New Business or Existing Business Surveys, to give us the details
       necessary about your operations to check on what regulations might affect you. The
       facility contact information is for our purposes only, so we can send a report back to you
       on what your environmental obligations are and how you can go about complying with
       the requirements that apply.
   •   Review the Environmental Information Summary which provides a brief summary of a
       range of environmental requirements managed by DNR, Commerce, EPA, OSHA and
       others.

Community Development Block Grant for Economic Development Revolving Loan Fund
(CDBG-ED/RLF)
Successful local development projects depend on effective partnerships. In pursuing their
economic goals and objectives, many Wisconsin communities have used the CDBG-ED program
to help businesses structure financial packages necessary for a start-up or to expand present
operations. These loans, when repaid directly to the community, are used to capitalize a
community Revolving Loan Fund (RLF).

Overview
Within recent years, RLF's have grown dramatically in number and use:
   • Over 190 Wisconsin communities are involved in the RLF program
   • These communities have already received over $90 million from CDBG-ED loan
       repayments and expect to receive over $130 million.
   • The local RLF loan portfolio now exceeds $95 million.
   • There are more than 1,200 local RLF loans.
   • The average local RLF loan is about $75,000.
   • Cash reserves available for loans to existing and new business exceeds $50 million.

Regional Revolving Loan Fund Pilot Project
Commerce launched the new Regional Non-profits Initiative in 2005 as a pilot program to
encourage the voluntary consolidation of local community business revolving loan funds in order
to more effectively deploy underutilized economic development resources. At that time, there
were 200 such RLF funds statewide, with over $50 million cash on hand. Commerce selected
two potential pilot regions - the Northwest and West Central areas. Under Commerce oversight,
counties and communities in both regions worked collaboratively on developing viable models
for the regions that ensure fair representation and sound investment strategies. The Northwest
Wisconsin Regional Economic Development Fund has completed its first successful year of
operation. The West Central Regional Business Fund is just getting off the ground with
participation of 28 of the 31 RLFs in the seven-county area.

Advantages to consolidation are many - the most compelling being that Commerce allows the
regions to defederalize the funds, enabling more creative and responsive uses of the RLF funds.
Participation in a regional RLF is completely voluntary. If your county or region is interested in
the regional revolving loan initiative, contact 608 266- 2688.




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Department of Commerce Newsletter articles
Community Opportunities
By providing communities a source of flexible, low-cost gap financing for small businesses,
CDBG-RLFs have been a successful means of assisting communities in carrying out their
economic development goals and objectives.

The Department of Commerce RLF Technical Assistance Program assists communities in the
administration of their RLF programs. Site visits are provided by the Department upon request to
assist communities with any facet of their RLF program.

Commerce also offers a Revolving Loan Fund Handbook. This includes an "Administrator's
Guide" which "walks" the administrator through the process of the creation and capitalizing of a
RLF program from marketing, application process, credit evaluation, approvals, to loan closing
and documentation, as well as performance monitoring of the loan. It also includes the forms
necessary for administration, closing and documentation.

Business Advantages
Advantages to businesses are very attractive "tailor-made" loans, which may include deferred
payments, and reduced interest rates. These loans are typically smaller loans which can be more
efficiently administered at the local level. Questions regarding local CDBG-ED/RLF loans
should be made to your local Revolving Loan Fund contact person.

Questions regarding the CDBG-ED program should be referred to the local Area Development
Managers. Department of Commerce, 201 West Washington Avenue, P. O. Box 7970, Madison,
Wisconsin 53707.

Wisconsin Diesel Truck Idling Reduction Grant Program
The Department of Commerce (COMMERCE) administers a grant program to reduce diesel
truck idling. This grant program was created by the Governor's budget bill, 2005 Wisconsin Act
25. The program is designed to assist common, contract and private motor carriers in the
purchase and installation of idling reduction technology. Motor carriers are eligible for up to
50% reimbursement for the purchase and installation of idling reduction equipment. The
program’s primary goals are to help Wisconsin motor carriers reduce air pollution emissions and
fuel consumption, in addition to providing invaluable field testing data.

Eligible Applicants: An eligible applicant must meet all of the following:
    • Is a common, contract or private motor carrier that transports freight.
    • Is headquartered in the state of Wisconsin.
    • Pays at least 50% of the eligible costs for each idling reduction unit covered by this
       grant.
    • Agrees to collect and report information relating to the operation and performance of
       each idling reduction unit covered under this grant.

Eligible Costs:
    • Idling reduction unit (base price).
    • Installation of the idling reduction unit.


50
Ineligible Costs:
   • The cost of shipping an idling reduction unit from the manufacturer to the facility where
       the unit will be installed.
   • The cost of operating an idling reduction unit.
   • The cost of maintaining an idling reduction unit.
   • Self installation of idling reduction equipment unless approved by Commerce.
   • Accessories that are in addition to the basic idling reduction unit (ex., chrome exhaust,
       power inverter, etc).

Funding Availability
The program will award $2 million dollars in 2008 and $1 million dollars annually in 2009 and
2010.

Reporting Requirement
Grant awardees are required to submit a pre-installation (baseline), six and twelve-month reports.
The reports must be taken from an on-board electronic record (e.g., ECM download).

Agriculture Businesses
Wisconsin has a wide range of programs available to assist those in agriculture related
businesses.

Dairy 2020 Initiative
The mission of the Dairy 2020 Initiative is to help Wisconsin dairy business, through
cooperation at all levels, find ways to improve the business climate and competitive position of
the Wisconsin Dairy Industry, enhance individual business profitability, and enrich the quality of
life for Wisconsin's dairy farmers and their rural communities.

The Department of Commerce is the staffing agency for the Dairy 2020 Council, which is made
up of 26 members - twelve dairy producers, six industry representatives, two legislators, and six
public institution representatives. Council members work to address and effect change on the
challenges facing Wisconsin's dairy industry to better position it for long-term viability.

Dairy 2020 includes two programs to help dairy producers to make improvements and increase
production.

Dairy 2020 Early Planning Grant (EPG)
The Dairy 2020 Early Planning Grant (EPG) program helps encourage and stimulate the start
up, modernization, and expansion of Wisconsin dairy farms. The program provides grants to
dairy producers to pay for professional services such as the preparation of a business plan. The
award can be for up to 75 percent of the professional services with a maximum grant of $3,000.

Milk Volume Production
The Milk Volume Production program provides qualifying dairy producers with the type of
financing necessary to fill the "equity gap" and to partner with local communities to increase
dairy production in Wisconsin.




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Tax Credits
Department of Commerce has established an Agricultural Development Zone (ADZ) program to
help attract, promote, retain and encourage the expansion of agricultural businesses in
Wisconsin. Learn more about possible tax credits for your agriculture based business.

The Dairy Manufacturing Facility Investment Credit is a refundable tax credit for businesses that
are modernizing or expanding dairy manufacturing facilities in Wisconsin.

Other resources for agriculture related businesses:
Looking for information biofuels and bioenergy? Go to the Power Initiative website for a range
of related resources. Look under the Biofuels section for a guide to all regulations related to start
up of a production facility.

University of Wisconsin - Extension
Agriculture Topics
http://www.uwex.edu/topics/agriculture/

County Offices
http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cty/

UW-Center for Dairy Profitability
http://cdp.wisc.edu

Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board
http://producer.wisdairy.com

Department of Agriculture Trade and Consumer Protection - Farming and Agriculture
http://datcp.state.wi.us/core/agriculture/agriculture.jsp

Department of Natural Resources - Agriculture Sector
http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cea/assistance/agriculture/index.htm

Wisconsin Farm Technology Days
http://www.wifarmtechnologydays.com

Wisconsin Focus on Energy - Agriculture and Rural Business Incentives
www.focusonenergy.com

USDA Assistance Programs
www.usda.gov

Division of Housing & Community Development (DHCD)
The Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) has a broad range of financial
and technical assistance programs to increase affordable housing options, assist homeless
persons, improve community vitality, and expand economic opportunities. By providing these
resources through local governments and other agencies low-moderate income Wisconsin



52
households, communities, and businesses benefit from these programs. Eligible projects include
the expansion of affordable housing, jobs, business development, tax base and the reuse of
vacant land or building and related activities.

Blight Elimination and Brownfield Redevelopment Program (BEBR)
The Blight Elimination and Brownfield Redevelopment Program (BEBR) provides grant funds
to assist local governments, businesses and individuals with assessing and remediating the
environmental contamination of an abandoned, idle or underused industrial or commercial
facility or site. This program typically receives about $7.5 million in a combination of state and
federal funds each fiscal year. The maximum grant award is $1.25 million. Grants require a 20to
50 percent match depending on the size of the grant awarded.

Eligible Applicants
Any city, village, town, county, individual or businesses may apply for funds provided that the
party that caused the environmental contamination and any person who possessed or controlled
the environmental contaminant is either unknown, cannot be located or is financially unable to
pay.

Eligible Activities
BEBR grants may be used for brownfields redevelopment or associated environmental
remediation activities. Eligible costs are determined during a review of the grant application.
However, grant funds may typically be used for the following activities:
    • The environmental investigation, remediation or groundwater monitoring of the site;
    • The removal of underground storage tanks or hazardous waste containers;
    • The acquisition cost of the brownfield site;
    • Site clearance, building demolition or building renovation;
    • Asbestos and lead paint abatement; and
    • Infrastructure improvement

Application & Award Process
The BEBR program has a continual application process in which applications are accepted
throughout the year, and potential applicants are encouraged to contact Program Staff and the
Area Development Manager to discuss the project first. In reviewing the applications, Commerce
considers the following criteria in an application review:
    • The potential of a project to promote economic development;
    • Whether the project will have a positive effect on the environment;
    • The quality and amount of the applicant's contribution to the project; and
    • The innovativeness of the proposal for remediation and redevelopment.

Other Considerations
   • The Department is required to award at least 7 grants for projects that are located in
      municipalities with a population of less than 30,000.
   • The Department can not make an award of greater than $1,250,000.
   • Grant funds can not be used to pay lien claims to the Department of Natural Resources or
      the Environmental Protection Agency.



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     •   Grant funds can not be used to pay delinquent real estate taxes or interest/penalties that
         relate to those taxes.

Grant Recipient
Each successful applicant must enter into a contract with Commerce for the purpose of
implementing the proposed grant. The contract will require the creation and maintenance of the
project's proposed new full-time positions for a minimum two-year period. Recipients must
provide regular financial and program reports and when applicable, ensure compliance with
Federal requirements such as environmental review and Davis-Bacon wage issues.

Contact Information
If you have any questions regarding the program or other forms of brownfield financial
assistance, please contact:
(608)267-8926
(608)266-8969 (Fax)

CDBG-Emergency Assistance Program (CDBG-EAP)
The Community Development Block Grant Emergency Assistance Program (CDBG-EAP) is a
special program designed by the Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) to
assist local units of government that have recently experienced a natural or manmade disaster.
Funded from the Division’s annual CDBG allocation, the program provides funds to address
housing and community needs which occur as a direct result of natural or manmade disasters.
Communities may apply to DHCD within 60 days of the date of the disaster.

Eligibility
    • Cities, towns, counties and villages with populations less than 50,000 and all counties
        except Milwaukee, Waukesha, and Dane.
    • Residents of the municipality awarded CDBG-EAP funds may receive assistance if their
        dwelling was damaged by the disaster.
    • Municipality will be required to give preference to those households with incomes at or
        below 80% of the county median.
    • Infrastructure affected by natural disaster

Eligible Activities
CDBG-EAP funds may be used to address damage caused by the disaster, including:
    • Repair of disaster related damage to the dwelling unit, including repair or replacement of
       plumbing, heating, and electrical systems. CDBG-EAP funds may be used to reimburse
       owners for repairs that have been made in direct response to the disaster for up to 50% of
       the pre-market equalized assessed value.
    • Acquisition and demolition of dwellings unable to be repaired.
    • Downpayment and closing cost assistance for the purchase of replacement dwellings.
       Assistance is limited to 50% of the pre-market equalized assessed value.
    • Streets
    • Sidewalks
    • Community Centers
    • Publicly owned utility system repairs


54
CDBG-EAP funds may not be used for:
  • Repairs or other costs covered by insurance or other federal or state assistance.
  • Cleaning.
  • Replacement of furniture, food, clothing or other personal items.
  • Any repairs not directly related to the disaster.

Funding
   • A maximum of $500,000 may be awarded to a local unit of government to address
      emergency housing conditions, or damaged public facilities.
   • Residents of the community awarded CDBG-EAP funds may receive assistance if their
      dwelling was damaged by the disaster and if their household income doesn't exceed the
      income limit established for their county (80% of the County Median Income).

Contact Information
Information regarding EAP may be obtained by contacting (608) 267-3682.

CDBG Grant Planning Grant Program (CDBG-PLNG)
The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Planning Program provides funding to local
governments and community partnerships that have clearly identified a community or economic
development concern, or opportunity, and lack the resources needed to plan an appropriate
response. The program’s goals are to help communities develop clear and actionable strategies
for addressing specific site, neighborhood, community or regional economic or development
needs and improve the quality of community or economic development projects by helping to
fund local plans. Planning Grant funds will be available on a continuous basis until available
funds are committed.

Grant Categories
There are four categories of Planning Grants available to CDBG-eligible local units of
government:

Regional Economic Development Planning Grants
Regional Economic Development Planning Grants are intended to encourage multi-county and
regional approaches to addressing economic development issues. They are available to counties
or multi-county partnerships wishing to develop plans to diversify the local or regional economy,
attract new businesses and jobs, coordinate economic development efforts, respond to sudden
and significant job loss or persistent high unemployment, or address other significant economic
issues. The Department will provide grants of up to $25,000 for a project with county-wide focus
or up to $20,000/county, but not more than $100,000 in total, for multi-county partnerships.
Regions exhibiting high distress will receive first priority.

Community Planning Grants
Community Planning Grants are available for community wide planning or to develop strategies
more narrowly focused on specific existing neighborhoods, including business districts that are
in, or are in danger of, decline or deterioration. The Department provides grants up to $25,000
for planning and strategic development activities that
    • develop and utilize collaborations among community stakeholders


                                                                                             55
     •   assess and analyze demographic/economic data (including downtown market analysis)
     •   address economic or physical blight conditions
     •   prepare plans to physically improve downtown business districts
     •   conduct environmental or historic preservation studies

Site Specific Planning Grants
Site Specific Planning Grants, up to $15,000, are available to help plan for the use or reuse of a
specific site, for example, the adaptive reuse of a former hospital or school building, or potential
use of a parcel of land. Eligible activities include community assessments, needs analysis and
prioritization; strategy development; preliminary design; and actions to organize, survey and
engage affected residents, stakeholders or beneficiaries.

Functional Planning Grants
Functional planning grants of up to $15,000 are available to help communities assess and
develop specific responses to broader needs that exist within the community. Among the
potential targets for these grants are implementation strategies for comprehensive plans;
affordable housing; energy conservation; accessibility; historic preservation; small business
assistance; flood mitigation; telecommunications services; or response plans to plant closings,
natural disasters or other emergencies.

Eligibility Requirements
Eligible applicants are units of general local government eligible for the CDBG Small Cities
Program in Wisconsin. Entitlement communities (generally, cities with populations above
50,000, Milwaukee County and most of Dane and Waukesha Counties) are not eligible. Groups
of local governments may apply for Regional Economic Development Planning Grants,
however, multi-jurisdictional applications must designate one local government as the lead
applicant. Applicants must satisfy the following requirements:

To qualify for assistance, a planning proposal must address an activity which, if
implemented, meets at least one of two national objectives under the CDBG Program.
   1. at least 51 percent of the persons who would benefit from implementation of the plan are
      low or moderate income persons
   2. the plan addresses a slum or blighted area in the community.

Proposed planning activities must relate to projects that are CDBG eligible. Typical eligible
planning activities involve feasibility studies; project plans; redevelopment plans;
infrastructure/needs assessments in support of housing, efficient land use, economic
development; downtown revitalization; and historic preservation. Engineering, architectural and
design costs related to specific projects are not eligible.

Match Requirements
Successful applicants must provide a match of at least 50 percent of the total grant award from
sources other than grants provided by the federal or state government. Private or public funding
can be used for the required match. Not more than 25 percent of the match can be in-kind. In
cases of extreme hardship, the Department may reduce the match requirement to not less than 25
percent of the total grant award.



56
Other Requirements
A completed plan must be produced within 12 months of finalizing a grant contract. The plan
must present a discussion of:
   • outcome alternatives
   • preferred outcome
   • specific implementation steps to achieve outcome
   • schedules
   • preliminary cost estimates
   • potential financing sources for implementation.

Evaluation Criteria
It is the Department’s intention to fund specific economic or community development plans that
are likely to be implemented and that will improve the quality of life in Wisconsin communities.
Funding decisions will be based upon the following criteria (not listed in order of importance).
The award of a planning grant does not commit the Department to provide funds to implement
the plan.
     • The need for a plan.
     • The demonstration of community distress.
     • Evidence that key community stakeholders share the belief that the issue being addressed
         is critical to enhancing community vitality.
     • The ability to undertake all activities associated with planning and supply the required
         match.
     • The demonstration that the proposed planning activity follows or reinforces local smart
         growth plans.
     • The likelihood that the applicant is prepared to implement the plan in a timely manner.
     • Plan proposals that address downtown/main street and central business areas will receive
         preference.
     • Plan proposals that focus on the preservation and revitalization of existing neighborhoods
         and business districts will receive preference.
     • Plan proposals that reflect collaboration between public and private sector stakeholders
         will receive preference.

Contact Information
Before submitting an application, please contact (608) 266-7942 to further discuss your proposal.
Doug will assist you in determining the eligibility of your proposal as well as identify other
program application and implementation requirements.

CDBG-Small Cities Housing Program
The Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, administered by the
Wisconsin Department of Commerce, Division of Housing and Community Development
(DHCD), provides grants to general purpose units of local government for housing programs
which principally benefit low and moderate income (LMI) households. CDBG dollars are
flexible and responsive to local needs.

Following grant completion, the local unit of government uses repaid CDBG housing loans to
establish a local revolving loan fund (RLF) for housing repairs and homebuyer assistance. Many


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municipalities throughout the state have available RLF dollars. For a comprehensive list of
previous CDBG housing grantees as a potential source of rehab dollars, go to the CDBG-RLF
Housing contact list.

In addition to addressing LMI housing needs, CDBG can be used to leverage other programs or
serve as a local match. The grant also can be used as an incentive to involve the private sector in
local community development efforts or to respond to area needs. Often the CDBG program
serves as a catalyst for other community development projects.

Eligibility
General purpose units of local government (i.e., towns, villages, and cities with populations of
less than 50,000 and counties other than Milwaukee, Waukesha, and Dane) are eligible to apply.
Applications may be submitted individually or jointly with another jurisdiction where mutual
action is needed to solve a shared problem.

Special purpose units of government such as redevelopment authorities, housing authorities, and
sanitary districts cannot apply but may be chosen by grantees to operate the program. Indian
tribes are not eligible because there is a special Indian Block Grant Program administered
directly by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Eligible Activities
    • Rehabilitation of dwelling units.
    • Removal of architectural barriers.
    • Homeownership opportunities for renters.
    • Payment of relocation costs and benefits.
    • Small public facilities projects.
    • Demolition or removal of buildings so site can be used for LMI housing.
    • Conversion of buildings into LMI dwelling units.
    • Acquisition of real property for the construction of LMI housing with other sources of
       funds.
    • Site improvements for the construction of LMI housing with other sources of funds.

Housing proposals will be funded in order to upgrade the quality and expand the supply of
decent, safe, and sanitary housing for LMI households. Successful programs have included
residential rehabilitation (including accessibility improvements for persons with disabilities);
conversion of commercial property to residential units; assistance to LMI renters to become
homeowners; and small public facilities projects.

Funding
Under the Rehabilitation program, available funding is approximately $7million per year with
the average 22-month grant being approximately $450,000. The maximum award per grantee is
$650,000.

While the grant ceiling establishes the maximum which may be requested, individual grants will
be awarded only in amounts commensurate with the size of the community, the capacity to
complete the work in a timely manner and the scope of the proposed program.


58
Community Development Block Grant For Public Facilities (CDBG-PF)
(CDBG-PF) is a versatile financing tool for general purpose local units of government in need of
funds to undertake needed infrastructure and public building projects (excluding buildings for the
conduct of government). The Program is designed to enhance the vitality of a community by
undertaking public investment that contributes to its overall community and economic
development. The CDBG program is federally funded and all assisted projects must comply with
the federal requirements that accompany the funds. To be awarded funds, projects must meet one
of three National Objectives for the program. They are 1) the project principally benefits low and
moderate-income persons, 2) the project eliminates slum and blight, and 3), the proposed activity
meets an urgent local need. Urgent local need projects are typically catastrophic events. Other
federal requirements that accompany the CDBG funds are the payment of federal wage rates on
construction projects, compliance with environmental review and assessment procedures, and
undertaking actions to affirmatively further fair housing.

Commerce staff works with applicants and grant recipients to effectively and efficiently address
the federal requirements. The result has been the funding and implementation through
completion of thousands of CDBG assisted projects in the state since 1974 when the program
was started by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and also during
Commerce administration of the program since 1982. Although not the answer for all community
and economic development needs, hundreds of communities throughout the state have been able
to access the funds for their use. The program is worth checking out!

Meeting The Low And Moderate-Income National Objective
The U.S. Census 2000 low and moderate-income (LMI) Census data is used to determine an
applicant's area-wide eligibility for funding under the CDBG Program's National Objective of
"benefit to low and moderate-income persons. Per communications with the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development, there is no rounding of the Census data. A community with an
LMI population of 50.6 percent is not eligible to claim community-wide LMI benefit. The LMI
percentage must be 51 percent or higher.

Community-wide surveys done previously are no longer accepted since the 2000 Census LMI
data is now available. Communities interested in doing a survey to determine what they feel is a
more accurate representation of the LMI population should contact program staff for further
information and guidance. We are particularly concerned about significant differences between
Census LMI data and survey data. We first want to discuss with you the justification for a survey
in light of the recent Census data.

A hard copy of the data for Wisconsin communities is available by contacting (608) 608-266-
2742. The cost is $10.00 for copying and mailing or may be downloaded here LMI 2000 Census
Data. The listing of the Census eligible communities will also be included in the revised Project
Proposal to be posted on this page soon.

Interest in the Public Facilities Block Grant Program continues to remain high. Program
information and application materials are found below on this web page, but the following is a
list of some of the considerations that enhance proposals.




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     •   A creative approach to addressing the described need that reflects the maximum return on
         the Block Grant dollars.
     •   Evidence of intergovernmental cooperation and cost sharing.
     •   Increased use of private funds to match public dollars for community-wide projects.
     •   Evidence of taking a comprehensive look at the problem (bigger picture) before deciding
         on a specific course of action.

Factors Considered During The Review Of CDBG Application
When considering the submission of a CDBG-Public Facilities application, applicant's should be
aware that the review of an application takes into consideration a number of other considerations
in addition to assigning points in the 4 point categories. These point categories and Other
Considerations are described in the application. The "Other Considerations" can have a
significant bearing on the outcome of the review.

The demand for CDBG funds is greater than ever given the overall budget woes of all units of
government. Also, the beginnings of a recovering economy is placing considerable demand for
CDBG funding, specifically for infrastructure improvements that will enable businesses to
startup or expand and provide much needed jobs and additional tax base for communities.

Funds are limited and funding decisions are more difficult than ever. Financial need is a major
consideration. Not only is the financial need of the community considered, but also that of the
residents/households benefiting from the project. It is for this reason the Department, when
looking at water and sewer projects, looks at the community's Enterprise Statements (financial
statements for the water and sewer utilities) and household utility rates and how they compare to
household income in the community. Proposals from communities with current or projected
household utility rates in excess of 3% of household income have a stronger chance at funding.
However, the 3% figure is not necessarily a make or break figure. Consideration is also given to
the amount of funds being held by the utility. Typically, water and sewer projects are financed
with revenue bonds that are paid back with user fees. It is for this reason we look at the
household utility rates. We have found in our review of water and sewer pro jects a wide range
of household utility bills, ranging from a few hundred dollars a year to over a thousand. We try
to help those in greatest need.

Applications for projects for activities that are typically funded out of general obligation bonds
typically are subject to a review of the applicant's general obligation capacity, debt incurred to
date, and remaining capacity. The Department has always reviewed financial need and it has
become apparent that the need has intensified for some communities during the past 22 years of
grant administration.

Also looked at is the amount of other public funding going into a project as well as the amount of
CDBG funding received to date. The considerations include a number of factors and it is for this
reason that potential applicants are advised to review their project prior to submitting an
application. Staff will do their best to provide an assessment of the prospects for funding given
the information at hand at the time of the contact.




60
Implementation Handbook
Now available in a Word Document is the Implementation Manual (Please Note: when printing
the manual, the first page number at the bottom of each page corresponds to the chapter number,
the second number after the hyphen is used when instructing your printer what page numbers
you want printed. This was done intentionally to assist you in printing. For example, if you only
want to print Chapter 3, instruct your printer to print pages 23 to 59, which are all of the pages in
Chapter 3). Numbering of the Implementation Manual on the web is different from the hard
copy. Do not make cross-reference using page numbers.

The Implementation Manual Note: Use the Implementation Manual that was effective at the
time your project was funded.

CDBG STAFF
(608) 266-2435
(608) 266-7998
(608) 267-3682
(608) 261-7714

ESG/THP/HPP
Each year the Division of Housing & Community Development (DHCD) holds a competition to
distribute Emergency Shelter Grant/Transitional Housing Program/Homelessness Prevention
Program funds (ESG/THP/HPP.)

Emergency Shelter Grant
These HUD funds are to be used to boost the capacity, improve the quality and support
operations of emergency shelters for the homeless, as well as provide prevention programs and
essential social services to homeless individuals and families. The shelters benefiting from this
program serve a broad range of homeless interests, including victims of domestic violence,
runaway adolescents and persons with disabilities.

Transitional Housing Program
This state program provides funds that help formerly homeless persons or families transition to
economic independence. Funds may be used for housing, childcare, educational or vocational
training, transportation, or other costs needed to assist the participant in attaining self-
sufficiency.

Homelessness Prevention Program
These state program funds provide security deposits and other rental assistance to help homeless
individuals live on premises that are safe and sanitary, modest in design and reasonable in cost.
Funding can also be used to prevent rent eviction or home foreclosure for qualifying households.

Eligibility
Any city, county, tribe, or private nonprofit agency (if its project receives an approval
certification by the local government) may apply for and receive funding in response to the
published request for proposals issued by DHCD. Local matching funds are required.
Participation in the statewide Homeless Management Information System (Wisconsin



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ServicePoint) is a requirement. Applicants are strongly urged to collaborate within their areas of
service to ensure the availability of a comprehensive continuum of services for individuals and
families affected by homelessness.

Grant award recipients must comply with all applicable state and federal requirements as detailed
in the grant agreement. These include nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements.
Grants may not be used to renovate, rehabilitate, or convert buildings owned by pervasively
religious organizations unless specific safeguards are established (ESG funds only).

Funding
Any city, county, tribe, or private nonprofit agency (if its project receives an approval
certification by the local government) may apply for and receive funding in response to the
published request for proposals issued by DHCD. Local matching funds are required.
Participation in the statewide Homeless Management Information System (Wisconsin
ServicePoint) is a requirement. Applicants are strongly urged to collaborate within their areas of
service to ensure the availability of a comprehensive continuum of services for individuals and
families affected by homelessness.

Grant award recipients must comply with all applicable state and federal requirements as detailed
in the grant agreement. These include nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements.
Grants may not be used to renovate, rehabilitate, or convert buildings owned by pervasively
religious organizations unless specific safeguards are established (ESG funds only).

Contact Information
Information regarding ESG/THP/HPP may be obtained by contacting (608) 266-9388.

HCRI Homebuyer Program
The Housing Cost Reduction Initiative (HCRI) was created in 1989, by the Governor and the
Wisconsin Legislature. The State set aside these funds to provide housing assistance to low- and
moderate-income (LMI) households seeking to own or rent decent, safe, affordable housing. In
2006, the Wisconsin Department of Commerce, Division of Housing and Community
Development divided the HCRI into the Housing Preservation Program (HPP) and the HCRI
Homebuyer Program.

Eligibility
Eligible applicants for funding under the HCRI program include:
    • The governing body of a county, city, village, or town
    • The elected governing body of a federally-recognized American Indian tribe or band in
        the State of Wisconsin
    • A nonstock, nonprofit corporation organized under Chapter 181
    • A for-profit corporation organized under Chapter 180
    • A cooperative organized under Chapter 185 if the articles of incorporation or bylaws of
        the cooperative limit the rate of dividend that may be paid on all classes of stock
    • A religious society organized under Chapter 187
    • A housing authority, including a redevelopment authority or housing and community
        development authority


62
Households receiving assistance must have gross incomes at or below 80% of the County
Median Income (CMI) adjusted for family size. Homebuyer properties must be single-family
and the primary residence of the owner.

