Welcome to Stratford University

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					                   Welcome to Stratford University
                       A Personal Message from the President

     Thank you for the interest you have shown in our programs. You have taken the
first step toward an exciting and rewarding career. For over thirty years, we have
helped many students just like you find a place on the career ladder of their choice.
Many are now in management positions or own their own businesses.

     Stratford University is dedicated to competency-based education. Each program
provides the skills (or competencies) demanded by employers. More importantly,
Stratford University provides a student-centered classroom environment. This
means that our faculty members are flexible and will accommodate students
with different learning styles and modes without compromising employer-dictated
standards. This dual focus, on both the employer and the student, is the reason
for our success and the success of our graduates.

     The University’s faculty members have been hand-chosen for their teaching
ability, personality traits, and experience in the field. In fact, the entire Stratford
University staff works as a team to help you succeed. Because of our commitment
to your career success, the educational atmosphere in the school is friendly, helpful,
and knowledgeable.

     We have designed the placement and instructional programs so you can start
in your new career soon after graduation. Because of the quality of our educational
product and the enthusiasm of our staff, we have an excellent placement record.
We look forward to having you as part of our school.

    Come and visit the school, even if only virtually, at www.stratford.edu. Any
member of the admissions, administration, or instructional teams would enjoy
describing how Stratford can help you achieve your goals.




    Dr. Richard R. Shurtz
                                                                                    1
TABLE of CONTENTS
Mission .......................................................................................................................          5
Instructional Philosophy ............................................................................................                    5
Public Service ............................................................................................. ........................    6
History........................................................................................................................          6
Accreditation ..............................................................................................................             6
Stratford Programs of Study .......................................................................................                      7
Arts and Sciences Courses ...........................................................................................                    9
Online Courses ...........................................................................................................              11
Selected Collegiate Memberships and Affiliations .......................................................                                13
Description of Instructional Facilities .........................................................................                       14
Transportation Options ...............................................................................................                  16
Academic Calendar .....................................................................................................                 17
Class Hours ................................................................................................................            18
Enrollment Information .............................................................................................                    18
     Undergraduate Admission Requirements .............................................................                                 18
     Graduate Admission Requirements ......................................................................                             18
     International Students Admission Requirements .................................................                                    19
     Non-Discrimination Policy ..................................................................................                       22
Admissions Process .....................................................................................................                23
Student Financial Aid Services ....................................................................................                     23
     Consumer Information .......................................................................................                       24
     Application ..........................................................................................................             24
     Borrower Rights and Borrower Responsibilities ...................................................                                  29
     Veterans Administration Benefits ........................................................................                          31
     Vocational Rehabilitation Benefits ......................................................................                          31
Private Financing .......................................................................................................               32
Scholarship Programs ................................................................................................                   32
Tuition and Fees .........................................................................................................              33
Student Services and Welcome Center .........................................................................                           33
     Career Services ....................................................................................................               34
     Counseling and Academic Advising .....................................................................                             34
     Student Activities .................................................................................................               34
Academic Policies .......................................................................................................               35
     Term and Credit System ......................................................................................                      35
     Grading System ...................................................................................................                 35
     Grade Appeal .......................................................................................................               36
     Incomplete Grade ................................................................................................                  36
     Grade of W ..........................................................................................................              37
     Course Repetitions ..............................................................................................                  37

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TABLE of CONTENTS
     Auditing Courses .................................................................................................        37
     Course Exemption Policy ....................................................................................              38
     Registration ........................................................................................................     38
     Add/Drop Period .................................................................................................         39
     Withdrawing from Stratford University ................................................................                    39
Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress ...................................................................                   39
     Appeal of Dismissal Due to Unsatisfactory Academic Progress .............................                                 42
     Readmission after Dismissal for Unsatisfactory Academic Progress .....................                                    43
     Leave of Absence .................................................................................................        43
     Full-Time Status .................................................................................................        44
     Undergraduate Student Requirements for Graduation .........................................                               44
     Graduate Student Requirements for Graduation ..................................................                           44
     Changing Academic Programs ............................................................................                   45
     Warning, Probation, Suspension or Dismissal .....................................................                         45
     Appeals ...............................................................................................................   45
     Grounds for Academic Dishonesty/Misconduct ....................................................                           46
     Grounds for Non-Academic Dishonesty/Misconduct ............................................                               46
     Student Records/Release of Information .............................................................                      46
Cancellation and Refund Policy .................................................................................               47
     Return of Title IV Funds ......................................................................................           47
     Virginia State Refund Policy ...............................................................................              49
     Student Completion or Graduation Rate ..............................................................                      50
Campus Safety and Security Policies ..........................................................................                 50
     Disclosure Policy .................................................................................................       51
     Drug Free Policy .................................................................................................        51
     Formal Complaint Procedure ..............................................................................                 52
     Policy and Program Changes ..............................................................................                 53
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ...............................................................................                         54
School of Health Sciences ...........................................................................................          54
     Medical Assisting AAS..........................................................................................           54
     Clinical Hemodialysis Technician AAS ................................................................                     55
     EKG-Phlebotomy Technician AAS ........................................................................                    56
     Medical Insurance Billing and Coding AAS .........................................................                        58
     Pharmacy Technician AAS ..................................................................................                59
     Additional CPR Requirements .............................................................................                 60
     Additional Educational Benefit ............................................................................               61
School of Business Administration..............................................................................                62
     Accounting BS .....................................................................................................       62
     Business Administration BS ................................................................................               63

                                                                                                                               3
TABLE of CONTENTS
    Accounting AAS ................................................................................................... 66
    Business Administration AAS .............................................................................. 67
    Accounting Certificate ......................................................................................... 68
    Accounting Diploma ............................................................................................ 69
School of Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management ................................................. 70
    Hospitality Management BA ................................................................................ 70
    Advanced Culinary Arts AAS ................................................................................ 73
    Baking and Pastry Arts AAS ................................................................................ 75
    Hotel and Restaurant Management AAS .............................................................. 77
    Advanced Culinary Arts Professional Diploma ..................................................... 78
School of Computer Information Systems ................................................................... 80
    Information Technology BS ................................................................................ 80
    Network Management and Security AAS .............................................................. 81
    Digital Design AAS .............................................................................................. 83
GRADUATE PROGRAMS ........................................................................................... 85
Overview .................................................................................................................... 85
    Accounting MS .................................................................................................... 87
    Master of Business Administration (MBA) ........................................................... 88
    International Master of Business Administration (IMBA) .................................... 90
    Enterprise Business Management MS .................................................................. 91
    Information Systems MS ..................................................................................... 92
    Software Engineering MS .................................................................................... 94
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS .......................................................................................... 96
    Undergraduate Courses ....................................................................................... 96
    Graduate School Courses ..................................................................................... 136
GOVERNING BOARD................................................................................................. 152




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Mission
Stratford University is a private institution of higher learning. The student body is quite
diverse, including new high school graduates, working professionals, international
students, and persons desiring to change their career fields.

The mission of Stratford University is to prepare students for rewarding and challenging
careers by providing quality, competency-based educational programs that meet the
changing needs of employers in emerging high demand industries.

In order to meet this mission, the University offers a variety of graduate, undergraduate,
and diploma programs in emerging and high employment demand fields. To meet the
needs of a diverse community of learners, the University provides education that balances
technical, professional, and critical thinking components.

In pursuit of this mission, the institution seeks:

  1. To ensure a student’s career goals can be met by matching students with
     appropriate programs of study,

  2. To ensure a quality learning experience by employing faculty who are committed
     to learning and who demonstrate excellent teaching skills,

  3. To ensure relevant curricula through input from the governing board, advisory
     boards, academic partners and graduates, and

  4. To ensure student success through a comprehensive support program including
     testing prior to acceptance, financial planning, academic assistance, and other
     student services.

Instructional Philosophy
The face and climate of today’s business world is changing rapidly. Economic growth
and the constantly transforming needs of modern industries can provide exciting and
challenging opportunities for qualified graduates. Stratford University is at the forefront
of these changes and is dedicated to assisting graduates find employment in this evolving
job market. Our innovative approach to education helps our graduates gain the skills
and self-confidence needed to be successful.

Stratford University seeks to give its students relevant skills and knowledge, leading them
to satisfying careers and helping them to maximize their potentials. The University is able

                                                                                         5
to achieve these goals through a carefully-planned program of instructional and career
counseling, including timely curriculum revisions, hands-on learning experiences in
appropriate undergraduate courses, individual help, and placement assistance.

    1. Instructional Focus: The entire program is directed toward specific instructional
       goals with small class size. All curricula, presentations, supportive reference
       materials, and student-teacher interactions are collectively driven by this strategy.

    2. Communication: Effective use of communication reinforces the instructional
       message. Creative seating arrangements and small group projects are used to
       encourage student/student and student/teacher interaction. A team-building
       atmosphere is sought during all phases of the program.

    3. Self-Discovery: Hands-on learning using actual equipment is key to the Stratford
       University instructional methodology. Learning by discovery provides self-fulfillment
       for image building. Stratford University recognizes that self-discovery is the key
       to long-term retention of information. In the final analysis, the University combines
       sound instructional technology with an insight into the career market to produce a
       valuable and unique educational service.

Public Service
Stratford University understands that community service contributes to its mission. To this
end, the institution has established an effective and continuous program of community
relations. The University President provides leadership in this area and is involved in
issues that involve the institution at national, regional and local levels. The Program
Deans have developed contacts with various entities and strive to offer needed services to
outside organizations.

History
Stratford University was established in 1976. The undergraduate and graduate programs
are approved for Federal Student Financial Assistance by the US Department of Education.
The University has the authority to issue I-20s by the US Immigration and Naturalization
Service for F-1 visas. All programs have been approved for the training of veterans.

Accreditation
Stratford University is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges
and Schools (ACICS) to award diplomas, associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees.
Stratford University is also a member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation

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(CHEA), a national advocate and institutional voice for self-regulation of academic
quality through accreditation. CHEA is an association of 3,000 degree-granting
colleges and universities and recognizes 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting
organizations.

Stratford University is certified by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
(SCHEV) to operate campuses in Virginia

Stratford Programs of Study
Stratford University offers undergraduate programs at the associate’s, bachelor’s, and
diploma levels. The graduate school offers five master’s degrees.

Diploma programs require completion of 60 quarter credit hours; all associate degree
programs require completion of 90 quarter credit hours. The bachelor’s degree
programs require 180 quarter credit hours. Most graduate programs require 54 quarter
credit hours for completion with the exception of the MBA which is a 90 quarter credit
program. The course numbering system follows accepted higher education practices with
courses numbered 100-199 designating first year courses, 200-299 designating second
year courses, 300-399 designating third year courses; 400-499 designating fourth year
courses; 500 and above designating fifth and sixth year courses (master’s level). All
diploma, associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, and master’s degree programs contain a
required core determined by the faculty as common knowledge needed by each student.

The Graduate School offers a focused selection of targeted master’s degree programs.
The graduate programs are offered at the Falls Church Campus. The MBA and IMBA
are also available in the online format. Stratford University offers the following
graduate degrees:

  1.   Master of Science in Accounting (MS)
  2.   Master of Business Administration (MBA)
  3.   International Master of Business Administration (IMBA)
  4.   Master of Science in Enterprise Business Management (MS)
  5.   Master of Science in Software Engineering (MS)
  6.   Master of Science in Information Systems Management (MS)

The Master of Science in Accounting program equips persons seeking positions as
professional accountants in industrial, financial, governmental, global and non- profit
institutions with the specialized knowledge and skills demanded of the profession and
necessary for success. The Master of Business Administration provides students with a
comprehensive foundation in the fundamentals of business, enabling them to find a job in

                                                                                      7
various disciplines within both the government and the private sector. The International
Master of Business Administration equips senior leaders through a program that explores
and analyzes global business principles in a collaborative atmosphere of multicultural
teamwork and innovation. The focus of Enterprise Business Management is to plan and
deploy an information infrastructure to help a company achieve a sustained competitive
advantage, with emphasis on case studies and best practices. The Software Engineering
program provides a foundation in technical software concepts and design techniques
as well as management and teamwork approaches that will enable students to oversee
software projects of high technical complexity. The Information Systems program
provides the knowledge necessary for the student to develop, implement, and operate
information systems in a variety of organizations.

The School of Computer Information Systems offers the following bachelor’s and
associate’s degrees:

    1. Bachelor of Science in Information Technology
    2. Associate of Applied Science in Network Management and Security
    3. Associate of Applied Science in Digital Design

These programs focus on information systems and the constantly changing technologies
that drive them. They are designed specifically to accommodate the need for trained
computer professionals in the Information Technology (IT) area.

The School of Culinary Arts and Hospitality offers a bachelor’s degree, three associate’s
degrees, and a diploma program. These are offered at the Falls Church campus.

    1.   Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Management
    2.   Associate of Applied Science in Advanced Culinary Arts
    3.   Diploma in Advanced Culinary Arts
    4.   Associate of Applied Science in Baking and Pastry Arts
    5.   Associate of Applied Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management

The Culinary Arts and Baking and Pastry Arts associate programs prepare students for
culinary positions in the growing food service industry, providing instruction in food
theory, catering, supervisory development, and knowledge of how to prepare sauces, entrees,
vegetables and specialties, and baked goods. The diploma program is designed to provide
the core competencies for immediate, entry-level employment in the culinary field.

The Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Management prepares students for management
positions in the rapidly-growing hospitality industry, while the Hotel and Restaurant
associate’s program provides training and preparation for entry into the field. Both

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programs emphasize hospitality, human resource management, control systems, food
and beverage operations, and managing for profitability.

The School of Business Administration offers the following bachelor’s and associate’s
degrees:

  1.   Bachelor of Science in Accounting
  2.   Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
  3.   Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
  4.   Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration

These programs are designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in the business
industry by offering a wide variety of course work. The bachelor’s degree features three
tracks: accounting and finance, e-business, and management. The associate’s program
includes courses in management, statistics, accounting, sales and marketing, and a
variety of electives from which to choose. These electives give students the ability to
choose additional areas of study.

The School of Health Sciences offers associate’s degrees in Allied Health to include:

  1.   Medical Assisting
  2.   Clinical Hemodialysis Technician
  3.   EKG-Phlebotomy Technician
  4.   Medical Insurance Billing and Coding
  5.   Pharmacy Technician

The School of Health Sciences offers an array of associate’s degrees in the Health
Sciences. These programs are designed to give the students the opportunity to acquire
the skills required for success the field of health science. Students study the structure
and function of the major body systems in conjunction with medical terminology,
professional procedures, medical law and ethics, computer skills, and administrative
processes. Students may select elective courses to help prepare them for special areas of
interest in their field of study.

Arts and Sciences Courses
The School of Arts and Sciences (formerly called “General Education”) provides the
liberal arts and sciences courses for the other departments. These course areas include
psychology, mathematics, humanities, natural science, and English. These courses are
integrated into the curriculum so that the projects and exercises are relevant to the skill
sets demanded by employers.