Eligible Activities
Eligible HCRI Homebuyer activities include:
Acquisition: Grantees can help eligible homebuyers purchase affordable homes by providing
downpayment, closing cost, and/or gap financing assistance.

HCRI funding cannot be used to provide assistance for development costs, improvements to
dwelling units, or payments on a construction or rehabilitation loan.

Funding
HCRI Homebuyer funds totaling approximately $2.8 million are awarded through a biennial
competition. Individual grants will be awarded only in amounts commensurate with the scope of
the proposed program and its capacity.

Contact Information
Information regarding the HCRI Homebuyer Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 267-
6904.

HOME-Homebuyer and Rehabilitation Program (HHR)
The Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) has identified homeownership
and the conservation of quality owner-occupied and rental housing as top priorities for allocating
federal and state housing resources. A program was established to provide essential home
purchase assistance and necessary home rehabilitation, and other vital improvements for
dwelling units occupied by low- and moderate-income households.

The source of funds is the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) HOME
Investment Partnerships Program (HOME), and the American dream Downpayment Initiative
(ADDI) program. The Wisconsin Department of Commerce, DHCD awards these funds to local
units of government and local housing organizations through a biennial funding cycle.

Eligibility
Eligible applicants for funds under the HHR program include:
    • The governing body of a village, city, town, or county;
    • The governing body of a federally-recognized American Indian tribe or band in the State
        of Wisconsin;
    • A public agency or nonprofit organization;
    • Faith-based or religious organizations, as long as the funds are not used to support
        inherently religious activities.

State HOME funds may not be provided for activities in other HOME Participating
Jurisdictions:
   • Cities of Eau Claire, Green Bay, La Crosse, Madison, Milwaukee, and Racine;
   • Counties of Dane, Milwaukee, and Rock;


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     •   The Jefferson, Ozaukee, Washington, Waukesha County Consortium.

Eligible Activities
The program is designed to provide funding for three HOME-eligible activities:
    • Homebuyer assistance: Direct assistance may be provided to eligible homebuyers for
       acquisition (downpayment and closing costs), acquisition and rehabilitation, or new
       construction. Grantees may utilize the funds to construct housing for sale to low- and
       moderate-income (LMI) homebuyers (household income at or below 80% County
       Median Income).
    • Owner-occupied rehabilitation: Funds are provided for making essential improvements
       to single-family homes serving as the principal residence of LMI owners. Eligible costs
       include energy-related improvements, accessibility improvements, lead-based paint
       hazard reduction, and repair of code violations.
    • Rental rehabilitation: Funds are provided to landlords for making essential repairs to
       units rented to tenants at or below 60% of the county median income. Landlords are
       required to lease HOME-assisted units at or below the HUD published Fair Market Rent
       (FMR) for the county.

Funding
HOME Homebuyer and Rental Rehabilitation funds, including ADDI, total approximately $12
million for the biennial funding cycle. Grants to eligible applicants will be awarded only in an
amount commensurate with the scope of the proposed program and the applicant’s capacity.

Contact Information
Information regarding the HHR Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 267-6904.

Project for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness (PATH)
The Projects for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness (PATH) is a federal formula
grant program, created in 1991 under the McKinney Act, and administered by the Substance
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). PATH funds serve individuals
with serious mental illness, as well as individuals with co-occurring substance abuse disorders,
who are homeless. Under the PATH grant program, SAMHSA provides a flexible stream of
funding that encourages community commitment to serving individuals who are homeless and
living with serious mental illness and helps fill critical gaps in services. PATH, by nature of the
selective focus, draws attention to the most vulnerable of the homeless population and allows for
implementation of programming to meet their needs.

Eligible Activities
Agencies use PATH dollars to support a wide array of eligible services. People who are
homeless and have serious mental illness can be very difficult to engage. Many among this
population also have substance use/abuse problems. PATH funds are specifically targeted to help
bring these individuals into the services they need. Grantees may use PATH funds to provide any
or all of a number of essential services including outreach, screening and diagnosis, community
mental health, case management, alcohol and drug treatment, habilitation and rehabilitation,
supportive and supervisory services in residential settings, and referral to other services such as




64
health care. A limited amount of funding may also be used for housing assistance - minor
renovation, repairs, or one time rent payment to prevent eviction.

Funding
$713,000 in PATH funds are available for state fiscal year 2006-2007. The PATH legislation
requires that the funds be used in areas that have the largest population of individuals who are
homeless and have serious mental illness. The five (5) agencies that will receive the PATH funds
include:
    • Healthcare for the Homeless – Milwaukee County - $285,625.00
    • Tellurian UCAN, Inc. – Dane County - $135,000
    • Rock County Human Services – Rock County - $ 177,719
    • Fox Valley Emergency Shelter – Outagamie County - $34,958
    • Hebron House of Hospitality - Waukesha County - $24,900
    • The remainder of the funds are used for state operating expenses and technical assistance.

Contact Information
Information regarding PATH may be obtained by contacting (608) 264-7625.

Rental Housing Development
The Rental Housing Development (RHD) Program assists eligible housing organizations,
particularly Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs), with funds to develop
affordable rental housing. For-profit corporations may partner with the above-mentioned groups
or directly apply for these funds.

The funds must serve households at or below 60% of the County Median Income (CMI).
 Projects receiving HOME funds are subject to rent limitations for a specified period. Funds may
be used for acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction activities. Application and Program
Guide are available below and accepted as long as the supply of funds lasts. Application
submission dates are quarterly.

This program is part of the Bureau of Local Development, Division of Housing and Community
Development, Wisconsin Department of Commerce. It is federally funded through HUD’s Home
Investment Partnership’s Program (HOME).

Wisconsin Business Retention and Expansion Study Program (WIBRES)
The Wisconsin Department of Commerce recognizes that Wisconsin's economy is a reflection of
the business climate within each urban and rural community in the state. While new business
attraction can stimulate economic growth, the retention and expansion of existing businesses is
vital to maintaining and growing a community and ultimately the state. In order to aid in
strengthening economic development in Wisconsin, Commerce provides communities with a
survey tool to determine factors that affect business retention and expansion locally. The
program is currently offered free of charge to all qualifying communities in Wisconsin.

The Tool - WIBRES:
The Wisconsin Business Retention and Expansion Study program (WIBRES) recommends a
process that combines a site visit with our strategically designed survey instrument to collect



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information from chief executive officers on the local business climate. The survey questionnaire
covers the following categories:
I. History and status of present location
II. Nature of the business
III. Physical plant specifications
IV. Markets and customers
V. Competitors
VI. Future plans
VII. Labor and manpower
VIII. Assessment of government relations, regulations, and services in the area
IX. Financial conditions
X. Energy costs and supplies
XI. Community linkage
XII. Overall impressions

In addition to the survey questionnaire provided by Commerce, communities may wish to collect
data to examine community specific issues. Commerce will design an addendum questionnaire
for this purpose and provide a summary of the data collected.

Program Objectives:
The purpose of the WIBRES program is to help communities develop a systematic approach to
business retention and expansion efforts. Identifying the needs of area business is the first step to
being responsive. The program provides an opportunity to:
    • Gain an understanding of the business community's view of the local economy
    • Determine future expansion/relocation plans of companies in order to set up an early
       warning system for local action
    • Acquaint business executives with assistance available through various economic
       development programs
    • Improve the communications bridge and strengthen relationships between local/county
       government and the business community
    • Identify specific concerns and problems of the local businesses and provide swift,
       effective solutions

Wisconsin Neighborhood Stabilization (WNS) Program
The new Neighborhood Stabilization Program will provide emergency assistance to acquire and
redevelop foreclosed properties that might otherwise become sources of abandonment and blight
within their communities. The program is authorized under Title III of the Housing and
Economic Recovery Act of 2008. HUD is treating Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds as
a special allocation of Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 CDBG funding. Neighborhood Stabilization funds
can be used to purchase foreclosed or abandoned homes and to rehabilitate, resell, or redevelop
these homes in order to stabilize neighborhoods and stem the decline of property values of
neighboring homes.




66
Eligibility
Eligible applicants for funding under the WNS program are:
    • Local units of government, including CDBG Entitlements and HOME Participating
        Jurisdictions;
    • Federally-recognized American Indian tribe or band in the state of Wisconsin;
    • Nonprofit corporations organized under Chapter 181;
    • Housing Authority.

Eligible applicants will have experience in property acquisition and/or
rehabilitation/redevelopment utilizing federal funding.

Eligible Activities
All activities funded under the WNS program must be CDBG-eligible and must meet the CDBG
low- and moderate-income national objective. Certain CDBG rules have been superseded to
allow the eligible uses described under the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA). This
provision redefines and supersedes the definition of "low- and moderate-income" effectively
allowing households with incomes up to 120% CMI (moderate income) to qualify.

The categories of eligible activities include:
   • Applicant purchase and rehabilitation of homes and residential properties that have been
      abandoned or foreclosed upon, in order to sell, rent, or redevelop such homes and
      properties for eligible households;
   • Direct down payment/gap financing assistance to eligible homebuyers purchasing a
      foreclosed property;
   • Establishment of land banks for foreclosed homes in neighborhoods where property
      stabilization is required;
   • Demolition of blighted structures;
   • Redevelopment of sites;
   • Delivery costs, including: establishing financing mechanisms for purchase and
      redevelopment of eligible properties.

Funding
The State of Wisconsin will be applying to HUD for $38,779,123.00 in funding. The application
will be submitted to HUD by December 1, 2008.

Community-Based Economic Development Program (CBED)
The Community-Based Economic Development Program (CBED) provides financing assistance
to local governments and community-based organizations that undertake planning or
development of projects or that provides technical assistance services that support of businesses
(including technology–based businesses) development.

Eligible Applicants
    • Cities, villages, towns, counties, tribes and community-based organizations may apply for
       planning funds.
    • Community-based organizations may apply development, revolving loan or entrepreneur
       training funds.


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     •   Applicants seeking planning, development projects and assistance grants must provide a
         25 percent cash match; those seeking incubator grants or regional grants must provide at
         least a 50 percent match.
     •   Applicants seeking incubator grants must have an authorized graduation policy.
     •   Technology based incubators are strongly encouraged.
     •   Applicants seeking incubator grants may not receive more than two technical assistance,
         two start-up or expansion, five operations.

Eligible Activities & Funding
Planning, Development Projects and Assistance Grants
    • Grants of up to $30,000 to fund non-profit organizations to assist small businesses,
       develop economic development project plans or to undertake an entrepreneur-training
       program for at-risk youth.

Business Incubator & Technology Based Incubator Grants
   • Grants up to $100,000 for unique regional projects which are collaborative efforts
      between community-based organizations or local units of government.
   • Grants of up to $10,000/year for technical assistance in developing a feasibility study or
      the initial design of an incubator start-up or expansion project or to improve the operation
      of an incubator.
   • Grants of up to $100,000/year to start, rehabilitate or expand an incubator.
   • Grants of up to $30,000/year to fund operations of an existing incubator.
   • Grants of up to $75,000/year for a venture capital development seminar.

Venture Capital Fair
   • Grants of up to $75,000 for a venture capital development seminar.

Regional Economic Development Grants
   • Grants up $100,000 for unique regional projects which are collaborative efforts between
      community-based organizations.

Project Administration
The recipient is responsible for project administration. This includes submitting requests for
funds; progress reports; close-out reports; and complying with other contractual obligations.

Contact Information
Information regarding the CBED Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 266-7942.

Critical Assistance Program (CA)
The Critical Assistance Program (CA) is designed to provide direct financial assistance to reduce
the housing costs of low- and moderate-income households. Grant awards include
administrative funds to support the housing activities, and may be used to provide housing
counseling as well as staff salaries and other administrative necessities.

Prevention of homelessness is an important part of the HUD Continuum of Care philosophy
however it is not an allowable activity for funding through the HUD Continuum of Care


68
Supportive Housing Program. Therefore, the Bureau of Supportive Housing (BSH) plans to use
several hundred thousand to fund prevention activities including services that are concerned with
housing counseling and eviction or foreclosure prevention in those parts of the state that are not
served using HUD Emergency Shelter Grant or State funded Homeless Prevention funds. The
bureau encourages the coordination of CA prevention activities with existing local programs and
expects the applicant agency to collaborate with agencies in local communities for the delivery
of homelessness prevention services.

Eligible Activities
Rent and Security Deposits
Grantees may provide rental assistance to households in the form of security deposits, short-term
rental subsidy, and/or utility costs.

Foreclosure Prevention
Homeowners may receive assistance with payment of principal and interest on a mortgage loan
that is in arrearage, property taxes, and utility arrearages. The homeowner must show the ability
to make future payments.

The grantee agency may use up to 15% of the award for administrative funds to support the
housing activities.

Contact Information
Information regarding the Critical Assistance Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 266-
9388.

HOME- Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program (TBRA)
The federal HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) was created to help produce
housing opportunities for households that earn not more than 80% of County Median Income
(CMI). The Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) is providing HOME
TBRA funds through local governments, housing authorities and non-profit organizations to
provide HOME rental assistance, in association with support services coordinated by the
participating agency, to help homeless persons and to prevent homelessness.

The Department of Commerce, Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD)
HOME funds are not available in entitlement areas that receive HUD HOME funds directly.
These entitlement areas include the cities of Eau Claire, Green Bay, Kenosha, LaCrosse,
Madison, Milwaukee and Racine and entitlement counties include the
Waukesha/Jefferson/Washington/Ozaukee County consortia, Milwaukee and Rock.

Because the TBRA Program allows local flexibility in many program design areas, DHCD will
allow individual grantees to develop community-specific programs. Programs must comply with
all HOME regulations such as tenant occupancy and income requirements, unit and rent
standards and administrative performance. The participating agency is subject to performance
indicators, such as program participation levels, affirmative outreach efforts and availability of
suitable housing. As with all HUD HOME programs, the TBRA program also requires a 25%
match. Eligible match cannot include tenant rent or be provided from a federal source.



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Contact
For more information contact (608) 264-7625.

Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS
The Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program is authorized by AIDS
Housing Opportunity Act (AOHA) and amended by the Housing and Community Development
Act of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-550 approved October 28, 1992). It is designed to provide eligible
applicants with program and administrative resources for meeting the housing needs of persons
with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or related diseases and their families.

HOPWA funds may be used to assist all forms of housing designed to prevent homelessness
including emergency housing, shared housing arrangements, apartments, single room occupancy
(SRO) dwellings, and community residences. Appropriate services must be provided as a part of
any HOPWA assisted housing, but HOPWA funds may also be used to provide services
independent of any housing activity.

Eligibility
Any non-profit organization or governmental housing agency is an eligible applicant. There are
specific requirements for participation by religious organizations. The Division of Housing and
Community Development administers the application and contract process (including the
required Environmental Impact Assessment), monitors the work of grant recipients and files
required reports with the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Eligible Activities
The following activities may be carried out with HOPWA funds:
    • Housing information services including counseling and referral to assist eligible persons
       to locate, acquire, finance and maintain housing.
    • Resource identification to establish, coordinate and develop housing assistance resources
       for eligible persons.
    • Acquisition, rehabilitation, conversion, lease and repair of facilities to provide housing
       and services and SRO or community residence new construction.
    • Project or tenant based rental assistance, including assistance for shared housing
       arrangements. Short term rent, mortgage and utility payments to prevent the
       homelessness of tenants or mortgagers of dwellings.
    • Supportive services including, but not limited to, health, mental health, assessment,
       permanent housing placement, drug and alcohol abuse treatment and counseling, day
       care, nutritional services, intensive care when required and assistance in gaining access to
       local State and Federal government benefits and services.
    • Technical assistance in establishing and operating a community residence.

Grant award recipients must comply with federal requirements in 24 CFR part 574 -- Housing
Opportunities for Persons with AIDS. These include standards for supportive services and
housing quality as well as non-discrimination and equal opportunity requirements.




70
Funding
Approximately $400,000 is available for HOPWA programs annually. In the balance of state
area funds are distributed in response to an application process. Contracts are scheduled to start
October 1 of each year and they may be multi-year agreements.

Contact Information
Information regarding the HOPWA Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 266-9388.

Interest Bearing Real Estate Trust Accounts Program (IBRETA)
Since 1993, Wisconsin Statutes require real estate brokers to establish interest-bearing real estate
trust accounts for the deposit of all down payments, earnest money and other trust funds received
by the broker and related to the conveyance of real estate. Banks and other depository institutions
remit the interest from the IBRETA accounts, approximately $200,000 to
$300,000 annually, to the State. The Dept. of Commerce, Division of Housing and Community
Development uses these funds to augment existing emergency and transitional homeless
programs. IBRETA dollars, partially fund grants to organizations that provide shelter or services
to homeless individuals or families.

Contact (608) 266-8273.

Wisconsin Main Street Overview
The Wisconsin Main Street Program is a comprehensive revitalization program designed to
promote the historic and economic redevelopment of traditional business districts in Wisconsin.
The Main Street Program was established in 1987 to encourage and support the revitalization of
downtowns in Wisconsin communities. Each year, the Department of Commerce selects
communities to join the program. These communities receive technical support and training
needed to restore their Main Streets to centers of community activity and commerce.

The Four-Point Approach
In 1980, the National Trust for Historic Preservation established the National Main Street Center
to assist nationwide downtown revitalization efforts. The Wisconsin Main Street Program is
based on the Trust's philosophy, which advocates restoration of the historic character of
downtown while pursuing traditional development strategies such as marketing, business
recruitment and retention, real estate development, market analysis, and public improvements.

Four elements combine to create this well balanced program:
   • Organization involves building a Main Street framework that is well represented by civic
       groups, merchants, bankers, citizens, public officials, and chambers of commerce.
       Everyone must work together to renew downtown. A strong organization provides the
       stability to build and maintain a long-term effort.
   • Design enhances the attractiveness of the business district. Historic building
       rehabilitations, street and alley clean-ups, colorful banners, landscaping and lighting all
       improve the physical image of the downtown as a quality place to shop, work, walk,
       invest in, and live. Design improvements result in a reinvestment of private and public
       dollars into the downtown.




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     •   Economic Restructuring involves analyzing current market forces to develop long-term
         solutions. Recruiting new businesses, creatively converting unused space for new uses,
         and sharpening the competitiveness of Main Street's traditional merchants are examples
         of economic restructuring activities.
     •   Promotion creates excitement downtown. Street festivals, parades, retail events, and
         image development campaigns are some of the ways Main Street encourages consumer
         traffic in the downtown. Promotion involves marketing an enticing image to shoppers,
         investors, and visitors.

Main Street Benefits
Investment
In the first five years of a local Main Street program, the state of Wisconsin invests
approximately $125,000 in on-site visits, training, and technical assistance.

The Wisconsin Main Street Program, the National Main Street Center, and private consultants
spend more than 80 days in each new community during the start-up phase.

After the start-up phase, the state annually invests approximately $5,000 in each Main Street
community to provide quarterly volunteer and director training sessions, design assistance,
business consultations, and town-specific technical assistance. Other benefits are an annual
awards ceremony, cooperative marketing opportunities, and an extensive library of slides,
videos, and printed materials. In addition, scholarships are available for local Main Street
program directors to attend the National Town Meeting on Main Street.

Results
Together, Wisconsin Main Street communities have impacted the heart and soul of our
communities-the downtowns. A significant number of new jobs have been created; many new
businesses have been attracted; and millions of dollars have been privately invested in the
communities.

Services Available To Communities
Communities selected to participate in the Wisconsin Main Street Program receive five years of
technical assistance, including:
    • Volunteer and program manager training;
    • Advanced training on specific downtown issues, such as marketing, business recruitment,
    • Volunteer development, and historic preservation;
    • On-site visits to help each community develop its strengths and plan for success;
    • On-site design consultations;
    • On-site small business consultations:
    • Telephone assistance;
    • Materials such as manuals and slide programs

State Shelter Subsidy Grant Program
The State Shelter Subsidy Grant Program (SSSG) This program provides up to 50% of an
emergency shelter or voucher program's annual operating budget. These funds are available to
programs with additional funding needs due to renovation/expansion of an existing shelter


72
facility, the development of an existing building into a shelter facility, the expansion (or
development) of shelter services or the inability of a shelter program to obtain adequate funding
to continue an existing level of service. Estimates of the homeless population in Wisconsin range
from 29,000 to 34,000. The emergency shelter programs funded by the State Shelter Subsidy
Grant Program provided approximately 398,000 nights of shelter to 24,000 persons annually.

Eligibility
An eligible applicant may be a county or municipal governing body or agency, a community
action agency, or other private non-profit organization. Only generic emergency facility or
voucher programs are eligible. Individuals and families who are homeless are eligible for shelter
and related services Domestic Abuse and Runaway shelters are not eligible.

Funding
The $1,131,000 annual state appropriation is shared among Milwaukee County, Dane County,
and balance of state areas and is available for three pre-determined allocations based on shelter
use within each area. Grant amounts, which range from $1,100 to $60,000, are enhanced
through the use of funds from the Interest Bearing Real Estate Trust Account (IBRETA) funds.

In many areas, a local shelter or service provider is the designated lead agency which works with
other shelters to develop a plan for distributing funds earmarked for that community. This plan
is submitted in their application to Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD)
and must be endorsed by all shelters in that community. The grant to the lead agency may not
exceed 50% of the participating shelters combined operating budgets.

The balance of state shelter programs apply directly to DHCD for a grant. Funds are distributed
by formula to all eligible applicants. The formula is based on the estimated number of shelter
nights each applicant provides compared to the total number of shelter nights the balance of state
agencies estimate they will provide. No applicant may receive a grant greater than 50% of its
operating budget.

The grant cycle for this program begins in late summer, when notices of available State Shelter
Subsidy funding are sent to potential grantees. Applications are available on the DHCD website,
by e-mail, diskette and hard copy. Applications are due to DHCD in fall and grant contracts
begin in January.

Contact Information
Information regarding the SSSG Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 266-8273.

Wisconsin Fresh Start
The Wisconsin Fresh Start Program (WFS) awards funds to agencies to establish and sustain
programs based on the Operation Fresh Start, Inc., service model. The program is designed to
provide on-site housing construction and rehabilitation work experience, off-site academic
classes and supportive services for at-risk young people.

The program provides young people with education, employment skills and career direction
leading to economic self-sufficiency. The purpose of the replication effort is to establish



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comparable projects throughout the state using the Operation Fresh Start program in Madison as
the model.

The program aims to increase the self-esteem and self-sufficiency of youths and young adults
(ages 16 to 24) who evidence alcohol and other drug abuse problems; poor health and nutrition;
low educational achievement; poor employment history; physical, sexual and emotional abuse or
criminal histories. The program offers an educational component where participants complete
classes leading to a high school equivalency diploma and a vocational component where
participants learn basic home construction, rehabilitation and remodeling skills. An additional
focus of the work component of the program is to rehabilitate substandard housing into well-
built, mechanically sound and affordable dwellings for low- and moderate-income residents.

This program is part of the Bureau of Supportive Housing, Division of Housing & Community
Development, Wisconsin Department of Commerce. It is funded through a variety of federal,
state and local funding sources.

Information regarding the Fresh Start Program may be obtained by contacting (608) 267-2737.

Health Professions Loan Assistance Program (HPLAP)
The Health Professions Loan Assistance Program is designed to provide incentives for
physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs) registered dental
hygienists (RDHs) and certified nurse midwives (CNMs) to practice in Wisconsin rural and
urban medical shortage areas.

Program Benefits
Physicians and dentists can receive up to $50,000* and PAs, CNMs, NPs, and RDHs can receive
up to $20,000* in loan repayment over a three year period, specifically:
    • Physicians and dentists can receive up to $50,000 and NPs, PAs, RDHs and CNMs can
       receive up to $25,000 in loan repayment assistance over a three year period at the
       following rate:
    • In the first and second year, 40 percent of the principal balance or a maximum of $20,000
       for physicians and dentists, and $10,000 for other professions.
    • In the third year, 20 percent of the principal balance or a maximum of $10,000 for
       physicians and dentists and $5,000 for other professions.

Eligible Applicants
    • Physicians and dentists who are board-eligible or board-certified in the specialties of
       Family Practice, General Internal Medicine, General Pediatrics and Obstetrics can
       participate in the program.
    • NPs, PAs, RDHs and CNMs if they are licensed, have the appropriate certification and
       will be practicing primary care in a primary-care setting.

Eligible Practice Sites
Eligible practice sites are the health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) designated by the
federal Department of Health and Human Services. These HPSAs include high-need areas in
both rural and urban locations.



74
Contact Information
Contact Wisconsin Office of Rural Health, at (800) 385-0005, or visit the WORH website and
click on Health Professions Loan Assistance Program (HPLAP) program information or
application links.

Housing Services
One of the many functions of the Division of Housing & Community Development (DHCD) is
to help expand local affordable housing and support services to people without housing. The
fifteen federal and state programs, managed by DHCD, aid elderly persons, people with
disabilities, low and moderate income residents and the homeless population. DHCD works
closely with local governments and non-profit housing organizations to deliver financial and
technical housing assistance and to strengthen the capabilities of housing organizations.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Annual Grant Cycle; DHCD administers Wisconsin's federally funded CDBG Housing
program for small cities (cities, towns, and villages with populations less than 50,000 and
counties other than Milwaukee, Waukesha and Dane counties). These eligible units of local
government apply for CDBG funds that are used for housing and neighborhood improvement
programs principally benefiting low and moderate income households. About$7-
8millionisawardedeachyear to approximately 20communitiesfor 22 month contracts.
CDBGfundsareusedforvarioushousingandneighborhoodrevitalizationactivities including housing
rehabilitation, homebuying, relocation, demolition of dilapidated structures, and handicap
accessibility improvements. Program information may be obtained by calling 608/2616535

Emergency Assistance (CDBGEAP) Is an Emergency Fund to address disasters in
communities eligible to participate in the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant
Housing Program. CDBG EAP funds may be used to repair uninsured housing damage caused
by floods, tornadoes or other disasters.

The funds may be used to reimburse property owners for disaster related repairs as well as to
replace housing units severely damaged in the disaster. CDBGEAP funds are intended to
primarily benefit low to moderate-income households. Program information may be obtained by
calling 608/266 5842

Development Projects Program This is a project development funding source that has no set
application due date. It emphasizes the creation of new housing and/or economic opportunities.
These opportunities can be supported by multiple Division funding sources and may involve a
variety of activities, either specific to a site or to a common goal. There is a focus on the creation
of additional affordable housing units, new infrastructure or new jobs occurring in conjunction
with other community development activities. An emphasis will be placed on participation by the
local unit of government, private sector participation, and other state or federal
agency cooperation. Program information may be obtained by calling 608/2673682




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Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME)
The State of Wisconsin receives about $12 million in federal HOME housing project funds
per year. The funds are used to create housing opportunities for low-income households in non
entitlement areas of the state. Funding categories include:

HomeBuyer and Rehabilitation Program (HHR)
HomeBuyer and Rehabilitation Program (HHR) administered by local agencies making
needed housing repairs and accessibility improvements in affordable owner occupied and rental
units and providing homebuyer downpayments and closing costs. The HHR program has a
combined request for proposals with the state funded Housing Cost Reduction Initiative
(HCRI) for home buying purposes. The HHR program also includes HUD American Dream
Down payment Initiative (ADDI) funding. Contact 608/2676904

Rental Housing Development (RHD)
Rental Housing Development (RHD) includes new construction, conversion
or acquisition/rehabilitation projects undertaken by eligible housing development
organizations to develop affordable rental units. Applications accepted quarterly. Contact
608/2676912

Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program (TBRA
Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program (TBRA) to assist eligible tenants with homeless and
special housing needs.