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The courses offered by the School of Arts and Sciences helps students to improve their
critical and analytical thinking skills, enhance their knowledge of the human community,
and teach skills in conducting research and communicating knowledge. The Arts and
Sciences “elective pool” provides students a good assortment of courses that provide a
liberal education as well as expand their knowledge beyond their major. The Associate
of Arts degrees require a minimum of 22.5 quarter hours of class work and the Bachelor
degrees require 54 quarter hours. The elective pool and requirements are as follows:

Arts and Sciences Elective Pools
     Number                Course Name                                                                                                  Credits
                           Mathematics
     MAT110 * ........     Fundamentals of Mathematics .................................................................                    4.5
     MAT210 ..........     College Algebra .........................................................................................        4.5
     MAT290 .........      Current Topics in Mathematics ................................................................                   4.5
     MAT310 ..........     Statistics ...................................................................................................   4.5
     MAT410 ..........     Introduction to Calculus ..........................................................................              4.5
     MAT490 ..........     Special Topics in Mathematics .................................................................                  4.5
                           Humanities
     HUM110 .........      Principles of Ethics ..................................................................................          4.5
     HUM210 .........      Spanish I ..................................................................................................     4.5
     HUM290 .........      Current Topics in the Humanities ............................................................                    4.5
     HUM320 .........      World Literature .......................................................................................         4.5
     HUM330 .........      The American Experience .......................................................................                  4.5
     HUM410 .........      Understanding World Cultures .................................................................                   4.5
     HUM420 .........      Spanish II.................................................................................................      4.5
     HUM490 .........      Special Topics in Humanities ..................................................................                  4.5
                           Science
     SCI110 ............   General Science ........................................................................................         4.5
     SCI250 ...........    Microbiology.............................................................................................        4.5
     SCI290 ...........    Current Topics in Science .........................................................................              4.5
     SCI410............    Impact of Science and Technology ...........................................................                     4.5
     SCI490 ...........    Special Topics in Science .........................................................................              4.5
                           English
     ENG111 ..........     College Composition .................................................................................            4.5
     ENG290 ..........     Current Topics in English.........................................................................               4.5
     ENG310 ..........     Oral Communications .............................................................................                4.5
     ENG320 ..........     Advanced Composition and Research ......................................................                         4.5
     ENG490..........      Special Topics in English .........................................................................              4.5
                           Psychology
     PSY110 ...........    Social Psychology .....................................................................................          4.5
     PSY290...........     Current Topics in Psychology ...................................................................                 4.5
     PSY320 ...........    Human Growth and Development ............................................................                        4.5
     PSY490 ...........    Special Topics in Psychology ....................................................................                4.5
     * Not applicable for bachelors programs

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Bachelors Degree Elective Requirements
    Number              Course Name                                                                                   Credits
    MATXXX ........     Mathematics Elective (100 or 200 level) .................................................. 4.5
    SCIXXX ..........   Science Elective (100 or 200 level) ........................................................... 4.5
    PSYXXX .........    Pyschology Elective (100 or 200 level) ..................................................... 4.5
    HUMXXX .......      Humanities Elective (100 or 200 level) .................................................... 4.5
    ENGXXX ........     English Elective (100 or 200 level) ........................................................... 4.5
    MATXXX ........     Mathematics Elective (200 level or higher) .............................................. 4.5
    SCIXXX ..........   Science Elective (200 level or higher) ...................................................... 4.5
    PSYXXX .........    Pyschology Elective (200 level or higher) ................................................ 4.5
    ENG XXX .......     English Elective (200 level or higher) ...................................................... 4.5
    HUMXXX .......      Humanities Elective (200 level or higher)................................................ 4.5
    XXXXXX ........     Open Arts and Science Elective (300 level or higher) ............................... 4.5
    XXXXXX ........     Open Arts and Science Elective (300 level or higher) ............................... 4.5
                        Overall Program Total Requirement                                                               54

Associates Degree Elective Requirements
    Number              Course Name                                                                                   Credits
    MATXXX ........     Mathematics Elective (100 or 200 level) .................................................. 4.5
    SCIXXX ..........   Science Elective (100 or 200 level) ........................................................... 4.5
    PSYXXX .........    Pyschology Elective (100 or 200 level) ..................................................... 4.5
    HUMXXX .......      Humanities Elective (100 or 200 level) .................................................... 4.5
    ENGXXX ........     English Elective (100 or 200 level) ........................................................... 4.5
                        Overall Program Total Requirement                                                               22.5

Online Courses
Stratford University currently offers online courses as part of a Distance Learning
Program in order to meet the needs of the student population. Currently the University
offers the following degree programs online:

  1. Associate of Applied Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management
  2. Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
  3. Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration
  4. Associate of Applied Science in Digital Design
  5. Associate of Applied Science in Network Management and Security
  6. Associate of Applied Science in Medical Insurance Billing and Coding
  7. Bachelor of Science in Accounting
  8. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
  9. Bachelor of Science in Information Technology
  10. Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Management
  11 Master of Science in Accounting

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  12.Master of Business Administration
  13.International Master of Business Administration
  14. Master of Science in Enterprise Business Management
  15 Master of Science in Information Systems
  16. Master of Science in Software Engineering
  17. Certificate in Accounting
  18.Diploma in Accounting

These courses are tailored for an online format and include a detailed syllabus outlining
course content, objectives, course schedule, instructor information, grading scale, and
homework assignments. The credits awarded are the same as the university’s classroom-
based courses, all equaling 4.5 quarter credits. Students who register for an online class
must have access to a computer which will support the instructional materials. Online
courses do not meet in person. A critical component of each online course involves
active participation in the virtual classroom, which often includes mandatory threaded
discussions. Students should plan to devote between five and six hours per week to each
online course.

Students work independently, completing Internet-based reading assignments and
communicating with instructors and other students by email and discussion boards.
The courses are delivered through asynchronous classroom hours and virtual faculty
office hours. Synchronous review sessions and chats may also be scheduled to facilitate
learning. Weekly homework assignments are submitted online and students are
required to complete quizzes, examinations, and other assignments using the distance
learning platform.

Computer use for online instruction must meet the requirements below:

  1. Internet service provider for online access (DSL or cable modem strongly recommended)
  2. Windows® 98, ME, 2000, XP, Vista, or Mac OS 9.2 or higher
  3. 800 MHz or greater Intel® Pentium® processor
  4. 128 MB or greater RAM (256MB or greater is better!)
  5. Color video display card
  6. Color monitor with 800x600 or greater resolution
  7. 56.6 Kbps or greater modem (broadband access strongly recommended)
  8. Sound card and speakers or headphones
  9. Internet Explorer 5.0 or greater (Later versions of Netscape work as well)
  10. Microsoft Word 97 or later

The University does not differentiate admission, graduation, and program requirements
between online programs and residential programs. The admission process for an online

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program is the same as for a residential program. This process includes completing an
online Application for Admission form, as well as submitting certified copies of TOEFL
scores (International students only) for final admission.

Graduation requirements for an online program are the same as for a residential
program. These include a 2.0 GPA for undergraduate programs and completion of core,
elective, and general education requirements. Graduate programs require a 3.0 GPA and
completion of core and elective requirements.

Selected Collegiate Memberships and Affiliations
Stratford is proud of its industry and educational affiliations. We will continue to expand
in this direction because it helps establish a broader range of contacts for our graduates.

  ■   American Culinary Federation Foundation Accrediting Commission, Accredited Member
  ■   American Hotel and Lodging Association, Partner
  ■   Career College Association, Member
  ■   Careers through Culinary Arts Program (CCAP), Supporting Member
  ■   Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education, Member
  ■   Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce, Member
  ■   International Association of Culinary Professionals, Member
  ■   Islamic Saudi Academy, Business Partner
  ■   National Association of Foreign Student Advisors (NAFSA)
  ■   Northern Virginia Technology Council, Member
  ■   Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board, Member
  ■   Online College Library Center (OCLC) Eastern, Member
  ■   Regional Prince William County Chamber of Commerce, Member
  ■   Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington, Associate Member
  ■   Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium, Member
  ■   Southern Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Member
  ■   Virginia Career College Association, Board Member
  ■   Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Member
  ■   West Potomac High School, Business Partner

Undergraduate and graduate programs are approved for federal student financial
assistance programs.

  ■   Approved by the Virginia Department of Rehabilitation Services
  ■   Approved for the training of veterans
  ■   Authorized to enroll immigrant alien students
  ■   Approved by District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services

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Description of Instructional Facilities
Buildings
Both the Falls Church and Woodbridge campuses have been designed for students’
educational convenience. The University’s Falls Church campus is located at 7777 Leesburg
Pike, Falls Church, Virginia. Reception, Admissions, Registrar, Library, International
Office and Financial Aid offices occupy the lobby (ground) level. Classrooms are located
on the first, second, fourth and fifth floors. Stratford’s Woodbridge Campus is located
at Dominion Center, 13576 Minnieville Road, Woodbridge, Virginia. The Woodbridge
location is close to I-95 and Potomac Mills Mall.
(Note: in March, 2009 the 13576 Minnieville Road Woodbridge campus will be relocated to a new 43,000
square foot facility located at 14349 Gideon Drive Woodbridge, VA 22192)

Classrooms
All Stratford University classrooms are equipped with whiteboards, comfortable seating,
ceiling mounted projectors, projection screens, and computer cabling. Also, most
classrooms have wireless Internet access. Stratford University has both general purpose
and state-of-the-art specialized classrooms. General purpose classrooms are traditional
rooms with specific scheduling requirements governed by best matching the subject being
presented with consideration of the room size and class size. Specialized classrooms
have been equipped with information technology equipment, laboratory equipment
and supplies, or specialized resources such as needed in the Culinary Arts/Baking and
Pastry program and the Health Sciences program. Courses where the instructor requires
technology to support the delivery of instruction, and where the technology is used on
a regular basis, are given scheduling priority for these rooms. The Falls Church facility
has 22 classrooms and the Woodbridge facility has 19 classrooms. Classrooms, media
services, and computer laboratories are available for use when classes are not in session.

Libraries
Each Stratford University campus has a large library with computer terminals and
dedicated library staff. Both shelf racked books and online texts are available for
students, staff, and faculty. The Falls Church library and the Woodbridge library each
have 24 computer terminals for student use.

Student Lounges
Both campus facilities have student lounges where students can meet, access wireless
Internet connection, obtain food and drinks from vending machines, and use microwave

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ovens. The Falls Church facility also has a full-service Deli and lunchroom. Both
campuses have direct access to many off-site eating establishments.

Welcome Center
The Falls Church campus has a large Welcome Center located on the second floor of
the Falls Church building where students can obtain information on transportation,
housing, employment, resume writing assistance, and English enrichment. The
Woodbridge campus also offers students services and resume writing assistance in the
first floor Students Services Center.

Parking
Adequate free parking is readily available at both campuses. Parking lots are lighted,
well-secured, and have clearly marked spaces for handicapped parking..

Directions to the Falls Church Campus
By Automobile: From Route 495 (Beltway), take Exit 47B (Route 7, Leesburg Pike) east toward Falls
Church. Turn right at the first light onto Ramada Road. After turning, you will see the Westin Tysons
Corner Hotel on your right and the University on your left. The parking lot directly surrounds the building.
From Route 66 take Exit 66 (Route 7, Leesburg Pike) west toward Tysons Corner. Turn left at the Westin
Tysons Corner Hotel, just before Route 495 (Beltway) onto Ramada Road. Note that this intersection has a
stoplight and that Ramada Road is on the left, with Lisle Avenue entering on the right.

By Metrorail or Metrobus:                                                                     ROCKVILLE
Take the Orange Line (Vienna)                       N
                                                                                             270

Metrorail to the West Falls                                                                                      WHEATON                  95

                                                                                                              KENSINGTON
Church Metro Station. Take the                                                                                   495
                                                                                                                                    COLLEGE
                                                                                                                                                     295

                                                                                                                       MARYLAND      PARK
Westbound Metrobus 3A, 3W, 3Z,                                                                     BETHESDA
                                                                                                                                           1

28A, or 28B to the Leesburg                                                                                                HYATTSVILLE BLADENSBURG

Pike and Lisle Avenue stop                                          7

                                                                   TYSONS
                                                                                       495            WASHINGTON, D.C.
                                                                                                                               50
near the W Hotel. After exiting                                    CORNER
                                                                                               ARLINGTON                            295
the bus and crossing Leesburg                                       VIENNA        FALLS
                                                                                 CHURCH
Pike to Ramada Road, you will                           66
                                                             29   FAIRFAX
                                                                            50


see the “W” Hotel on your right               CENTERVILLE                              ANNANDALE
                                                                                                                                               495
                                                                                                    ALEXANDRIA
and the University on your left                                                  495                                                             ANDREWS
                                                                                                                                                 AIR FORCE
                                                                                                                                                    BASE
(7777 Leesburg Pike). When                                                                   VIRGINIA
                                         MANASSAS
returning, use the Ramada                                                               95                 1

                                                                   FORT BELVOIR
Road stop, which is directly in
front of the building.




                                                                                                                                                             15
Directions to the Woodbridge Campus
From Washington, DC, and Points North:
Take I-95 South to Exit 158B, Prince William                                                                                                    FAIRFAX
                                                                                                                         OC
                                                                                                                           CO
                                                                                                                              QU
                                                                                                                                                COUNTY
Park- way, Manassas. Proceed through six                            PRINCE WILLIAM                                               ON
                                                                        COUNTY                                                        RIV
                                                                                                                                           ER
stop signals to a six-lane intersection with                                                  OLD B
                                                                                                      RIDGE
                                                                                  641                           ROAD




                                                                                                                                      OCCOQ
Minnieville Road. Turn right onto Minnieville




                                                                                                                                                GOR
                                                                                         WOODBRIDGE




                                                                                                                                                   D
                                                                                         HIGH SCHOOL
Road and proceed three stop signals. Stratford




                                                                                                                                          UON
                                                      PRIN                                                                      641




                                                                                                                                                     ON
                                                            CE

University is located in the Dominion Center,



                                                                 WI
                                                                   LL
                                                                                                                                95




                                                                                                                                                         BLV
                                                                                                                  AD
                                                                   IA
                                                                                                                                                RO




                                                                                                                RO
                                                                      M




                                                                                                                                                             D
located on the left side of this intersection.                                                                                                    AD




                                                                               63
                                                                                                    640




                                                                          PA
                                                                                 9
                                                                             R
                                                                                                          LE




                                                                              KW
Make a left into Dominion Square from                                                            IEV
                                                                                                     IL




                                                                                AY
                                                                                                N
                                                                                            MIN           639
behind Provident Bank.                               DALE                                                               WOODBRIDGE
                                                                                                                       MIDDLE SCHOOL            WOODBRIDGE
                                                     CITY                                             POTOMAC
                                                                        DAL                            MILLS
                                                                           E                            MALL
                                                                                                                                      1
From Fredericksburg, Virginia and Points
                                                                                 BLV
                                                                                     D
South: Take I-95 North to exit 158B, Prince                                                784

William Parkway, Manassas. Proceed through
                                                                 PRINCE WILLIAM
six stop signals to a six-lane intersection with                     COUNTY
                                                                                                                                                     N

Minnieville Road. Turn right onto Minnieville                                                    95

Road and proceed three stop signals. Stratford
University is located in the Dominion Center,
located on the left side of this intersection.                                            POTOMAC
                                                                                         HIGH SCHOOL
Make a left into Dominion Square from
behind Provident Bank.

From Manassas, and Points West: Take I-66 East to exit 47 (Route 234 South – Sudley Road). Take the
Prince William Parkway East to Woodbridge (approximately 9 miles.) Proceed through six stop signals to
a six-lane intersection with Minnieville Road. Turn right onto Minnieville Road and proceed three stop
signals. Stratford University is located in the Dominion Center, located on the left side of this intersection.
Make a left into Dominion Square from behind Provident Bank.

From Maryland and Points East: Take the Capitol Beltway to I-95 South. Take I-95 South to Exit 158B,
Prince William Parkway, Manassas. Proceed through six stop signals to a six-lane intersection with
Minnieville Road. Turn right onto Minnieville Road and proceed three stop signals. Stratford University
is located in the Dominion Center, located on the left side of this intersection. Make a left into Dominion
Square from behind Provident Bank.

Transportation Options
The University supports use of the metropolitan transit system as well as carpooling.
Information related to public transportation options is available in the Student
Services Office and the Admissions Office. For additional commuter information,
please check the University website, www.stratford.edu or the Metro website,
www.wmata.com


16
Academic Calendar
Stratford University conducts classes throughout the year, except for holidays. The calendar
year is divided into five 10-week quarters. Each quarter has a mini-start in the middle for
a total of 10 starts per year, spaced approximately at five-week intervals. The starts which
coincide with the beginning of a quarter are considered to be the main starts.

                                         —2009—
                       Session
   Year/Qtr.          Start Date       End Date        Holidays 2009
   2009-1 A          01/05/2009       02/09/2009       January 19, Martin Luther King Day
          B           02/9/2009       03/14/2009       February 16, President’s Day
          C          01/05/2009       03/14/2009
   2009-2 A          03/16/2009       04/19/2009
          B          04/20/2009       05/23/2009
          C          03/16/2009       05/23/2009
   2009-3 A          05/25/2009       06/28//2009      May 25, Memorial Day
          B          06/29/2009       08/01/2009       July 4, Independence Day
          C          05/25/2009       08/01/2009
   2009-4 A          08/03/2009       09/06/2009       September 7, Labor Day
          B          09/07/2009       10/10/2009
          C          08/03/2009       10/10/2009
   2009-5 A          10/12/2009        11/15/2009
          B          11/16/2009       12/19/2009       November 26, Thanksgiving Day
          C          10/12/2009       12/19/2009       Holiday Break – December 21 - January 3

                                         —2010—
                       Session
   Year/Qtr.          Start Date        End Date       Holidays 2010
   2010-1    A       01/04/2010       02/06/2010       January 18, Martin Luther King Day
             B        02/8/2010       03/13/2010       February 15, President’s Day
             C       01/04/2010       03/13/2010
   2010-2    A       03/15/2010       04/17/2010
             B       04/19/2010       05/22/2010
             C       03/15/2010       05/22/2010
   2010-3    A       05/24/2010       06/26//2010      May 31, Memorial Day
             B       06/28/2010       07/31/2010       July 5, Independence Day
             C       05/24/2010       07/31/2010
   2010-4    A       08/02/2010       09/04/2010
             B       09/07/2010        10/9/2010
             C       08/02/2010        10/9/2010       September 6, Labor Day
   2010-5    A       10/11/2010       11/13/2010
             B       11/15/2010       12/18/2010       November 25, Thanksgiving Day
             C       10/11/2010       12/18/2010       Holiday Break – December 20 - January 2
                 Holiday classes other than Holiday Break require make-up sessions


                                                                                             17
Class Hours
Stratford University conducts classes on a ten-week quarter with day, evening and weekend
classes. Session C meets the full ten weeks while Session A meets the first five weeks of the
quarter, and Session B meets the second five weeks of the quarter. Typically classes are
offered on the following schedule: Day classes begin at 8:00 am, 8:30 am or at 9:00 am
depending on the program. Afternoon classes start at 1:00 pm. Evening classes begin at
5:30 or 6:00 pm, depending on program. Classes meeting for five weeks meet two or three
times per week either Monday, Wednesday and Friday or Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; most
classes meeting for ten weeks meet once a week. Saturday classes begin at 9:00 am. Both
graduate and undergraduate courses may be scheduled for either five or ten week sessions.

Enrollment Information
Undergraduate Admission Requirements
Students applying for admission to Stratford University must have earned a high school
diploma or GED. To demonstrate evidence of high school graduation or equivalent,
a student must certify through the Application for Admission form provided by the
University that he/she is a high school graduate or equivalent. The student must also
sign the Application for Admission form and will be assessed an application fee.

Graduate Admissions Requirements
All students admitted to Stratford master’s degree programs must satisfy the following
requirements:

  ❏ Graduation from a college or university with a baccalaureate degree, or equivalent.
  ❏ Submission of copies of transcripts from all colleges or universities attended. Please
    note that all transcripts in a language other than English must be translated.
  ❏ All students must meet the language requirement if English is not their first language
    (please see International Students language requirement in this catalog).

Acceptance requires that a student meet one of the following two criteria:

  ❏ A 2.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate work supportive of their
    field of study.
  ❏ Evidence of graduate potential demonstrated by relevant professional work experience
    related to the field of study. This requires evaluation of work experience by the
    Program Dean or designated representative; a personal interview or submission of
    employment documentation or resume is required. The student may be required to
    complete undergraduate foundation courses.
18
Provisional acceptance may be granted if a student meets one of following two criteria:

  ❏ Evidence of graduate potential demonstrated by junior/senior level coursework
    that has been graded on a 4.0 grading scale. Overall GPA must be at least 2.0
    on a 4.0 grading scale. Please note that if the undergraduate coursework is
    widely removed from the graduate field of study, the student may be required to
    complete prerequisite undergraduate foundation courses. This requires review of
    undergraduate transcript by the Program Dean or designated representative.

  ❏ Evidence of graduate potential demonstrated by coursework documented using an
    international transcript with a grading scale that cannot be directly translated to
    the 4.0 scale used in the US. Please note that if the undergraduate coursework is
    widely removed from the graduate field of study, the student may be required to
    complete prerequisite undergraduate foundation courses. Transcript must document
    a degree that is equivalent to a baccalaureate degree in the US. This requires review
    of undergraduate transcript by the Program Dean or designated representative.

Provisional acceptance requires that the student must:

  ❏ meet with the Program Dean or his or her designated representative each quarter
    to address any academic issues. On-line students can communicate via email.
  ❏ receive academic counseling from the Program Dean, or his or her designated
    representative, if the student’s GPA drops below 3.0.

      Acceptance is not required for students applying to take individual classes only.

International Students Admission Requirements
Admission requirements and acceptance procedures for international students are
similar to those for students who are citizens of the United States, but there are additional
requirements for English language skills, transcript translation, and student visa to
study in the United States.

Language Requirement – Students whose native language is not English must provide
evidence of sufficient facility to do college-level work in an English-speaking institution.
Completion of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International
English Language Testing System (IELTS) is evidence of proficiency.

Students admitted into the US on a Stratford University Form I-20 who score slightly
below the required TOEFL or IELTS minimum score will be required to enroll in an
English Enhancement class at Stratford University. (This class is currently being offered
at no charge.) Students unable to complete the English Enhancement class satisfactorily

                                                                                         19
will be required to enroll in an intensive English training program and to demonstrate
English proficiency before being allowed to begin their Stratford academic programs.

Undergraduate Programs (Residential):

  TOEFL (Computer-based Test)
  ❏ 173 Minimum Program Requirement
  ❏ 97- 172 Combination English/Program courses
  ❏ Below 97 requires Intensive English Language Program

  TOEFL (Internet-based Test)
  ❏ 61 Minimum Program Requirement
  ❏ 32- 60 Combination English/Program courses
  ❏ Below 32 requires Intensive English Language Program

  IELTS
  ❏ 6.0 Minimum Program Requirement
  ❏ 5.5-5.9 Combination English/Program courses
  ❏ Below 5.5 requires Intensive English Language Program

Undergraduate Programs (On-line):

  ❏ On-line programs taught in English have the same language requirements as
    residential programs.
  ❏ On-line programs taught bilingually do not have an English language
    requirement. The second non-English language must be the native language of
    the student.

Graduate Programs (Residential):

  TOEFL (Computer-based Test)
  ❏ 173 Minimum Program Requirement
  ❏ 97- 172 Combination English/Program courses
  ❏ Below 97 requires Intensive English Language Program

  TOEFL (Internet-based Test)
  ❏ 61 Minimum Program Requirement
  ❏ 32- 60 Combination English/Program courses
  ❏ Below 32 requires Intensive English Language Program

  IELTS
  ❏ 6.0 Minimum Program Requirement

20
  ❏ 5.5-5.9 Combination English/Program courses
  ❏ Below 5.5 requires Intensive English Language Program

Graduate Programs (Online):

  ❏ On-line programs taught solely in English have same language requirement as
    residential programs.
  ❏ On-line programs taught bilingually do not have an English language requirement.
    However, the second non-English language must be the native language of
    the student.

Transcript Requirement – Transcripts sent from any school, college, or university that is
recorded in a language other than English must be accompanied by a certified translation.
All documents must be original or a certified copy. Transcript translation service is
available through World Education Services www.wes.org or another agency accredited by
the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (www.naces.org).

Visa Requirement – Students must have been issued the appropriate visa to enter
the United States. Contact the international student office for more information about
visa requirements.

Health Insurance – Health insurance is strongly recommended for all international
students and their dependents. The international student office has information on
insurance programs. Students can apply through those or find one independently.

Additional information for International students attending Stratford University:

  1. Leave of Absence – Students can apply for a leave of absence after completing
     three quarters of full-time study. If students wish to take a leave they must inform
     the International Student Advisor of their intention during the general registration
     period for that quarter. If students contact the office after the general registration
     period they may not be granted leave and will have to register for full-time classes
     and will have to pay any fines associated with late registration.

  2. Full Time Status – International students must maintain fulltime status at all
     times. For under graduate students this means a minimum of 13.5 credits per quarter
     and for graduate students it means a minimum of 9 credits per quarter. Students
     who are also participating in English language courses must provide proof with
     their registration forms and may be allowed to take less than full time credits.

  3. Working on campus – There are a few on campus opportunities for students
     to participate in. Students who are interested should contact the International
                                                                                       21
     Student Advisor as soon as possible and let them know of their interest. If a position
     becomes available the student will be contacted either by the international student
     advisor or by a staff member of the University.

  4. Curricular Practical Training (CPT) – CPT is a work authorization for students
     holding F-1 visas. CPT is specialized curriculum-based training linked to their
     field of study. Students are allowed and encouraged to pursue CPT opportunities
     during their enrollment at Stratford. CPT is available after a student completes one
     academic year of study (3 quarters of enrollment).

  5. Optional Practical Training (OPT) – At the end of their program of study, students
     are allowed to apply for optional practical training (OPT). OPT is specialized
     training that a student seeks in his/her field of study and can be granted for up
     to one year. Interested students can apply for OPT 90 days prior to graduating and
     must apply by the end of their program if they wish to pursue it. Each time a student
     seeks a higher level of education they become eligible for another period of OPT. F–
     1 students who have completed a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics
     (STEM) degree and accept employment with employers enrolled in U.S. Citizenship
     and Immigration Services’ (USCIS’) E-Verify employment verification program are
     eligible for an extension of 17 months, in addition to their initial 12 months of OPT.
     This rule extends the maximum period of OPT from 12 months to 29 months, as
     long as the job is directly related to the student’s major area of study.

  6. Contact Information – Under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) rules ,
     as long as a student is affiliated with Stratford University he or she must supply the
     University with up-to-date contact information including their telephone number,
     address, email address, and emergency contact information. If something changes
     it is the student’s responsibility to notify the university within 10 days. If a student
     fails to maintain his/her record he/she could lose their status as a student.

  7. Payments – International students need to maintain a zero balance when
     transitioning between quarters.

Non-Discrimination Policy
Stratford University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national
origin, sex, age or handicap. The school complies with the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
related executive orders 11246 and 11375, Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of
1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 402 of the Vietnam
Era Veteran’s Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 and all civil rights laws of Virginia.


22
Admission Process
The specific steps to gain admission to the University are as follows:

  1. The candidate submits a completed Application for Admission together with the
     nonrefundable application fee. This application can either be sent in advance of
     an interview or be completed during the interview.

  2. Undergraduate school applicants must interview with the admissions department
     to determine if the student can be accepted into the University. Graduate school
     applicants must be interviewed by the Dean of the Graduate School or a designee, in
     addition to an interview with the Admissions Department. Admissions decisions will
     be based on meeting the admissions requirements and completing an acceptable
     plan to cover tuition costs. The financial planning department is available to assist
     students with financial aid, for those who qualify, and payment plans.

  3. Once accepted for admission, students are required to register for the first quarter
     classes and purchase textbooks.

Student Financial Aid Services
It is the goal of Stratford University to assist every qualified student in procuring financial
aid that enables the student to attend the University. The University participates in a variety
of federal student financial assistance programs. The financial aid programs are designed
to provide assistance to students who are currently enrolled or accepted for enrollment,
but whose financial resources are inadequate to meet the full cost of their education.

The majority of financial aid available to students is provided by the Federal Government and
is called Federal Student Aid (FSA). This includes the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Family
Educational Loan (FFEL) and Direct Lending program for subsidized and unsubsidized
Stafford Loan and Federal Parent Loans for graduate and undergraduate students)

The University also utilizes alternate source funding provided by the institution and
through other private agencies. Alternate source loans enable the student to contribute
to his/her education while in the University.

The primary responsibility for meeting the costs of education rests with the individual
student and his or her family. A subsidized loan is awarded on the basis of need, regardless
of sex, age, race, religion, creed or national origin. Need is defined as the difference
between the cost of education for one academic year and the amount a student’s family

                                                                                           23
can be reasonably expected to contribute to this cost of education for the same period.
A student may borrow loan funds beyond his or her subsidized loan amount even if he
or she does not have demonstrated financial need. In that case, he or she will receive an
unsubsidized loan.

Consumer Information
Most of the information dissemination activities required by the Higher Education
Reauthorization Act 2008 have been satisfied within this catalog. However, student
finance personnel are available, in accordance with federal regulations, to discuss
consumer information in more detail with current and prospective students.

To be eligible for financial aid, a student must:

  ❏ Be enrolled as a regular student in an eligible program of study on at least a
    half-time basis;
  ❏ Have a high school diploma or the equivalent;
  ❏ Be a U.S. citizen or national, or an eligible non-citizen. Verification of eligible non-
    citizen status will be required;
  ❏ Have financial need (except for some loan programs) as determined by a need
    analysis system approved by the Department of Education;
  ❏ Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP);
  ❏ Provide required documentation for the verification process and determination
    of dependency status;
  ❏ Have a valid Social Security Number;
  ❏ Not have borrowed in excess of the annual aggregate loan limits for the Title IV
    financial aid programs;
  ❏ Be registered for the Selective Service, if required; and
  ❏ Sign an updated Statement of Educational Purpose\Certification Statement on
    refunds and default.

Application
Students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) annually.
This application is available on paper from the Department of Education or online at
www.fafsa.ed.gov The application must be completed with extreme care and accuracy.
Our Student Financial Aid Officers are available to assist students in the completion of
this form and to answer questions.

The FAFSA is used to determine eligibility for all types of federal financial aid programs.


24
Once processed, the application will produce an Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
which determines eligibility. Financial aid from federal programs is not guaranteed
from one year to the next. Each student must reapply every year. Also, if the student
changes universities, the aid does not automatically go with them. Each student should
check with the new university to find out the appropriate procedures for reapplying
for financial aid.

Need and Cost of Attendance

Once the application is completed, the information will be used in a formula established
by the U.S. Congress that calculates need and helps determine eligibility. When
combined with other aid and resources, a student’s aid package may not exceed the cost
of attendance.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students must meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress in order to remain
eligible to continue receiving financial assistance as well as to remain eligible to
continue as a student of Stratford University.

The Financial Aid Office will provide details to all eligible recipients. Students should
read these standards carefully and refer any questions to academic or student finance
personnel. Satisfactory academic progress for purposes of determining continuing federal
financial assistance is determined by applying the CGPA requirements, progression towards
completion requirements, maximum completion time restrictions, probation provisions,
suspension and dismissal procedures, and appeals procedures as outlined in this catalog.
Students on academic probation are considered to be maintaining satisfactory academic
progress and are eligible to continue receiving federal financial assistance.

Students who have been academically suspended or dismissed are no longer active
students of the university and are ineligible for financial aid. Reinstatement of financial
aid eligibility will occur only after readmission following suspension or in the event the
student’s appeal results in readmission.

Policies and Procedures for Verification

  1. All selected applicants will be verified.
  2. The selected applicants must submit required verification documents within 3 days
     of notification.
  3. If a student fails to provide the required documentation within the established
     time frame, he/she will be treated as a cash paying student until the documents
     are provided.
                                                                                       25
  4. The Financial Aid Office reserves the right to make exceptions to the above stated
      policies due to extenuating circumstances, on a case-by-case basis.
  5. Students will be given a clear explanation of the documentation needed to satisfy
      the verification requirements and the process for the document submission.
  6. The University will inform students in a timely manner of the consequences
      of failing to complete the verification requirements and the actions the University
      will take if the student does not submit the requested documentation within the
      time period specified.
  7. Students will be informed of their responsibilities regarding the verification
      of application information, including the University’s deadline for completion of
      any actions required.
  8. Students will be notified if the results of the verification will change the student’s
      scheduled award.
  9. The University will assist the student in correcting erroneous information.
  10. Any suspected case of fraud will be reported to the Regional Office of the Inspector
      General, or if more appropriate, to a state or local law enforcement agency having
      jurisdiction to investigate the matter. Referrals to local or state agencies will be
      reported on an annual basis to the Inspector General.
  11. No interim disbursements of Title IV aid will be made prior to the completion
      of verification.