Wisconsin Fresh Start Program (WFS)
Grants are awarded to agencies to establish and sustain programs based on the Operation Fresh
Start, Inc. service model. The program is designed to provide onsite housing construction
work experience, offsite academic classes and supportive services for at risk young people -
primarily high school dropouts (ages 1624). Funding sources originate from HUD, Corrections,
WHEDA and other state and local sources. Information may be obtained by calling 608/ 267-
2737

Homeless Programs/Initiatives
The Division administers several federal and state housing programs that provide shelter and
services for individuals and families who are homeless or have special needs.
    • Over $1.13 million in operating subsidies, through the State Shelter Subsidy Grant, is
       awarded annually to agencies providing assistance to homeless persons.
    • Interest Bearing Real Estate Trust Account (IBRETA) funds are collected
       annually from Wisconsin financial institutions and distributed to homeless programs.
    • A total of $375,000 is available annually for transitional housing and service program
       expansion through the State Transitional Housing Program.
    • $1.4 million annually for Homeless Prevention Program (HPP) funds for short
       term rental assistance (formerly HODAP and HCRI).
    • The HUD Emergency Shelter Grant Program provides approximately $1.9 million
       annually to agencies for emergency shelter and transitional housing programs.
    • Approximately $400,000 in Housing Opportunities for Persons with
       AIDS (HOPWA) funds per year. Last year the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin



76
       received these HUD resources to serve persons affected by AIDS/HIV across the state
       except for the Milwaukee/St. Paul metro area.
   •   On an annual basis, the Division competes on the federal level for HUD Continuum of
       Care Supportive Housing funds. These funds support a variety of transitional and
       permanent housing programs for homeless persons in the areas of the state outside of
       Milwaukee, Madison and Racine. Approximately $6 million received each year.
   •   Projects for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness (PATH) funds services
       for individuals with serious mental illness, or with co-occurring substance abuse
       disorders, who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. About $700,000 of federal
       funds is available annually to provide outreach, mental health and substance abuse
       services, case management, access to housing, primary health care and job training. Call
       608/2612510
   •   Wisconsin Service Point (WISP) is a web enhanced database software program
       implemented to track the scope of homelessness in Wisconsin, to improve service
       delivery to homeless persons, and to evaluate the effectiveness of service interventions.
       Since the site became available more than 700 users working at 125 partner agencies
       have created more than 150,000 client records. Call 608/2672933

Visit our Webpage at www.commerce.wi.gov/cd

For further information contact:
Division of Housing and Community Development
P.O. Box 7970
Madison, WI 537077970
Phone: (608) 2672713
FAX: (608) 2665381
TTY: (608) 2648777

Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection
 PO Box 8911
 Madison, WI 53708-8911

The 2008 Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative Grant Program
As part of a comprehensive plan to re-invigorate dairy and livestock agriculture, the state is
responding to a ground swell of interest in management intensive grazing (MIG). About one
fourth of dairy farmers use some form of rotational or intensive grazing, allowing them to
minimize cost of production and environmental risk. To capture those benefits, intensively
managed grazing requires research, education and technical know-how.

Grazing is good for the environment, reduces labor and energy costs, and helps farmers keep
more money in their pockets. About half of the state's beginning dairy farmers are using grazing
as a strategy for getting started because it requires less capital outlay.

This year, we expect a total of approximately $1 million for our grazing grant program from state
and federal sources. A portion of the funding, $400,000 has already been allocated by the State
of Wisconsin. An additional $686,000 is expected from the NRCS. We expect these funds to


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become available in Spring, 2008. In anticipation of receiving them, we are issuing this call for
proposals for technical assistance, education, and research projects.
All grants are part of the Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, a national effort begun in 1991.
Senator Herb Kohl and Congressman David Obey are credited with helping to secure the funds
for Wisconsin. DATCP has been administering the grants since 2004. In 2008, the state of
Wisconsin is also contributing to the fund for the first time.

2008 Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative Grant Opportunities:
Grazing Grants For Technical Assistance And Education
Approximately $740,000 will be awarded for technical assistance and education. Applications
must be postmarked by February 13, 2008.

Grazing Grants For Research
Approximately $246,000 will be awarded for research. Applications must be postmarked by
March 31, 2008.

Dairy Investment Tax Credit
Signed into law in 2004, this law aims to benefit smaller to medium operations most by
encouraging modest growth. If just 10 percent of Wisconsin dairy farms take advantage of the
tax credit and modernize, they could generate an additional $500 million in gross farm receipts
for the state, according to some estimates. One agricultural economist estimates the tax credit
could generate a net gain of almost $18,000 per average farm and the economic value to the local
community would be 2.5 times that amount.

Summary of the Program
The dairy investment tax credit is intended to reduce the net cost of durable assets, such as
milking parlors, barns, manure handling equipment, feed storage structures, etc., that dairy
producers purchase for their operations.

The tax credit is generally limited to those investments that will yield increased net economic
returns on dairy farms. As such new vehicles or similar assets do not qualify for investment tax
credit treatment.

The Maximum that can be claimed
The maximum credit that can be claimed by a dairy operation is $50,000. Thus the maximum
investment eligible for the investment tax credit is $500,000.

The tax credits will start in the 2004 tax year and must be applied to a dairy producer’s annual
Wisconsin income tax liability. If the credit exceeds a producer’s income tax liability in a given
tax year, only a credit equal to the tax liability can be claimed and the remaining balance of the
credit must be carried forward to offset future income tax liabilities until the credit is eventually
used up. These investment tax credits expire in the 2009 tax year even if they have not been fully
used to offset income tax liabilities during the 2004-2009 period.

This investment tax credit program is an economic development initiative which should pay for
itself over time. In essence the state of Wisconsin is foregoing tax receipts in the short-run and



78
positioning itself to receive even higher tax receipts in the future. These increased tax receipts
will come from higher dairy farm earnings brought about by the investments triggering the tax
credits and increased non-farm earnings that are the by-product of higher farm incomes. In total,
these future income tax receipts from both farm and non-farm sources should exceed the total
value of investment tax credits the state of Wisconsin grants to dairy farmers.

Value Added Dairy Initiative
The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, working with state,
federal and private partners, developed the Value Added Dairy Initiative (VADI) to help restore
and reinvigorate its transitioning dairy sector. The initiative is federally-funded, and matched by
in-kind contributions of agencies and organizations within Wisconsin's dairy sector.

Two groups lead the initiative:
Grow Wisconsin Dairy Team
This cohesive team of Wisconsin interagency members coordinates and focuses resources for
dairy farmers modernizing their businesses and for processors streamlining the supply chain.
Since 2004, the team has administered more than $1.5 million in grants to the dairy industry and
provided technical assistance to nearly 500 farms. This assistance is acting as a catalyst for
reinvestment and innovation in the dairy sector.

Dairy Business Innovation Center
This non-profit organization was created as part of the Initiative to provide technical assistance
to new and emerging specialty dairy businesses. Since 2004 the DBIC has helped 161 specialty
dairy clients by providing access to specialized technical assistance and its world class
consulting team. DBIC has helped clients start new businesses, develop 50+ new products and
access new markets. Through workshops and training it has coordinated more than 110 projects
to help the industry obtain market exposure and identify new clients.

2008 VADI Dairy Processor Innovation Grants
The Value Added Dairy Initiative Dairy Processor Grant program is offering grant dollars to
individuals or groups, businesses and organizations to help fund projects geared at innovation,
market development and, or modernization of dairy processing. A total of $300,000 will be
available over the next year, with the maximum grant award per project being $35,000. Grant
recruitment will be broken down into three periods, with application deadlines being May 30,
2008; September 30, 2008; and January 31, 2009.

Applications for the first grant period must be received at the WI DATCP office by 4:30p.m.
Friday, May 30. Email submissions are preferred; but mailed, faxed and hand-delivered
applications are acceptable. For additional details on the Wisconsin Dairy Processor Innovation
Grant program or application, please contact Matt Lange at 608-224-5081.

Loans
USDA - Farm Service Agency
Offers several types of loans that farmers can apply for, including Beginning Farmer and
Rancher loans, emergency loans, farm operating loans, and farm ownership loans. FSA also
administers other federal programs that deal with crops and livestock.



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Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority
Offers loan programs available for Wisconsin agricultural producers, including Beginning Farm
Bond Program, CROP fund, and FARM program.

Wisconsin Department of Commerce
Offers a pair of loan programs for state agribusinesses, including rural early planning grant and
rural economic development microloan.

Wisconsin Small Business Administration
A wide range of financial information and loan programs, including SBA Express Loan
Program, Microloan Program and Pre-Qualification Loan Program Intermediaries.

Grants
Dairy 2020
A grant program operated by the Wisconsin Department of Commerce to encourage and
stimulate the start up, modernization and expansion of Wisconsin dairy farms. For questions,
contact at (608) 266-7370.

Agricultural Development and Diversification Grant Program
A program operated by the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
Protection that awards grants to projects that can further develop Wisconsin's diversifying
agricultural industry.

Grow Wisconsin Dairy Team Grants
A program operated by the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
Protection that awards grants to beginning or existing dairy producers for modernizing their
farms or for transitioning to an organic or grazing operation. Funds also available to dairy
businesses for introducing a new dairy product or entering a new market, as well as to local
organizations seeking to enhance development of modernized dairy farming in their areas.

Educational
University of Wisconsin-Extension Cooperative Extension
Provides livestock, crop, farm management, and family living consultation and information
services from county offices throughout the state.

Wisconsin Technical College System
Education can help today's successful farmers keep up with the changes and improvements in the
farming industry and help remain competitive through farm business and production
management programs.

UW-Madison, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
An educational leader in food and agriculture, the life sciences, natural resources and
environmental stewardship, and rural community development, offering strong, research-based
education opportunities.




80
Program on Agricultural Technology Studies
Offers information and networking services for farm-related organizations as well as research
services for the University of Wisconsin-Madison and other institutions.

University of Wisconsin Center for Dairy Profitability
Provides business planning advice, educational programs and support on dairy management,
farm business management, and information on dairy issues.

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Animal Science
Applies science and technology to the production, management and distribution of livestock and
poultry for food, fiber and recreation to advance economic vitality.

Beginning Farmer Center of Iowa State University Extension
Offers services and resources to help the transition of farming operations from established
farmers to beginning farmers.

Social Sciences Unit of Missouri University's College of Agriculture, Food and Natural
Sciences
Offers an extensive list of links on estate planning for farmers.

Governmental
Wisconsin Farm Service Agency
Administers the federal farm commodity, conservation and loan programs for Wisconsin
agricultural producers through nearly 60 service centers throughout the state.

Farmland Preservation
A program administered by the Wisconsin Department of Revenue that provides state income tax
credits to farmers who meet the program's requirements. DATCP can assist counties in creating
county agricultural preservation plans

Wisconsin Stewardship Program
Assists in the acquisition of land for conservation purposes, including wildlife habitat, special
scientific or ecological value, rare or endangered habitats and species, stream corridors, and
restoration of wetlands and grasslands.

Organizational
Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin
Provides educational programs for its members and offers a forum for exchanging ideas and
promoting the profitability of the dairy business.

Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board
Offers access to a wide variety of resources that support the continued success of all aspects of
Wisconsin's dairy industry as well as information about WMMB's numerous marketing
programs.




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Women’s Business Initiative Corporation
Business Office             Kenosha Office                    Madison Office
2745 N. Dr. Martin Luther   Southeast Region                  South Central Region Office
King Jr. Drive              600 52nd Street Suite 130         2300 S. Park Street
Milwaukee, WI 53212         Kenosha, WI 53140                 Madison, WI 53713
Phone: (414) 263-5450       Phone: (262) 654-1234 ext.118     Phone: (608) 257-5450
FAX: (414) 263-5456         FAX (262) 654-4655                FAX: (608) 257-5454



WWBIC Micro Loans
Eligible Uses of Loan
Loans can be used for expenses associated with starting or expanding a business, including
machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures, inventory, supplies and working capital.

Ineligible Use of Loan
Loan proceeds cannot be used to purchase real estate or refinance existing debt.

Loan Size
WWBIC can lend up to $100,000.

Interest Rate
The interest rate is 9% - 12%. Rates in some geographic locations may be lower.

Loan Maturity
Terms are from 12 months to 72 months (6 years).

Program Costs
Loan Application Review: A non-refundable application fee. This fee is based on loan size as
follows:
Loan size         Fee
$5000 or less      $50
$5001 – 10,000    $100
$10,001 – 50,000 $150
Over $ 50,000     $200

Loan Closing: A minimum $200 to cover the costs of providing services to the borrower.

Closing Costs
None.

To receive a loan application, call 414-263-5450




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West Allis Small Business Development Program
The City of West Allis has teamed up with WWBIC to provide support to West Allis
entrepreneurs. Through the use of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds,
WWBIC can lend up to $25,000 for small businesses in the city of West Allis.

Qualifying Businesses
Businesses located or with plans to locate in the city of West Allis. Successful applicants must
agree to meet program income requirements.

Uses of Loan
Loans can be used for expenses associated with starting or expanding a business, including
machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures, inventory, supplies and working capital.

Program Costs
At closing, the borrower will be asked to reimburse charges such as filing fees, title reports
and/or credit reports.

Additional Program Components
West Allis entrepreneurs are also eligible for full scholarships to WWBIC's business
development classes.

Urban Economic Development Association (UEDA) of Wisconsin
 2212 North Dr. Martin Luther King Drive
 Milwaukee, WI 53212
 Phone: (414) 562-9904
 Fax: (414) 562-9906

Urban Economic Development Association of Wisconsin, Inc. (UEDA) is a nonprofit
membership association comprised of over 100 nonprofit, corporate and individual members
dedicated to the professional development of individuals and groups working in community and
economic development. Our mission is to support housing and economic development initiatives
that revitalize Wisconsin communities.

UEDA is a 501(c) (3) tax-exempt nonprofit organization that was incorporated in 1997 and is
governed by a Board of Directors and members.

What does UEDA do?
Our programs focus on organizations and service providers that build affordable housing, work
in community development, offer financial education, and support entrepreneurship through
direct business assistance or commercial revitalization efforts. UEDA offers members access to
professional training, technical assistance, innovative solutions, policy advocacy and
collaborations. Since its inception, UEDA has initiated, facilitated and managed a number of
roundtables, coalitions and collaborative working groups.




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Technical Assistance and Programs
UEDA Member Training
UEDA regularly provides announcements for related trainings and offers training to address the
needs of its members. Trainings range from one-day events to a series of weeklong courses in
housing and economic development.

Technical Assistance Grants
The U.S. Department Of Housing And Urban Development (HUD) Is Determined To Help
Communities Grow And Prosper, Rebuild And Revitalize, And Tackle Tough Problems.

Through a series of competitive grants, HUD has gathered the resources of a number of technical
assistance providers to supply guidance or training for HUD program participants. The providers
are firms, for profit and non-profit organizations, and government agencies.

Making Connections Milwaukee (MCM)
Making Connections Milwaukee connects residents to the economic, spiritual and educational
resources that allows them to take control over their own destiny, gain a prosperous quality of
life; and demonstrate personal and community pride.

Making Connections Milwaukee is about partnerships that, over time, will lead to positive, long-
term results for families living in a targeted central city community in Milwaukee. About 30,000
people live in this 1.85 square mile area bounded by 24th Street to 47th Street and Center Street
to Highland Boulevard.

MCM is an Annie E. Casey Foundation initiative founded on the premise that children do better
when they have support from strong families and that strong families are the product of
neighborhoods that offer economic opportunities, vibrant social networks and responsive
services and support.

There are seven strategies of the Making Connections Milwaukee initiative:
   • Asset Building
   • Community Schools
   • School Readiness
   • Child Safety
   • Neighborhood Workforce Development
   • Resident Leadership
   • Washington Park Partners

As the lead Asset Building Strategy Partner for MCM, UEDA is committed to bridging the gap
between residents and the variety of services currently available in our market. The Asset
Builders Council is a committee of the Asset Building Strategy of Making Connections
Milwaukee. Members are MCM residents and have volunteered their time to assist and guide
UEDA with the strategy.




84
Business Assistance Caucus of Milwaukee (BACOM)
The Business Assistance Caucus of Milwaukee is an affinity group of public and nonprofit
agencies and private consultants, working together to develop business assistance to central city
entrepreneurs and business owners.

From 2003-2006 UEDA convened BACOM members and assisted them in:
   • Building capacity to provide business development services, and
   • Coordinating support for Initiative for a Competitive Milwaukee (ICM).

These capacity building activities included, but were not limited to:
   • Sharing resources through presentations, printed materials, and website;
   • Establishing systems for referrals to technical "experts";
   • Bringing training opportunities and expert speakers to providers, and;
   • Meeting nonprofit governance and management standards

Milwaukee Community Development Intervention Team (McDIT)
Self-Evaluation is an important tool for nonprofit organizations. When nonprofits get into
difficult situations, it can be a bumpy ride to recovery. UEDA is there to help guide your
organization through the improvement process.

Many troubles start with one or more of these indicators. Recognizing these warning signs
should give a board or staff concern:

Problematic Financial Indicators are not limited to:
   • Inconsistent financial reports at board meetings
   • Poor communication between Treasurer and staff
   • Board doesn’t ask questions about financial statements
   • Revenue less than expenditures
   • Withholding taxes are remitted on time
   • Board fails to address persistent cash flow problems
   • Agency has few, if any cash reserves
   • Reporting deadlines are missed
   • Agency looks to restricted accounts to pay operating expenses

Concerning organizational issues are not limited to:
  • Board provides insufficient oversight of operations and projects
  • Staff does not communicate effectively with board leadership
  • Scheduled meetings get cancelled
  • There is no continuity of Board leadership

If you recognize one or more of these indicators in your agency, UEDA can help! The McDIT
process is designed to help evaluate and alleviate common issues that community development
organizations face as organizations change and respond their market.




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The process offers:
   • Confidential analysis and discussion
   • Suggestions for immediate action
   • Referrals for long term capacity-building

Renewal Community Tax Credits
Renewal Community Wage Credit
Purpose: Provide incentives to businesses that hire employees that live and work within the
Renewal Community boundaries. Maximum credit is 15% of first $10,000 in wages per
employee annually through 2009. Unused credits can be carried forward for up to 20 years.

The Renewal Community Wage Credit is a tax credit against federal taxes by allowing a
business to reduce their take liability through a credit of up to $1,500 per employee working and
residing in Renewal Community census tract(s). The wage credit is 15% of wages up to the
$10,000 wages per year.
    • This credit applies to every existing employee and new hire employed for at least 90
        days.
    • There is no limit on the number of employees and employer can take credit for.

Employers need to obtain a statement from the employee, under penalty of perjury, that gives the
address of the employee’s principal residence and provides assurance that the employee will
notify the employer of a change in the employee’s principal residence. This statement is found
on form available on the website: http://www.mkedcd.org/projects/RC/lookup/index.html.

Note: An employer cannot count same wages for purposes of the Welfare Opportunity Tax
Credit; Welfare to Work Tax Credit; and, the Renewal Community Wage Credit.

Commercial Revitalization Deduction
Purpose: Provides an incentive to Renewal Community property owners who are substantially
renovating existing buildings or developing new properties for commercial use. This incentive is
limited to $10 million per project and requires an application to the Redevelopment Authority of
the City of Milwaukee.

This credit can reward investment in real estate projects. The commercial revitalization credit
will provide a tax credit to an owner with plans to substantially renovate or develop commercial
property for use within the Renewal Community. This incentive offers the owner one of two
depreciation schedules to reduce a tax burden:
    • The commercial revitalization deduction will allow the owner receiving an allocation
        from the City of Milwaukee Redevelopment Authority the ability to take all qualified
        costs equally over 120 months or deductions; or,
    • one-half of qualified costs in the first year a building is placed in service.

This credit is awarded on a competitive basis at the close of business year. A Renewal
Community has $12 million allocated each year from 2002 to 2009. Milwaukee is one of the few
cities where all of the available allocations have been made in 2002 -2005. The applications are




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competitive and we encourage project sponsors to contact a Renewal Community Specialist for
guidance early in the development process at 414-286-5480.

This credit is available for buildings placed in service between, December 31, 2001 and January
1, 2010 that receive an allocation of the credits from the Redevelopment Authority of City of
Milwaukee (RACM). IRS Publication 946 describes this incentive in greater detail.

Increased Section 179 Deduction
Purpose: This credit provides an incentive to a “Renewal Community Business” up to an
additional $35,000 immediate depreciation expense for machinery or equipment, including
computers, placed in service in that year.

There are limits on the amount businesses can deduct as Section 179 of the Internal Revenue
Code – depreciation. Businesses in the Renewal Community may be able to claim an increased
Section 179 deduction of as much as an additional $35,000 (after December 31, 2001) if they
qualify as Renewal Community Businesses.

Capital Gain Exclusion
Purpose: This credit provides an incentive to a “Renewal Community Business” and allows the
seller a 0% capital gains rate for Renewal Community assets held for a minimum of 5 years.
Qualified assets could include tangible property in the Renewal Community, stock, capital
interests or profit interests acquired for cash.

If a qualified Renewal Community Business holds a qualified community asset more than 5
years, the business owner will not have to include any “qualified capital gain” from its sale (or
exchange) in their gross income. This exclusion applies to an interest in, or property of, certain
businesses operating in a renewal community. To qualify the community asset must be acquired
between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2009

Department of Natural Resources
 101 S. Webster Street
 PO Box 7921
 Madison, Wisconsin 53707-7921
 (608) 266-2621
 (608) 261-4380 (Fax)
 (608) 267-6897 (TTY)

About the DNR
The Department of Natural Resources is dedicated to the preservation, protection, effective
management, and maintenance of Wisconsin's natural resources. It is responsible for
implementing the laws of the state and, where applicable, the laws of the federal government that
protect and enhance the natural resources of our state. It is the one agency charged with full
responsibility for coordinating the many disciplines and programs necessary to provide a clean
environment and a full range of outdoor recreational opportunities for Wisconsin citizens and
visitors.




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Our Mission
  • To protect and enhance our natural resources:
     o our air, land and water;
     o our wildlife, fish and forests
     o and the ecosystems that sustain all life.
  • To provide a healthy, sustainable environment and a full range of outdoor opportunities.
  • To ensure the right of all people to use and enjoy these resources in their work and
     leisure.
  • To work with people to understand each other's views and to carry out the public will.
  • And in this partnership consider the future and generations to follow.

The Well-being of Wisconsin's Natural Resources
Throughout Wisconsin's history, the well-being of its people has been tied to the well-being of
its natural resources. The fresh water, fertile soil, clean air, vast forests, flourishing and abundant
wildlife constituted the basis of life, livelihood, and recreation for many generations of native
and newly arrived Wisconsinites.

Recognizing that the valuable natural resources of our state could only be protected and wisely
managed through a coordinated effort, the Wisconsin Legislature created the Department of
Natural Resources in 1967. In creating the Department, the Legislature brought together closely
related traditional conservation functions such as fish, parks, wildlife, and forest management
and combined them with newly emerging environmental protection responsibilities such as water
pollution control, solid waste management, and air pollution cleanup.

Community Financial Assistance (CFA)
CFA administers grant and loan programs. Program staff work closely with local governments
and interested organizations to develop and support projects that protect public health, natural
resources, the environment and outdoor recreational opportunities.

Environmental Loans
Environmental loans are available for drinking water, wastewater, and brownfield projects.

Environmental Loans administers the Environmental Improvement Fund (EIF) -- the umbrella
fund for the programs described below.

Detailed reference documents on the process to obtain an EIF loan are available in our reference
guide. The description page for each of the programs below contains an alphabetical index for
the reference guide documents applicable to that specific program.

The Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP)
The Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP) provides low interest loans to municipalities for
wastewater treatment facilities and urban storm water runoff projects. In addition to regular
CWFP loans, there are 2 subprograms within the Clean Water Fund Program:




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The Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP) is one of the subsidized loan programs included in the
Environmental Improvement Fund (EIF). The CWFP provides loans to municipalities for
wastewater treatment and urban storm water projects.

Most CWFP projects receive a subsidized interest rate of either 55%, 65%, or 70% of the EIF
market interest rate. CWFP wastewater projects that meet certain criteria may be eligible to
receive Hardship Financial Assistance, which may be in the form of a lower interest rate loan or
include a grant.

Municipalities constructing wastewater projects with a total project cost of less than $1,000,000
may be interested in the Small Loan portion of the CWFP.

Hardship Financial Assistance
Hardship assistance is available to municipalities that meet certain criteria. [not available for
storm water projects]

The Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP) designates a portion of its total subsidies available each
biennium to provide additional financial assistance to municipalities meeting financial hardship
criteria. To the extent subsidy is available, CWFP can provide hardship financial assistance in
the form of a reduced interest rate loan, or award a grant of up to 70% of the municipality's
project cost eligible for below-market interest rate.

Small Loan
Small Loans provides a subsidy to the interest rate on a loan that a municipality obtains from the
State Trust Fund. [Not available for storm water projects].

Introduction
Within the Clean Water Fund Program (CWFP), there is a subprogram called the Small Loan
Program (SLP). The SLP provides municipalities a more streamlined, less costly approach to
financing wastewater treatment or storm water projects that have total estimated project costs of
$1,000,000 or less. The program is designed to reduce the interest rate on loans from the State
Trust Fund (the Board of Commissioners of Public Lands) used to finance eligible projects. If the
municipality takes out a loan from the State Trust Fund for the planning, design, and
construction of wastewater treatment facilities or structural urban BMPs for storm water, the
municipality may then apply for an interest rate subsidy through the SLP. An interest rate
subsidy would help the municipality pay the interest costs on its State Trust Fund loan.

How the SLP Works
  • A municipality applies to the Board of Commissioners of Public Lands (BCPL) for a
      State Trust Fund loan to finance the planning, design, and construction of its DNR-
      approved wastewater project or structural urban BMP.
  • The municipality submits a Notice of Intent to Apply Form (ITA, Form 8700-195) and a
      Priority Evaluation and Review Form
  • (PERF, 8700-196) by December 31 preceding the state fiscal year in which it plans to
      submit an Interest Subsidy Application.




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     •   While waiting for approval of its State Trust Fund loan application, or after receiving
         approval, the municipality submits an SLP Interest Rate Subsidy Agreement Application
         (Form 8700-249) to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Bureau of Community
         Financial Assistance.
     •   A DNR project manager reviews the Interest Rate Subsidy Appication and determines the
         interest rate reduction to be applied to the municipality's project. The type of project
         being undertaken is one of the factors in determining the reduction. The Department of
         Administration (DOA) calculates the interest rate subsidy amount based on the DNR's
         determination. The SLP's annual subsidy costs are limited to an amount no greater than
         the subsidy cost that the CWFP would incur to fund the project with a regular CWFP
         loan.
     •   The DNR project manager prepares an Interest Rate Subsidy Agreement (IRSA) that
         authorizes the CWFP to make annual payments to the municipality that subsidize the
         annual interest payments due on the State Trust Fund loan.
     •   The municipality, DOA, and DNR sign the IRSA, and copies are distributed.
     •   The BCPL annually mails an invoice to the municipality for its principal and interest
         payment due.
     •   The DOA receives a copy of the invoice and sends an interest subsidy check to the
         municipality prior to the date payment is due on the State Trust Fund loan.

Example of the SLP Interest Subsidy
   • The municipality obtains a State Trust Fund loan to pay for a sludge storage project
     costing $500,000. The term of the loan is 20 years with an annual interest rate of 6.0%.
   • DNR determines that the municipality's sludge storage project is a compliance
     maintenance project eligible for SLP subsidy payments. Assume that the CWFP program
     has a 5.0% market interest rate and a 3.0% subsidized interest rate available on loans for
     compliance maintenance projects. Based on the difference between the two interest rates,
     the CWFP reduces the interest rate by 2 percentage points annually for compliance
     maintenance projects. Applying the same reduction to the SLP, the interest subsidy would
     "buy-down" the municipality's State Trust Fund loan interest rate 2 percentage points,
     from 6% to 4%. In this example, for the next 20 years, the DOA annually provides a
     check to the municipality for one-third (1/3) of the interest due on its State Trust Fund
     loan.

Eligible SLP Projects
The following types of projects with total estimated project costs of $1,000,000 or less are
eligible:
    • A compliance maintenance project.
    • A project necessary to achieve substantial compliance with an enforceable requirement
        that was new or changed after May 17, 1988.
    • A project necessary to control storm water runoff rates, volumes, and discharge quality.
    • A project necessary to eliminate actual or imminent pollution of groundwater, surface
        water or threat to human health in unsewered areas within a municipality.
    • A project necessary for the replacement or major rehabilitation of an existing sewer
        collection system and necessary to maintain the integrity and performance of the
        treatment works serving the municipality.


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   •   The construction of individual systems serving one or more residences, if the
       municipality agrees to the requirements of s. NR 162.61(2), Wis. Adm. Code.

Ineligible SLP Projects and Costs
Following is a partial listing of projects and costs that are ineligible for SLP subsidy (for further
information see ss. NR 162.61(3) and NR 162.62(2), Wis. Adm. Code).
    • Projects costing in excess of $1,000,000.
    • Projects found to be ineligible for financing by the BCPL.
    • Laterals that transport wastewater from structures to municipally-owned or privately-
       owned wastewater systems.
    • Hook-up charges payable to other municipalities.
    • Sewers that only serve development not in existence as of the date of the Interest Rate
       Subsidy Application.
    • Storm water projects that are solely for drainage and flood control.
    • Costs included in the State Trust Fund loan that are not related to the wastewater
       treatment or storm water project.

SLP Requirements
Prior to preparation of the IRSA, the following must occur:
    • The municipality submits to the DNR an ITA form and a PERF by the December 31st
        prior to the state fiscal year in which the municipality will apply for subsidy.
    • The DNR approves the facility plan for the project.
    • The BCLP executes the State Trust Fund loan.
    • The municipality submits to DNR an Interest Rate Subsidy Application (Form 8700-249),
        including plans and specifications.
    • The municipality submits a proposed or an executed inter-municipal agreement in cases
        where two or more municipalities discharge to or through the same treatment works or
        structural urban BMP.
    • The municipality submits information that DNR uses to calculate the project's parallel
        cost percentage.
    • The municipality submits to DNR other project, financial, and utility information, as
        requested by the project manager.
    • The State Trust Fund provides loan information to the DNR.
    • The DNR approves the plans and specifications and accepts the Interest Rate Subsidy
        Application.

General Obligation Pledge
The State Trust Fund requires the municipality to pledge its General Obligation (GO) borrowing
capacity to secure the loan. If the municipality is unsure as to how much GO capacity it has
available, contact the Department of Revenue at (608) 266-8207.

The SLP Payment Process
   • Each January the BCPL sends an invoice to each municipality that has a loan payment
      due on the following March 15th. The invoice shows the principal amount, the interest
      amount, and the total payment due. DOA receives a copy of the invoice, which it uses to



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         calculate the interest subsidy payment. Prior to the March 15th loan payment date, DOA
         sends an interest subsidy check to the municipality for a portion of its State Trust Fund
         loan interest payment. The municipal clerk deposits the SLP interest subsidy check in a
         municipal account, then issues one check for the whole amount due to the State Trust
         Fund.
     •   A municipality may prepay all or a portion of its State Trust Fund loan without penalty
         between March 15th and July 31st each year. A 30-day notice of prepayment is required
         by the State Trust Fund. DOA will adjust the remaining interest subsidy payments to
         reflect any prepayments.

Advantages of the SLP
  • Flexibility - The State Trust Fund offers loan terms of up to 20 years, so the municipality
     can select a loan alternative that best fits its financing needs. The SLP interest subsidy
     payments are then scheduled based on the loan terms.
  • Streamlined Approach - The Interest Rate Subsidy Application is short, simple and offers
     a streamlined review process. Likewise, the State Trust Fund loan process is short and
     simple.
  • No Issuance Costs - No fees are charged for a State Trust Fund loan or SLP Interest Rate
     Subsidy Agreement.

Disadvantages of the SLP
   • Limited General Obligation Capacity - A municipality must provide a general obligation
      pledge to the State Trust Fund. Wisconsin Statutes limit the amount of a municipality's
      aggregate general obligation debt to 5% of its equalized valuation.
   • No Hardship Assistance - The SLP has no "hardship" component to reduce interest rates
      below the regular CWFP interest rates.

Who to Contact
For further information about the SLP and to obtain application forms, contact the Department of
Natural Resources, Bureau of Community Financial Assistance at (608) 266-7555 or e-mail a
Clean Water Fund Program project manager. For SLP Information, contact Dave Calhoon at
david.calhoon@dnr.state.wi.us or phone (608) 264-8844.

The Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP)
The Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP) provides low interest loans to municipalities
for drinking water facilities.

The Safe Drinking Water Loan Program (SDWLP) provides loans to public water systems to
build, upgrade, or replace water supply infrastructure to protect public health and address federal
and state safe drinking water requirements. The DNR is the primary administrator and the
Department of Administration (DOA) is the financial manager for this program.

The reference guide provides information, listed alphabetically by topic, on the steps and
regulations to be followed from the early stages of the loan process through the closeout stage.

For information related to SDWLP forms, publications, and deadlines, contact (608) 266-5889.



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Land Recycling Loan Program (LRLP)
The Land Recycling (Brownfields) Loan Program (LRLP) provides low interest loans to
municipalities for investigation and remediation of certain contaminated properties.

Wisconsin's Land Recycling Loan Program (LRLP) provides low cost loans to cities, villages,
counties and towns for the purpose of remediating environmental contamination (brownfields) at
landfills, sites or facilities where contamination has affected or threatens to affect groundwater or
surface water. Redevelopment and housing authorities are also eligible.

Features of the program:
   • current interest rate is 0% plus .5% servicing fee
   • LRLP loan term is 20 years
   • local government must secure LRLP loan with a general obligation pledge
   • technical remediation criteria for all LRLP projects must adhere to DNR's 700 series
      administrative rules
   • local government must submit the Notice of Intent To Apply postmarked by the Dec. 31
      prior to fiscal year (July 1) that they anticipate funding
   • DNR announces application deadlines semi-annually
   • funding decisions are made according to priority ranking only if applications exceed
      available funds
   • developer agreements must be reviewed by the Dept. of Administration prior to award of
      funds
   • proceeds of land sale must be used to repay LRLP loan

For information regarding a grant program for preliminary brownfields activities, such as site
investigations, tank and container removal, demolition, and asbestos abatement, see the Bureau
for Remediation and Redevelopment's Brownfield Site Assessment Grant page.

Each of these 3 major programs follows the same basic process, although timelines, deadlines,
and interest rates vary by program.

Grants
Grants are available for acquisition of land and easements for conservation and outdoor
recreation purposes, conservation, dam rehabilitation/abandonment, dry cleaner remediation,
forest fire protection, urban forestry, gypsy moth, hunter education, lakes, municipal flood
control, nonpoint source runoff pollution, parks, recreational facilities and trails, recycling,
habitat restoration, rivers, small and abandoned dam removal, stewardship, urban wildlife
damage and well compensation.

Brownfield Site Assessment Grant
Eligible local governmental units can be reimbursed up to 80 percent of the costs associated with
assessing environmental contamination at brownfield sites. Examples of eligible projects include
    • Phase I and Phase II environmental site assessments and ch. NR 716 site investigations.
    • Demolition of structures, buildings, or improvements, including necessary asbestos
        abatement.



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     •   Removal of underground petroleum product storage tank systems and hazardous
         substance storage tank systems, and removal of abandoned containers.

Eligible brownfield sites are defined as
    • industrial or commercial facilities or sites with
    • common or multiple ownership that are
    • abandoned, idle, or underused and have
    • actual (or perceived) environmental contamination which adversely affects expansion or
       redevelopment.

To be eligible for funding
   • The applicant must be a local government unit such as a city, village, town, county, tribe,
       or redevelopment, community development, or housing authorities.
   • The applicant cannot have caused the environmental contamination at the site.
   • The party responsible for the environmental contamination must be unknown, unable to
       be located or financially unable to pay for grant activities.

Funding is divided between small and large grants with70 percent of funds allocated to small
grants (between $2,000 and $30,000) and 30 percent allocated for large grants (between $30,001
and $100,000). No more than 15 percent of all available funds will be awarded to a single
applicant in the fiscal year. At least one application cycle will be offered per fiscal year, if
funding is available.

If sufficient funds are not available, eligible applications will be ranked by the DNR according to
the criteria proposed in ss. NR 168.13(2), (3), and (4), Wis. Admin. Code. Grant funding is
offered to the highest ranked applicant first, and then continues down the ranked list until all
funds are allocated.

Please see the Bureau for Remediation and Redevelopment's web site for information on the next
application cycle.

Additional Information:
Procurement Guide for Local Governments Receiving DNR Grants

Contact:
Department of Natural Resources
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, WI 53707-7921
Phone: (608) 261 4927

Brownfields Green Space and Public Facilities Grant
Eligible brownfield sites are defined as
    • industrial or commercial facilities or sites with
    • common or multiple ownership that are
    • abandoned, idle, or underused and have



94
   •   actual (or perceived) environmental contamination which adversely affects expansion or
       redevelopment.

The DNR offers financial assistance to fund environmental remediation of brownfield sites
that will be used:
   • As green space.
   • As recreational areas.
   • By a local government.

Eligible applicants include local units of government such as cities, villages, towns, counties,
tribes, redevelopment authorities, community development authorities and housing authorities.

If sufficient funds are not available, DNR will rank eligible applications according to the criteria
proposed in ch. NR 173, Wis. Adm. Code. Grant funding is offered to the highest ranked
applicant first, and then continues down the ranked list until all funds are allocated.

Additional information and applications are available on the Bureau for Remediation and
Redevelopment's web site.

Additional Information:
Procurement Guide for Local Governments Receiving DNR Grants

Contact:
Department of Natural Resources
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, WI 53707-7921
Phone: (608) 261- 4927

Note: The Environmental Improvement Fund offers loans for brownfield remediation through
the Land Recycling Loan Program.

Dry Cleaning Environmental Response Program
Owners and operators (as defined in s. 292.65, Wis. Stats.) can be partially reimbursed for costs
associated with site investigation and remediation of site-specific dry cleaning product releases.
For information on eligible/ineligible activities for funding, please refer to the reimbursement
fact sheet. In order for costs to be eligible for reimbursement, applicants must have complied
with all applicable statues and codes. The maximum reimbursement is $500,000 per facility.

Priority is given to projects that are threats to municipal wells or other water sources and urgent
spill projects. The DNR project manager will assign a risk evaluation to each project based on
the amount of material spilled and the level of threat.

Applications for reimbursing site investigation costs may be submitted when the consultant's site
investigation report and remedial action options report are submitted to and approved by the
DNR. During remediation, two applications for reimbursement will be accepted per fiscal year.
Applications must be submitted within 120 days of completing the response activity.



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This grant is jointly administered with the bureau of Remediation and Redevelopment. If you
have technical questions about your specific dry cleaning project, please contact your DNR
Project Manager.

Farm Service Agency
Direct Farm Loans
"Direct" farm loans are made by FSA with Government funds. We also service these loans and
provide our Direct loan customers with supervision and credit counseling so they have a better
chance for success. Farm Ownership, Operating, Emergency and Youth loans are the main types
of loans available under the Direct program. Direct loan funds are also set aside each year for
loans to minority applicants and beginning farmers (see links below).

Where to Go for More Information
Further information and applications for the loan programs described are available at local FSA
county offices. These are usually listed in telephone directories in the section set aside for
governmental/public organizations under the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Service
Agency.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Direct Ownership Loans
How can Farm Ownership loan funds be used?
With a Direct Farm Ownership Loan, you can purchase farmland, construct or repair buildings
and other fixtures, and promote soil and water conservation.

What is the maximum loan size?
The maximum amount for Direct Farm Ownership Loans is $300,000.

What is the Direct FO Joint Financing Plan?
Loan applicants may choose to participate in a joint financing plan. In this program, FSA lends
up to 50 percent of the amount financed, and another lender provides the balance. FSA may
charge an interest rate of not less than 4%.




96
Direct Operating Loans
How can Operating Loan funds be used?
Operating Loans may be used to purchase items such as livestock, farm equipment, feed, seed,
fuel, farm chemicals, insurance, and other operating expenses. Operating Loans can also be used
to pay for minor improvements to buildings, costs associated with land and water development,
family subsistence, and to refinance debts under certain conditions.

Loan funds cannot be used to finance nonfarm enterprises, which include raising earthworms,
exotic birds, tropical fish, dogs, or horses for non-farm purposes (racing, pleasure or show).

What is the maximum loan size?
The limit on Direct Farm Operating Loans is $300,000.

Emergency Farm Loans
Overview
USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides emergency loans to help producers recover from
production and physical losses due to drought, flooding, other natural disasters, or quarantine.

Loan Uses
Emergency loan funds may be used to:
   • Restore or replace essential property;
   • Pay all or part of production costs associated with the disaster year;
   • Pay essential family living expenses;
   • Reorganize the farming operation; and
   • Refinance certain debts.

Eligibility
Emergency loans may be made to farmers and ranchers who:
    • Own or operate land located in a county declared by the President as a disaster area or
        designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as a disaster area or quarantine area (for
        physical losses only, the FSA Administrator may authorize emergency loan assistance);
    • Are established family farm operators and have sufficient farming or ranching
        experience;
    • Are citizens or permanent residents of the United States;
    • Have suffered at least a 30-percent loss in crop production or a physical loss to livestock,
        livestock products, real estate, or chattel property;
    • Have an acceptable credit history;
    • Are unable to receive credit from commercial sources;
    • Can provide collateral to secure the loan; and
    • Have repayment ability.

Loan Requirements
FSA loan requirements are different from those of other lenders. Some of the more significant
differences are the following:




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     •   Borrowers must keep acceptable farm records;
     •   Borrowers must operate in accordance with a farm plan they develop and agree to with
         local FSA staff; and
     •   Borrowers may be required to participate in a financial management-training program
         and obtain crop insurance.

Collateral is Required
All emergency loans must be fully collateralized. The specific type of collateral may vary
depending on the loan purpose, repayment ability and the individual circumstances of the
applicant. If applicants cannot provide adequate collateral, their repayment ability may be
considered as collateral to secure the loan. A first lien is required on property or products
acquired, produced, or refinanced with loan funds.

Loan Limit
Producers can borrow up to 100 percent of actual production or physical losses, to a maximum
amount of $500,000.

Loan Terms
Loans for crop, livestock, and non-real estate losses are normally repaid within 1 to 7 years;
depending on the loan purpose, repayment ability, and collateral available as loan security. In
special circumstances, terms of up to 20 years may be authorized. Loans for physical losses to
real estate are normally repaid within 30 years. In certain circumstances, repayment may be
made over a maximum of 40 years.

Interest Rate
The current annual interest rate for emergency loans is 3.75 percent.

Application Deadline
Applications for emergency loans must be received within 8 months of the county's disaster or
quarantine designation date.

Temporary Assistance
Borrowers who receive temporary assistance are expected to return to conventional credit
sources. Emergency loans are a temporary source of credit, and borrowers are reviewed
periodically to determine whether they can return to commercial credit.

For More Information
Further information on the emergency loan program is available from local USDA Service
Centers.

Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Loans
The Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides direct and guaranteed loans to beginning farmers and
ranchers who are unable to obtain financing from commercial credit sources. Each fiscal year,
the Agency targets a portion of its direct and guaranteed farm ownership (FO) and operating loan
(OL) funds to beginning farmers and ranchers.




98
A beginning farmer or rancher is an individual or entity who (1) has not operated a farm or ranch
for more than 10 years; (2) meets the loan eligibility requirements of the program to which
he/she is applying; (3) substantially participates in the operation; and, (4) for FO loan purposes,
does not own a farm greater than 30 percent of the median size farm in the county. (Note: all
applicants for direct FO loans must have participated in business operation of a farm for at least
3 years.) If the applicant is an entity, all members must be related by blood or marriage, and all
stockholders in a corporation must be eligible beginning farmers.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) makes and
guarantees loans to approved socially disadvantaged applicants to buy and operate family-size
farms and ranches.

A socially disadvantaged (SDA) farmer, rancher, or agricultural producer is one of a group
whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic, or gender prejudice because of his or her
identity as a member of the group without regard to his or her individual qualities. SDA groups
are women, African Americans, American Indians, Alaskan Natives, Hispanics, Asian
Americans and Pacific Islanders.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.




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Youth Loans
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency (FSA) makes operating loans of up
to $5,000 to eligible individual rural youths age 10 through 20 to finance income-producing,
agriculture-related projects. The project must be of modest size, educational, and initiated,
developed and carried out by rural youths participating in 4-H clubs, FFA or a similar
organization.

The project must be an organized and supervised program of work. It must be planned and
operated with the assistance of the organization advisor, produce sufficient income to repay the
loan, and provide the youth with practical business and educational experience in agriculture-
related skills.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Guaranteed Farm Loans
FSA guaranteed loans provide lenders (e.g., banks, Farm Credit System institutions, credit
unions) with a guarantee of up to 95 percent of the loss of principal and interest on a loan.
Farmers and ranchers apply to an agricultural lender, which then arranges for the guarantee. The
FSA guarantee permits lenders to make agricultural credit available to farmers who do not meet
the lender's normal underwriting criteria.

FSA guaranteed loans are for both Farm Ownership and Operating purposes. Like the Direct
Loan Program, a percentage of Guaranteed Loan funds are targeted to beginning farmers and
ranchers and minority applicants.

Where to Go for More Information
Further information and applications for FSA loan programs are available at the Agency's local
county offices. These are usually listed in telephone directories in the section set aside for
governmental/public organizations under the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Service
Agency.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of



100
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

Emergency Conservation Program
ECP Overview
USDA Farm Service Agency's (FSA) Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) provides
emergency funding and technical assistance for farmers and ranchers to rehabilitate farmland
damaged by natural disasters and for carrying out emergency water conservation measures in
periods of severe drought. Funding for ECP is appropriated by Congress.

Program Administration
ECP is administered by state and county FSA committees. Subject to availability of funds,
locally-elected county committees are authorized to implement ECP for all disasters except
drought, which is authorized at the national office of FSA.

Land Eligibility
County FSA committees determine land eligibility based on on-site inspections of damage,
taking into account the type and extent of damage. For land to be eligible, the natural disaster
must create new conservation problems that, if untreated, would:
    • impair or endanger the land;
    • materially affect the land's productive capacity;
    • represent unusual damage which, except for wind erosion, is not the type likely to recur
        frequently in the same area; and
    • be so costly to repair that Federal assistance is or will be required to return the land to
        productive agricultural use.

Conservation problems existing prior to the applicable disaster are ineligible for ECP assistance.

Payments
ECP program participants receive cost-share assistance of up to 75 percent of the cost to
implement approved emergency conservation practices, as determined by county FSA
committees.

Individual or cumulative requests for cost-sharing of $50,000 or less per person, per disaster are
approved at the county committee level. Cost-sharing from $50,001 to $100,000 is approved at
the state committee level. Cost-sharing over $100,000 must be approved by FSA's national
office.

Technical assistance may be provided by USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service.




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Emergency Conservation Practices
To rehabilitate farmland, ECP program participants may implement emergency conservation
practices, such as:
   • remove debris;
   • restore fences and conservation structures; and
   • provide water for livestock in drought situations.

Other conservation measures may be authorized by county FSA committees, with approval from
state FSA committees and FSA's national office.

Sign-up Periods
Producers should check with their local county FSA offices regarding ECP sign-up periods,
which are set by county FSA committees.

For More Information
More information on ECP is available at FSA offices and on FSA's Web site at:
http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

Farmable Wetlands Program
Overview
Restoring wetlands reduces downstream flood damage, improves surface and groundwater
quality, and recharges groundwater supplies. Wetlands provide vital habitat for migratory birds
and many wildlife species, including threatened and endangered species, and provide
recreational opportunities such as bird watching and hunting.

The Farmable Wetlands Program (FWP) is a voluntary program to restore up to 500,000 acres of
farmable wetlands and associated buffers by improving the land's hydrology and vegetation.
Eligible producers in all states can enroll eligible land in the FWP through the Conservation
Reserve Program (CRP).

State Acreage Allocations
FWP is limited to no more than 1 million acres, and no more than 100,000 acres in any one state.




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Sign-up
Offers are accepted on a continuous sign-up basis and are automatically accepted provided the
acreage and producer meet certain eligibility requirements. Acceptance is not determined by a
competitive offer process.

Eligible Land
Eligible acreage includes farmed and prior converted wetlands that have been impacted by
farming activities. The maximum acreage for enrollment of wetlands and buffers is 40 acres per
tract. A producer may enroll multiple wetlands and associated buffers on a tract as long as the
total acreage does not exceed 40 acres.

Acreage must meet the following FWP eligibility requirements:
   • Land must be cropland planted to an agricultural commodity 3 of the 10 most recent crop
      years and be physically and legally capable of being planted in a normal manner to an
      agricultural commodity.
   • A wetland must be 10 acres or less. Only the first 5 acres may receive payment.
   • A buffer may not exceed the greater of 3 times the size of the wetland or an average of
      150 feet on either side of the wetland.
   • Participants must agree to restore the hydrology of the wetland to the maximum extent
      possible.

Conservation Practices
The conservation practices authorized under FWP are:
   • CP27 - Farmable Wetlands Pilot Wetland; and
   • CP28 - Farmable Wetlands Pilot Buffer.

Contract Duration and Effective Date
FWP contracts are from 10 to 15 years in exchange for annual rental payments, incentive
payments, and cost-share for installing necessary practices. The effective date of the contract is
the first day of the month following the month of approval.

Payments
Eligible producers may receive the following types of payments:
    • Annual rental payments for a 10- to 15-year period. The rental rate is based on the
        weighted average dryland cash rent.
    • Upfront CRP signing incentive payment of $100 to $150 per acre depending on contract
        length. This one-time payment is made after the contract is approved and all payment
        eligibility criteria are met.
    • Practice incentive payment equal to 40 percent of the eligible costs of installing the
        practice. This one-time payment is made after the practice is installed, eligible costs are
        verified, and other payment eligibility criteria are met.
    • Incentive amount equal to 20 percent of the weighted average dryland cash rent.
    • Up to 50 percent cost-share for establishing permanent cover.




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Cooperating Agencies
The FWP is administered by USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA) with assistance from the
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS); the Cooperative State Research, Education,
and Extension Service; state agencies; and local soil and water conservation districts.

Producers can find out details and sign up at their local FSA or NRCS office, both of which are
listed in telephone books under "United States Government, U.S. Department of Agriculture."

More Information
Information about FSA and its conservation programs is available on the FSA Web site at:
http://www.fsa.usda.gov

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all
programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of
program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET
Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-
W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410, or call
(202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD).

Grassland Reserve Program
GRP Overview
GRP is a voluntary program for landowners to protect, restore, and enhance grasslands on their
property. USDA's NRCS, FSA, and Forest Service implement GRP to conserve vulnerable
grasslands from conversion to cropland or other uses and conserve valuable grasslands by
helping maintain viable ranching operations.

GRP emphasizes support for working grazing operations: enhancement of plant and animal
biodiversity: and protection of grassland and land containing shrubs and forbs under threat of
conversion to cropping, urban development, and other activities that threaten grassland
resources.

Benefits
Restoring and protecting grasslands contributes positively to the economy of many regions,
provides biodiversity of plant and animal populations, and improves environmental quality.

How GRP Works
Applications may be filed for an easement or rental agreement with NRCS or FSA at any time.
Participants voluntarily limit future use of the land while retaining the right to conduct common
grazing practices; produce hay; conduct fire rehabilitation; and construct firebreaks and fences.




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GRP contracts and easements prohibit the production of crops (other than hay), fruit trees, and
vineyards and any other activity that would disturb the surface of the land, except for appropriate
land management activities included in a conservation plan.

Each state will establish ranking criteria that will prioritize enrollment of working grasslands.
The ranking criteria will consider threats of conversion, including cropping, invasive species,
urban development, and other activities that threaten plant and animal diversity on grazing lands.

Easement Options
Permanent Easement. This is a conservation easement in perpetuity. Easement payments for this
option equal the fair market value, less the grassland value of the land encumbered by the
easement. These values will be determined using an appraisal.

Thirty-year Easement. USDA will provide an easement payment equal to 30 percent of the fair
market value of the land, less the grassland value of the land encumbered by the easement.

For both easement options, USDA will provide all administrative costs associated with recording
the easement, including appraisal fees, survey costs, title insurance, and recording fees.
Easement payments may be provided, at the participant's request, in lump sum or annual
payments (equal or unequal amounts) for up to 10 years.

Rental Agreement
Participants may choose a 10-year, 15-year, 20-year, or 30-year contract. USDA will provide
annual payments in an amount that is not more that 75 percent of the grazing value of the land
covered by the agreement for the life of the agreement. Payments will be disbursed on the
agreement anniversary date each year.

Restoration Agreement
An approved grassland resource management plan identifying required restoration activities will
be incorporated within the rental agreement or easement. CCC may provide up to 90 percent of
the restoration costs on lands that have never been cultivated, and up to 75 percent of the cost on
restored grasslands and shrub lands that were previously cropped. Participants will be paid upon
certification of the completion of the approved practice by NRCS or an approved third party.
Participants may contribute to the application of a cost-share practice through in-kind
contributions. The combined total cost-share provided by Federal or State Governments may not
exceed 100 percent of the actual cost of restoration.

Eligibility
Landowners who can provide clear title on privately owned lands are eligible to participate for
either easement option. Landowners and others who have general control of the acreage may
submit an application for a rental agreement.

Offers for enrollment must contain at least 40 contiguous acres, unless NRCS determines that
special circumstances exist to accept a lesser amount.




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Individuals or entities that have an average adjusted gross income exceeding $2.5 million are not
eligible to receive program benefits. However, an exemption is provided in cases where 75
percent of the adjusted gross income is derived from farming, ranching, or forestry operations.

Eligible land includes privately owned and Tribal lands, such as grasslands; land that contains
forbs (including improved rangeland and pastureland or shrubland); or land that is located in an
area that historically has been dominated by grassland, forbs, or shrubland that has the potential
to serve as wildlife habitat of significant ecological value. Incidental lands may be included to
allow for the efficient administration of an agreement or easement.

Grassland Reserve Program, Section 2401 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of
2002 (Pub. L. 107-171)

Housing & Economic Development Authority
You can contact us by e-mail, telephone, fax, or US mail.
                                 Madison Office                   Milwaukee Office
E-Mail: info@wheda.com           201 W. Washington Ave.,          140 S. 1st St., Ste. 200
In Wisconsin call:               Ste. 700                         Milwaukee, WI 53204
1-800-334-6873                   Madison, WI 53703                Tel: 414-227-4039
1-800-562-5546 (existing         or                               Fax: 414-227-4704
Single Family loans)                                              Toll Free: 1-800-628-4833
TTY: 1-800-943-9430              P.O. Box 1728
                                 Madison, WI 53701-1728
                                 Tel: 608-266-7884
                                 Fax: 608-267-1099
                                 Toll Free: 1-800-334-6873

Tax-Exempt Bond Financing
Tax-Exempt Bond Financing provides long-term below market interest rate financing for the
construction, acquisition and rehabilitation of affordable rental housing.

Features & Benefits
   • Below-market interest rates—improves profitability.
   • Long term fixed- or variable-rate financing—15 to 30 year terms.
   • Construction and/or permanent financing—work with one lender for all your financing
      needs.

Term Sheets
Fixed-Rate Financing
A summary of the lending terms of Tax-Exempt Bond Fixed-Rate Financing.

Variable-Rate Financing
A summary of the lending terms of Tax-Exempt Bond Variable-Rate Financing.




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Feasibility Worksheet
The Feasibility Worksheet helps you evaluate whether your proposed development will be
feasible using WHEDA financing. It walks you through a cash flow analysis, and shows the
strengths and weaknesses of your development.

Stand-Alone Bond Financing
Stand-Alone Bond Financing provides increased flexibility and expeditious timing for the
construction, acquisition and rehabilitation of affordable rental housing.

Features & Benefits
   • Designed for increased flexibility and expeditious timing.
   • Can be taxable or tax-exempt.
   • Long term fixed- or variable-rate financing—10 to 30 year terms.
   • Construction and/or permanent financing—work with one lender for all your financing
      needs.

Term Sheet
A summary of the lending terms of the Stand-Alone Bond loan, taxable or tax-exempt, with both
fixed-rate and variable-rate financing.

Stand-Alone Rates
Indicative rates for Stand-Alone financing are posted weekly on this web site in an interactive
Excel spreadsheet. The spreadsheet can also be used to estimate bond cost-of-issuance by
inputting the estimated loan amount.

How to Use Stand-Alone Bond Financing
How to Use Stand-Alone Bond Financing provides information about why and how to use this
type of financing.

Feasibility Worksheet
The Feasibility Worksheet helps you evaluate whether your proposed development will be
feasible using WHEDA financing. It walks you through a cash flow analysis, and shows the
strengths and weaknesses of your development.

Loan Application
Download application materials. For help when downloading files, read our About File Formats
instructions.

Tax Credit Development Financing
Tax Credit Development Financing offers competitive, fixed-rate financing designed specifically
for tax credit developments.

Features & Benefits
   • Loan amounts from $500,000 to $10,000,000—financing to meet your needs.
   • Competitive fixed-rate financing—no need to worry about rates increasing during the life
      of the loan.



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   •   30-year term with 30-year amortization—terms to meet your needs.
   •   Construction and/or permanent financing—work with one lender for all your financing
       needs.

Term Sheet
The Term Sheet is a summary of the lending terms of Tax Credit Development Financing.

Feasibility Worksheet
The Feasibility Worksheet helps you evaluate whether your proposed development will be
feasible using WHEDA financing. It walks you through a cash flow analysis, and shows the
strengths and weaknesses of your development.

Loan Application
Download application materials. For help when downloading files, read our About File Formats
instructions.

How to Use Tax Credit Development Financing
How to Use Tax Credit Development Financing tells how to get started with Tax Credit
Development Financing.

Frequently Asked Questions
FAQs list questions and their answers to commonly asked questions about Tax Credit
Development Financing.

Construction Plus Loan
With our Construction Plus Loan you can finance up to 90% of the development cost of rental
housing for families, elderly, or people with disabilities.

Features & Benefits
   • Finance up to 90% of development costs.
   • Competitive, variable interest rates.
   • Combine with WHEDA's permanent financing for easy, one-stop shopping.
   • Terms up to 36 months.

Term Sheets
Term Sheet for Tax Credit Developments
Term Sheet for Inclusionary Zoning Developments

Loan Application
Download application materials. For help when downloading files, read our About File Formats
instructions.

How to Use the Construction Plus Loan
How to Use the Construction Plus Loan tells how to get started with Construction Plus financing.




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Preservation of Affordable Housing
WHEDA's SOS Initiative provides financing to preserve existing affordable housing.
WHEDA's SOS Initiative
   • Governor Doyle announces the 2005 SOS Initiative to help preserve affordable housing
      for seniors and low-income Wisconsin residents.

Preservation Task Force Report
   • The Governor's Housing Preservation Task Force has released a report entitled
      "Preserving Wisconsin's Quality Affordable Rental Housing". The report proposes
      streamlined regulation, a trust fund, and other steps to save affordable housing in crisis.