Student Financial Aid Disbursements

Federal regulations require that Federal Family Education Loans (subsidized and
unsubsidized Stafford) cannot be released nor can a Federal PLUS loan application be
certified until financial aid information has been received from all colleges an applicant
attended. Financial aid information is necessary even if the student did not receive any
aid. The institution may get this information by using the financial aid information they
receive from the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) page of the student’s SAR/
ISIR. The student’s SAR/ISIR must include a valid EFC code prior to disbursement.

General

All Title IV financial aid funds received by the institution will be credited to the student’s
account (excluding Federal Work-Study) with the exception of requirements set forth in
Section 682.604 of current federal regulations.

All students who do not complete the financial aid process (e.g., do not submit all
required documents) by the end of the second week of their first term of enrollment
will be packaged as cash paying students and notified of the payment plan. A student is
considered financed (also referred to as “packaged”) when the following has occurred:

26
  ❏   His/her eligibility has been determined, and
  ❏   His/her ISIR has been received, and
  ❏   His/her Federal Stafford Loan MPN has been completed and sent to the lender, and
  ❏   Verification has been completed and all required documents are in the file, and
  ❏   Plus or alternative loan applications have been certified, and
  ❏   He/she has been notified of an accepted, required cash payment plan.

Repackaging of Loans

Students are required to repackage their financial aid prior to the beginning of a new
academic year (which is equivalent to 3 quarters). It is the students’ responsibility to
contact the Financial Aid Office two weeks prior to the end of their academic year. For
PELL/FSEOG recipients, the student must contact the Financial Aid Office two weeks
prior to the close-out of the Financial Aid year ( June 30).

Selection of Eligible Applicants
In accordance with Federal Regulation 668.43(b) (3) the following procedures describe
how aid recipients are selected from the pool of eligible applicants.

Federal PELL Grant

This grant is designed to assist needy students who desire to continue their education beyond
high school. Federal PELL Grants are only awarded to undergraduate students who have
not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree and students who are enrolled in an eligible
post-baccalaureate teacher certification program if they meet certain requirements. Each
student is entitled to apply for a Federal PELL Grant. Eligibility is determined by the
student’s need, the cost of attendance, and the amount of money appropriated by Congress
to fund the program. The amount of the grant is determined by a standard formula
used by the Department of Education. The amount of the grant available to the student
will depend on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and the cost of attendance. For
many students, the Federal PELL Grant provides a “foundation” of financial aid to which
other aid may be added to defray the cost of university education. Students or prospective
students must complete a FAFSA in order to participate in the PELL Grant program. The
application will be transmitted electronically through a federally approved need analysis
system, which will determine the applicant’s Expected Family Contribution (EFC).

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

This grant is available to students with exceptional financial need. In determining
student eligibility, the university will base the selection on procedures designed to make

                                                                                         27
FSEOG awards to those students with the lowest expected family contribution (EFC) who
will also receive a Federal Pell Grant in that award year. The amount of the grant, and
the number of students who may receive this grant, depend on the availability of funds
from the U.S. Department of Education.

Academic Competitiveness and National SMART Grants
These grants are available to students in combination with the Pell Grant and other
estimated financial assistance that cannot exceed the Cost of Attendance (COA), but may
exceed need. Eligibility for these grants varies by grade level and program. In order to
qualify for either grant, the student must be:

  ❏   Enrolled in a 2-or 4-year degree granting school,
  ❏   A U.S. citizen,
  ❏   A full-time student, and
  ❏   Pell-eligible.

Academic Competitive Grant (ACG) qualifying students must:

  ❏ Be enrolled in first or second year of study,
  ❏ For first-year, not previously have been enrolled as an undergraduate, and must
    have completed high school after January 1, 2006, with the exception of dual-
    enrolled students who are not enrolled in a formal degree or certificate program,
    or
  ❏ For second-year, have completed high school after January 1, 2005, and have a
    cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 at end of first year of undergraduate education, and
  ❏ Have completed a rigorous course of study in high school (please see the financial
    aid office for additional information).

National SMART Grant qualifying students must:

  ❏ Be enrolled in third or fourth year of study,
  ❏ Obtain/maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 in the coursework required for
    the major, and
  ❏ Pursue one of several specific majors (please see the financial aid office for
    additional information).

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)
The Federal Work-Study program provides part-time employment to students who need
the earnings to defray the cost of their education. Students may work on or off campus

28
for a qualified public, private or community service organization. Application for the FWS
program may be made through the Student Financial Aid Office and eligibility is based on
financial need and the availability of funds. The University will attempt to place students
in jobs related to their program of study, and work schedules will be arranged according
to class schedules. The amount of the grant, and the number of students who may receive
this grant, depend on the availability of funds from the U.S. Department of Education.

Federal Family Educational Loan Program (FFELP) / Direct
Lending Program
Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans are low interest loans that are insured by a guarantee
agency and made to the student by a lender such as a bank, credit union, savings and
loan association, or the Federal Government.

Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans

The terms of an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan are the same as those for a Subsidized
Stafford Loan except the Government does not pay interest on the student’s behalf on
an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. All interest that accrues on the loan during enrollment
and the grace period is required to be paid by the student. The student has two options
of repayment of the accrued interest: either pay the interest while in school or it will be
capitalized (i.e. added to the loan principal amount).

Repayment of Stafford Loans start six months after the student drops below half-time
status, withdraws from the University, or graduates.

Federal PLUS Loans

The Federal PLUS loan is available to parents of dependent students to help pay for
the educational expenses of the student. PLUS loans are not based on need, but when
combined with other resources, cannot exceed the student cost of education. Parents may
borrow up to the cost of attendance minus other aid per eligible dependent student.

Repayment of Federal PLUS Loans start six months after the student drops below half-
time status, withdraws from the University, or graduates.

Borrower Rights and Borrower Responsibilities
When a student takes on a student loan he/she has certain rights and responsibilities.

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The borrower has the right to receive the following information before the first
loan disbursement:

  ❏   The full amount of the loan;
  ❏   The interest rate;
  ❏   When the student must start repaying the loan;
  ❏   The effect borrowing will have on the student’s eligibility for other types of financial
      aid;
  ❏   A complete list of any charges the student must pay (loan fees) and information on
      how those charges are collected;
  ❏   The yearly and total amounts the student can borrow;
  ❏   The maximum repayment periods and the minimum repayment amount;
  ❏   An explanation of default and its consequences;
  ❏   An explanation of available options for consolidating or refinancing the student
      loan; and
  ❏   A statement that the student can prepay the loan at any time without penalty.

The borrower has the right to receive the following information before leaving school:

  ❏ The amount of the student’s total debt (principal and estimated interest), what the
    student’s interest rate is, and the total interest charges on the loan(s);
  ❏ A loan repayment schedule that lets the student know when his/her first payment
    is due, the number and frequency of payments, and the amount of each payment;
  ❏ If the student has FFEL Program Loans, the name of the lender or agency that
    holds the student’s loan(s), where to send the student’s payments, and where to
    write or call if the student has questions;
  ❏ The fees the student should expect during the repayment period, such as late
    charges and collection or litigation costs if delinquent or in default;
  ❏ An explanation of available options for consolidating or refinancing the student’s
    loan; and
  ❏ A statement that the student can repay his/her loan without penalty at any time.

The borrower has a responsibility to:

  ❏ Understand that by signing the promissory note, the student is agreeing to repay
    the loan according to the terms of the note;
  ❏ Make payments on the student loan even if the student does not receive a bill or
    repayment notice;
  ❏ Make payments on the student loan even after applying for a deferment or
    forbearance, until notification that the request has been granted;
  ❏ Notify the appropriate representative (institution, agency, or lender) that manages
    the student’s loan when the student graduates, withdraws from school, or drops
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    below half-time status; changes his/her name, address, or Social Security Number,
    or transfers to another institution; and
  ❏ Receive entrance counseling before being given the first loan disbursement, and
    receive exit counseling before leaving school.

Entrance and Exit Interview/Loan Counseling

The Department of Education requires that any students receiving a Federal Family
Educational Loan be notified concerning their loans. The University counsels each
student regarding loan indebtedness and gives each student an entrance test and mails
an exit interview regarding the loan to make sure the student understands the amount
borrowed and the student’s rights and responsibilities regarding repayment. The student
must report to the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawal or graduation for loan
counseling. The purpose of this session is to inform the student of their tentative total
loans received while in attendance at the University, refunds that may be made, and to
provide the student with an estimated payment schedule. If the student is unable to meet
with the Financial Aid Office, an exit interview will be mailed. In order to qualify for
any form of financial aid, the student must be enrolled in a program which is approved
for financial aid by the United States Department of Education. Contact the University’s
Financial Aid Office for more specific information. See the Financial Aid officer, or the
Debt Management Guide located in the Financial Aid Office to find out more information
regarding deferments and forbearances.

Veterans Administration Benefits
Stratford University is approved for the training of veterans, service persons, disabled
veterans and survivors or dependents of veterans. Contact the University to learn if the
program you want is approved. It is the responsibility of the Veterans Administration
(VA) to determine the eligibility and to approve payments. Veterans are encouraged
to contact their local VA Regional Office to determine eligibility. The eligible person must
submit to the University a Certified Official copy of discharge or release papers from the
military (Form DD214) if applicable. Then, the applicant must submit an Application
for Educational Benefits (Form 22-1990) or Request for Change of Program or Place
of Training (Form 22-1995) if previous benefits have been received. It should be noted
that tuition payments are due on schedule regardless of schedule of receipt of benefits
from the VA.

Vocational Rehabilitation Benefits
Stratford University is approved for Vocational Rehabilitation Benefits. Contact the State
Department of Rehabilitative Services in your area to determine your eligibility and

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to obtain approval for payment of benefits. The University must have this approval in
writing before the student is allowed to enroll.

Private Financing
Private financing is available for credit-worthy individuals from Sallie Mae and SunTrust.
This is financing from outside agencies not affiliated with the Federal Financial Aid
program. Please see the Financial Planning office for more information.

Scholarship Programs
Active duty military are eligible to participate in the Stratford University military tuition
assistance (TA) program and Stratford University is proud to make this available to
those men and women who serve our country. Military members who are eligible for
tuition assistance will have the costs of tuition remaining waived after TA benefits are
applied. This includes active duty military spouses and reservists who have served on
active duty. Students are responsible for all books and fees outside of tuition. Stratford
University offers several scholarship programs. Information about applying is available
in our Admissions Department.

Stratford University Academic Scholarship Program - The Stratford University Academic
Scholarship Program is designed for current students and graduates who are entering
a bachelor of arts, bachelor of science, or master’s degree program meeting the
following criteria:

  ❏ Current Stratford University students who are in their final quarter and have a
    cumulative GPA of 3.5 or better; or
  ❏ Stratford University graduates with an AAS degree who finished with an overall
    GPA of 3.5 or better; or
  ❏ Stratford University graduates with a Bachelor’s degree who finished with an
    overall GPA of 3.5 or better.

Undergraduate students who meet these criteria are awarded a maximum of $1,500, which
is disbursed in equal portions of $250 per quarter, for six quarters. Graduate students
meeting these criteria are awarded a maximum of $1,050, which is also disbursed in six
equal portions of $175 per quarter. To remain eligible for this scholarship, students must
take at least two courses during the quarter, maintain a 3.0 GPA for each quarter, and
also maintain good-standing status (undergrad 9 credits, graduate 9 credits).

High School Senior Scholarship Program - The Graduating Senior Scholarship Program is
designed for eligible high school seniors who enroll at Stratford University during the summer
and fall quarters following their high school graduation. In order to qualify, students must:
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  ❏ Complete and submit a scholarship application, normally before July 15th of the
    calendar year of which the student intends to enter Stratford University;
  ❏ Provide evidence of having a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better;
  ❏ Submit an essay which demonstrates the desire to achieve success in entering the
    student’s selected program;
  ❏ Provide evidence of being a well-rounded individual who has participated in school
    activities, community service, etc.

Selected students will receive $500.00 at the beginning of their third and sixth quarters of
enrollment. Scholarship winners are chosen by the HS Scholarship Committee consisting of
the Campus Director, the Financial Aid Administrator, and the Dean of Arts and Sciences.

Departmental Merit Scholarships - Funds permitting, Stratford University holds and/
or participates in competitions in which area residents compete. Program Deans may at
their discretion award merit-based scholarships of up to $2000 to contest winners and to
entrants showing special promise.

Note: For information on additional outside scholarships, students should visit our
Financial Aid Office.

Tuition and Fees
Tuition and fees are based on the level and type of the student’s program. All students in
the same program are charged the same tuition and fees except for active-duty military
personnel. The current Catalog Addendum contains a complete listing of current tuition
and fees. The University reserves the right to adjust tuition and fees at any time.

Student Services and Welcome Center
Student success is a vital measure of the University’s success. The mission of the Student
Services and Welcome Center is to provide a supportive environment to ensure student
academic success.

The Center provides referrals for academic and personal issues, tutoring services,
and scholarship resources. In addition, Student Services organizes quarterly student
activities and social events. Student Services also publishes the “Stratford Hype” student
newsletter on a periodic basis.

The Student Services Coordinator is the mediator between students and staff. Students
are encouraged to bring all questions, concerns and comments to the attention of
Student Services.

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The University provides academic counseling and support to students who are not meeting
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). Students are strongly encouraged to schedule an
appointment to meet with a tutor to meet and overcome any academic challenges.

Career Services
Career assistance is provided throughout the normal course of study by instructors and
the Career Services Staff. This team will help you with your detailed job search during
the last phase of your program.

The Career Services Office offers a full range of assistance to currently enrolled students
and alumni to further their professional development and transition into their career
field. To assist upcoming graduates with their job search preparation, the University
offers the following resources:

  ❏ Job search preparation, including resume and cover letter writing, interviewing
    skills and practice, and business etiquette.
  ❏ Information regarding job vacancies, job directories, on-campus interviews and
    job fairs. Students must sign an authorization form and have a current resume on
    file in order to receive job assistance. In addition, graduates should notify Career
    Services as soon as they become employed in their career field.

Job search assistance is always available to alumni who remain in their field of study.
Stratford University does not guarantee employment.

Counseling and Academic Advising
The University provides counseling services through referrals to community agencies for
additional assistance. Students see an academic advisor prior to each registration.

Student Activities
Stratford University sponsors a variety of student activities and organizations, including:

  ❏ The School of Computer Information Systems sponsors the IT and Certification
    Clubs at the Woodbridge Campus.
  ❏ The International Student Club enables students to cultivate meaningful
    relationships with each other through social activities, fund raisers, and
    cultural events.

For additional student activities, please see Student Services.

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Academic Policies
Term and Credit System
Stratford University operates on a quarter-credit system. For administrative and
financial purposes the student’s academic year is divided into three ten- week quarters.
Several programs have an A and B schedule each quarter. It normally takes 30 months
(4 academic years) to complete a bachelor’s degree, 15 months (2 academic years) to
complete an AAS degree, and 12 months (1.66 academic years) to complete a diploma.
Institutional policy defines an undergraduate full-time student as one registered
for at least 13.5 quarter-credit per ten- week quarter. A full-time graduate student is
one registered for at least 9 quarter-credit per ten-week quarter. For purposes of calculating
units of credit, one quarter credit is equivalent to ten hours of lecture instruction,
twenty hours of laboratory instruction, or thirty hours of externship experience.
Many classes at Stratford University are designed to be a combination of lecture and
laboratory instruction.

Grading System
The formal grading system utilized by the Stratford University instructional team
conforms to recognized educational standards.