Purpose of Preservation
Section 8 properties serve tenants whose average annual income is approximately $9,000.
Replacement of this housing would be virtually impossible in today's economic climate. Many of
these developments are at a stage where the owners could consider converting the properties to
market rate housing. This would displace most of the low-income residents. WHEDA wants to
provide loans for these developments to preserve and extend the affordability and viability of
these properties.

We offer owners and prospective buyers of Section 8 properties the knowledge and experience
gained by financing and servicing over 20,000 affordable rental units in Wisconsin. Contact a
Senior Underwriter (SU) for more information on Preservation of Affordable Housing

Section 8 Contract Administration
Section 8 Contract Administration provides information on processing Housing Assistance
Payment (HAP) requests, annual management and occupancy reviews, contract renewals, rent
adjustments, and REAC inspections.

Eligibility
2008 Section 8 Income Limits
Determine the income eligibility of applicants for Public Housing, Section 8 and other programs
subject to Section 3(b)(2).

Tax Credit Allocating Program
Year-specific information, including QAP, application, award and reservation lists, fast facts,
income and rent limits, and other pertinent information.

Introduction To The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program
Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA) was appointed by the
Governor to administer the IRS federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program for
Wisconsin. This brief introduction to the Program is intended to help readers understand Tax
Credit basics. Detailed information about the application process, program requirements, and
compliance regulations is available on our website, www.wheda.com.




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#1 Why Was The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Created?
Congress enacted Section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code as part of the Tax Reform Act of
1986. The Credit replaced traditional tax benefits eliminated on multifamily real estate. The
program was created to encourage production of affordable multifamily rental housing for low-
to-moderate income persons. Without the Credit, cash flow from rent is often inadequate to
support housing development. Tax credits increase the owner/investor down payment in a
housing development by lowering mortgage and financing costs allowing lower rents.

#2 What Is The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit?
The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit is a dollar-for-dollar reduction of federal income taxes
owed by owners/investors in qualified projects for tenants whose incomes are at or below 60% of
County Median Income (CMI).

#3 Who Can Use The Credit, And How?
Owners/investors (corporations or individuals) reduce their federal income tax liability over a
10-year period in qualifying projects. The benefit is spread over 10 years and the investor equity
contribution is lower than the cumulative Tax Credit. There are limitations on individuals
claiming Credit on personal income taxes. Since the program is quite complicated, consultation
with competent tax and legal counsel is strongly recommended.

#4 How Do Development Owners/Investors Obtain Credit?
An application for Tax Credit must be submitted to WHEDA. Applicants must meet mandatory
threshold requirements for financing, market, site control, and zoning. Applications are then
evaluated and points are awarded for select criteria as outlined in WHEDA's current Qualified
Allocation Plan.

#5 How Does A Housing Development Qualify For Credit?
To qualify for Credit, owners/investors must agree to maintain the project for 30 years with a
minimum percentage of rent-restricted units for income-qualified tenants. If this does not occur,
the IRS can "recapture" Credit retroactively.

Owners must choose one of the following options, known as the "minimum set-aside election":

At minimum, 20% of the units must be rented to tenants with incomes not exceeding 50%
County Median Income, adjusted for family size,
OR
At minimum, 40% of the units must be rented to tenants with incomes not exceeding 60% of
County Median Income, adjusted for family size.

There are two components required to qualify a set-aside unit. The first is the rent and the
second is the income of the tenant(s). Maximum rent of set-aside units, including utilities, is
based on a 1.5 person per bedroom calculation. The maximum income of tenants cannot exceed
50% or 60% of County Median Income (CMI), based on actual family size. Rent and Income
Limits are available on www.wheda.com .




110
#6 How Does The Set-Aside Affect The Amount Of Credit A Development Receives?
Only the actual percentage of total units set-aside is used in the Tax Credit calculation. Owners
may choose to set-aside any percentage of units between the minimum and 100%. For example,
if an owner chooses to set-aside 20% of the units at 50% of CMI, only 20% of depreciable
development costs are utilized in the Tax Credit calculation. If the owner chooses to set-aside
40% of units for tenants with incomes at 60% of CMI, only 40% of depreciable development
costs are used in the Tax Credit calculation. If the owner chooses to set-aside more than the
minimum percentage of units, whatever percentage is chosen at either 50% or 60% of CMI will
determine the Tax Credit calculation.

Neighborhood Business Revitalization Guarantee (NBRG)
Business Eligibility for Business as Borrower
   • Expansion or acquisition of an existing small business. An expansion may involve a
      new line of business that complements the existing business. Existing is defined as being
      in operation for at least 12 months.
   • Annual revenues under $5 million.
   • Located in a Wisconsin community with a population over 35,000.
   • Owner is actively engaged in the business and current in child support payments, if any.
   • Project will create or retain jobs.
   • Business is unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.

Business Eligibility for Developer as Borrower
   • Developing or rehabilitating commercial real estate, including mixed-use properties,
      where a business occupies a portion of the building.
   • Located in a Wisconsin community with a population over 35,000.
   • Developer is actively engaged in the project, but does not need to locate his business
      within the project.
   • Developer is current in child support payments, if any.
   • Project will create or retain jobs.
   • Developer is unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.

Contractors Loan Guarantee (CLG)
Business Eligibility
   • Business must have been in operation for at least 12 months.
   • Business must have been awarded a contract, purchase order or other instrument
      approved by WHEDA, from either a local government agency, a state or federal agency
      or a business with gross annual sales of at least $5 million.
   • Employs 50 or fewer full-time equivalent employees at time of application.
   • Located in Wisconsin.
   • Owner is actively engaged in the business and current in child support payments, if any.
   • Project will create or retain jobs.
   • Business is unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.




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Use of Loan Proceeds
   • Employee salaries, wages and benefits
   • Inventory, supplies and specific equipment needed to perform on the contract
   • WHEDA® closing fee (this portion will not be guaranteed)

Features & Benefits
   • Lower Interest Rate—improves profitability and cash flow
   • Use for Working Capital or Fixed Assets
   • Reduce Risk for the Lender—makes it easier to approve the loan

WHEDA Small Business Guarantee (WSBG)
Features & Benefits
   • Lower Interest Rate—improves profitability
   • Longer Term and Amortization—lower monthly payment
   • Use for Working Capital—finance more than fixed assets and inventory
   • Reduce Risk for the Lender—makes it easier to approve the loan

Business Eligibility
   • Start-up of a daycare business which can be for adults or children.
   • Start-up of a small business in a vacant storefront in the downtown area of a rural
      community. A rural community is defined as “(1) a city, town or village in this state with
      a population of 12,000 or less, or (2) a city, town or village in this state that is located in a
      county with a population density of less than 150 persons per square mile.” See list of
      ineligible communities.
   • Expansion or acquisition of an existing small business. An expansion may involve a
      new line of business that complements the existing business. Existing is defined as being
      in operation for at least 12 months.
   • Employs 50 or fewer full-time equivalent employees at time of application.
   • Located in Wisconsin.
   • Owner is actively engaged in the business and current in child support payments, if any.
   • Project will create or retain jobs.
   • Business is unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.

Use of Loan Proceeds
   • Purchase or improve land and buildings including mixed-use properties. A mixed-use
       property is a property that contains both commercial and residential components.
          o For a mixed-use property to be eligible, the business can occupy as little as 25%
              of the total square footage of the building.
   • Fund leasehold improvements
   • Purchase or improve machinery and equipment
   • Purchase inventory
   • Fund permanent and revolving working capital
   • Finance floor plan lines of credit
   • Finance soft costs not to exceed 5% of eligible project costs
   • Refinance existing debt that does not exceed 75% of the WHEDA® guaranteed loan


112
   •   WHEDA closing fee (this portion will not be guaranteed)

Linked Deposit Loan (LiDL) Subsidy
Features & Benefits
   • Lower Interest Rate—improves profitability
   • Use for Start-up, Acquisition or Expansion Costs—meets financing needs
   • Use in conjunction with WSBG, SBA or conventional financing—allows you to take
      advantage of other financing products

Business Eligibility
   • At least 50% owned by a woman or ethnic minority group member.*
   • Greater than 50% of the business is controlled by a woman or ethnic minority group
      member.*
   • Employs 25 or fewer full-time equivalent employees at time of application.
   • Business, along with affiliates, subsidiaries and parent company, has gross annual sales
      of $500,000 or less.
   • Business is able to demonstrate a financial need for the subsidy.
   • Will create or retain jobs.
   • Located in Wisconsin.

*Minority Definitions
  • American Indian: A person who is enrolled as a member of a federally recognized
      American Indian tribe or band or who can document at least one-fourth American Indian
      ancestry or document tribal recognition as an American Indian.
  • Asian Indian: A person whose ancestors originated in India, Pakistan or Bangladesh.
  • Asian Pacific: A person of any race whose ancestors originated in Japan, China, Taiwan,
      Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, the Philippines, Samoa, Guam, the U.S. Trust
      Territories of the Pacific or the Northern Marianas.
  • African American (Black): A person whose ancestors originated in any of the black
      racial groups of Africa.
  • Hispanic: A person of any race whose ancestors originated in Mexico, Puerto Rico,
      Cuba, Central America or South America or whose cultural origin is Spanish.
  • Native Hawaiians; Eskimos; and Aleuts: Not defined

Agribusiness Guarantee
The Agribusiness Guarantee helps new or existing businesses obtain financing on favorable
terms to develop or expand production of products using Wisconsin's raw agricultural
commodities.

Features & Benefits
   • Lower Interest Rate—improves profitability
   • Longer Term and Amortization—lowers monthly payment
   • Use for Working Capital—finance more than fixed assets and inventory
   • Reduce Risk for the Lender—makes it easier to approve a loan




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Business Eligibility
The business must do one of the following:
   • Start with a Wisconsin grown, raw agricultural commodity and then:
          o Create a product new to the business, or expand production of an existing product
              that will increase the use of a raw agricultural commodity; or
          o Enhance the efficiency of the business.
   • Commercially harvest whitefish from Lake Superior.

The business must also:
   • Be located in Wisconsin in an area having a population of 50,000 or less;
   • Have an owner who is actively engaged in the business and current in child support
      payments, if any; and
   • Demonstrate it is unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.

Use of Loan Proceeds
   • Purchase or improve land and buildings
   • Purchase or improve machinery and equipment
   • Purchase inventory
   • Fund permanent and revolving working capital
   • Fund initial marketing expenses associated with making the product available to
       consumers
   • Refinance existing debt that does not exceed 75% of the WHEDA® guaranteed loan
   • WHEDA closing fee (this portion will not be guaranteed).

Credit Relief Outreach Program (CROP)
CROP is a financing resource for farmers that provides guarantees on agricultural production
loans.

Features & Benefits
   • Lower Interest Rate—lowers monthly payment
   • Use for Working Capital
   • Reduce Risk for the Lender—makes it easier to approve a loan
   • Low Cost

Farmer Eligibility
   • Debt-to-asset ratio of 40% or greater.
   • Must have sufficient collateral to cover the value of the CROP loan.
   • Have not defaulted on previous WHEDA loans (farmer would become eligible upon
     repayment).
   • Reside in Wisconsin, or if a partnership or corporation the entity must be legally
     registered in Wisconsin.
   • Actively engaged in the operation and current in child support payments, if any.
   • Farm located in Wisconsin.
   • Unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.




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Use of Loan Proceeds
   • Fertilizer
   • Seed
   • Fuel
   • Land rent
   • Animal feed
   • UCC filing charges
   • Equipment rental
   • Equipment repair
   • Tillage service
   • Custom hire
   • Crop insurance
   • Pesticides and herbicides
   • Put Options
   • Hedging
   • Feeder animals purchased and sold within the term of the loan
   • Utility bills pertaining solely to the production of the agricultural commodity
   • Labor costs directly related to planting and harvesting the agricultural commodity,
       excluding labor costs paid to the farmer and spouse
   • Refinance of last year's CROP loan as long as at least 60% of that loan is repaid
   • WHEDA® CROP Application fee (can be financed as part of the CROP loan, but will
       not be guaranteed)

Farm Asset Reinvestment Management (FARM) Guarantee
Features & Benefits
   • Lower Interest Rate—improves profitability
   • Longer Term and Amortization—lowers month payment
   • Reduce Risk for the Lender—makes it easier to approve the loan

Farmer Eligibility
   • Currently operating a farm.
   • Debt-to-asset ratio, including assets and liabilities incurred with the FARM loan, of 85%
     or less.
   • Must have sufficient collateral to cover the value of the FARM loan.
   • Has not defaulted on previous WHEDA loans (farmer would become eligible upon
     repayment).
   • Reside in Wisconsin, or if a partnership or corporation the entity must be legally
     registered in Wisconsin.
   • Actively engaged in the operation and current in child support payments, if any.
   • Farm located in Wisconsin.
   • Unable to obtain conventional financing at reasonable terms.
   • As a startup farmer, the individual(s) has no less than 3 years of farming experience
     including managing the day to day operations of a farm.




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Use of Loan Proceeds
   • Purchase or improve land and buildings for agricultural purposes
   • Purchase or improve machinery and equipment
   • Refinance existing debt if farmer is expanding their existing farm operation. The
       refinanced debt must not exceed 75% of the WHEDA® guaranteed loan.
   • Purchase livestock to be held for more than one year
   • WHEDA closing fee (this portion will not be guaranteed)

Housing Choice Voucher Program
The WHEDA Housing Choice Voucher Program helps families with very low to extremely low
incomes rent decent, safe, sanitary and affordable housing of their choice. In the near future,
you'll have access to the necessary forms from this page. Check back often!

About the Program
WHEDA currently works with local agents to serve residents in 37 Wisconsin counties where
there are no community programs available.

Eligible families pay between 30-40% of their adjusted income for rent. The balance is
subsidized by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Resident
portions of the rent are re-evaluated at least once a year.

Eligibility
    • A household's annual income may not exceed established limits. The program's income
        limits are published by HUD on a yearly basis and vary by city or county.

Program eligibility is determined by:
   • the number of members in a household,
   • a family's gross annual income, and
   • criminal background checks.

Once an application has been submitted the agency will verify the information given to
determine eligibility.

Roles and Responsibilities
   • There are three components to a Housing Choice Voucher:
   • the voucher;
   • the lease; and
   • the HAP Contract.

Unit Selection
   • A voucher will specify unit size and the maximum rent and utilities allowed
   • Maximum assistance paid will be the lesser of:
       o the payment standard, or
       o gross rent minus 30% of adjusted income
   • A voucher may be used at a holder's current residence if it qualifies



116
   •   A selected unit must pass a physical inspection annually.

Subsidy can only be paid on a unit that has a passed inspection, a signed lease and a signed HAP
contract. The resident is responsible for rent if a lease is signed before the unit passes inspection.

Home Loan
The Home Loan offers below-market fixed interest rate Home financing to first-time
Homebuyers with low to moderate incomes.

Features and Benefits
   • Low cost, fixed interest rate—more customers qualify
   • Fast turnaround time—you won't wait days for approval
   • 3% minimum downpayment—gets your customers into a Home sooner
   • Easy Close Loan available - helps your customer cover down payment and closing costs.
   • Job Loss Protection pays the mortgage payment in the event of involuntary
      unemployment

Borrower Eligibility
First-Time Home Buyer
Your customer cannot have had an ownership interest in a principal residence for three years.
The only three exceptions are:
   • The property is located in a target area
   • The property will be the subject of a qualified major rehabilitation
   • You are a veteran and can provide a D.D. 214 with a "Member 4" status in the lower right
       corner

Copies of your customer's tax returns for the last three years are required to determine eligibility.

Home Loan Property Eligibility
Types of Property
   • New or existing single family detached dwelling
      o Manufactured housing on land taxed as real estate.
   • Condominium
   • Two-unit which is at least five (5) years old
   • Newly constructed two unit located in a target area

Property Usage
No more than 15% of the property can be used for trade or business purposes.

Home Loan for Veterans
The Home Loan for Veterans offers fixed interest rate home financing to military veterans
purchasing a home. Military veterans do not have to be first-time home buyers to qualify for a
WHEDA Home Loan.




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Features and Benefits
   • Low cost, fixed interest rate—more customers qualify
   • Fast turnaround time—you won't wait days for approval
   • Job Loss Protection pays the mortgage payment in the event of involuntary
      unemployment
   • Veterans do not have to be first-time home buyers to qualify
   • Low down payment options are available

Borrower Eligibility
First-Time Home Buyer
Your customer cannot have had an ownership interest in a principal residence for three years.
The only three exceptions are:
   • The property is located in a target area
   • The property will be the subject of a qualified major rehabilitation
   • You are a veteran and can provide a D.D. 214 with a "Member 4" status in the lower right
       corner

Major Rehabilitation Loan
The Major Rehabilitation Loan provides 30-year fixed-rate financing to purchase and rehabilitate
an existing Home, or, to refinance and rehabilitate an owner's current Home.

Features and Benefits
   • Below market interest rate—more customer qualify
   • Lower mortgage insurance premium - reduces monthly payment.
   • Fast turnaround time—you won't wait days for approval
   • Provides interim rehabilitation financing —no need to obtain other construction financing
   • Only one loan closing—saves your customer money
   • Job Loss Protection pays the mortgage payment in the event of involuntary
      unemployment

Borrower Eligibility
Previous Home Ownership
The borrower does not have to be a first-time Homebuyer, but must occupy the property as their
principal residence once the rehabilitation work is completed.

Partnership for Homeownership
Partnership for Homeownership provides affordable Home financing for Wisconsin's rural
residents through a partnership between WHEDA and USDA - Rural Development.

Features and Benefits
   • Rural Development qualifies the borrowers—you get customers who are already
      qualified.
   • Rural Development prepares the loan file—less time needed to prepare the application
      package.




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   •   Affordable financing for your customers —another option for you to use to reach the
       low-to-moderate income market.

Borrower Eligibility
First-Time Homebuyer
The borrower may not have had an ownership interest in a principal residence for three years.
Copies of the borrower's tax returns for the last three years are required to determine eligibility.
The only exception is if the property is located in a target area.

Property Eligibility
Purchase Price Limits
The total purchase price cannot exceed the purchase price limit for an existing property in the
county where the property is located.

Types of Property
   • Existing and newly constructed single family Homes
   • New construction with WHEDA providing both the interim and permanent financing
   • New manufactured Homes
   • Owner occupied
   • No more than 15% of the property can be used for trade or business purposes
   • Properties must be in a community with a population of 20,000 or less

For more information on property eligibility, contact Rural Development - USDA.

Home Loan
Home Loan offers long-term, below-market, fixed-rate financing for low- to moderate-income,
first-time Homebuyers.

Features & Benefits
   • Low cost, fixed interest rate
   • Up to a 30-year term
   • Fast turnaround time for loan approval
   • Low down payment
   • Down payment assistance is available
      o Easy Close
      o Partnership Neighborhood Initiative
      o Rural Initiative
   • Lower Mortgage Insurance Premiums
   • Job Loss Protection pays your mortgage payment in the event of involuntary
      unemployment
   • Gateway to Home Ownership offers a network of resources to access credit repair
      assistance and Homebuyer education




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Borrower Eligibility
First-Time Home Buyer
You cannot have had an ownership interest in a principal residence during the past three years.
The only three exceptions are:
   • The property you are purchasing is located in a target area
   • The property you are purchasing will be the subject of a qualified major rehabilitation
   • You are a veteran and can provide a D.D. 214 with a "Member 4" status in the lower right
       corner

Income Limits
The combined income of all adults who will occupy the property cannot exceed the limits for the
county in which the property you are purchasing is located.

Property Eligibility
Types of Property
   • New or existing single family detached dwelling
      o Manufactured housing must be on land you own and be taxed as real estate
   • Condominium
   • Two-unit which is at least five (5) years old
   • Newly constructed two unit located in a target area

Purchase Price Limits
The purchase price cannot exceed the limit for the county in which the property is located.

Principal Residence
You must occupy the property as your principal residence within 60 days after the loan closing.
The property must remain owner occupied throughout the life of the loan.

Property Usage
No more than 15% of the property can be used for trade or business purposes.

Partnership Neighborhood Initiative
WHEDA® is focusing its lending efforts in the urban areas of Milwaukee, Madison, Racine, and
Beloit. For a limited time, WHEDA is pleased to offer down payment assistance to first-time
home buyers who purchase a home in specific neighborhoods.
The down payment assistance options offer:
   • Minimal cash required at closing: Only $500 is needed at the time of closing. There is
        no need to save thousands of dollars for down payment and closing costs.
   • Easy Close down payment assistance: Home buyers can obtain immediate access to a
        down payment loan of up to $4,000, featuring payments of only $38.20 per month.
   • Job loss payment protection: Loans will feature mandatory coverage after loan closing
        to cover house payments for up to six months in the event of involuntary job loss.
   • Access to educational resources: Borrowers receive home buyer education and
        counseling to help ensure future success as homeowners.




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Available in neighborhoods with a high demand for affordable mortgages. First-time
homebuyers who purchase a home in the following zip codes may be eligible for this reduced
interest rate loan:
Beloit - 53511
Madison - 53711
Milwaukee - 53204, 53209, 53212, 53215, 53218, 53223, 53224
Racine - 53402, 53403, 53404, 53405

WHEDA wants its customers to be successful homeowners. That's why we offer home buyer
education classes and access to counseling services to help people with saving for a down
payment, budgeting, and correcting credit issues. At WHEDA we provide access to resources
and tools to enable more Wisconsin residents the ability to buy a home sooner and with a
mortgage they can afford.

Income and purchase price limits do apply. To learn more about qualifying for a WHEDA loan
through the Partnership Neighborhood Initiative, call us at 1-800-628-4833.

Wisconsin Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency
Financial Incentives
Alliant Energy-WP&L - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs
Incentive Type:      Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Lighting, Agricultural Equipment, Custom/Others pending approval
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Agricultural
Incentive Amount: For Shared Savings, at least $7,500 For Farm Wiring Program, $1,000
                     plus 50% of remaining costs
Maximum              For Farm Wiring Program, $10,000
Incentive:
Expiration Date:     12/31/2008
Website:             http://alliantenergy.com/docs/groups/public/documents/pub/p014705.hcsp

Summary:
Alliant Energy-Wisconsin Power & Light offers two incentive programs for businesses and
farms to install high efficiency equipment.

Shared Savings
With the Shared Savings Program, agriculture-related businesses and farms can purchase high
efficiency equipment without any upfront costs. Alliant Energy-WP&L will pay for the cost of
the equipment and the customer will pay back on their monthly energy bill. Nearly all energy
efficient equipment will qualify, but pre-approval from Alliant Energy-WP&L is recommended.

Farm Wiring Program
Alliant Energy offers a farm rewiring program to increase safety and efficiency. The first $1,000
of the cost of the project are covered by this incentive, as well as 50% of the remaining costs, up
to a total incentive of $10,000. To start, Alliant Energy will inspect the facility for stray voltage




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and recommend improvements. Possible loans for wiring or energy efficiency equipment are also
associated with this program.

In addition to these programs, Alliant-WP&L offers financial incentives for commercial
customers who agree to have their energy load voluntarily curtailed during peak periods. More
information can be found at the program website.

Contact:
 Alliant Energy
 4902 North Biltmore Lane
 P.O. Box 77007
 Madison, WI 53707-1007
 Phone: (800) 255-4268
 Fax: (608) 758-1459
 E-Mail: customercare@alliantenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.alliantenergy.com

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industry Energy Efficiency Lighting
Rebates
Incentive Type:                 Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency             Lighting
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:             Commercial, Industrial
Incentive Amount:               Electronically Ballasted Fluorescent Fixtures: $6.50 per
                                ballast Metal Halide Fixtures: $10.00 per fixture Sodium
                                Vapor Fixtures: $10.00 per fixture
Maximum Incentive:              $10,000
Expiration Date:                12/15/2008
Website:                        http://www.barronelectric.com/services/efficientlighting.html

Summary:
Barron Electric Cooperative is a member-owned electric cooperative providing service to 17,000
customers in Northwest Wisconsin. In conjunction with Dairyland Cooperative, Barron Electric
provides a rebate for commercial and industrial customers to upgrade lighting to more efficient
fixtures.

Commercial and industrial customers can upgrade lighting in their buildings with high efficiency
Electronically Ballasted Fluorescent Fixtures, Metal Halide Fixtures and Sodium Vapor Fixtures
and receive rebates for each one installed. Ballasts and fixtures must be hard-wired to qualify.
Any combination of five ballasts or fixtures is required as a minimum, and there is a maximum
of $10,000 in rebates per customer per year. Rebates are not available on new construction.

For more information on how to apply for these rebates, see the program website above.

Contact:
 Program Manager - BEC


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 Barron Electric Cooperative
 1434 State Highway 25 North
 P.O. Box 40
 Barron, WI 54812
 Phone: (715) 537-3171
 Phone 2: (800) 322-1008
 E-Mail: barronec@barronelectric.com
 Web site: http://www.barronelectric.com

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program
Incentive Type:  Utility Rebate Program
Eligible         Refrigerators/Freezers, Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Chillers, Air
Efficiency       conditioners, Compressed air, Motors, Motor-ASDs/VSDs, Agricultural
Technologies:    Equipment, anti-condensate heater controls, LED refrigerated case lighting,
                 guest room energy management controls, PC network management, vending
                 machine control
Applicable       Commercial, Industrial, Schools, Agricultural
Sectors:
Equipment        Minimum efficiency requirements and other terms and conditions apply.
Requirements:
Project          To qualify for an incentive, customers should receive pre-approval prior to
Review/Certifica implementing any efficiency improvements.
tion:
Website:         http://www.cedarburglightandwater.com/business_customers/default.asp?C
                 ategoryNumber=2

Summary:
Cebarburg Light and Water Utility provides incentives for its commercial, industrial and
agricultural customers to increase their energy efficiency. Upon request, Cebarburg Light and
Water Utility will send an energy engineer from their power supplier, Wisconsin Public Power
Inc., to inspect the facility and suggest cost-effective ways to reduce the customer's monthly
energy bill. They will provide an in-depth analysis of the operation’s energy use and a detailed
report outlining specific recommendations and projected savings. If the project will reduce
energy consumption and power demand during peak periods, the customer may be eligible for a
cash incentive. To qualify for an incentive, customers should receive pre-approval from
Cedarburg Light & Water prior to implementing any efficiency improvements. Many types of
efficiency improvement projects are eligible, and the incentive amount will be determined on a
case-by-case basis. For more information, please contact Fred Rambert.

Wisconsin Focus on Energy also offers financial incentives to eligible business customers for
installing qualifying energy efficiency measures. These measures include a variety of
technologies including energy efficient lighting, motors, compressed air, and HVAC equipment.
To find out more click on link provided.

Contact:
 Cedarburg Light and Water Utility


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 PO Box 767
 Cedarburg, WI 53012-0767
 Phone: (262) 375-7650
 E-Mail: frambert@wppisys.org
 Web site: http://www.cedarburglightandwater.com

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program
Incentive    Utility Rebate Program
Type:
Eligible     Water Heaters, Lighting, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Air conditioners,
Efficiency   Building Insulation, Ceiling fans, Geothermal heat pumps, Flue closure
Technologies
:
Applicable   Residential, Low-Income Residential
Sectors:
Incentive    ENERGY STAR® bulbs: $2/bulb ENERGY STAR® ceiling fans: $15 Central
Amount:      A/C: $100 - $200, varies by efficiency Furnace: $150 *Customers installing
             qualified Efficient Heating & Cooling furnace and split system air conditioner at
             the same time receive an additional $150 Boiler: $400 Flue closure: $75 Water
             heaters (varies by efficiency): $50-250
Equipment    Except for central air equipment, rebates are only available for pre-qualified
Requiremen equipment Central A/C: Minimum SEER rating of 14 ENERGY STAR®
ts:          qualified bulbs and ceilings fans Furnace: must be equipped with an Electrical
             Commutated Motor
Expiration   Systems Bonus is only available from March 1, 2008 - August 31, 2008. Rebates
Date:        on ENERGY STAR® qualified bulbs and ceiling fans valid until 12/18/08
Website:     http://www.cedarburglightandwater.com/energy_efficiency/default.asp?Categor
             yNumber=2

Summary:
Cedarburg Light & Water offers rebates to its residential customers on energy-efficient heating
and cooling equipment, water heaters, and ENERGY STAR® qualified bulbs and ceilings fans.
For more information regarding residential incentives available through Cedarburg Light and
Water Conservation programs, click on the link above.

Various cash-back rewards are offered in partnership with Wisconsin Focus on Energy. Detailed
information regarding qualifying equipment and cash rebate amount can be found on the Focus
on Energy website or by calling (800) 762-7077.