Undergraduate Grading System

                Grade            Grade Points               Description
                  A                  4.0                    Excellent
                  B                  3.0                    Very Good
                  C                  2.0                    Average
                  D                  1.0                    Poor
                  F                  0.0                    Failing
                  I                  0.0                    Incomplete
                  W                  0.0                    Withdrawal
                 TC                  0.0                    Transfer Credit
                  R                  0.0                    Repeated Course
                 AU                  0.0                    Audited Course
                 AP                  0.0                    Advanced Placement
                 CE                  0.0                    Credit by Exam




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Graduate Grading System

                Grade           Grade Points               Description
                  A                 4.00                   Excellent
                  A-                3.67
                  B+                3.33
                  B                 3.00                   Average
                  B-                2.67
                  C+                2.33
                  C                 2.00                   Poor
                  C-                1.67
                  D+                1.33
                  D                 1.00                   Very Poor
                  F                 0.00                   Failing
                  I                 0.00                   Incomplete
                  W                 0.00                   Withdrawal
                  TC                0.00                   Transfer Credit
                  R                 0.00                   Repeated Course
                  AU                0.00                   Audited Course
                  CE                0.00                   Credit by Exam

Grade Appeal
A grade appeal must be initiated by the student within three weeks of receiving the
grade. A written request must be submitted to the instructor of the class. If the issue is
not resolved, the written request must be submitted to the appropriate Program Dean
or coordinator. If after a review by the Program Dean the issue remains unresolved, a
committee of uninvolved faculty or staff will be selected for the grade appeal hearing.
Both the student and the faculty member may present information. The committee will
notify the student and the instructor of its findings within seven days of the hearing. All
decisions are final.

Students that Receive a Grade of Incomplete
A student is required to make up any incomplete course work within five weeks of the
conclusion of the course. If the work is not completed and approved by the instructor
within this five-week period, the grade converts from an I to an F. Incomplete courses
do not factor into a student’s grade point average; however they do count as credits
attempted without credits earned for purposes of satisfactory academic progress (SAP).



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Students that Receive a Grade of W
A student who withdraws from a class after the drop/add period will be awarded a grade
of W and is charged tuition at the regular published rate. A W grade is counted as credits
attempted without credits earned in rate-of-progress calculations.

Withdrawals during Add/Drop Period

If a student drops a class during the Add/Drop Period, all records related to that class
will be removed from the student’s academic and financial records. The student will not
be charged tuition or fees for that class. Graduate students will be assessed a $50 fee per
Add/Drop form.

Last date of Attendance

If a student fails to submit a class withdrawal using an official Stratford Add/Drop form,
the official last day of attendance will be the end of the quarter. (This requirement may
be waived for online students upon review by the Dean of On-line Learning. However,
online students wishing to drop a class must send notice via regular mail or email to the
Registrar’s Office and receive a confirmation email from the Registrar.)

Tuition and Fee Waivers

Tuition and fee waivers for classes dropped after the add/drop period can only be
approved for mitigating circumstances. A justification granting permission for a late
add/drop needs to be submitted by the respective Dean, which in turn must be approved
by the Campus Administrator (or their designated representative) prior to being posted
to the student Ledger Card. No adjustments can be made without such written approval.

Course Repetitions
A student who is required to repeat a course must complete it within the maximum time
frame and is charged tuition at the regular published rate. All course repetitions count
as courses attempted for purposes of calculating satisfactory academic progress. The
GPA will be based only on the latest attempt of the course; previous attempts will not be
computed in the GPA calculation.

Auditing courses
A student who has been admitted to Stratford University may choose to register for a class
for “audit” (no academic credit). A student may not change status in a class from audit

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to credit after the mid-point of the class. An auditor is not required to take an active part
in the class or to take or pass examinations. Classes taken for audit may be repeated for
credit. Audit courses are subject to all regular tuition and fees. Audited classes do not
count as credits attempted for purposes of calculating satisfactory academic progress
and have no effect on the GPA.

Course Exemption Policy
Some students enter the University possessing certain skills which allow them to begin
at an advanced point in the program of study or to exempt a class during the program.
In order to serve the specific educational needs of these students, each appropriate dean
shall have the authority to design an individual program of study for these students.
Exemptions cannot be granted by other Stratford University personnel. Advanced credit is
normally limited to 9 quarter-hour credits for a lower division (AA/AAS level) program and
9 quarter-hour credits for an upper division (BA/BS level) program. Course exemptions
normally apply only to major courses, not to general education courses. The primary
exception is the case in which a student transfers in advanced mathematics courses. In
this case, the student will be exempted from any mathematics courses considered to be
of a lower level than the course(s) transferred in. He or she will instead be permitted to
take an appropriate Stratford University elective in place of the exempted course.

  1. The appropriate dean or qualified faculty member shall evaluate the student’s
     prior knowledge or skill set through means such as credit by exam, practical
     examination, certification or other avenues.
  2. In conjunction with the student, the dean will determine which course(s) may
     be exempted.
  3. The student will still be required to complete the appropriate number of credits
     (diploma – 63; associate degree – 90; bachelor’s degree – 180; Master of Science
     and International Master of Business Administration – 54; (Master of Business
     Administration – 90). Exempted classes do not carry credit toward the degree
     or diploma.
  4. Exempted classes will be replaced with appropriate Stratford University electives
     chosen by the student in conjunction with their Program Dean or advisor.

Registration
Students must register for classes each quarter. The institution charges tuition each
quarter based on the number of credits the student selects during registration at the
published tuition rate. Students are required to register for classes before the start of
the quarter in question or during the published late registration period. Graduate level
students registering during late registration period will be assessed late registration fees.

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After this point, the student may only add or drop classes during the add/drop period.
Once the student has registered for the class, the only way to not be charged tuition is to
drop the class using the add/drop form during the add/drop period.

Add/Drop Period
The add/drop period is the first week of each ten-week quarter. During the add/drop
period, a student may drop from a class without incurring any financial penalty. Students
that begin classes for Session B may drop a class the first week of enrollment without
incurring financial penalty. Students that wish to change their registration status may
add or drop a class or classes and must submit the completed add/drop form to the
Registrar’s Office. If a drop form is received after the add/drop period has expired, the
student will be responsible for charges based on the institutional refund policy.

Withdrawing from Stratford University
If a student withdraws entirely from the institution, it is strongly recommended that the
student notify the Registrar’s Office in writing as soon as possible to begin the process
to withdraw from the University. If a student does not notify the University (in writing
as recommended or by contacting the Registrar verbally) of the intent to withdraw, it is
likely that the student will receive a failing or withdrawal (W) grade in all registered
classes and that the student may incur additional costs. When the student withdraws,
the institution will determine if any outside funding must be returned based on the
requirements of the funding source. Students who fail to register for the quarter will be
withdrawn from the University.

Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress
In order to achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress, a student must maintain a minimum
cumulative grade point average and complete the program within a specified maximum
time based on quarter credit hours.

Maximum Time Frame – Students must progress through the program at a pace that
will ensure successful completion within 1.5 times the program length as measured in
quarter credit hours attempted. If a student cannot complete the program within the
Maximum Time Frame (MTF), the student will be dismissed. The maximum time frame
for diploma and degree programs is shown in the following table:




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     Program Type            Graduation Requirement       Maximum Time Frame (MTF)
     Diploma                 63 Quarter Credits           94.5 Quarter Credits
     Associate’s Degree      90 Quarter Credits           135 Quarter Credits
     Bachelor’s Degree       180 Quarter Credits          270 Quarter Credits
     Master’s Degree         54 Quarter Credits           81 Quarter Credits
     Master of Business
     Administration          90 Quarter Credits           135 Quarter Credits

Minimum Completion Percentage – In order to ensure that the MTF condition will
be met, the Completion percentage will be tracked throughout the program. Completion
percentage is the percentage of attempted courses that are completed with a D or above.
All courses, including withdrawal and retakes, will be included in credit hours attempted
and hence will impact the completion percentage. When the attempted credits are 25%
of the MTF a completion percentage of less than 55% will result in probation. When the
attempted credits are 50% of the MTF, a completion percentage of less than 60% will
result in dismissal. When the attempted are 75% of the MTF, a completed percentage of
less than 60% will result in dismissal. The completion percentage must be 67% or greater
to graduate. Completion percentage is computed at the end of each quarter.

Undergraduate Minimum Cumulative Grade Average – The student must complete
the program with a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 to graduate. Grades
will be measured at the end of each quarter. Stratford University uses a 4.0 scale.
Withdrawals are not included in the GPA. In the case of retakes, only the highest grade is
included in the GPA. When the attempted credits are 25% of the MTF, a CGPA below 1.35
will result in probation and below 1.0 in dismissal. When the attempted credits are 50%
of the MTF, a CGPA below 1.70 will result in probation and below 1.5 in dismissal. When
the attempted credits are 75% of the MTF, a CGPA below 1.85 will result in probation and
below 1.5 in dismissal. The student must achieve a CGPA of 2.0 to graduate.

Graduate Minimum Cumulative Grade Average – The student must complete the
program with a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 to graduate. Grades will
be measured at the end of each quarter. Stratford University uses a 4.0 scale. Withdrawals
are not included in the GPA. In the case of retakes, only the highest grade is included in
the GPA. When the attempted credits are 25% of the MTF, a CGPA below 2.0 will result in
probation and below 1.5 in dismissal. When the attempted credits are 50% of the MTF, a
CGPA below 2.5 will result in probation and below 2.0 in dismissal. When the attempted
credits are 75% of the MTF, a CGPA below 2.75 will result in probation and below 2.50 in
dismissal. The student must achieve a CGPA of 3.0 to graduate.

Program Changes – When a student changes programs within Stratford University,
only classes that apply toward the new program’s degree are calculated in the student’s

40
CGPA and course completion percentage. The student’s standard program length will be
recalculated, and the student will start with the recalculated CGPA, credits attempted
and credits completed for purposes of determining satisfactory academic progress. In
order for students to transfer into another program, the student must have completed at
least 67% of their current program and have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 or higher
at 50% of the MTF.

Transfer Credits – transfer credits from another institution is noted on the transcript
with a grade of “TC”. Transferred courses have no effect on grade point average. These
courses meet the graduation requirements only. The student’s standard program length
will be reduced by the number of transfer credits. Transfer credits have no effect on
calculations of the number of credits that a student has attempted or completed while at
Stratford University. Students may transfer credits earned from another program within
Stratford University after approval of the appropriate dean.

Graduate and undergraduate credits may be transferred from other accredited institutions,
provided courses are related to the intended program of study with at least a grade of C
or higher. Courses with other grades may be transferred in at the discretion of the dean.
Credits must normally be earned before enrollment into Stratford University.

Certain training received from prior military schools, military service, or prior work
experiences may be awarded as transfer credit. The military service records, job
descriptions, DD214, and/or passing a challenge examination may be required to receive
this credit.

Transfer of credit is initiated by the receipt of an official copy of all transcripts from
higher education institutions attended prior to acceptance by Stratford University. The
official copy of the transcript is submitted to the Registrar’s Office and forwarded to
the transcript evaluator. Additional documentation in the form of course descriptions,
syllabi, or a competency test may be requested if needed to assure that the transferred
course is equivalent to one of the courses required for completion of a degree or diploma
at Stratford University.

The Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree is mainly considered to be a terminal
degree. While Stratford will normally accepts a Stratford A.A.S. degree toward a
subsequent Stratford B.A. or B.S. degree in the same program track, the Stratford A.A.S.
degree may or may not be transferable to a baccalaureate degree program at another
educational institution. Transfer of credits received from Stratford University to another
institution is solely at the discretion of the granting institution.

No guarantee of transfer is made or implied by Stratford University.

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Summary of Academic Progress Policy – The Satisfactory Academic Progress
Conditions are summarized in the tables below. Satisfactory Academic Progress is
computed at the end of each quarter. If you are close to any critical cutoff, make an
appointment with your academic advisor to schedule appropriate assistance.

In addition to the previously referenced evaluation points (25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%
of MTF), students are evaluated at the completion of each academic year to determine
eligibility for continued federal financial assistance. An academic year must include at
least 30 weeks of instruction (3 quarters) and 36 hours of undergraduate earned credits
or 27 hours of graduate earned credits. The SAP requirements for that evaluation are
based on the following tables:

Undergraduate SAP Summary Table
     Percent of MTF     Cumulative GPA        Cumulative GPA          Completion
       Attempted        Probation Cutoff      Dismissal Cutoff     Percentage Cutoff
           25%                1.35                 1.00             55% (Probation)
           50%                1.70                 1.50             60% (Dismissal)
           75%                1.85                 1.75             60% (Dismissal)
          100%               2.00                  2.00             67% (Dismissal)

Graduate SAP Summary Table
     Percent of MTF     Cumulative GPA        Cumulative GPA          Completion
       Attempted        Probation Cutoff      Dismissal Cutoff     Percentage Cutoff
           25%               2.00                  1.50             55% (Probation)
           50%                2.50                 2.00             60% (Dismissal)
           75%                2.75                 2.50             60% (Dismissal)
          100%               3.00                  3.00             67% (Dismissal)

Financial Aid Eligibility – While on probation, a student can continue to receive
financial aid. If a student fails to make satisfactory academic progress, their financial
aid will be terminated.

Appeal of Dismissal Due to Unsatisfactory Academic Progress
A student who is placed on probation or dismissed may appeal the action through the
following appeal sequence:

  ❏ Appeals must be submitted in writing and describe any mitigating circumstances
    the student feels deserve further consideration.

42
  ❏ The appeal is forwarded to the Campus Director and the appropriate dean who will
    review the written records, collect other information as necessary, and issue the
    final determination within ten (10) days from the date of the original request.

Readmission to the University after Dismissal for Unsatisfactory
Academic Progress
A student who has been dismissed from the University may petition to be readmitted. In
order to be considered the student must submit a written petition which describes the
changes in behavior or circumstance that will result in improved academic performance.
The readmission petition must be forwarded to the Campus Director and the appropriate
dean at least ten days before the beginning of the quarter in which the student requests
readmission. The Campus Director, through whatever means, will determine if the
student has demonstrated a likelihood of future success in the program of study. If the
Campus Director determines that there is a likelihood of future success, the student may
be permitted to retake previously failed, incomplete, or withdrawn courses in order to
improve the student’s GPA and course completion percentage. During this period, the
student is not matriculating at the University and must pay the full published tuition and
fees for the coursework without recourse to Federal Student Financial Assistance funds.
During this period, the student may enroll in only one course per five-week term, and
may not attempt more than 13.5 credits.

If the student’s GPA improves to at least 1.5 and the student successfully completes all of
the courses attempted during this period, then the student may be formally readmitted
to the University. At this time, eligibility for student financial assistance funds may
be restored, and the student will be placed on academic probation for at least one
additional quarter.

If the Campus Director determines that there is not a likelihood of future success,
the student will not be permitted to re-enter the institution.

Leave of Absence
Students who receive Federal Financial Aid (Title IV) are not eligible for a leave of
absence. If Title IV recipients are not enrolled for one quarter, they will be reported
as dropped to Federal loan officials. If they begin classes within the academic year,
the drop will be reversed. However, the loss in grace period will be reduced by the drop
period. This policy is required by Federal Aid regulations to ensure that loan repayment
start date is not improperly extended. Students who plan to return the next quarter
are encouraged to plan their class schedule with an academic advisor prior to leaving
for the term.

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Students who do not receive Federal Financial Aid (Title IV) are eligible for a leave of
absence of one quarter after they have successfully completed three quarters as full-time
students. Full-time students are defined as 9 quarter credits per quarter for a graduate
student and 13.5 quarter credits per quarter for an undergraduate student. International
students will be treated as “in status” during this leave period. In order to qualify, the
student must enroll in classes for the quarter following the period of leave. All leave
of absence request forms must be signed by the Program Dean, or their designated
representative. Any variations from this policy due to mitigating circumstances must be
approved both the Program Dean and the Campus Director.

International students are permitted a leave of absence after completion of one academic
year (3 quarters).

Maintaining Full-Time Status
In order to maintain full-time status, an undergraduate student must attempt for
academic credit at least 13.5 quarter credits each quarter. A graduate student must
attempt for academic credit at least 9 quarter-credits each quarter.

Undergraduate Student Requirements for Graduation
Students must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 and accumulate the minimum required
credits, and meet all core, elective, and general education requirements of the program
in order to receive a degree or diploma. Students must complete at least 25% of the
program credits at the University. Students must clear all financial obligations with the
University in order to be considered a graduate.

Graduate Student Requirements for Graduation
Students must achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 satisfy all programmatic requirements.
Students must complete core required courses in the program of study and must complete
at least 50% of the program credits in residence at the University. Students in an online
program are exempt from the residency requirement. Students must fulfill all degree
requirements within 5 years from beginning the first course.

Students who do not meet this requirement may petition for readmission and must
develop a degree plan that provides for completion within a 2-year period. The Graduate
School of Stratford University reserves the right to update/change the graduate curricula
at any time. Any candidate for a degree shall be held to compliance with changes for the
uncompleted portion of the program of study.


44
Changing Academic Programs
Students changing programs or credentials must complete the following steps:

  1. Submit a written request to change programs to the Registrar and obtain permission
     from the appropriate dean.
  2. Meet with the Business Office.
  3. Meet with a Financial Aid officer if necessary.
  4. Request a review of transfer credits if needed.

Warning, Probation, Suspension or Dismissal
The following may be considered as cause for probation, suspension, or dismissal:

  1.   Academic dishonesty of any kind
  2.   Failure to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress
  3.   Violation of School rules and regulations
  4.   Failure to maintain financial obligations

Appeals
The Campus Director or a designated representative is responsible for the administration
of all disciplinary procedures. After reviewing all pertinent information, informing the
student of charges and meeting with the student, the Campus Director, or a designated
representative, may impose disciplinary actions or dismiss the charges. A student that is
dissatisfied with this decision may appeal the case to the Review Committee within seven
days of receipt of the original decision. The Review Committee is composed of at least
three University staff members drawn from the President, the Executive Vice President,
the various Deans, and the Comptroller. The members of the Review Committee are
selected for each appeal based on their availability and to avoid the perception of any
conflict of interest that might jeopardize a fair hearing for the student. The Review
Committee will hear the appeal within 14 days of the request unless both parties agree to
an extension of the time limit. The student has the right to call witnesses. The Campus
Director or designated representative that made the original decision will present the
case against the student. The Review Board’s decision will be made in writing within
seven days and its decision is final.




                                                                                      45
Grounds for Academic Dishonesty/Misconduct
  1. Plagiarism – presenting the work of another as one’s own in a paper, exam, or
     other assignment. Acknowledgment must be given for the use of another’s ideas or
     language.
  2. Cheating on Examinations – copying another’s work or allowing your work to be
     copied; using unauthorized notes; taking another’s exam or having another take
     yours.
  3. Computer Use – software is protected by copyright. Students may not copy the
     institution’s software without permission of the copyright holder. Additionally,
     students may not place personal software on the institution’s computers or damage
     or destroy either software or computers.
  4. Other Forms – other forms of academic dishonesty include: selling or purchasing
     examinations, papers or other assignments and submitting or resubmitting the
     same paper for two different classes without explicit authorization.

Grounds for Non-Academic Dishonesty/Misconduct
  1. Physical and/or psychological abuse, threat, or harassment.
  2. Initiation of, or causing to be initiated, any false report, warning or threat of fire,
     explosion, or other emergency.
  3. Unauthorized use, possession, or storage of any weapon, dangerous chemical or
     explosive element.
  4. Disrupting, obstructing or interfering with University-sponsored events.
  5. Theft of school equipment, products and supply materials.
  6. Unauthorized possession, use, sale, or distribution of alcoholic beverages or any
     illegal or controlled substance.
  7. Gambling or holding raffle or lottery at the University without proper approval.
  8. Disorderly, lewd, or obscene conduct.
  9. A breach of established or reasonable classroom safety procedures

Student’s Records/Release of Information
In compliance with Public Law 93-380, “The Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act” (FERPA), which is Section 438 of the General Education Provision Act, Stratford
University has adopted policies and procedures which permit the student the opportunity
to view his or her educational records upon request. Educational records mean those
records, files, documents, and other material that contains information directly related
to a student. Educational records do not include working papers concerning students,
such as informal notes and other temporary notes of a similar nature that are in the sole
possession of the faculty or staff and are not accessible or revealed to any other person.

46
The institution does not permit access to or release of confidential information to any
individual or agency without the written consent of the student, except for the following
reasons: 1) Records required by Stratford University officials in the proper performance
of their duties, 2) Organizations conducting studies for educational and governmental
agencies, 3) U.S. Government agencies as listed in Public Law 93-380, 4) Accrediting
agencies, 5) Parents of dependent children as defined in the Internal Revenue Code of
1954, 6) Appropriate persons in connection with an emergency, 7) Other educational
institutions upon request of transcripts for students seeking enrollment in that
institution, 8) In connection with the award of financial aid, and 9) In response to legal
court orders.

Name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, program undertaken, dates
of attendance and certificates, diplomas and degrees awarded may be provided to third
parties unless the request to omit such information is presented in writing.

All records are maintained in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974.

Cancellation and Refund Policy
Return of Title IV Funds
For many Stratford students, an important source of funding is the Title IV Student
Financial Assistance programs of the United States Department of Education. Participating
students that withdraw from the University may have some or all of the funds returned to
the Department depending on the amount of time attended during the quarter.

For students that officially withdraw from the University, the institution will use as the
withdrawal date for purposes of the return of funds as the earlier of the last documented
day of physical attendance or the date of attendance at an academically-related activity, the
date when the withdrawal process began, or the date the student provided official notice.

If the institution determines that the student withdrew without beginning the withdrawal
process or officially withdrawing, the institution will use the last day of the quarter (or
class) as the withdrawal date unless a documented date of attendance at an academically-
related activity is deemed more appropriate.

The Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to determine how much financial
aid was earned by students who withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of
absence prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term.


                                                                                         47
For a student who withdraws after the 60% point-in-time, there are no unearned funds.
However, a school must still complete a Return Calculation in order to determine whether
the student is eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement.

The calculation is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal
Return of Title IV funds formula:

  Percentage of payment period or term completed = the number of days
  completed up to the withdrawal date divided by the total days in the payment
  period or term. (Any break of five days or more is not counted as part of the days
  in the term.) This percentage is also the percentage of earned aid.

Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of
unearned aid using the following formula:

  Aid to be returned = (100% of the aid that could be disbursed minus the
  percentage of earned aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could have
  been disbursed during the payment period or term.

If a student earns less aid than is disbursed, the institution will be required to return a
portion of the funds and the student would be required to return a portion of the funds.
Keep in mind that when Title IV funds are returned, the student borrower may owe a
debit balance to the institution.

If a student earns more aid than is disbursed to him/her, the institution will owe the
student a post-withdrawal disbursement which must be paid within 120 days of the
student’s withdrawal.

The institution must return the amount of Title IV funds for which it is responsible
no later than 45 days after the date of the determination of the date of the student’s
withdrawal.

Refunds are allocated in the following order:

  1.   Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans
  2.   Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
  3.   Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans (other than PLUS loans)
  4.   Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans
  5.   Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans
  6.   Direct PLUS loans
  7.   Federal Pell Grants for which a Return of funds is required

48
  8. Academic Competitiveness Grants Program
  9. National SMART Grants Program
  10. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants for which a Return of
      funds is required
  11. Other assistance under this Title for which a return of funds is required
      (e.g., LEAP)

Notification of Postwithdrawal Disbursements

The student and/or his or her parent/s will be notified in writing by the school in
the event of a Title IV Postwithdrawal Disbursements (PWD). A confirmation must be
received from the student and/or parent/s within 60 days of receipt of notification to
accept or decline a PWD. A confirmed acceptance of PWD must be made within 120 days
of the date of determination by the school that the student withdrew.

Return of Additional Funds

After the completion of the required return of Title IV funds, some students may have
a credit balance. Any additional credit balances will be repaid to any outstanding loan
balances. In the event there are two or more additional lenders, the University may select
the lender to pay the refunds. In the event there are no lenders, the refund will be paid
to the student.

Virginia State Refund Policy
The University obligates students to tuition and laboratory fees by the academic quarter.
If the student withdraws during the add/drop period, the institution refunds 100% of the
tuition and laboratory charges. If the student withdraws after the add/drop period, the
institution follows the state refund policy in accordance with §23-276.3 B of the Code of
Virginia as follows:

  a. A student who enters school but withdraws during the first 1/4 (25%) of the course
     is entitled to receive a refund of 50% of the tuition and laboratory fees.
  b. A student who enters school but withdraws after completing 1/4 (25%), but less
     than 1/2 (50%) of the course is entitled to receive a refund of 25% of the tuition
     and laboratory fees.
  c. A student who withdraws after completing 1/2 (50%) or more of the course is not
     entitled to a refund.




                                                                                      49
Student Completion or Graduation Rate
The following information is provided in compliance with the Federal Student Right-to-Know
and Campus Security Act of 1990. The completion or graduation rate is a projection based
on actual fall enrollment retention data for a defi ned group of entering students. A student
may request a current completion or graduation rate at the University Registrar’s Office.

Campus Safety and Security Policies
Stratford University has appointed a Campus Security Force Team to enhance the safety
of both the students and the employees. Security policies are available to all enrolled
students and for any prospective student upon request. All students and employees are
encouraged to report crimes, suspicious activities or other security problems to the
proper authorities at the campus. A list of the Campus Security Force Team is provided
to all students and employees.

  •   Campus Director (Falls Church - Woodbridge)
  •   Chief Operating Officer
  •   Human Resources Director
  •   Chief Academic Officer

Procedure:

The following procedures will be followed to address reports or complaints made to
security personnel:

  1. The Director of Human Resources will make, keep, and maintain daily logs of
     crimes reported to police or security department. The logs will be open for public
     inspection within two business days of receipt of the report. The written report will list:
     a) Date of crime,
     b) Time of crime,
     c) General location of the crime,
     d) Nature of complaint,
     e) Action taken by Campus Security Force Team
     f) Recommendations to higher authorities.

      This report will be signed and submitted to the Chief Operating Officer for filing or
      further action. In the event that outside assistance (such as local Police, Sheriffs
      Department, Federal Officers, etc) should be called in, the Campus Security Force
      Team will cooperate with the agencies and investigations to the best of their
      abilities and within the scope of school policies.

50
  2. The Campus Security Force Team has the authority to monitor and control all
     persons on the campus property to determine their legitimate presence, and to:
     a) Escort unauthorized persons to the proper office or off of campus property;
     b) Report any suspicious activity or criminal activity to their supervisor;
     c) Control the actions of persons violating company rules or local, State or
         Federal laws – so long as these actions by the Campus Security Force Team
         do not in themselves violate any local, State or Federal laws;
     d) Cooperate with local, State or Federal Law Officers should that become necessary.

  3. Students and employees are given a copy of the Campus Security Policies upon
     entrance to the school. These policies are discussed and reviewed at staff meetings
     on a regular basis and during campus safety meetings. Information is also
     provided for:
     a) Assault and rape awareness programs;
     b) Procedures to follow when a sex offense occurs;
     c) Disciplinary action procedures;
     d) Locations for counseling opportunities for alcohol and drug abuse education
         and crime prevention education;
     e) Policies on the use, possession and sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs.

  4. While on campus property, students are encouraged to:
     a) Travel in groups or pairs;
     b) Stay or walk in well lighted areas;
     c) Report suspicious activities or persons;
     d) Lock vehicles and personal belongings;
     e) Know where the Campus Security Force Team can be reached at any time.

  5. Stratford University prohibits the possession of weapons while on the campus
     property or when involved in any campus sponsored activity.

Disclosure Policy
As required under section 485(f)(1) of the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (section
1601 of Public Law 106-386), Stratford University is providing its campus community
with the following information: Information may be found at the Sex Offender Registry
Information Center at www.crimetime.com/SPguide.htm

Drug Free Policy
For the protection and welfare of all students and staff, Stratford University has established
the following Drug Free Policy:

                                                                                          51
  1. That the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a
     controlled substance in the school is prohibited;
  2. That violations of this prohibition will result in the discharge or the appropriate
     action pursuant to the School Personnel Action Rule;
  3. That as a condition of enrollment, each student of Stratford University agrees
     that he or she will abide by the terms of the above statement, and will notify the
     Campus Director of any criminal drug status conviction for a violation occurring
     in the school no later than five days after conviction.

This policy is in compliance with the US Department of Education and the Drug Free
Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989, PL 101-226 20 U.S.C’s 1145g, Higher
Education Act of 1965, Section 1213.

Formal Complaint Procedure
At Stratford University student success in our programs is our highest priority. To that end, the
Stratford University faculty and staff attempts to create, in all areas, an atmosphere that is
conducive to learning. Stratford also strives to be open to concerns of faculty members.

Our efforts, however, may not always succeed. For this reason, we have established
a procedure which, we hope, will address any school-related problem, concern, or
complaint. Most student concerns, we have found, can be handled by the instructors.
Students should first discuss the problem with the instructor and the Dean, if necessary.
If the problem is not resolved after a reasonable amount of time the student should
contact the Campus Director. Similarly, faculty concerns should be brought to the
attention of the Dean of the program for which they teach.

The Campus Director and all other management team members maintain an open-door
policy. Students and faculty may express concerns to any of these individuals. Complaints
are best handled, however, by following the above stated procedure.

At the written request of the student, the Academic Policy Committee comprised of the
Campus Director and two senior staff members will be convened to address concerns
which remain unresolved. This Committee will convene within five days of a written
request. The Dean may appear at the Committee’s meeting to provide background
information on the concerns but will not participate in the final decision. Each student
is assured fair treatment regarding any complaint issue.

The student will be notified of the committee’s decision within three days of the meeting.
If after following the above stated procedure, the student feels his or her concerns have
not been resolved, she or he may address these concerns in writing to the following:

52
     State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
     James Monroe Bldg., 9th Floor
     101 N. 14th St.
     Richmond, VA 23219
     Attn: Institutional Approval Coordinator
     (804)225-2600

     Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools
     750 First Street, NE, Suite 980
     Washington, DC 20002-4241
     (202) 336-6780

Similarly, a faculty member may request in writing that a Faculty Policy Committee
hear his or her concern(s). This Committee is comprised of the Campus Director and
two senior staff members, and will be convened to address concerns which remain
unresolved. This Committee will convene within five days of a written request. The Dean
whose faculty is making the request may appear at the Committee’s meeting to provide
background information on the concerns but will not participate in the final decision.
The faculty member will then be notified of the committee’s decision within three days
of the meeting. If after following the above stated procedure, the faculty member feels
his or her concerns have not been resolved, she or he may address these concerns in
writing to the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia and/or to the Accrediting
Council for Independent Colleges and Schools at addresses given above.

Policy and Program Changes
This University catalog is current as of the time of printing. From time to time, it may
be necessary or desirable for Stratford University to make changes to this catalog due
to the requirements and standards of the University’s accrediting body, state, licensing
agency, U.S. Department of Education, market conditions, employer needs or due to
other reasons. Stratford University reserves the right to make changes to any portion of
this catalog, including the amount of tuition and fees, academic programs and courses,
university policies and procedures, faculty and administrative staff, the university
calendar and other dates, and other provisions.

Stratford University also reserves the right to make changes in equipment and
instructional materials, modify curriculum and when size and curriculum permit, to
combine classes. The Campus Director should be contacted for information concerning
any such changes.



                                                                                     53
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
SCHOOL of HEALTH SCIENCES
Health Sciences degrees give students the skills required for entry into the health
science field. Students study the structure and function of the major body systems
in conjunction with medical terminology, professional procedures, medical law and
ethics, computer skills, and administrative processes. This program also provides general
education courses in English composition, general science, humanities, psychology,
and mathematics.


Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Medical Assisting
      This program gives students theoretical and hands-on experience that will allow them to
demonstrate their clinical skills including patient care, laboratory procedures, venipuncture, assisting
with exams, collecting specimens, administering patient medication, recording vital signs, and taking
patient history. Students will also be able to demonstrate administrative skills including scheduling,
bookkeeping procedures, medical office and records management, processing of insurance claims,
and procedural and diagnostic coding.
      The Associate’s Degree in Health Sciences with a concentration in Medical Assisting program
consists of core, concentration, elective, and general education requirements. This program is offered
in both residential and nontraditional modes of delivery. Students should note that all courses are not
offered each term. Please check term schedules for details.