Contact:
 Cedarburg Light and Water Utility
 PO Box 767
 Cedarburg, WI 53012-0767
 Phone: (262) 375-7650
 E-Mail: frambert@wppisys.org


124
 Web site: http://www.cedarburglightandwater.com

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Energy Efficient Retrofit Lighting Rebate Program
Incentive Type:                    Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Technologies:  Lighting
Applicable Sectors:                Commercial, Industrial
Incentive Amount:                  Electronically Ballasted Fluorescent Fixtures: $ 6.50 per
                                   ballast Metal Halide Fixtures: $10.00 per fixture Sodium
                                   Vapor Fixtures: $10.00 per fixture
Website:                           http://www.ecec.com/electric/rebates/rebateslighting.htm

Summary:
Eau Claire Energy Cooperative is a member-owned electric cooperative providing service
Wisconsin customers. In conjunction with Dairyland Cooperative, Eau Claire provides a rebate
for commercial and industrial customers to upgrade lighting to more efficient fixtures.

Commercial and industrial customers can upgrade lighting in their buildings with high efficiency
Electronically Ballasted Fluorescent Fixtures, Metal Halide Fixtures and Sodium Vapor Fixtures
and receive rebates for each one installed. Ballasts and fixtures must be hard-wired to qualify.
Any combination of five ballasts or fixtures is required as a minimum and rebates are not
available on new construction.

For more information on how to apply for these rebates, see the program website above.

Contact:
 Program Manager - ECEC
 Eau Claire Energy Cooperative
 P.O. Box 368
 8214 US Highway 12
 Fall Creek, WI 54742-0368
 Phone: (715) 832-1603
 Phone 2: (888) 832-1604
 Fax: (715) 832-2055
 E-Mail: info@ecec.com
 Web site: http://www.ecec.com




Energy Independence Fund Grant and Loan Program
Incentive Type:            Industry Recruitment/Support
Eligible Renewable/Other   Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Thermal Process Heat, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass,
Technologies:              Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Renewable Substitutes for
                           Petroleum-based Chemicals, Anaerobic Digestion, Renewable Fuels
Applicable Sectors:        Commercial, Industrial, Institutional
Amount:                    Varies by project
Max. Limit:                Not specified
Terms:                     Grants: 50% cost-share required; Loans: 4% interest rate for up to 15 years, maximum of 25% of
                           project cost




                                                                                                                    125
Website:                http://commerce.wi.gov/BD/BD-WEIF.html


Summary:
Note: The application deadline for the first round of funding has expired. Check the
program website for information on future rounds of funding

The Wisconsin Energy Independence Fund is a 10-year, $150 million initiative designed to
support the development and commercialization of clean energy technologies in Wisconsin
through grants and loans to businesses and researchers. A total of $15 million is expected to be
awarded annually through three competitive application cycles. Typical awards will range from
$100,000 to $500,000 per project, although no minimum or maximum amounts are specified.
The fund is subject to legislative appropriations, so the availability of funds may change from
year to year. The first round of funding began on April 2, 2008 and applications for all categories
of project must be received by June 2, 2008.

Clean energy includes electrical, mechanical, or thermal energy produced from hydrogen,
biomass, biogas, solar energy, geothermal energy, biofuels, wind energy, or hydroelectric power.
Projects that propose the substitution of renewable chemicals for petroleum derived chemicals
will be considered for funding as well. Three categories of projects will be funded through this
initiative: research and development; commercialization or adoption; and supply chain
development.

Grants: Research and development (R&D) projects are the only category of projects eligible for
grant funding. All grants require at least a 50% cost-share and grant money must be spent in
Wisconsin to where it is practical to do so. The cost share proportion may be met with in kind
contributions of goods and services with a declarable market value. In order to be eligible for a
grant R&D projects must meet the following criteria:
   • Be based on viable science;
   • Propose game-changing or transformational technology;
   • Have a large market potential;
   • Be aligned with state and regional strengths; and
   • Are likely to be commercialized or manufactured in Wisconsin

Low-Interest Loans: Commercialization projects and supply-chain development projects are
both eligible for 4% fixed rate loans with terms of up to 15 years. The term of the loan will vary
according to the project and the how the money will be used. Loans may be used for construction
and expansion projects; for the acquisition of land, buildings, equipment, and existing
businesses; or as working capital. The loans are intended to be "gap financing" and will cover a
maximum of 25% of the project cost. Eligibility criteria for each category are described below.

Commercialization or Adoption
  • Technology should be supported by established science;
  • Have a large market potential;
  • Have growth estimates exceeding industry averages; and
  • Have significant job creation potential




126
Supply Chain Development
   • Should eliminate or reduce market barriers to clean energy technologies;
   • Have a high market penetration potential; and
   • Support clean energy sources with a competitive cost structure to existing non-clean
      energy source options

The target date for awards in the current solicitation is August 2008. Applications under this
program may only be submitted on-line. Interested parties should consult the program website
for additional information on the application process, project evaluation criteria, and application
workshops.

Contact:
 Office of Energy Independence
 Commercialization and Marketing Development
 17 W. Main St., Suite 429
 Madison, WI 53703
 Phone: (608) 264-7651
 Web site:
 http://power.wisconsin.gov/index.asp?locid=131

Focus on Energy - Commercial/Industrial Efficiency Incentives
Incentive Type:      State Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency  Refrigerators/Freezers, Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Chillers,
Technologies:        Furnaces, Boilers, Air conditioners, Compressed air, Programmable
                     Thermostats, Motors, Motor-ASDs/VSDs, Processing and
                     Manufacturing Equipment, Agricultural Equipment, Custom/Others
                     pending approval
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Schools, Local Government, Tribal
                     Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional
Incentive Amount:    Varies by equipment type
Maximum              $500,000 per customer
Incentive:
Equipment            Must meet Focus on Energy's standards for energy efficiency
Requirements:
Installation         Equipment must be purchased and installed by a participating contractor
Requirements:
Expiration Date      12/31/2008
Website:             http://www.focusonenergy.com/Incentives/Business/

Summary:
Focus on Energy offers financial incentives to eligible customers who install qualifying energy-
efficiency equipment. Eligible measures including energy-efficient lighting, motors, compressed
air, HVAC equipment and custom projects such as system or building upgrades, or process
improvements. Incentives are also available for maintaining equipment and studying the
feasibility of a proposed energy-efficiency project. See the program website and application for
details regarding incentive amounts.


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   •   Agricultural Incentives: Prescriptive lighting measures and milk-house equipment on
       dairy farms including scroll compressors, plate coolers, ventilation fans and other
       qualifying equipment.
   •   Compressed Air System Audit and Leak Survey Incentive: Audits, leak surveys and
       qualifying nozzles.
   •   Custom Lighting and HVAC Projects: Incentives on non-prescriptive measures;
       custom incentives must be pre-approved by Focus on Energy prior to project initiation.
   •   Energy Efficient Repulper Rotor Incentive: Qualifying repulper rotors.
   •   Food Service Incentives: Energy Star and other qualifying food service equipment.
   •   Greenhouse Incentives: Qualifying automatic climate controls, poly-film, fans and other
       equipment.
   •   HVAC Incentives: Prescriptive incentives on qualifying HVAC equipment including
       boilers, furnaces, air conditioning, etc.
   •   Lighting Incentives: Prescriptive incentives on qualifying lighting fixtures, lamps,
       occupancy sensors, etc.
   •   Motors and VFD Incentives: Prescriptive incentives on NEMA Premium Efficient
       motors and qualifying variable frequency drives.
   •   Service Buy-Down Incentives: Incentives to buy-down the cost to service equipment
       such as chillers, steam traps and natural gas burners/boilers.
   •   Specialty Measure Incentives: Prescriptive incentives on specific measures such as
       guest room energy management controls, anti-sweat heater controls for refrigerated
       doors, PC control software, vending machines, etc.
   •   Electric Chiller Incentives: Prescriptive incentives on qualifying electric chillers.
   •   To obtain custom incentives, interested applicants must work with a Focus on Energy
       advisor to obtain pre-approval for projects prior to purchasing and installing the
       equipment. The program website contains a general list of eligible custom improvements
       broken down by economic sector. All equipment must be new, and existing equipment
       must be removed (and preferably recycled.) Projects with less than a one-and-a-half-year
       payback are not eligible, while projects with paybacks exceeding 10 years may not
       qualify and are subject to additional review.

Custom electricity incentives are calculated based on first-year energy savings as follows:
   • $0.04/kilowatt-hour and $125/peak kilowatt for electric savings for Tier 1* technologies
   • $0.06/kilowatt-hour and $200/peak kilowatt for Tier 2* technologies
   • Custom therm incentive levels are also calculated based on first-year energy savings:
   • $0.40/therm for Tier 1* technologies
   • $0.60/therm for Tier 2* technologies

Custom incentives are limited to $250,000 per project, and may cover no more than 30% of the
project costs. Overall, an individual customer is limited to $500,000 in incentives.

*For definitions of Tier 1 and Tier 2 technologies and projects, see the program website

Contact:
 Focus on Energy



128
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Focus on Energy - Efficient Heating and Cooling Cash-Back Rewards
Incentive Type:                   State Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency               Water Heaters, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Air
Technologies:                     conditioners, Flue Closure
Eligible Renewable/Other          Geothermal Heat Pumps
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:               Residential
Incentive Amount:                 Varies by equipment type
Equipment Requirements:           Must meet Focus on Energy equipment specifications
Installation Requirements:        Equipment must be purchased and installed by a
                                  participating contractor
Funding Source:                   Public Benefits Fund
Website:                          http://www.focusonenergy.com/Incentives/Residential/Cash-
                                  Back_Rewards/Res-Bus-Heat-Cool/

Summary:
The Focus on Energy Program offers “Cash-Back Rewards” to eligible residents for purchasing
and installing furnaces, air conditioners, boilers, or other energy efficient heating and cooling
equipment. The equipment must meet the program’s efficiency standards and be installed after
July 1, 2007 to be eligible. Equipment should be installed prior to submitting an application and
should come from the list of pre-qualified equipment listed on the program website. Geothermal
heat pumps are included under the furnace and central air conditioning specifications and
incentive levels.

Incentive levels are as follows and vary depending on equipment specifications:
   • Air conditioners (including heat pumps): $100
   • Natural gas furnace: $150
   • Natural gas boiler: $400
   • Water Heaters: $50 - $250
   • Flue Closure: $75

This is an ongoing program without specified expiration date, however, the current program year
runs until December 31, 2008. Please refer to the program website for additional information
about equipment eligibility other restrictions.

Note that customer eligibility for Focus on Energy incentives is based on utility participation;
interested individuals and companies should use the eligibility tool on the program website to
determine if their local utility is participating in the Focus on Energy program.



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Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Focus on Energy - Energy Star Products Cash-Back Rewards
Incentive Type:                      State Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Technologies:    Lighting, Air conditioners
Applicable Sectors:                  Residential
Incentive Amount:                    Water Heaters: $50 - $250; Lighting: $2 - $15 per unit
Equipment Requirements:              Lighting products must be Energy Star qualified;
                                     Water heaters must meet minimum Energy Factor
                                     requirements.
Funding Source:                      Public Benefits Fund
Expiration Date                      12/18/2008 for lighting incentives 12/31/2008 for
                                     water heater incentive
Website:                             http://www.focusonenergy.com/Incentives/Residential/

Summary:
Eligible Wisconsin consumers who purchase and install Energy Star qualified lighting products
and qualifying water heaters are eligible for incentives through the Focus on Energy program.
Reward forms can be downloaded from the program website.


Incentive amounts are as follows:
   • Water heaters: $50 - $150
   • Light bulbs: $2 per bulb
   • Torchieres, fixtures and ceiling fans with light kit: $15 per product

Products must meet minimum efficiency standards in order to qualify for rebates.

Note that customer eligibility for Focus on Energy incentives is based on utility participation;
interested individuals and companies should use the eligibility tool on the program website to
determine if their local utility is participating in the Focus on Energy program.

Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339


130
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Focus on Energy - Home Performance with Energy Star
Incentive Type:      State Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency  Furnaces, Custom/Others pending approval, Yes; specific technologies
Technologies:        not identified
Applicable Sectors: Residential
Incentive Amount:    Varies based on auditor recommendations
Equipment            Eligible measures/equipment determined by auditor recommendations
Requirements:
Funding Source:      Public Benefits Fund
Website:             http://www.focusonenergy.com/Resources/

Summary:
Through the Home Performance with Energy Star program, Focus on Energy offers in-home
energy audits and cash incentives for installing select recommended efficiency measures. Energy
consultants inspect home energy systems, help identify the most effective measures for
increasing home efficiency, and, and assist participants applying for Cash-Back Rewards for the
measures adopted. The incentive amount varies by case and by auditor recommendations.

Focus on Energy also offers Cash-Back Rewards on efficient heating and cooling equipment and
on selected Energy Star products.

Please note that customer eligibility for Focus on Energy incentives is based on utility
participation; interested individuals and companies should use the eligibility tool on the program
web site to determine if their local utility participates in the Focus on Energy program.

Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Focus on Energy - Renewable Energy Cash-Back Rewards
Incentive Type:      State Rebate Program
Eligible             Solar Water Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Non-Residential
Renewable/Other      Wood-Burning Systems
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local
                     Government, Tribal Government, Fed. Government
Incentive Amount:    Varies by technology and type of project



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Maximum                 Varies by technology
Incentive:
Eligible System         Wind: 20 kW maximum; PV: 0.5 kW - 20 kW; Solar hot water and
Size:                   biomass combustion: 5,000 therms/year maximum
Equipment               All systems require a 2-year installation warranty and a 1-year
Requirements:           equipment warranty; Other requirements vary by technology
Installation            All systems must comply with all federal, state and local codes;
Requirements:           Renewable electricity systems must be grid-tied; PV, solar hot water and
                        wind installers must be Focus on Energy full service installers
Ownership of            Remain with customer/generator
Renewable Energy
Credits:
Funding Source:         Public Benefits Fund
Expiration Date         December 31, 2008
Project                 Projects subject to post-installation inspection and performance
Review/Certification    monitoring for up to 2 years
Website:                http://www.focusonenergy.com/Incentives/Renewable

Summary:
Focus on Energy offers Cash-Back Rewards for installing or expanding renewable-energy
systems on businesses and homes. Payments are based on the estimated amount of electricity or
thermal energy produced annually by an eligible system. Eligible non-residential projects include
wind, photovoltaics (PV), solar hot water, and biomass combustion. Eligible residential systems
include wind, PV and solar hot water. All projects must displace natural gas or electricity.

The following maximum incentives and system capacities apply:
   • Wind-energy systems (20 kW or less): 25% of project cost or $35,000.
   • PV systems (0.5 kW - 20 kW): 25% (35% for non-profit and public) of project cost or
       $35,000.
   • Commercial solar hot water systems (5,000 therms or less): 25% (35% for non-profit and
       public) of project cost or $50,000
   • Small residential solar hot water system (250 therms or less): 25% of project cost or
       $2,500
   • Non-residential biomass combustion system: 25% of project cost or $10,000 (5,000
       therms or less); 25% of project cost or $7,500 (3,000 therms or less); 25% of project cost
       or $3,000 (1,000 therms or less);

Customers must be located in the service territory of a participating electric provider or natural
gas provider. Renewable-energy systems must be installed on the property of an eligible
customer. Certain system repairs and additions may be eligible depending on the technology.
Systems that exceed the size limitations described above may be eligible for assistance under the
Focus On Energy Renewable Energy Grant program.

Focus on Energy also offers a site-assessment program for residents and businesses. This
program provides prospective renewable-energy system owners with site-specific information on
how a solar-energy or wind-energy system could meet the owner's energy needs. A site


132
assessment is encouraged for projects seeking Cash-Back Rewards; it is required when applying
for a reward for wind-energy systems. A residential renewable-energy site assessment typically
costs $300 to $400. Homeowners located in the Focus on Energy territory can receive this
service for only 40% of the cost, while Focus on Energy pays the remaining 60%. Likewise,
Focus on Energy may pay up to 50% for a business solar energy site assessment, or up to 100%
for a business wind energy site assessment, which typically costs $400-$600. Reimbursements
for site assessments vary by technology.

Finally, an Energy Star homes or a home that has participated in Home Performance with Energy
Star is eligible for an additional $500 rebate for the purchase of a solar-electric systems or solar
hot water system.

Focus on Energy works with eligible Wisconsin residents and businesses to install cost effective
energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Focus information, resources and financial
incentives help to implement projects that otherwise would not be completed, or to complete
projects sooner than scheduled. Its efforts help Wisconsin residents and businesses manage rising
energy costs, promote in-state economic development, protect our environment and control the
state's growing demand for electricity and natural gas.

Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Focus on Energy - Renewable Energy Grant Programs
Incentive Type:       State Grant Program
Eligible              Solar Water Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Commercial and
Renewable/Other       Industrial Makeup Air Solar Heating, Anaerobic Digestion
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:   Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Local Government,
                      Tribal Government, Fed. Government, Institutional
Amount:               Varies by technology and estimated energy production
Maximum Amount:       $500,000 aggregate for all FOE grants to any individual or business
                      during each fiscal year (July 1, 2007 - Dec. 31, 2008)
Equipment             2-year installation warranty; 1-year equipment warranty; A system
Requirements:         performance meter with an uncertainty of no more than 5% must be
                      included in electric generating systems
Installation          Vary by technology employed. Full details on program website.
Requirements:
Project               Focus on Energy reserves the right to inspect systems and monitor
Review/Certification: performance anytime during the first 2 years.
Funding Source:       Public Benefits Fund


                                                                                               133
Website:                  http://www.focusonenergy.com/Incentives/Renewable/
Effective Date:           Most valid through 12/31/2008, exceptions noted in text

Summary:
Note: The Focus On Energy program occasionally issues limited time offer RFPs for projects
that are not covered under their regular programs. Recent RFPs are listed under the Special
Opportunities section in the summary below. As the time frame behind these special
opportunities is typically short, interested parties should also visit the program website to make
certain a given RFP is still active or to search for additional limited time offers not listed on this
page.

Wisconsin Focus on Energy offers several grant programs to support the development of
renewable energy. Grant recipients and projects must be located in a participating utility's service
territory. The program website above contains an interactive tool to assist people in determining
their eligibility for different programs. Projects should be completed within one year.
Collaboration or partnerships with non-eligible entities are allowed, but the grant must be paid to
an eligible entity. With the exception of dairy farm biogas implementation grants, which have a
proposal deadline of September 30, 2008, all of the regularly offered grants below are valid
through December 31, 2008. The following types of grants are currently available:

Business & Marketing Grants
Business & Marketing Grants provide financial support for developing business skills and
marketing materials for organizations and businesses that provide renewable-energy services.
Grants will be awarded to assist renewable-energy businesses and organizations in developing
business plans, gaining market recognition, understanding their market better, training
employees, gaining certification and other related activities. Grants under this designation will
not be issued for the purpose of purchasing renewable energy equipment or for research and
development activities. Up to 50% of project costs will be funded, with a maximum grant of
$10,000.

Feasibility Study Grants
Feasibility Study Grants provide financial support for assessing the feasibility of using complex,
customer-sited renewable-energy systems. These grants are intended to increase the ability of
businesses or organizations to make informed decisions about using renewable-energy systems
by understanding and solving technical uncertainties. Feasibility study grants do not support the
purchase of renewable energy equipment or research and development activities. Up to 50% of
project costs will be funded, with a maximum grant of $10,000.

Development Grants
Similar to the feasibility study grants listed above this grant provides support for assessing the
feasibility and development activities of customer-sited Biogas Digesters or Biomass
Combustion Systems of greater than 500 kW capacity and/or production more than 750,000
therms/year, and Wind Turbine Projects of between 100 kW and 15 MW. Eligible expenditures
include complex feasibility studies, environmental permitting, financing and other
developmental activities. Funding is available for up to 50% of project costs up to a maximum of
$50,000.



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Implementation Grants
Implementation Grants provide financial support for large renewable-energy projects (greater
than 20 kW or 5,000 therms per year). Grant amounts are based on a calculated estimate of the
quantity of electricity and/or thermal energy the system will produce in one year.

Maximum amounts and system size restrictions for each technology are as follows:
  • Solar Water Heating: 25% (35% for non-profits, state, or local goverments) or $50,000
  • Solar-Electric Systems: 25% (35% for non-profits, state, or local goverments) or $50,000;
     maximum system size of 50 kW
  • Wind-Energy Systems: 35% or $50,000; maximum system size of 100 kW
  • Biomass Combustion, Biogas Digesters: 25% or $250,000; maximum system size of
     750,000 therms/year or 500 kW and maximum project cost of $1.75 million. Dairy farm
     biogas projects that aggregate biogas production from multiple farms may be larger.

Special Opportunities
Renewable Energy Opportunity Grants: This program is very similar to the Implementation
Grant program described above, except that the maximum grant amounts are twice as large and
the proposal evaluation methodology is somewhat different. The program is meant to support
one project for each technology category. Proposals must be submitted by October 29, 2008.

Solar Hot Air Demonstration Grant: This grant provides financial support for the installation of a
solar make-up air heating system. Preference will be given to highly visible building sites at
organizations with an educational mission. Proposals are due October 29, 2008.

Focus on Energy works with eligible Wisconsin residents and businesses to install cost effective
energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Focus information, resources and financial
incentives help to implement projects that otherwise would not be completed, or to complete
projects sooner than scheduled. Its efforts help Wisconsin residents and businesses manage rising
energy costs, promote in-state economic development, protect our environment and control the
state's growing demand for electricity and natural gas. Click here for more details on the overall
funding structure of Focus on Energy.

Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Madison Gas & Electric - Clean Power Partner Solar Buyback Program
Incentive Type:      Production Incentive
Eligible             Photovoltaics
Renewable/Other


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Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:     Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local
                        Government, State Government, Agricultural, Institutional
Amount:                 $0.25/kWh
Terms:                  Must be an MGE Green Power Tomorrow participant at a level at least
                        equivalent to the AC output of the PV system; Eligible system size: 1
                        kW - 10 kW; Only valid for systems installed after March 6, 2007; Other
                        contractual and equipment requirements apply (see summary)
Website:                http://www.mge.com/home/rates/cleanpower.htm

Summary:
Customer generators in the Madison Gas & Electric (MGE) green power purchase program
(Green Power Tomorrow) are eligible to receive a special rate for the power produced from solar
photovoltaic (PV) systems. Under this program, the electricity produced from 1 to 10 kilowatt
(kW) PV systems will be purchased by MGE at a rate of $0.25/kilowatt-hour (kWh). This rate
will apply to all electricity produced by the system, as opposed to net consumption. As the
program is limited to Green Power Tomorrow participants, customers will purchase electricity
from the utility at the normal retail rate plus a $0.01/kWh green power premium. Annual green
energy purchases must be at least as large as the AC output of the PV system. This arrangement
requires that the customer have two electricity meters; one to measure electricity production and
one to measure electricity consumption. MGE will provide the additional meter but the customer
must pay for an electrician to supply and install a two-meter socket and any other modifications
necessary for system function.

Only PV systems installed after March 6, 2007 are eligible for this program. The favorable
purchase rate does not apply to other types of customer-owned renewable energy systems,
however, such systems remain eligible for net metering provided they meet the state
requirements. Participants must sign a 10-year interconnection agreement with MGE and
systems must be designed and installed to comply with Wisconsin interconnection standards.
Any renewable energy credits (RECs), emission allowances, or other environmental attributes
generated by the system over the life of the contract will accrue to MGE rather than the
customer-generator. The overall enrollment for this program is capped at 150 kW.

Further information on this program is available from the program website or through
consultation with the utility.

Contact:
 Madison Gas and Electric
 133 South Blair Street
 Madison, WI 53701-1231
 Phone: (608) 252-7387
 Fax: (608) 252-7098

Madison Gas & Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program
Incentive Type:      Utility Loan Program
Eligible Efficiency  Custom/Others pending approval


136
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:      Commercial, Industrial
Terms:                   Interest rates fixed for one year then adjusted with the prime rate every
                         year on May 1 Terms up to 10 years
Website:                 http://www.mge.com/business/services/financing/

Summary:
Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) offers its business customers a loan for energy efficiency
projects. Customers use a Shared Savings Loan from MGE to finance improvements, with the
money saved from improvements used to offset the cost of repaying money provided by MGE.

Projects must be over $5,000 to qualify and can cover equipment replacements, facility
improvements or new construction. Interest rates are fixed for one year then adjusted with the
prime rate every year on May 1. Participants must satisfy a credit review and provide project
information.

Contact:
 Business Helpline
 Madison Gas and Electric
 133 South Blair Street
 Madison, WI 53701-1231
 Phone: (608) 252-7007
 Phone 2: (608) 252-7000
 Fax: (608) 252-7098
 E-Mail: talksbiz@mge.com
 Web site:
 http://www.mge.com/business/services/financing/

Marshfield Utilities - Commercial/Industrial/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate
Program
Incentive Type:         Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency     Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Chillers, Heat pumps, Air
Technologies:           conditioners, Motors, Custom/Others pending approval
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Agricultural
Incentive Amount:       $200 per kW reduced Ground-source heat pump: $800 Motor rebate: $2-
                        $5/HP
Maximum                 $10,000 per customer, per year (and no more than 100% of project cost)
Incentive:
Equipment               All eligible equipment has mandatory efficiency requirements based on
Requirements:           size and type. See program details for efficiency charts.
Website:                http://marshfieldutilities.org/conservation.htm

Summary:
Marshfield Utilities offers incentives for its commercial, industrial and agricultural customers to
upgrade to more efficient equipment through three different rebate programs: The Lighting
Program, The Cooling Efficiency Improvement Program, and The Customized Energy Incentive


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Program. The rebate amount for all three programs is equal to $200 for every kW reduced
through the incorporation of such measure and a cap is set at $10,000 per year.

Motor and Ground Source Heat Pump rebates are also available for qualified customers.
Incentive amounts for motors range from $2-$5/HP and $800 for ground-source heat pumps.

These incentive programs will be in effect for an indefinite period, but are subject to
modification or cancellation at any time without notice. Customers must request incentives
within one year from purchase date. Customers should check with WECC or call the toll free
number to find out more about the incentive program, its details and timing.

Contact:
 Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation
 Marshfield Reward
 211 S. Paterson St.
 3rd Floor
 Madison, WI 53703
 Phone: (888) 543-8155
 Web site: http://www.weccusa.org/

 Energy Conservation Programs
 Marshfield Utilities
 2000 South Roddis Avenue
 PO Box 670
 Marshfield, WI 54449
 Phone: (715) 387-1195
 Web site: http://www.marshfieldutilities.org

Marshfield Utilities - Energy-Efficient Motor Rebate Program
Incentive Type:         Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency     Motors
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Agricultural
Incentive Amount:       $20/motor - $450/motor, varies by horsepower
Equipment               Motors must meet minimum efficiency ratings, which vary according to
Requirements:           horsepower and speed
Website:                http://marshfieldutilities.org/motorrebateapp.pdf

Summary:
Marshfield Utilities offers a financial incentive for its commercial, industrial and agricultural
customers to purchase energy efficient motors. Rebates are available for qualifying new,
replacement and spare motors, and the exact rebate amount varies according to the motor's
horsepower and speed. It is the responsibility of the customer and installer to ensure that the
motor and the installation of the motor meets all applicable building and local codes. This offer
is available to Marshfield Utilities customers only, for a limited time and may not be combined
with any other utility offer. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis, until


138
allocated funds are spent. This program may be modified or discontinued at any time without
notice.

Contact:
 Motor Rebate Program
 Marshfield Utilities
 2000 South Roddis Avenue
 PO Box 670
 Marshfield, WI 54449
 Phone: (715) 387-1195
 Web site: http://www.marshfieldutilities.org

Marshfield Utilities - Ground-Source Heat Pump Rebate Program
Incentive Type:         Utility Rebate Program
Eligible                Geothermal Heat Pumps
Renewable/Other
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:     Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Agricultural, All Marshfield
                        Utilities Customers
Incentive Amount:       $800
Project                 Inspections will be conducted to verify installation of heat pump at user
Review/Certification: address
Website:                http://marshfieldutilities.org/groundsourceapp.pdf

Summary:
Marshfield Utilities offers an $800 rebate to all its customers who install a ground-source heat
pump. The purchaser must be a customer of the Marshfield Utilities, and the heat pump must be
installed where there is direct Marshfield Electric service. Customers who wish to participate in
this program must complete the heat pump rebate application form and mail it Marshfield
Utilities along with a copy of dated sales receipt.

Contact:
 Ground-Source Heat Pump Program
 Marshfield Utilities
 2000 South Roddis Avenue
 PO Box 670
 Marshfield, WI 54449
 Phone: (715) 387-1195
 Web site: http://www.marshfieldutilities.org

Marshfield Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program
Incentive Type:                    Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency                Clothes Washers/Dryers, Dishwasher, Refrigerators/Freezers,
Technologies:                      Dehumidifiers, Lighting, Furnaces, Boilers, Air conditioners,
                                   Shade Trees



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Applicable Sectors:                Residential
Incentive Amount:                  Compact Fluorescent Bulbs: $2 per bulb Torchiere Lamps:
                                   $15 Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $25 Freezer: $50
                                   Room Air Conditioner: $25 Dishwasher: $15 Dehumidifier:
                                   $25 Central A/C: $100 - $200, varies by efficiency rating
                                   Furnaces with an “ECM” Fan Motor: $150 Boilers: $150 -
                                   $200 Shade Trees: $40 - $75
Equipment Requirements:            Appliances and Lighting Equipment: Must be ENERGY
                                   STAR rated Central A/C: Minimum SEER rating of 14
                                   Boilers: Minimum 90% AFUE
Expiration Date:                   12/31/2008
Project Review/Certification:      Marshfield Utilities reserves the right to verify sales receipts
                                   and/or installation of products and services before issuing
                                   incentives.
Website:                           http://www.marshfieldutilities.org/energyconsvbrochure2007-
                                   08.pdf

Summary:
Marshfield Utilities offers cash-back rewards to its residential customers who install qualified
ENERGY STAR products in their homes through their Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate
Program. As part of this program, Marshfield Utilities also offers rebates for qualified shade
trees planted around their customers' homes. The products must be purchased and installed
between July 1, 2007 and December 31, 2008 to qualify for the rebate. To apply for this rebate
mail the application to ENERGY STAR Appliances c/o Marshfield Reward.