Core Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                               Credits
     MED110 ..........   Anatomy and Pathophysiology I ............................................................... 4.5
     MED120 .........    Medical Terminolog ................................................................................. 4.5
     MED210 .........    Anatomy and Pathophysiology II ............................................................. 4.5
     MED220 .........    Professional Procedures ........................................................................... 4.5
     MED230 .........    Medical Law and Ethics ............................................................................ 4.5
     MED285 .........    Electrocardiology ..................................................................................... 4.5
     MED290 .........    Externship ................................................................................................ 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                     31.5

Concentration Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     MED255 .........    Phlebotomy .............................................................................................. 4.5
     MED140 .........    Basic Clinical Procedures ......................................................................... 4.5
     MED150..........    Diagnostic Procedures .............................................................................. 4.5
     MED240 .........    Pharmacology .......................................................................................... 4.5
     MED260 .........    Exams and Specialty Procedures ............................................................. 4.5
                         Total Concentration Requirements                                                                          22.5

54
Elective Requirements
     Students are required to complete 13.5 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfill the elective
requirements. Other elective options may be available with the approval from the Dean.

     Number               Course Name                                                                                          Credits
     IST101............   Fundamentals of Information Systems .................................................... 4.5
     MED250 .......       Medical Office Practice ............................................................................ 4.5
     MED130 .........     Medical Office Billing, Coding, and Insurance ........................................ 4.5
     MED160 .........     Medical Computer Applications ................................................................ 4.5
     MED170 ..........    Domestic Violence .................................................................................... 4.5
     MED270 .........     Medical Finance Insurance ...................................................................... 4.5
     MED280 .........     Therapeutic Communication ................................................................... 4.5
                          Total Elective Requirements                                                                            13.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                          Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                               22.5

                          Associate of Applied Science Degree in Health Sciences
                          with a concentration in Medical Assisting
                          Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                90




Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Clinical Hemodialysis Technician
     This Program is designed to educate students to provide the highest quality of care to patients
who have chronic kidney disease (ESRD). Clinical hemodialysis care is a life supporting health care
profession practiced under qualified medical direction. The Program prepares students to operate
hemodialysis machines and to work as technicians in hospitals, clinics, and other health care facilities.
Hemodialysis technicians work with people with kidney disease by collecting blood, by performing
punctuation and catheterization, and by providing pre and post assessment of patients.
     The Program consists of 90 quarter credit hours including core medical courses, subject area
concentration courses, and General Education courses. Included in the concentration is the completion
of 135 hours in an externship course. Completion of the Certified Clinical Hemodialysis Technician
Program is acknowledged by the awarding of an Associate of Applied Science Degree. Graduates of
the Program qualify for membership within the National Association of Nephrology Technicians/
Technologists (NANT) and are eligible for certification by the Nephrology Nursing Certification
Commission (NNCC).



                                                                                                                                         55
Core Requirements
     Number              Course Name                                                                                          Credits
     MED110 ..........   Anatomy and Pathophysiology I ............................................................... 4.5
     MED120 .........    Medical Terminology................................................................................ 4.5
     MED140 .........    Basic Clinical Procedures ......................................................................... 4.5
     MED210 .........    Anatomy and Pathophysiology II ............................................................. 4.5
     MED240 .........    Pharmacology ......................................................................................... 4.5
     MED250 .........    Medical Office Practice ............................................................................ 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                27

Concentration Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                       Credits
     MIB130 ..........   Diseases of the Human Body .................................................................... 4.5
     CHT110 ..........   Principles of Hemodialysis ....................................................................... 4.5
     CHT210 ..........   Dialysis Delivery Systems ......................................................................... 4.5
     CHT220 ..........   Pre/Post Patient Assessment ..................................................................... 4.5
     CHT230 ..........   Dialysis Treatment of Renal Disease ........................................................ 4.5
     CHT240 ..........   Fundamentals of Renal Nutrition ............................................................ 4.5
     CHT250 ..........   Dialysis Quality and Safety Procedures .................................................... 4.5
     CHT260 ..........   Advanced Dialysis Procedures .................................................................. 4.5
     CHT290 ..........   Hemodialysis Externship .......................................................................... 4.5
                         Total Concentration Requirements                                                                    40.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                         Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                               22.5

                         Associate of Applied Science Degree in Health Sciences
                         with a concentration in Clinical Hemodialysis Technology
                         Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                90



Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
EKG-Phlebotomy Technician
     This Program prepares students to operate an EKG machine and to work as technicians in non-
invasive cardiac diagnostic laboratory units in hospitals, diagnostic laboratories, medical clinics,
and other medical facilities. Students will learn how to prepare patients for EKG mountings, how
to operate a 12 lead EKG machine, how to interpret EKG readings including identification of signs
of advanced heart diseases, interpretation of advanced arrhythmias, interpretation of hypertrophies
as well as myocardial infarction. Additionally, students will acquire the professional skills needed to
perform phlebotomy procedures (drawing blood). Students will also learn how to perform medical

56
asepsis techniques, blood collection, patient identification, finger sticks, venipuncture, heel sticks,
and collection of urine samples. Upon completion of the Program, students will have acquired the
necessary knowledge and skills to practice competently as EKG and phlebotomy technicians.”
      The Program consists of 90 quarter credit hours including core medical courses, subject
area concentration courses, and General Education courses. Included in the concentration is the
completion of 135 hours in an externship course. Completion of the EKG-Phlebotomy Program is
acknowledged by the awarding of an Associate of Applied Science Degree. Graduates are eligible to sit
for the National Healthcareer Association (NHA), the American Medical Technologist (AMT), and the
National Association of Health Professionals (NAHP) certification exams.

Core Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                         Credits
     MED110 ..........   Anatomy and Pathophysiology I ............................................................... 4.5
     MED120 .........    Medical Terminology................................................................................ 4.5
     MED140 ........     Basic Clinical Procedures ......................................................................... 4.5
     MED155 ..........   Principles of Phlebotomy ......................................................................... 4.5
     MED210 .........    Anatomy and Pathophysiology II ............................................................. 4.5
     MED250 .........    Medical Office Practice ............................................................................ 4.5
     MED255 .........    Phlebotomy Procedures ............................................................................ 4.5
     MED285 .........    Electrocardiography ................................................................................. 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                               36

Concentration Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                        Credits
     EPT210 ..........   Blood Chemistry Analysis ......................................................................... 4.5
     EPT220 ..........   Clinical Hematology I .............................................................................. 4.5
     EPT230 ..........   Clinical Hematology II ............................................................................. 4.5
     EPT250 ..........   Advanced Electrocardiographic Interpretation ......................................... 4.5
     EPT260 ..........   Cardiac Rehabilitation ............................................................................. 4.5
     EPT270 ..........   Cardiovascular Invasive/Non-Invasive Procedures .................................. 4.5
     EPT290 ..........   Phlebotomy/EKG Externship .................................................................... 4.5
                         Total Concentration Requirements                                                                     31.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                         Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                               22.5

                         Associate of Applied Science Degree in Health Sciences
                         with a concentration in EKG-Phlebotomy Technology
                         Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                               90




                                                                                                                                       57
Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Medical Insurance Billing and Coding
      This Program provides students with the knowledge and skills to be successful billers
and/or coders. The Program is designed to provide comprehensive exposure to the administration of
insurance billing and coding. The Program explores the many specialty areas of the medical insurance
industry. Students will gain the competency and experience necessary to succeed in these highly
specialized fields.”
      The Program consists of 90 quarter credit hours including core medical courses, subject
area concentration courses, and General Education courses. Included in the concentration is the
completion of 135 hours in an externship course. Completion of the Medical Insurance Billing and
Coding Program is acknowledged by the awarding of an Associate of Applied Science Degree. Graduates
are eligible for certification by the American Academy of Procedural Coders as well as the American
Health Information Management Association.

Core Requirements

     Number               Course Name                                                                                        Credits
     MED110 ..........    Anatomy and Pathophysiology I ............................................................... 4.5
     MED120 .........     Medical Terminology................................................................................ 4.5
     MED130 .........     Medical Office Billing, Coding, and Insurance ....................................... 4.5
     MED160 .........     Medical Computer Applications ................................................................ 4.5
     MED250 .........     Medical Office Practice ............................................................................ 4.5
     MED270 .........     Medical Finance and Insurance ............................................................... 4.5
                          Total Core Requirements                                                                              27

Concentration Requirements

     Number               Course Name                                                                                      Credits
     IST101............   Fundamentals of Information Systems .................................................... 4.5
     MIB130 ..........    Diseases of the Human Body .................................................................... 4.5
     MIB210 ..........    Introduction to Diagnostic and Procedures Coding ................................. 4.5
     MIB220 ..........    Coding of Clinical Procedures I ............................................................... 4.5
     MIB230 ..........    Coding of Clinical and Diagnostic Procedures II ..................................... 4.5
     MIB240 ..........    Case Studies in Coding of Patients ........................................................... 4.5
     MIB250 ..........    Medical Re-imbursement Systems ............................................................ 4.5
     MIB260 ..........    Electronic Medical Billing ....................................................................... 4.5
     MIB290 ..........    Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Externship .................................. 4.5
                          Total Concentration Requirements                                                                   40.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                          Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                              22.5



58
                         Associate of Applied Science Degree in Health Sciences
                         with a concentration in Medical Insurance Billing and Coding
                         Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                 90


Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Pharmacy Technician
      Program objectives are to educate and provide pharmacy technicians that are capable of assisting
pharmacists in the preparation and dispensing of medications. Graduates will be capable of working in
a variety of home health care settings such as hospitals, retail, long-term care facilities, home health
care agencies, clinic pharmacies, mail order pharmacies, and drug wholesalers. Upon completion of
the Program, students will have acquired the necessary knowledge and skills to practice competently
as pharmacy technicians.”
      The Program consists of 90 quarter credit hours including core medical courses, subject
area concentration courses, and General Education courses. Included in the concentration is the
completion of 135 hours in an externship course. Completion of the Pharmacy Technician Program
is acknowledged by the awarding of an Associate of Applied Science Degree. Graduates of the Program
may wish to take the certification exam given through the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board.
Graduates will also be eligible to sit for certification exams by the National Association of Health
Professionals (NAHP), the Nationally Registered Title of Certified Pharmacology Technicians or the
(NRCPhT), and the National Healthcareer Association of Certified Pharmacy Technicians (CPhT).

Core Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                           Credits
     MED110 ..........   Anatomy and Pathophysiology I ............................................................... 4.5
     MED120 .........    Medical Terminology................................................................................ 4.5
     MED140 .........    Basic Clinical Procedures ......................................................................... 4.5
     MED210 .........    Anatomy and Pathophysiology II ............................................................. 4.5
     MED240 .........    Pharmacology .......................................................................................... 4.5
     MED245 .........    Pharmacology II ...................................................................................... 4.5
     MED250 .........    Medical Office Practice ............................................................................ 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                 31.5

Concentration Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                      Credits
     PHT110 ..........   Pharmacy Calculations ........................................................................... 4.5
     PHT220 ..........   Institutional and Community Pharmacy Operations .............................. 4.5
     PHT230 ..........   Institutional and Community Pharmacy Lab I ........................................ 4.5
     PHT240 ..........   Institutional and Community Pharmacy Lab II ..................................... 4.5
     PHT250 ..........   Advanced Administration Technical Lab .................................................. 4.5
     PHT260 ..........   Pharmacy Maintenance, Safety & Quality Assurance Issues .................... 4.5
     PHT270 ..........   Administrative Inpatient and Outpatient Care Management .................... 4.5
     PHT290 ..........   Pharmacy Externship .............................................................................. 4.5
                         Total Concentration Requirements                                                                   36

                                                                                                                                         59
Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                     Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                   22.5

                     Associate of Applied Science Degree in Health Sciences
                     with a concentration in Pharmacy Technology
                     Total Credits Required for Graduation                                   90



                                       *          *          *


Additional CPR requirements for Health Sciences students:
Health Sciences students are required to present a valid CPR Course Completion Card as
a prerequisite for their externship course (See attached Syllabus). This current CPR card
is a requirement that participating hospitals and health care providers recognize since
students are in life situations. Stratford University ensures all students comply with this
direction before being placed in an Externship position.

CPR certification can be obtained in a number of ways. The American Red Cross (ARD)
http://www.redcross.org /SERVICES/HSS/courses / and American Heart
Association (AHA) http://www.americanheartorg/presenter.jhtml?identifier
=3011764 are two organizations that provide CPR training for a fee, with the AHA
course being the more comprehensive of the two. However, both courses are designed
for the healthcare provider who requires successful completion of a CPR course and
proof of completion. Curriculum consists of information on warning signs of heart
attack, respiratory arrest, stroke in adults, pediatric injury prevention, the core AHA
scenarios of adult and pediatric 1 and 2 rescuers CPR, foreign body airway obstruction,
Bag Vale Mask (BVM) and the AED. In addition, the new form of CPR, Hands-Only
CPR, is integrated into the course curriculum. Health Sciences students can obtain the
training at Stratford University after signing up and paying a fee of $85.00 for the AHA
version pending availability of our certified instructor. The American Heart Association
program does lead to a higher fee than the American Red Cross does. However, students
may obtain the training with either one of the two organizations listed above or through
Stratford University pending availability of our certified instructor.




60
Additional educational benefit for Health Sciences students:
National Healthcare Credentialing Certification Exams: While not a requirement
for Stratford University students, Stratford University participates with the National
Association for Health Professionals (NAHP) http://www.nahpusa.com / in a pro-
gram that helps students complete the National Certification Exam and be recognized
through the National Allied Health Test Registry for the following career areas:

     NRCPht – Pharmacy Technician
     NRCPT – Phlebotomy Technician
     NRCMA – Medical Assistant

Being a member of NAHP, Stratord University is authorized to proctor the exams for
the above certificate areas. Although NAHP exams are not part of the current Stratford
University Health Sciences program, we believe successful completion of these exams
can help enhance a student’s professional development and medical assisting career.
On the first day of each academic quarter, the Stratford University instructors announce
the exam dates as well as the information on how to apply. The interested student then
has to complete the application form, can review a copy of the exam preparation book
(at no cost) from Stratford University (or the student can purchase the books on their
own) and submit the exam fee of $75.00 directly to the NAHP. The student then can take
the exam in a proctored setting at Stratford University. The exam is computerized and
the result is posted immediately after the exam, however; no NAHP certificates are issued
until the student has successfully completed their Stratford University AAS program
and is awarded their AAS degree. All certification exam fees and additional study
materials are the responsibility of the student. Stratford University does not offer its
own version of these exams, nor collect any funds from the organization offering the
certification exam.

Students can check the status of their exams by going to the following website and
entering their login and password http://www.nahpusa.com/ResultsApps.asp




                                                                                      61
SCHOOL of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bachelor of Science (BS) Degree
Accounting
      The mission of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting program is to prepare students for
employment as accountants in the dynamic, changing realities of today’s business environment.
      The program aims to provide students with a broad, fundamental knowledge of the field in order
to prepare students for a career in accounting. The program allows students to prepare for exams for
professional certifications such as Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Certified Internal Auditor (CIA),
Certified Managerial Accountant (CMA), or Accredited Business Accountant (ABA). Students who
complete the program also satisfy the requirements for entry to the Master of Science in Professional
Accounting program.
      The BS in Accounting program is comprised of 20 core classes, 12 Arts and Sciences classes, and
8 elective classes – a total of 40 classes and 180 quarter hour credits. Students who average two classes
per quarter may complete the program in 20 quarters.

Core Requirements

     Number                Course Name                                                                                                Credits
     BUS100 ..........     Introduction to Business .......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS112 ...........    Accounting I ............................................................................................ 4.5
     CIS110 ............   Computer Office Applications ................................................................... 4.5
     BUS220 ..........     Business Communications ....................................................................... 4.5
     BUS122 ..........     Accounting II ........................................................................................... 4.5
     ACC299 ..........     Intermediate Accounting I ....................................................................... 4.5
     ACC300 ..........     Intermediate Accounting II ...................................................................... 4.5
     ACC301 ...........    Intermediate Accounting III .................................................................... 4.5
     BUS250 ..........     Principles of Economics .......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS320 ..........     Taxation Principles .................................................................................. 4.5
     ACC330 ...........    Cost Accounting, or .................................................................................. 4.5
     BUS340 ..........     Managerial Accounting ............................................................................ 4.5
     ACC335 ...........    Auditing ................................................................................................... 4.5
     ACC350 ...........    Non-Profit/Municipal Accounting ............................................................ 4.5
     ACC460 ..........     Advanced Federal Taxation ...................................................................... 4.5
     ACC410 ...........    Advanced Accounting ............................................................................... 4.5
     BUS420 ..........     Accounting Systems .................................................................................. 4.5
     BUS200 ..........     Business Law ............................................................................................ 4.5
     BUS300 ..........     Financial Management ............................................................................ 4.5
     BUS360 ..........     Business Ethics ......................................................................................... 4.5
     ACC490 ..........     Accounting Capstone: Senior Seminar in Accounting .............................. 4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                                      90

Elective Requirements

     Students will select appropriate business or accounting related courses to fulfill the elective

62
requirements (36 elective quarter credits or 8 classes). Other elective options may be available with the
approval of the Program Dean.