Contact:
 ENERGY STAR Appliances
 Marshfield Reward
 211 S. Paterson St.
 3rd Floor
 Madison, WI 53703
 Phone: (888) 543-8155
 Web site: http://www.energystar.gov

 Energy Conservation Programs
 Marshfield Utilities
 2000 South Roddis Avenue
 PO Box 670
 Marshfield, WI 54449
 Phone: (715) 387-1195
 Web site: http://www.marshfieldutilities.org

Riverland Energy Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program
Incentive    Utility Rebate Program
Type:
Eligible     Water Heaters, Lighting, Heat pumps, Air conditioners


140
Efficiency
Technologi
es:
Incentive     Varies by technology
Amount:
Website:      http://www.riverlandenergy.com/RIVERLAND%20HOMEPAGE/commercial/in
              centives.htm

Summary:
Riverland Energy Cooperative is a member-owned electric utility serving customers in the
Wisconsin counties of Trempealeau, Buffalo, and La Crosse. To encourage energy efficiency
amongst its commercial customers, Riverland offers a number of rebates for the purchase and
installation of lighting measures, air conditioners, heat pumps and water heaters that meet
minimum standards of energy efficiency. For more information on how to apply for these
rebates, contact a customer service representative at Riverland.

Contact:
 Riverland Energy Cooperative
 P.O. Box 277
 Arcadia, WI 54612
 Phone: (608) 323-3381
 Phone 2: (800) 411-9115
 Web site: http://www.riverlandenergy.com

Solar and Wind Energy Equipment Exemption
Incentive Type:     Property Tax Exemption
Eligible            Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat, Solar Thermal Electric,
Renewable/Other     Photovoltaics, Wind, Solar Pool Heating
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Residential
Amount:             100%
Max. Limit:         None
Website:            http://www.revenue.wi.gov/forms/govexmpt/pr-303.pdf
Authority 1:        Wis. Stat. § 70.111(18)
Authority 2:        Wis. Adm. Code Tax 12.50

Summary:
In Wisconsin, any value added by a solar-energy system or a wind-energy system is exempt from
general property taxes. A solar-energy system is defined as "equipment which directly converts
and then transfers or stores solar energy into usable forms of thermal or electrical energy, but
does not include equipment or components that would be present as part of a conventional
energy system or a system that operates without mechanical means." A wind-energy system is
defined as "equipment which converts and then transfers or stores energy from the wind into
usable forms of energy, but does not include equipment or components that would be present as
part of a conventional energy system." Passive solar design elements do not qualify under these



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rules. The exemption applies regardless of whether the equipment is deemed real property or
personal property.

Contact:
 Wisconsin Department of Revenue
 Division of Research and Policy
 2135 Rimrock Road
 P.O. Box 8933, Mail Stop 6-73
 Madison, WI 52708-8933
 Phone: (608) 266-5773
 Phone 2: (608) 266-2700
 Fax: (608) 261-6240
 E-Mail: paul.ziegler@revenue.wi.gov
 Web site: http://www.revenue.wi.gov/index.html

We Energies - Biogas Buy-Back Rate
Incentive Type:                    Production Incentive
Eligible Renewable/Other           Biomass, Anaerobic Digestion
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:                Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools,
                                   Local Government, Agricultural, Institutional
Amount:                            $0.155 per kilowatt-hour (15.5¢/kWh) for on-peak
                                   generation; $0.040 per kilowatt-hour (4.0¢/kWh) for off-
                                   peak generation
Terms:                             Available to systems up to 1 MW in capacity; maximum
                                   aggregate capacity limit of 10 MW
Website:                           http://www.we-
                                   energies.com/business_new/altenergy/custgen.htm#terms

Summary:
We Energies, an investor-owned utility serving portions of Wisconsin and Michigan, offers to
purchase electricity and associated renewable energy credits generated by anaerobic digesters
owned by its Wisconsin customers. Under a 15-year contract,* eligible customers will receive
$0.155 per kilowatt-hour (15.5¢/kWh) for electricity generated on-peak and $0.040 per kilowatt-
hour (4.0¢/kWh) for electricity generated off-peak. The on-peak period is defined as the period
from 9 AM to 9 PM on Monday through Friday, excluding certain legal holidays. Anaerobic
digesters may use animal waste from farm operations, waste from industrial food processes, or
waste from municipal wastewater-treatment facilities.

The utility provides a second meter to determine system output. During months where customer
energy production exceeds consumption, a credit will be applied to the customer's utility bill
equal to the net excess dollars. The customer will receive a check whenever the credit exceeds
$25. Participating customers must comply with applicable national, state and local electrical
codes, rules and regulations; the electric service rules and regulations of We Energies; the
requirements of Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter PSC 119; the state's Distributed



142
Generation Interconnection Agreement, and the "Energy for Tomorrow" Power Partner Program
Agreement.

The program is limited to systems up to 1 megawatt (MW) in capacity and has a total aggregate
limit of 10 megawatts (MW). It was approved by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin
(PSC) in January 2006 and took effect shortly afterward. The tariff is scheduled to expire on
December 31, 2009 or whenever the total aggregate capacity limit is reached.

* Customers have the option of remaining on the tariff for up to 15 years. Participating
customers with anaerobic digesters may opt out of a contract, but We Energies may not opt out.

Contact:
 Customer Contact Center
 We Energies
 231 W. Michigan St., P318
 Milwaukee, WI 53202
 Phone: (800) 714-7777
 Web site: http://www.we-energies.com

We Energies - Custom Energy Efficiency Incentive Program
Incentive Type:     Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Custom/Others pending approval
Technologies:
Applicable          Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Institutional
Sectors:
Equipment           Peak demand savings are required. Peak demand is defined as savings
Requirements:       occurring between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, from June
                    through August
Project             Prior approval is required for incentive eligibility. Once approved, the
Review/Certificati applicant has 120 days to complete the project and submit a Project
on:                 Completion Form. Failure to complete the project within 120 days may
                    result in loss of incentive payment. Written extensions may be granted
                    contingent on scope, complexity and equipment lead time.
Website:            http://www.we-
                    energies.com/business_new/energyeff/efficiency_incentives/custom_incen
                    tprog.htm

Summary:
We Energies Custom Incentive Program offers cash incentives to nonresidential customers for
approved projects using technologies not covered by We Energies' Prescriptive Incentive
Program. Partial funding of feasibility studies and comprehensive energy audits also may be
eligible for this rebate. To apply for this rebate, send the application form to the address specified
at bottom of the application. Applications must be returned before any work associated with
project is started and before equipment is purchased. The project must be completed within 120
of the application's submittal. In certain cases a written request for an extension may be granted,
depending on the scope and complexity of the project and equipment lead times.


                                                                                                143
In addition, the Focus on Energy program, in conjunction with We Energies, also provides
incentives through the Commercial and Industrial New Construction program. Financial
incentives and technical assistance are available to impact design with the goal of achieving a
20-30 % greater building energy efficiency over that of standard building practices. For more
information regarding this program, visit the program website.

Contact:
 We Energies
 231 W. Michigan St., P318
 Milwaukee, WI 532013
 Phone: (888) -60-3-55
 Web site: http://www.we-energies.com

We Energies - Direct Financial Incentives for Not-for-Profits
Incentive Type:       Utility Grant Program
Eligible              Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Anaerobic
Renewable/Other       Digestion, Small Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Tribal
                      Government
Amount:               $10,000 - $100,000
Max. Limit:           $100,000
Terms:                Systems must be manufactured and installed in compliance with the
                      latest edition of the National Electric Code. Systems must be installed by
                      a "Full-Service Installer" approved by Focus on Energy. PV and wind-
                      energy projects must undergo a site-assessment prior to proposal
                      submission.
Website:              http://www.we-
                      energies.com/business_new/altenergy/dirfinance_incent.htm
Effective Date:       05/13/2008 (current RFP)
Expiration Date:      10/30/2009

Summary:
We Energies, a Wisconsin-based investor-owned utility, offers certain customers grants ranging
from $10,000 to $100,000 to support the installation of renewable energy projects. As part of the
utility's Renewable Energy Development Program, the Direct Financial Incentives Program is
available to nonprofits (including schools and academic institutions) and units of government
(including special districts and authorities defined as government entities under Wisconsin law).
An award will cover up to 50% of a project's total installed cost, less any federal or state
government incentive or credit, and less any funding from Wisconsin Focus on Energy. In most
cases, customers retain ownership of the renewable-energy credits (RECs) associated with the
generation of electricity using eligible renewables. The following conditions apply:
     • Proposed photovoltaic (PV) and wind projects must have a site-assessment completed,
         preferably though the Focus on Energy Site Assessment Program or an equivalent
         program.


144
   •   All renewable energy systems must be manufactured and installed in compliance with all
       requirements of the latest edition of the National Electric Code (American National
       Standards Institute/National Fire Protection Association-70).
   •   Project installations must be completed by a "Full-Service Installer" approved by Focus
       on Energy.
   •   All installations must comply with Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter PSC 119 for
       interconnecting distributed generation facilities.
   •   All projects must include a strong and clearly identified outreach and educational
       component that will be used to inform and educate the public in an ongoing manner.
   •   The May 2008 Request for Proposals (RFP) from We Energies lists a total of nine rounds
       of funding. The application deadlines for each round of potential funding are as follows:
       o Round 1: May 30, 2008
       o Round 2: July 25, 2008
       o Round 3: September 30, 2008
       o Round 4: December 5, 2008
       o Round 5: February 27, 2009
       o Round 6: April 24, 2009
       o Round 7: June 27, 2009
       o Round 8: August 25, 2009
       o Round 9: October 30, 2009

See the program web site for more information, to view the current solicitation, or to find out
about the next round of funding.



Contact:
 We Energies
 Customer Incentives for Renewable Generating
 Facilities
 231 W. Michigan St., P318
 Milwaukee, WI 53203
 Phone: (800) 714-7777
 Web site: http://www.we-energies.com

We Energies - Livestock and Dairy Farm Electrical Re-wiring Program
Incentive Type:                             Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Technologies:           Electric Re-wiring
Applicable Sectors:                         Agricultural
Incentive Amount:                           Dairy Farm Customers: We Energies will pay
                                            first $1,000, and then 50% of remaining costs
                                            All Livestock Farm Customers: 50% total cost
                                            of project Rebates available for installation of
                                            new energy efficiency items
Maximum Incentive:                          Dairy Farm Customers: $6,000 Livestock Farm
                                            Customers: $2,000


                                                                                              145
Website:                                          http://www.we-
                                                  energies.com/agricultureservices/index.htm

Summary:
Any We Energies dairy farm customer can apply for assistance with a re-wiring project. We
Energies would pay the first $1,000 of the project and 50 percent of remaining costs up to a total
grant of $6,000. Qualified dairy farms can also receive up to $20,000 in financing from We
Energies at 3% interest to cover the remaining costs.

Additionally, any We Energies livestock farm customer, including dairy farmers, can apply for
assistance with a re-wiring project through a separate rebate program. To qualify for this
program, the project must be able to reduce the possibility of stray voltage from on-farm sources.
With this plan, We Energies reimburses up to 50 percent of an electrical re-wiring project, up to
a maximum of $2,000.

Contact:
 We Energies
 Agricultural Services
 1300 Janesville Ave.
 Fort Atkinson , WI 53538
 Phone: (920) 723-1778
 Web site: http://www.we-
 energies.com/agricultureservices

We Energies - Multi-family, Non-Profit, and Small Business Energy Efficiency Rebate
Program
Incentive Type:                   Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Technologies: Water Heaters, Lighting, Chillers, Boilers, Steam-system
                                  upgrades, Programmable Thermostats, Energy Mgmt.
                                  Systems/Building Controls, Motors, Custom/Others
                                  pending approval, Energy Evaluation, Custom Lighting,
                                  LED Exit Signs
Applicable Sectors:               Nonprofit, Multi-Family Residential, Small Business
Expiration Date:                  Valid for projects completed by Nov. 30, 2008. Forms
                                  must be submitted within 30 days of project completion
                                  and no later than Dec. 31, 2008
Website:                          http://www.we-
                                  energies.com/propertymanager_new/multifamily_prog.htm

Summary:
We Energies offers an Energy Incentive Program that serves Multi-Family, Non-
Profit/Charitable, and Small Business customers and provides incentives to to install eligible
technologies, including boiler controls, water heating improvements, steam trap replacements
and common area lighting improvements. Custom Incentives are also offered and designed to
meet the needs of customers for projects that are more complicated or incorporate alternative



146
technologies to those offered under the standard offer incentives. Pre-approval is necessary for
Custom Incentives but not for standard offer incentives.

Incentives will only be rewarded for standard measure energy-saving technologies or pre-
approved custom projects providing natural gas or peak demand electric savings. Peak demand
for electric measures is defined as savings occurring between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through
Friday, from June through August.

For more information and application details, please visit the program website listed above.

Contact:
 We Energies
 231 W. Michigan St., P318
 Milwaukee, WI 532013
 Phone: (877) 255-2850
 Web site: http://www.we-energies.com

We Energies - Prescriptive Incentive Program
Incentive Type:     Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Air
Technologies:       conditioners, Heat recovery, Steam-system upgrades, Compressed air,
                    Motor-ASDs/VSDs, Food Service Equipment, Energy Recovery
                    Ventilator, Repulper Rotor
Applicable          Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Construction, Institutional
Sectors:
Incentive           Boilers: $150 - $250 per unit, varies by type Furnaces: $150 per unit A/C:
Amount:             Varies by size and type Chillers: Varies by size and type Lighting: $2 -
                    $120/fixture, $15-$30/sensor Motors: $2/HP - $5/HP, varies by system
                    size VFDs: $50/HP VSD Air Compressors: $70/HP Energy Recovery
                    Ventilators (ERV): $1.25/CFM Food Service Equipment: Varies widely by
                    type
Maximum             HVAC Equipment: $40,000 per project Compressed Air: $20,000 Chillers:
Incentive:          $25,000 per project Lighting: $25,000 per project Motors: $25,000 per
                    project There is a maximum limit of $500,000 per corporate Tax ID per
                    year for all Focus on Energy incentives among all custom or prescriptive
                    applications.
Expiration Date:    Projects must be implemented by 12/31/08 and invoices must be delivered
                    no later than January 30, 2009.
Project             Program staff may conduct an inspection of the facility to survey installed
Review/Certificati equipment.
on:
Website:            http://www.we-
                    energies.com/business_new/energyeff/efficiency_incentives/effincent_me
                    dlrg_wi.htm

Summary:


                                                                                               147
We Energies Prescriptive Incentive Program offers cash rebates for the purchase of energy
efficient technologies that will replace older, less efficient technologies. Eligible projects include
new compressed air measures, HVAC, lighting, energy recovery ventilators (ERV), and motors.
With the exception of ERV installations, all equipment eligible for a prescriptive rebate must be
replacing older, less efficient equipment on a one-to-one basis. Applicants must submit rebate
applications within 30 days of their project's completion to qualify for the rebates. Projects that
do not match the technologies identified in the Prescriptive Incentive Program or are not one-for-
one replacements are encouraged to consider the Custom Incentive Program. Additional program
guidelines apply, please carefully read the terms listed on the rebate applications to ensure
eligibility.

The Focus on Energy program, in conjunction with We Energies, also provides incentives
through the Commercial and Industrial New Construction program. Financial incentives and
technical assistance are available to impact design with the goal of achieving a 20-30 % greater
building energy efficiency over that of standard building practices. For more information
regarding this program, visit the program website.

In addition to equipment rebates, We Energies will also contribute money to buy-down the cost
of chiller, natural gas burner/boiler, and steam trap maintenance. This incentive is capped at
$2,000 per system, or $40,000 per project. We Energies will also provide up to $20,000 for
compressed air system audits and leak surveys.

Contact:
 We Energies
 Energy Incentives
 PO Box 304
 Port Washington, WI 53074
 Phone: (888) 603-5519

We Energies - Solar Buy-Back Rate
Incentive Type:       Production Incentive
Eligible              Photovoltaics
Renewable/Other
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Agricultural,
                      Institutional
Amount:               $0.225 per kilowatt-hour (22.5¢/kWh); 10-year contract
Maximum               No maximum specified
Incentive:
Terms:                System capacity must be between 1.5 kW - 100 kW DC; aggregate
                      capacity of all participating systems is 1 MW; must comply with
                      applicable national, state and local electrical codes, rules and
                      regulations; electric service rules and regulations of We Energies;
                      requirements of Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter PSC 119; the
                      state's Distributed Generation Interconnection Agreement, and "Energy
                      for Tomorrow" Power Partner Program Agreement


148
Website:                http://www.we-
                        energies.com/business_new/altenergy/custgen.htm#terms
Effective Date:         10/1/2005
Expiration Date:        9/30/2011

Summary:
We Energies, a utility serving portions of Wisconsin and Michigan, offers to purchase electricity
and the associated renewable energy credits (RECs) generated by Wisconsin customers with
qualifying solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Under a 10-year contract,* We Energies purchases
100% of the system output at a rate of 22.5¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for electricity generated.
PV systems must have a rated capacity of at least 1.5 kilowatts (kW) and not more than 100 kW
to be eligible. Customers will receive a monthly credit for the energy and RECs sold to We
Energies, and will receive a check whenever any net accumulated amount exceeds $100.
Customers participating in this program may not net meter.

The program, which began operation October 2005, initially allowed customers to begin
participating until September 2008 or until the program reached a total of 500 kilowatts (kW) of
installed PV capacity. However, We Energies gained approval from the Public Service
Commission of Wisconsin for an expansion of their existing solar buy-back rate effective May
14, 2007. The cap has now been increased to 1,000 kW, and eligible customers may enroll in this
experimental tariff through September 30, 2011, for a 10-year term. All other program terms
remain the same.

Participating customers must comply with applicable national, state and local electrical codes,
rules and regulations; the electric service rules and regulations of We Energies; the requirements
of Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter PSC 119; the state's Distributed Generation
Interconnection Agreement, and the "Energy for Tomorrow" Power Partner Program Agreement.

A second meter is required in order to measure a PV system's output. Customers on a time-of-use
(TOU) tariff must pay $2.50 per month for the additional meter; other customers must pay $1.00
per month. Additional meter charges may apply for systems greater than 40 kW in capacity. The
minimum monthly charge under this program is the applicable facilities charge, plus the meter
charge. There is no separate facilities charge for customers with PV systems 20 kW or less.
(Note that these facility charges apply to customers selling electricity to the We Energies. The
charges are in addition to the normal monthly facilities charge applicable to the rate schedule
under which the customer takes electric service as a purchaser from the company.)

System owners must enroll in the utility's "Energy for Tomorrow" program, a green-power
program that allows customers the option to pay an additional sum on their monthly bills to
support renewable energy. We Energies will use the solar electricity purchased from customers
with PV systems to supply a portion of the energy sold under the "Energy for Tomorrow"
program.

Application information, the revised tariff sheet, and other information on We Energies
renewable energy programs can be found online at the program website shown above.




                                                                                             149
*We Energies will honor contracts of up to 10 years. Participating customers with PV systems
may opt out of a contract, but We Energies may not opt out.

Contact:
 Customer Contact Center
 We Energies
 231 W. Michigan St., P318
 Milwaukee, WI 53202
 Phone: (800) 714-7777
 Web site: http://www.we-energies.com

We Energies - Solar Thermal Incentives for Non-Profits
Incentive Type:                      Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Renewable/Other             Solar Water Heat
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:                  Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State
                                     Government, Tribal Government, Institutional
Incentive Amount:                    Dollar-for-dollar match of Focus On Energy incentive
Maximum Incentive:                   $50,000
Eligible System Size:                No specified limits, but incentives are capped
Equipment Requirements:              Systems require a 2-year installation warranty and a 1-
                                     year equipment warranty; Systems and/or components
                                     must be SRCC certified
Installation Requirements:           Must be installed by a Focus On Energy listed Full
                                     Service Solar Hot Water System Installer
Ownership of Renewable Energy        Remain with customer/generator
Credits:
Project Review/Certification:        Projects subject to post-installation inspection and
                                     performance monitoring by Focus On Energy
                                     personnel for up to 2 years.
Website:                             http://www.we-
                                     energies.com/business_new/altenergy/solar_incent.htm

Summary:
We Energies offers an incentive for non-profits, schools, and governmental organizations within
its service territory that wish to install solar water heating systems. The program acts as a dollar-
for-dollar matching rebate for qualified solar water heating projects that receive funding from the
state Focus On Energy Solar Water Heating Cash Back Rewards Program (smaller systems) or
the Focus On Energy Solar Water Heating Implementation Grant Program (larger systems). In
order to be eligible, you must be a We Energies electric customer and systems must displace
fuels or electricity and comply with all related Focus On Energy equipment and installation
requirements.

Applications for both programs must be submitted to Focus On Energy at the same time. An
organization may receive incentives from We Energies for only one solar water heating system



150
per year. We Energies will issue the incentive payment upon receiving notice from Focus On
Energy that the project is completed and all invoices have been paid in full.

Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

 We Energies
 231 W. Michigan St., P318
 Milwaukee, WI 53202
 Web site: http://www.we-energies.com

Xcel Energy - Farm Rewiring Incentives
Incentive Type:                        Utility Grant Program
Eligible Efficiency Technologies:      Agricultural Equipment
Applicable Sectors:                    Agricultural
Amount:                                Varies
Max. Limit:                            Maximum grant of $8,000
Website:                               http://www.xcelenergy.com/XLWEB/CDA/0,3080,1-
                                       1-2_738_31756-6730-11_192_352-0,00.html

Summary:
Xcel Energy provides an incentive to help its agricultural customers install safer and more
energy efficient electrical wiring. Xcel will cover 100% of the first $1,000 of expenses, and 50%
of the remaining costs up to $8,000. Projects must be pre-approved to qualify for funding.
Participant must be an Xcel Energy electric agricultural customer in Wisconsin with an active
livestock farm approved by Xcel. This incentive may be combined with a similar rewiring loan
program offered by the utility.

See the program guidelines for more information.

Contact:
 Customer Service
 414 Nicollet Mall
 Minneapolis, MN 55401-1993
 Phone: (800) 895-4999
 Phone 2: (800) 481-4700
 Web site: http://www.xcelenergy.com

Xcel Energy - Farm Rewiring Loan Program
Incentive Type:                      Utility Loan Program


                                                                                            151
Eligible Efficiency Technologies:          Agricultural Equipment
Applicable Sectors:                        Agricultural
Terms:                                     Amounts from $1,000 to $19,000 at 3% interest for
                                           up to 5 years. Participant must be an Xcel Energy
                                           electric agricultural customer in Wisconsin with an
                                           active livestock farm approved by Xcel.
Website:                                   http://www.xcelenergy.com/XLWEB/CDA/0,3080,1-
                                           1-2_738_31756-6730-11_192_352-0,00.html

Summary:
Xcel Energy operates the farm rewiring loan program to help its agricultural customers install
safer and more energy efficient electrical wiring. The loan program charges 3% interest with
terms of up to 5 years. Loans can only be used to cover costs not already covered by other
programs such as those offered by Wisconsin Focus on Energy. The loans may also be combined
with a similar rewiring grant program offered by the utility. Energy conservation measures
recommended or pre-approved with a rewiring project may also be eligible for Xcel's farm
rewiring grants.

Closing costs are limited to $200 and will be financed through the loan proceeds. See the
program guidelines for more information.

Contact:
 Customer Service
 414 Nicollet Mall
 Minneapolis, MN 55401-1993
 Phone: (800) 895-4999
 Phone 2: (800) 481-4700
 Web site: http://www.xcelenergy.com

Xcel Energy - Renewable Energy Buy-Back Rates
Incentive Type:     Production Incentive
Eligible            Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Geothermal
Renewable/Other     Electric, Anaerobic Digestion, Small Hydroelectric, Tidal Energy, Wave
Technologies:       Energy, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Agricultural,
                    Institutional
Amount:             Wind: $0.066/kWh (6.6¢/kWh) Biogas/Biomass: $0.073/kWh
                    (7.3¢/kWh) Other: Negotiated on case-by-case basis
Maximum             None specified
Incentive:
Terms:              10-year contract period; Minimum system size of 20 kW, maximum of
                    800 kW for biomass/biogas and 1 MW for other technologies;
                    Aggregate capacity limit of 0.25% retail sales for previous year (total for
                    all technologies)
Authority 1:        Advanced Renewable Energy Purchase Tariff
Effective Date:     01/09/2008


152
Summary:
Xcel Energy, an investor-owned utility offering services in eight states, will purchase 100% of
the electricity and associated renewable energy credits (RECs) generated by its Wisconsin
customers using qualifying renewable energy systems. The purchase will take the form of a 10-
year, fixed rate contract between the customer and the utility. Distributed generation systems
must use a renewable resource and have an initial placed in service date of no earlier than
January 1, 2008*. Renewable resources are defined as all resources eligible under the Wisconsin
RPS (Wis. Stat. § 196.378(1)(h)), except refuse-derived fuels. This definition includes wind,
solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal electric, biomass, biogas, fuel cells using renewable fuels,
geothermal electric, tidal, wave, and small hydroelectric systems.

Predetermined purchase prices have been set for wind systems ($0.0660/kWh) and
biomass/biogas systems ($0.073/kWh), while rates for other technologies will be negotiated on a
case-by-case basis between the utility and the customer generator. The minimum system size is
20 kilowatts (kW), meaning that this program is available for systems too large to be eligible for
net metering in Wisconsin. The maximum size is 800 kW for biomass/biogas systems and 1 MW
for all other technologies. All systems must meet the state interconnection requirements and be
connected to the grid at a voltage of 50 kV or less.

The customer is responsible for the installation of a separate electric meter and all other
associated equipment and installation costs. The tariff also contains monthly metering charges
for different sized systems.

The program, which is described as "experimental" by Xcel Energy, will remain open until
aggregate subscriptions account for 0.25% of previous year retail sales.
*Note: The attached tariff lists January 1, 2005 as the initial placed in-service date; however
this has been confirmed as an error with Xcel Energy personnel.

Contact:
 Xcel Energy Services
 Regulatory Policy
 10 East Doty, Suite 511
 Madison , WI 53703
 Phone: (608) 280-7308
 Fax: (715) 839-2602

Xcel Energy - Residential Conservation Programs
Incentive Type:                         Utility Rebate Program
Eligible Efficiency Technologies:       Water Heaters, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps,
                                        Programmable Thermostats, Electric Thermal
                                        Storage
Applicable Sectors:                     Residential
Incentive Amount:                       Varies by technology
Maximum Incentive:                      Varies by technology
Eligible System Size:                   Water heater must be 80 gallons or more


                                                                                              153
Website:                                    http://www.xcelenergy.com/XLWEB/CDA/0,3080,1-
                                            1-2_738_27102-24416-11_192_352-0,00.html

Summary:
Xcel Energy offers its Wisconsin residential customers rebates for high efficiency appliances and
systems. Currently, rebates are available for high efficiency electric water heaters, electric
thermal storage and high efficiency gas furnaces and boilers. The water heater rebate is only
available to those who do not live in an area with Xcel gas, and the customer should be on one of
the Xcel Energy time-of-use programs.

In addition to these rebates, Xcel Energy offers special rates for off-peak hours through the
Optional Off Peak Rate program. Customers that enroll are eligible for a lower electric rate
during off peak hours, between 9pm and 7am. Finally, Xcel Energy offers the Saver's Switch
program for residential customers, which pays customers a bill credit for agreeing to have their
air conditioner cycled on and off during peak hours in the summer months.

Contact:
 Xcel Energy
 P.O. Box 8
 Eau Claire, WI 54702-0008
 Phone: (800) 895-4999
 Web site: http://www.xcelenergy.com


Rules, Regulations & Policies
Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings
Incentive Type:       Energy Standards for Public Buildings
Eligible Efficiency   Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building, Specific technologies not
Technologies:         identified
Eligible              Passive Solar Space Heat, Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat,
Renewable/Other       Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Geothermal Heat Pumps,
Technologies:         CHP/Cogeneration, Bio-gas, Daylighting, Small Hydroelectric
Applicable Sectors:   State Government
Goal:                 10% reduction by 2008 in energy use in state buildings, based on the
                      fiscal year 2005 state energy baseline
Equipment/Products: Equipment must meet standards that meet or exceed federal EPA
                      standards, federal energy management standards, and/or standards
                      established by the American society of heating, refrigerating, and air-
                      conditioning engineers.
Requirement:          Use of LEED or comparable guidelines for all new buildings, additions
                      and retrofit projects for state buildings
Authority 1:          S.B. 459 (2005)
Date Enacted:         03/17/2006
Effective Date:       04/01/2006
Authority 2:          Executive Order 145 (2006)
Date Enacted:         04/11/2006


154
Summary:
On March 17, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act,
which aims to increase the use of renewable energy and improve energy efficiency in state
buildings in Wisconsin. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of
Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy efficiency standards for all
equipment for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, water heating or cooling, lighting,
refrigeration, or other function that consumes energy. These standards must meet or exceed
federal EPA standards, federal energy management standards, and standards established by the
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers. If no standard
exists for a given type of equipment, or if equipment meeting those standards is not available, the
department will ensure that all buildings and equipment purchased for those buildings maximize
energy efficiency to the extent technically and economically feasible. No purchasing agency or
authority may purchase equipment that does not meet these requirements.

In addition to developing these standards, the DOA must review the state energy conservation
code and institute rules that promote energy conservation in the design and construction of public
buildings. Under this Act, each of the six largest state agencies is also required to submit a
biannual report detailing plans for energy cost reduction in the facilities it occupies. Geothermal
technologies in space and water heating must also be used whenever technically and
economically feasible.

Furthermore, on April 11, 2006, Wisconsin’s governor signed Executive Order 145, which
directs the DOA to set energy efficiency goals for state facilities, office buildings or complexes,
and campuses for fiscal years 2007, 2008, and 2009 by July 30, 2006. These goals should work
to reduce overall energy use per square foot by 10% by 2008 and 20% by 2010, based on the
fiscal year 2005 state energy baseline adjusted for weather. The Department should also establish
programs for energy use analysis of state-owned buildings, and new state facilities are required
to be 30% more efficient than commercial code. In addition, state agencies must examine the
feasibility of energy performance contracting. According to Governor Doyle's Clean Energy
Wisconsin Plan, state agencies and universities reduced energy consumption by 7.2% per square
foot from 2005-2007 and are on track to meet the 2008 goal of a 10% reduction.

Under the Executive Order 145, the DOA is also required to develop sustainable building
guidelines based on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED*) rating system
and that recognize the use of forest products certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC),
American Tree Farm System (ATFS), and Sustainable Forest Initiative (SFI). These guidelines
apply to the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of all new construction,
additions, and retrofit projects in state buildings. Click here to view the most recent revision of
the DOA's Sustainable Facilities Design Guidelines.

Finally, Executive Order 145 directs the DOA to pursue demonstration projects at state facilities,
including the Capitol and Executive Residence, regarding the use of photovoltaic and other
renewable technologies to generate electricity and the use of alternative fuels for heating and
cooling.




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*Click here for more information on the United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in
Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System.

Contact:
 General Information
 State of Wisconsin Department of Administration
 Division of State Facilities
 101 E. Wilson St.
 Madison, WI 53702
 Phone: (608) 266-2731
 Fax: (608) 261-2291
 Web site:
 http://www.doa.state.wi.us/category.asp?linkcatid
 =773&linkid=58&locid=4

Focus on Energy Program
Incentive Type:      Public Benefits Fund
Eligible Efficiency  Yes; specific technologies not identified
Technologies:
Eligible             Solar Water Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Commercial and
Renewable/Other      Industrial Makeup Air Solar Heating, Anaerobic Digestion
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Residential, General Public/Consumer, Local
                     Government, Tribal Government, Fed. Government, Institutional
Types:               Renewables, energy efficiency, low-income energy assistance
Total Fund:          $94 million (July 2007 - December 2008), approximately 10% allocated
                     towards renewable energy
Charge:              Beginning 7/1/07, each utility is required to spend 1.2% of its annual
                     operating revenue on efficiency and renewables.
Website:             http://www.focusonenergy.com
Authority 1:         Wis. Stat. § 16.957
Date Enacted:        10/27/1999
Authority 2:         Wis. Stat. § 196.374
Date Enacted:        03/17/2006 (Act 141 Amendments)
Effective Date:      07/01/2007
Authority 3:         Chapter PSC 137
Effective Date:      08/01/2007

Summary:
Wisconsin's public benefits fund (PBF), created by Act 9 of 1999, supports energy efficiency and
renewable energy, while also providing energy assistance for low-income residents. The fund
was restructured in March 2006 by S.B. 459 (2005 Act 141). This law, most of which took effect
July 1, 2007, replaced existing PBF programs with programs that utilities create and fund
through contracts with private program administrators, with oversight and approval by the PSC.
Because Act 141 requires utilities to pay directly for PBF programs, the state will not be able to
transfer or otherwise use these funds for general obligations. (From 2002 to 2006, the governor


156
and legislature transferred or reallocated more than $108 million from the PBF to the state's
general fund or for other uses.)

Wisconsin utilities contract with the Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation (WECC),
which administers the residential, business and renewable energy programs. The Energy Center
of Wisconsin administers the Environmental and Economic R&D program. Collectively, the
energy efficiency, renewable energy, and research components comprise the Focus on Energy
initiative. Focus on Energy provides information, financial assistance, technical assistance and
other services to residents, businesses, schools, institutions and local governments. Financial
assistance takes the form of rebates, grants and loans.

Under Act 141, each electric utility and natural-gas utility is required to spend 1.2% of the latest
3-year average of its gross operating revenue on energy-efficiency programs and renewable-
resource programs. The PSC is authorized to specify a higher funding level and utilities will
recover the cost through rates. With PSC approval, a utility may retain a certain portion of the
revenue it is required to spend on statewide programs to administer or fund a new energy-
efficiency program for the utility's large commercial, industrial, institutional or agricultural
customers. According to the Governor's Clean Energy Wisconsin plan issued in the early 2008,
the 18-month Focus On Energy budget beginning July 1, 2007 was $94 million or roughly 1.25%
of utility operating revenues.

"Large energy customers"* may implement and fund an energy-efficiency project or a
renewable-energy project and, with PSC approval, may deduct the cost from the amount the
customer is required to pay its utility for cost recovery. The utility, in turn, deducts that amount
from the amount that it is required to spend on statewide or utility-administered programs. The
amount of money a utility may collect from a large energy customer is frozen until at least July
1, 2009, pending a PSC proposal for the equitable allocation of the cost recovery burden among
different customer classes. A "large energy customer" is defined as a customer that has a
monthly energy demand of at least 1,000 kilowatts or 10,000 therms of natural gas and, in any
month, has been billed at least $60,000 for electricity or natural gas -- or both -- for all its
facilities within a utility's service territory.

The state's municipal utilities and electric cooperatives have the option of participating in the
state program or operating their own "commitment-to-community" programs, which are similar
to Focus on Energy. There is a cap on public benefit fees for these programs of the lesser of $375
per month or 1.5% of the total other monthly charges. The PSC does not oversee "commitment-
to-community" programs, but Act 141 does require cooperatives and municipal utilities to submit
annual program audit reports to the PSC. These programs remain otherwise unaffected by the
Act 141 amendments.

History
The original PBF legislation required utilities to fund energy-efficiency programs and
renewable-energy programs through (1) a public benefits fee that utilities collect directly from
customers and (2) mandatory utility "contributions," which utilities recover from customers in
rates. The amount of the charge was based on levels of utility expenditures for energy programs
prior to the enactment of Act 9. The fee generated approximately $16 million annually, and the



                                                                                                157
charge generated approximately $46 million annually. In fiscal year 2005, these two sources of
revenue generated a combined total of $62.9 million for renewables and efficiency. In addition,
the state's five major investor-owned utilities administered and funded several related programs
required by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSC). In 2004, the five utilities spent
a combined total of approximately $38.8 million on these programs, which include energy-
efficiency projects, renewable-energy projects, load management, and other projects.

Contact:
 Focus on Energy
 431 Charmany Dr.
 Madison, WI 53719
 Phone: (800) 762-7077
 Fax: (608) 249-0339
 E-Mail: Focusinfo@focusonenergy.com
 Web site: http://www.focusonenergy.com/

Interconnection Standards
Incentive        Interconnection
Type:
Eligible         Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass,
Renewable/Oth Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Fuel Cells, Municipal Solid Waste,
er               CHP/Cogeneration, Microturbines, Other Distributed Generation
Technologies:    Technologies
Applicable       Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government,
Sectors:         State Government, Fed. Government
Special Rules    Yes
for Net-
Metered
Systems?
Limit on         15 MW
System
Size/Overall
Enrollment:
Standard         Yes
Interconnectio
n Agreement?
Additional       Yes
Insurance
Requirements?
External         Yes
Disconnect
Required?
Rules for Non- Yes
Net-Metered
DG?
Website:         http://psc.wi.gov/utilityinfo/electric/distributedGeneration/interconnectionPro


158
                  cedure.htm
Authority 1:      Wis. Stat. § 196.496
Effective Date:   2001
Authority 2:      Chapter PSC 119
Effective Date:   2/1/2004

Summary:
In February 2004, the Wisconsin Public Service Commission adopted interconnection standards
for distributed generation (DG) systems up to 15 megawatts (MW) in capacity. The rules
categorize DG systems by capacity and provide for several levels of interconnection review, as
follows:
    • Category 1: 20 (kilowatts) kW or less
    • Category 2: larger than 20 kW, but no larger than 200 kW
    • Category 3: larger than 200 kW, but no larger than 1 MW
    • Category 4: larger than 1 MW, but no larger than 15 MW

Generally speaking, Wisconsin's interconnection requirements become more stringent as the
system size increases. The rules apply to all public utilities. The 20-kW dividing line between
Category 1 and Category 2 installations corresponds to the maximum individual system capacity
allowed under the state's net-metering rules. Systems that qualify for net metering are not
considered commercial ventures that require commercial liability insurance. Additionally, the
PSC has published two sets of standard forms for interconnection. One set pertains to systems
smaller than 20 kW while the second set applies to larger systems up the maximum size of 15
MW. These forms are available on the program website. Application fees and insurance
requirements vary by category.

Contact:
 Public Service Commission of Wisconsin
 610 North Whitney Way, P.O. Box 7854
 Madison, WI 53707-7854
 Phone: (608) 266-3905
 Fax: (608) 266-3546

Madison - Contractor Licensing
Incentive Type:      Contractor Licensing
Eligible             Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat
Renewable/Other
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Installer/Contractor
Website:             http://www.cityofmadison.com/Sustainability/City/madiSUN/index.cfm
Authority 1:         Madison Code of Ordinances, 30.01

Summary:
Although the state of Wisconsin does not have any specific laws for contractors dealing with
renewable energy, the City of Madison has issued rules for contractor licensing and equipment



                                                                                          159
standards. In the City’s Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Code is a requirement for a
Class A-4 license for "a person desiring to enter into the business of installing, altering or
repairing active solar heating equipment" as well as fee and examination details. In addition,
installation standards for solar thermal equipment cover subjects such as orientation of the
collector, shading of solar collectors, mounting and roof support, material corrosion, sensors,
piping and insulation, fluids, storage, monitoring and manuals.

The city of Madison operates the MadiSUN Program with a goal of doubling the number of solar
hot water and solar electric (PV) systems in the city. Individuals interested in owning a solar
energy system can enlist the services of a Solar Agent through this program to help guide them
through the process.

Contact:
 MadiSUN Program
 City of Madison
 215 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
 Madison , WI 53703
 Phone: (608) 243-0586
 E-Mail: solar@cityofmadison.com
 Web site:
 http://www.cityofmadison.com/Sustainability/City
 /madiSUN/index.cfm

Madison - Green Power Purchasing
Incentive Type:     Green Power Purchasing/Aggregation
Eligible            Photovoltaics, Wind
Renewable/Other
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Local Government
% Renewables:       25% (Madison Metro Maintenance and Administration Facility). Goals
                    of 10% in 2007 and 20% in 2011 for city facilities as a whole.
Website:            http://www.cityofmadison.com/Sustainability/City/renewable.cfm
Authority 1:        City Resolution 07-00343
Date Enacted:       03/20/2007
Effective Date:     03/20/2007

Summary:
In 1999, Madison’s Metro Maintenance & Administration Facility began purchasing 25% of its
electricity from Madison Gas & Electric’s wind power program. The additional cost to purchase
the wind power is approximately $26,000 per year. Metro officials estimate that their wind
power purchase is equivalent to running ten buses per year with no carbon monoxide emissions.
In 2004, the city established a goal to increase the entire city’s electricity purchases to 10%
renewable energy by 2006 and 20% renewable energy by 2010.

More recently, on March 20, 2007 the City of Madison Common Council passed a resolution to
purchase 10% of its electricity from renewable sources in 2007 and 20% by 2011. The city


160
budget was amended to make available $17,000 for the purchase of renewable energy credits
(RECs), with a stated preference for those originating in Dane and Madison counties. The total
renewable energy purchase for both commitments combined is approximately 7.1 million
kilowatt-hours (kWh) for 2008 according to the city's sustainability website.

In this same legislation as the city-wide green power purchase, the Common Council resolved to
encourage community participation in renewable energy programs through it's own Clean
Energy Challenge Program, with a goal of being recognized as an EPA Green Power Partner
(consumer purchases of green electricity amounting to 2% of total consumption).

Contact:
 City of Madison
 215 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
 Madison , WI 53703
 Phone: (608) 266-4051
 Web site:
 http://www.cityofmadison.com/Sustainability/inde
 x.cfm




Madison - Solar in City Planning Guidelines
Incentive Type:       Solar Access Law/Guideline
Eligible              Passive Solar Space Heat, Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat,
Renewable/Other       Photovoltaics
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Construction
Website:              http://www.cityofmadison.com/Sustainability/City/madiSUN/index.cfm
Authority 1:          Madison Code of Ordinances, 16.23.8 et al.

Summary:
To facilitate solar access, Madison’s land subdivision regulations require streets to be "oriented
in an east-west direction to the maximum extent possible or to within 20 degrees of such
orientation." There are some exceptions based on topography, property size and shape, existing
street patterns, and other considerations. In addition, subdivision lots should be oriented to
maximize solar access for the buildings on them, and open space lots within subdivisions should
be placed "where the location of open space lands provide greater achievement of solar access
objectives and requirements of the entire subdivision." Finally, "the installation of trees shall
take into account solar access objectives...so as to minimize future shading of the most southerly
side of contemplated building locations."

The city of Madison operates the MadiSUN Program with a goal of doubling the number of solar
hot water and solar electric (PV) systems in the city. Individuals interested in owning a solar
energy system can enlist the services of a Solar Agent through this program to help guide them
through the process.


                                                                                             161
Contact:
 MadiSUN Program
 City of Madison
 215 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
 Madison , WI 53703
 Phone: (608) 243-0586
 E-Mail: solar@cityofmadison.com
 Web site:
 http://www.cityofmadison.com/Sustainability/City
 /madiSUN/index.cfm

Renewable Portfolio Standard
Incentive Type:       Renewables Portfolio Standard
Eligible              Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass,
Renewable/Other       Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Fuel
Technologies:         Cells using Renewable Fuels
Applicable Sectors: Municipal Utility, Investor-Owned Utility, Rural Electric Cooperative,
                      Retail Supplier
Standard:             Requirement varies by utility (statewide target of 10% by 12/31/15)
Technology            No
Minimum:
Credit Trading:       Yes
Website:              http://psc.wi.gov/utilityinfo/electric/newsInfo/renewableResource.htm
Authority 1:          Wis. Stat. § 196.378
Date Enacted:         10/27/1999 (amended 2006)
Effective Date:       12/31/2001 (amendments effective 04/01/2006)
Expiration Date:      None
Authority 2:          Chapter PSC 118

Summary:
In 1998 Wisconsin enacted Act 204, requiring regulated utilities in eastern Wisconsin to install
to an aggregate total of 50 MW of new renewable-based electric capacity by December 31, 2000.
In October 1999 Wisconsin enacted Act 9, becoming the first state to enact a renewable portfolio
standard (RPS) without having restructured its electric-utility industry. Wisconsin's RPS
originally required investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives to obtain at least 2.2% of
the electricity sold to customers from renewable-energy resources by 2012. Legislation (SB 459)
enacted in March 2006 increased renewable-energy requirements and established an overall
statewide renewable-energy goal of 10% by December 31, 2015. The requirements are as
follows:
    • For the years 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, each utility -- including municipal utilities --
        may not decrease its renewable-energy percentage below the utility's average renewable-
        energy percentage for 2001, 2002 and 2003.
    • For the year 2010, each utility must increase its renewable-energy percentage by at least
        two points above the utility's average renewable-energy percentage for 2001, 2002 and
        2003.


162
   •   For the years 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014, each utility may not decrease its renewable-
       energy percentage below the utility's renewable-energy percentage for 2010.
   •   For the year 2015, each utility must increase its renewable-energy percentage by at least
       six points above the utility's average renewable-energy percentage for 2001, 2002 and
       2003.
   •   For each year after 2015, each utility may not decrease its renewable-energy percentage
       below the utility's renewable-energy percentage for 2015.

Electric providers, wholesale suppliers and customers of electric providers may petition the PSC
for a one-year extension of a compliance deadline. By June 1, 2016, the Wisconsin Public
Service Commission (PSC) must determine if the state has met a renewable-energy goal of 10%
by December 31, 2015. If the goal has not been achieved, the PSC must indicate why the goal
was not achieved and must determine how it may be achieved.

Qualifying renewables include tidal and wave action, fuel cells using renewable fuels, solar
thermal electric and photovoltaics (PV), wind power, geothermal, hydropower less than 60
megawatts, and biomass (including landfill gas). Renewable energy generated outside of
Wisconsin is eligible. Electricity generated by hydropower receives special treatment. Utilities
receive credit for the sum of (1) all hydropower purchased in a reporting year, (2) the average of
the amounts of hydropower generated by facilities owned or operated by the utility for 2001,
2002 and 2003, adjusted to reflect the permanent removal from service of any of those facilities
and adjusted to reflect any capacity increases from improvements made after January 1, 2004;
and (3) the amount of hydropower generated in the reporting year by facilities owned or operated
by the electric provider that are initially placed in service on or after January 1, 2004.

A Renewable Resource Credit Program has been established, enabling utilities to buy and sell
"renewable resource credits" (RRCs)* from one another for any electricity generated in excess of
the percentage specified for a given year. Credits also may be used in subsequent years. The
Wisconsin PSC was one of principal developers of the Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking
System (M-RETS) to be used for this purpose. Public reports detailing utility progress under the
RRC program are available here on the M-RETs website.

* These credits are known as "renewable-energy credits" (RECs) in most other states.

Contact:
 Public Service Commission of Wisconsin
 610 North Whitney Way, P.O. Box 7854
 Madison, WI 53707-7854
 Phone: (608) 266-3905
 Fax: (608) 266-3546
 Web site: http://psc.wi.gov/

Solar and Wind Access Laws
Incentive Type:      Solar and Wind Access Law
Eligible             Passive Solar Space Heat, Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat, Solar
Renewable/Other      Thermal Electric, Solar Thermal Process Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind


                                                                                             163
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors:      Commercial, Industrial, Residential, General Public/Consumer,
                         Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed.
                         Government
Authority 1:             Wis. Stat. § 66.0401 et seq.
Effective Date:          1982 (wind added in 1993)
Authority 2:             Wis. Stat. § 700.41
Effective Date:          1982 (wind added in 1993)
Authority 3:             Wis. Stat. § 236.292
Effective Date:          1993
Authority 4:             Wis. Stat. § 844.22
Effective Date:          1993

Summary:
Wisconsin has several laws that protect a resident's right to install and operate a solar or wind
energy system. These laws cover zoning restrictions by local governments, private land use
restrictions, and system owner rights to unobstructed access to resources. The state's original
laws, enacted in 1982, have subsequently been amended and expanded numerous times.




Limitations on local zoning restrictions
First, under Wis. Stat. § 66.0401, local governments -- counties, towns, cities and villages -- may
not place any restriction on the installation or use of solar or wind energy systems unless the
restriction:
    • serves to preserve or protect public health or safety
    • does not significantly increase the cost of the system or decrease it's efficiency
    • allows for an alternative system of comparable cost and efficiency

This law effectively prohibits unreasonable public land use controls covering solar and wind
energy systems by defining a fairly narrow set of "reasonable" conditions. The law subsequently
allows for a local permitting procedure for guaranteeing unobstructed access to wind or solar
resources. A permit will not be granted if obstruction already exists or if the construction of such
an obstruction is already well into the planning stages. The effect of the permit is similar to a
private solar easement agreement, except it does not require the consent of a neighboring
property owner. It is important to note that system owners are not required to obtain a permit
under this subsection prior to installing a solar or wind energy system. If a permit is necessary as
the result of a local zoning ordinance, the permitting burden may not deviate from Wis. Stat. §
66.0401 as described above.

Limitations on private land use restrictions
A separate law, Wis. Stat. § 236.292, voids all restrictions on platted land that prevent or unduly
restrict the construction or operation of solar and wind energy systems. This law effectively
prohibits private land use controls (e.g., deed restrictions, homeowner association regulations,
easements, etc.) from preventing the installation and operation of wind and solar energy systems.


164
In the case of both access laws - public and private - solar energy systems are defined broadly to
include both thermal and electrical technologies.

Right to sun and wind
Other sections of Wisconsin law address a solar or wind system owner's right to retain
unobstructed access to the wind or sun. Wis Stat. § 700.41 effectively freezes the permitted
building envelope of properties adjacent to a solar or wind system to whatever it was at the time
the system was constructed. This allows the system owner to construct a system based on
existing zoning regulations and be certain that future zoning amendments and development will
not render the system ineffective. Separately, Wis. Stat. § 844.22 states that any structure or
vegetative growth that occurs after the installation of a solar or wind energy system and
interferes with its function is considered to be a private nuisance. The purpose of this law is to
provide system owners with a remedy to prevent interference with their systems in a situation
where none of the other statutory protections can be applied. The right to unobstructed resource
access can only be applied to actions that take place after a system is constructed.

Model policy
In order to assist counties, towns, and municipalities in interpreting Wisconsin's wind access
laws, chiefly Wis. Stat. § 66.0401, the state of Wisconsin has developed a Model Small Wind
Ordinance which suggests appropriate zoning language for wind energy systems of 100 kilowatts
(kW) or less. In the model, small wind systems are treated as a permitted use. The document
includes specific language on details such as setbacks from public roads, dwellings, and property
lines which can be considered directly relevant to preserving public health and safety.

There is currently no comparable guidance for ordinances addressing solar installations.

Contact:
 Public Service Commission of Wisconsin
 610 North Whitney Way, P.O. Box 7854
 Madison, WI 53707-7854
 Phone: (608) 266-3905
 Fax: (608) 266-3546
 Web site: http://psc.wi.gov/

Wisconsin - Green Power Purchasing
Incentive Type:      Green Power Purchasing/Aggregation
Eligible             Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric,
Renewable/Other      Geothermal Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Fuel Cells using
Technologies:        Renewable Fuels
Applicable Sectors: State Government
% Renewables:        20% by 12/31/11
Source:              Wind, Solar, Hydro, Landfill gas
Authority 1:         Wis. Stat. § 16.75(12)
Date Enacted:        03/17/2006

Summary:


                                                                                              165
Under terms of legislation (SB 459) enacted in March 2006, Wisconsin's Departments of
Administration, Corrections, Health and Family Services, Natural Resources, Public Instruction,
Veterans Affairs, the State Fair Park Board, and the Board of Regents of the University of
Wisconsin System have a goal of purchasing or generating 10% of their power from renewable
energy by December 31, 2007, and 20% by December 31, 2011. In July 2008 the Governor
announced that the state had completed a green electricity purchase of 92,400 Megawatt-hours
(MWh), equivalent to roughly 10% of the annual electricity consumption of the agencies covered
by the mandate.

Eligible resources include tidal and wave power, fuel cells using renewable fuels, hydropower
facilities less than 60 megawatts (MW), solar thermal-electric systems, photovoltaics (PV), wind,
geothermal, biomass, and any other non-conventional energy resources deemed eligible by the
state Public Service Commission.

According to the statute, agencies are not required to generate or purchase electricity derived
from renewables if the generation or purchase of renewables is not technically feasible or cost-
effective. Click here for further information on the recent green power purchase.

Contact:
 Office of Energy Independence
 17 W. Main St., Suite 429
 Madison, WI 53703
 Phone: (608) 261-8146
 E-Mail: brian.driscoll@wisconsin.gov
 Web site:
 http://power.wisconsin.gov/index.asp?locid=131

Wisconsin - Net Metering
Incentive Type:       Net Metering
Eligible              Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric,
Renewable/Other       Geothermal Electric, Municipal Solid Waste, CHP/Cogeneration, Other
Technologies:         Distributed Generation Technologies
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Industrial, Residential
Limit on System       20 kW (We Energies allows net metering for wind-energy systems up to
Size:                 100 kW)
Limit on Overall      None
Enrollment:
Treatment of Net      Varies by utility. Generally credited at retail rate for renewables;
Excess:               generally credited at avoided cost for non-renewables.
Utilities Involved:   Investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities
Interconnection       Yes
Standards for Net
Metering?
Website:              http://psc.wi.gov/
                      apps/tariffs/content/elelist.aspx
Authority 1:          PSCW Order, Docket No. 05-EP-6


166
Date Enacted:            9/18/1992

Summary:
The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSC) issued an order on January 26, 1982,
requiring all regulated utilities to file tariffs allowing net metering to customers that generate
electricity with systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. The order applies to investor-owned
utilities and municipal utilities, but not to electric cooperatives. All distributed-generation (DG)
systems, including renewables and combined heat and power (CHP), are eligible. There is no
limit on total enrollment.

The PSC has not adopted administrative rules for net metering.* Utilities' net-metering tariffs
contain some variations. Customer net excess generation (NEG) is generally credited at the
utility's retail rate for renewables, and at the utility's avoided-cost rate for non-renewables. NEG
credit is carried over to the customer's next bill. If NEG credit exceeds $25, then the utility must
issue a check for the amount, payable to the customer.

In January 2006, the PSC approved a proposal by We Energies, an investor-owned utility, to
offer net metering to customers with wind turbines greater than 20 kW but no greater than 100
kW in capacity. This offer is available to the first 25 eligible applicants, for a term of 10 years.
For more information, see www.we-energies.com/cg.

* Subsequent PSC decisions issued June 21, 1983, in docket numbers 05-ER-11, 05-ER-12 and
05-ER-13, further implemented Sections 201 and 210 of the federal Public Utility Regulatory
Policy Act of 1978 (PURPA). These decisions were confirmed by an order issued September 18,
1992, in docket number 05-EP-6. This latter order addresses net metering as it applies to
Wisconsin's investor-owned utilities.

Contact:
 Public Service Commission of Wisconsin
 610 North Whitney Way, P.O. Box 7854
 Madison, WI 53707-7854
 Phone: (608) 266-3905
 Fax: (608) 266-3546
 Web site: http://psc.wi.gov/

Wisconsin Energy Conservation Code
Incentive Type:     Building Energy Code
Eligible Efficiency Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building
Technologies:
Applicable Sectors: Commercial, Residential
Residential Code:   2006 IECC mandatory statewide for low-rise residential buildings 3
                    stories or less above grade, with 3 dwellings or more; can use REScheck
                    to show compliance. If used to demonstrate compliance with the State of
                    WI Uniform Dwelling Code (UDC) as applicable to 1 & 2 family
                    dwellings, then REScheck may be used when the code assignment is
                    indicated to be "Wisconsin" in REScheck.


                                                                                                 167
Commercial Code:       2006 IECC mandatory statewide; can use COMcheck to show
                       compliance
Code Change Cycle:     Review takes place every 3 years. Most recent update effective: March
                       1, 2008.
Website:               http://www.bcap-energy.org/node/99

Summary:
A new energy law, SB 459, was enacted in March 2006, promoting renewable energy and also
updates the state's building energy codes.

The law required the Department of Commerce (DOC) to promulgate an Energy Conservation
Code for the purpose of energy conservation in public buildings and places of employment and
to review that code. In conducting the review, the DOC must consider incorporating into the
Energy Conservation Code design requirements from the most current national energy efficiency
design standards that are generally acceptable and used by engineers and the construction
industry. Unlike the previous law, SB 459 refers to the International Energy Conservation Code
instead of the 1989 version of a standard adopted by ASHRAE. The bill also changes the five-
year revision requirement to a three-year requirement. The 2006 IECC codes for residential and
commercial construction were officially implemented on March 1, 2008.


For more information about building codes, contact:
BCAP Central Office
94 Grove St, #2
Providence, RI 02909
bcap@ase.org
www.bcap-energy.org

Contact:
 Wisconsin Department of Commerce
 Bureau of Integrated Services, Div. of Safety &
 Buildings
 P.O. Box 7162
 201 W. Washington Ave
 Madison, WI 53701-7162
 Web site: http://www.commerce.state.wi.us/SB/




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