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                         Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                   54

                         Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting
                         Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                  180



Bachelor of Science (BS) Degree
Business Administration
      The mission of the BS degree program in Business Administration is to allow students to build on a
core of knowledge gained through the associate’s degree or its equivalent to focus on one of two upper- level
concentrations: finance and accounting, or management. The primary goal of the BS degree program is
to prepare students for the dynamic, changing realities of today’s global business environment.
      The BS degree program includes core business requirements, elective requirements, and general
education requirements. The total requirement is 180 quarter credits. It typically takes 120 weeks (2.5
years) to complete the entire bachelor’s program without breaks. Students will be required to complete
4-6 hours per week in the fifth quarter of the program of voluntary community service activities as
a prerequisite for completion of their program of study. Students should note that not all courses are
offered each term.

Core Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     BUS100 ..........   Introduction to Business ......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS112 ..........   Principles of Accounting I ................................................................... ......... 4.5
     BUS120 ..........   Sales and Marketing ...................................................... .............................. 4.5
     BUS122 ..........   Principles of Accounting II ....................................................................... 4.5
     BUS135 ..........   Principles of Management ........................................................................ 4.5
     BUS200 ..........   Business Law: Business, Government & Society .................................... ..... 4.5
     BUS210 ..........   Human Resource Management ............................................................... 4.5
     BUS220 ..........   Business Communications ....................................................................... 4.5
     BUS235 ..........   Operations Management .......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS240 ..........   International Business ............................................................................. 4.5
     BUS250 ..........   Principles of Economics ........................................................................... 4.5
     BUS302 ..........   Microeconomics ....................................................................................... 4.5
     BUS360 ..........   Business Ethics ........................................................................................ 4.5
     BUS490 ..........   Business Administration Senior Project ................................................... 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                   63



                                                                                                                                           63
Concentration Areas
     Students enrolled in the Business Administration BS must take all listed 300/400 level class
requirements from Concentration A or B.

     Number               Course Name                                                                                      Credits
                          A: Finance and Accounting (All Required)
     BUS300 .......... Financial Management ............................................................................ 4.5
     BUS320 .......... Taxation Principles ................................................................................. 4.5
     BUS340 .......... Managerial Accounting ........................................................................... 4.5
     BUS400 .......... Advanced Financial Management ........................................................... 4.5
     BUS420 .......... Accounting Information Systems ............................................................ 4.5
     BUS440 .......... Business Forecasting and Simulation ..................................................... 4.5
     BUS450 .......... Personal Financial Management ............................................................ 4.5
     PLUS ............... Two courses from Management (Concentration B) ................................. 9
                          B: Management (All Required)
     BUS300 .......... Financial Management ........................................................................... 4.5
     BUS305 .......... International Business Strategies ............................................................ 4.5
     BUS325 .......... Entrepreneurial Leadership ..................................................................... 4.5
     BUS375 .......... New Venture Creation .............................................................................. 4.5
     BUS405 .......... Business Law: Legal Environment for Business ....................................... 4.5
     BUS415 .......... Organizational Theory and Development ................................................ 4.5
     BUS425 .......... Diversity in the Workplace ....................................................................... 4.5
     BUS430 .......... Competitive Strategies ............................................................................. 4.5
     PLUS ............... One course from Finance and Accounting (Concentration A) ................. 4.5
                          Total Concentration Requirements                                                                   40.5

Elective Requirements

      Students are required to complete 18 quarter credits at the 100/200 level and 4.5 quarter credits
at the 300/400 level. In conjunction with an academic advisor, students will choose appropriate
additional classes to fulfill the elective requirements.

     Number                Course Name                                                                                          Credits
     100/200 .........     Elective Requirements .............................................................................. 18
     300/400 .........     Electives Requirements ...................................... ........................................ 4.5
                           Total Elective Requirements                                                                            22.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                           Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                 54

                           Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration
                           Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                               180



64
Bachelor of Science (BS) Degree
Business Administration
(Upper-Level Requirements Only)
      The mission of the BS degree program in Business Administration is to allow students to build
on a core of knowledge gained through the associate’s degree or its equivalent to focus on one of
two upper-level concentrations: finance or accounting, and management. The primary goal of the
BS degree program is to prepare students for the dynamic, changing realities of today’s global
business environment.
      The BS degree program includes core business requirements, elective requirements, and general
education requirements. The total requirement is 180 quarter credits. The first 90 quarter credits are
completed prior to beginning the 90 credits of junior/senior level courses. The 90 credits of junior/
senior level courses for the BS will take approximately 15 months to complete. Students should note
that not all courses are offered each term. Students will be required to complete 4-6 hours per week
in the fifth quarter of the program of voluntary community service activities as a prerequisite for
completion of their program of study.

Core Requirements

     Number                 Course Name                                                                                            Credits
     BUS302 ..........      Microeconomics ....................................................................................... 4.5
     BUS360 ..........      Business Ethics ........................................................................................ 4.5
     BUS490 ..........      Business Administration Senior Project ................................................... 4.5
                            Total Core Requirements                                                                                  13.5

Concentration Areas:

     There are two BS concentration areas. The student must complete the listed courses.

     Number                 Course Name                                                                                          Credits
                            A) Finance and Accounting
     BUS300 ..........      Financial Management ............................................................................ 4.5
     BUS320 ..........      Taxation Principles .................................................................................. 4.5
     BUS340 ..........      Managerial Accounting ............................................................................ 4.5
     BUS400 ..........      Advanced Financial Management ............................................................ 4.5
     BUS420 ..........      Accounting Information Systems ............................................................. 4.5
     BUS440 ..........      Business Forecasting and Simulation....................................................... 4.5
     BUS450 ..........      Personal Financial Management ............................................................. 4.5
     PLUS ...............   Two courses from Management (Concentration B) .................................. 9.0
                            B) Management
     BUS300 ..........      Financial Management ............................................................................ 4.5
     BUS305 ..........      International Business Strategies ............................................................. 4.5
     BUS325 ..........      Entrepreneurial Leadership...................................................................... 4.5
     BUS375 ..........      New Venture Creation ............................................................................... 4.5
     BUS405 ..........      Business Law: Legal Environment for Business........................................ 4.5
     BUS415 ..........      Organizational Theory and Development ................................................. 4.5

                                                                                                                                             65
     BUS425 .......... Diversity in the Workplace ........................................................................         4.5
     BUS430 .......... Competitive Strategies ..............................................................................       4.5
     Plus ................. One course from Finance and Accounting (Concentration A) ..................                            4.5
                            Total Concentration Area Requirements                                                                 40.5

Elective Requirements

     Any one degree-level course approved by the Program Dean.

                            Total Elective Requirements                                                                            4.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                            Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                  31.5

                            Total 300/400 Level Courses                                                                            90
                            Total 100/200 Level Courses                                                                            90
                            (based on AAS or equivalent in Business Administration)

                            Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration
                            Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                  180



Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Accounting
      The mission of the Associate of Applied Science in Accounting degree program is to prepare
students with the necessary skills for entry level positions in business such as accounts payable or
accounts receivable clerk or bookkeeper.
      The graduate of the Associate of Applied Science program may apply all credits earned to the
Bachelor of Science in Accounting program.
      The AAS degree program includes 13 core classes, five Arts and Sciences classes, and two elective
classes – a total of 20 classes and 90 quarter hour credits. Students who average two classes per quarter
can complete the program in 10 quarters, or 100 weeks.

Core Requirements

     Number                 Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     BUS100 ..........      Introduction to Business .......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS112 ...........     Principles of Accounting I ........................................................................ 4.5
     CIS110 ............    Computer Office Applications ................................................................... 4.5
     BUS220 ..........      Business Communications ....................................................................... 4.5
     BUS122 ..........      Accounting II ........................................................................................... 4.5
     ACC299 ..........      Intermediate Accounting I ....................................................................... 4.5

66
     ACC300 ..........     Intermediate Accounting II ......................................................................                4.5
     ACC301 ...........    Intermediate Accounting III ....................................................................                 4.5
     BUS250 ..........     Principles of Economics ...........................................................................              4.5
     BUS320 ..........     Taxation Principles ..................................................................................           4.5
     ACC330 ...........    Cost Accounting, or ..................................................................................           4.5
     BUS340 ..........     Managerial Accounting ............................................................................               4.5
     ACC335 ...........    Auditing ....................................................................................................    4.5
     BUS200 ..........     Business Law ............................................................................................        4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                                         58.5

Elective Requirements

     Students will select appropriate business or accounting related courses to fulfill the elective
requirements. Other elective options may be available with the approval of the Program Dean.

                           Total Elective Requirements                                                                                      9

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                           Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                            22.5

                           Associate of Applied Science Degree in Accounting
                           Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                           90


Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Business Administration
      The mission of the AAS degree program in Business Administration is to allow students to acquire
the basic business skills necessary to be effective in the work place. Course work prepares students for
the dynamic, changing realities of today’s global business environment.
      The AAS degree program includes core business requirements, elective requirements, and general
education requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits and normally takes approximately
15 months to complete. Students will be required to complete 4-6 hours per week in the fifth quarter
of the program of voluntary community service activities as a prerequisite for completion of their
program of study. Students should note that not all courses are offered each term.

Core Requirements

     Number            Course Name                                                                                         Credits
     BUS100 .......... Introduction to Business .......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS112 .......... Principles of Accounting I ........................................................................ 4.5
     BUS120 .......... Sales and Marketing ................................................................................. 4.5
     BUS122 .......... Principles of Accounting II ....................................................................... 4.5


                                                                                                                                                  67
     BUS135 ..........    Principles of Management ........................................................................       4.5
     BUS200 ..........    Business Law: Business, Government & Society .......................................                    4.5
     BUS210 ..........    Human Resource Management ................................................................              4.5
     BUS220 ..........    Business Communications .......................................................................         4.5
     BUS235 ..........    Operations Management ..........................................................................        4.5
     BUS240 ..........    International Business .............................................................................    4.5
     BUS250 ..........    Principles of Economics ...........................................................................     4.5
                          Total Core Requirements                                                                                49.5

Elective Requirements

     Students are required to complete 13.5 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose appropriate additional business or related computer or business
administration courses to fulfill the elective requirements. Other elective options may be available
with approval from the Program Dean.

                          Total Elective Requirements                                                                            18

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                          Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                   22.5

                          Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration
                          Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                  90



Certificate Program
Accounting
      The mission of the undergraduate Certificate in Accounting program is to provide the basic
theoretical and practical training necessary for success as entry level bookkeeping/accounting clerk
in the business, governmental and/or non-profit sectors. The program also supplements a business or
computer background with knowledge and skills relative to senior management positions. Students
who complete the certificate program are also prepared to continue on to the Diploma in Accounting
program and/or to the Associate of Applied Science in Accounting program.
      The Certificate program is comprised of six classes (27 quarter hour credits). Students who
average two classes per quarter may complete the program in 30 weeks.

Core Requirements

     Number               Course Name                                                                                       Credits
     BUS112 ...........   Principles of Accounting I ........................................................................ 4.5
     BUS122 ..........    Principles of Accounting II ....................................................................... 4.5
     ACC299 ..........    Intermediate Accounting I ....................................................................... 4.5


68
     BUS320 ..........    Taxation Principles ..................................................................................      4.5
     ACC330 ...........   Cost Accounting, or ..................................................................................      4.5
     BUS340 ..........    Managerial Accounting ............................................................................          4.5
     BUS200 ..........    Business Law ............................................................................................   4.5
                          Total Core Requirements                                                                                     27



Diploma Program
Accounting
      The Diploma in Accounting program is designed primarily for students who have completed a
bachelor’s or an advanced degree and wish to qualify themselves for exams for professional certification
such as Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Certified Internal Auditor (CIA), Certified Managerial
Accountant CMA) or Accredited Business Accountant (ABA). The program also is designed for those
who wish to make a career change and need to acquire the skills necessary for success in the workplace
as an accountant. Otherwise qualified students who complete the diploma program also satisfy all of
the requirements for entry to the Master of Science in Professional Accounting program.
      The program is comprised of 12 classes, not including prerequisites (3). The average time to
complete the program on a part-time basis is six quarters, assuming 9.0 credit hours (two classes) per
quarter. The program is available through classroom instruction and Online instruction.

Core Requirements:

     Prerequisites: Introduction to Business, Financial Management, Principles of Economics.

     Number               Course Name                                                                                              Credits
     BUS 112..........    Principles of Accounting I ........................................................................ 4.5
     BUS 122 .........    Principles of Accounting II ....................................................................... 4.5
     ACC 299 .........    Intermediate Accounting I ....................................................................... 4.5
     ACC 300 .........    Intermediate Accounting II ...................................................................... 4.5
     ACC 301 ..........   Intermediate Accounting III .................................................................... 4.5
     BUS 320 .........    Taxation Principles .................................................................................. 4.5
     ACC 330 ..........   Cost Accounting........................................................................................ 4.5
     ACC 335 ..........   Auditing, or ............................................................................................. 4.5
     BUS 420 .........    Accounting Information Systems ............................................................. 4.5
     ACC 350 ..........   Non-Profit/Municipal Accounting ............................................................ 4.5
     ACC 410 ..........   Advanced Accounting, or .......................................................................... 4.5
     BUS 200 .........    Business Law ............................................................................................ 4.5
     BUS 420 .........    Accounting Information Systems ............................................................. 4.5
                          Total Core Requirements                                                                                    54




                                                                                                                                             69
SCHOOL of CULINARY ARTS and HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
Bachelor of Arts (BA) Degree
Hospitality Management 2+2 Option
      The mission of the BA degree program in Hospitality Management is to allow students to build
on a core of knowledge gained through the associate’s degree in hotel and restaurant management,
advanced culinary arts, baking and pastry arts, or its equivalent to develop the management skills
needed for successful operation of a hospitality-related business. Students who successfully complete
specific courses in this program may receive certificates from the American Hotel & Lodging Association
(AHLA) and may qualify to become a Certified Hospitality Supervisor (CHS).
      The bachelor’s degree program includes core requirements, elective requirements, and general
education requirements. The total requirement is 180 quarter credits and normally takes 120 weeks
(12 quarters) to complete. This program requires a completion of 90 quarter credits of lower level
requirements or equivalency prior to beginning the 90 quarter credits of upper level requirements.
Students will be required to complete 4 hours in the fifth quarter of the program of voluntary
community service activities as a prerequisite for completion of their program of study.
      The BA in Hospitality Management offers three concentration areas taken in the associate’s level:
(A) Hotel and Restaurant Management, (B) Advanced Culinary Arts, and (C) Baking and Pastry Arts.
      All three concentrations may be taken purely residential or through a combination of classroom
and online instruction. Students pursuing concentration A may choose to take classes entirely online.
      Students should note that all courses are not offered each term. Please check term schedules
for details.

Upper-Level Core Requirements

     Number              Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     HOS310 ..........   Beverage Operations Management ........................................................... 4.5
     HOS320 ..........   Hospitality Marketing ............................................................................... 4.5
     HOS330 ..........   Food and Beverage Controls ..................................................................... 4.5
     HOS360 ..........   Hospitality Law ......................................................................................... 4.5
     HOS370 ..........   Hospitality Leadership .............................................................................. 4.5
     HOS410 ..........   Financial Analysis of the Hospitality Industry.......................................... 4.5
     HOS420 ..........   Human Resource Management ................................................................ 4.5
     HOS425 ..........   Security and Loss Prevention ................................................................... 4.5
     HOS430 ..........   Hospitality Facilities Design OR
     HOS431 ..........   Hospitality Facilities Management ........................................................... 4.5
     HOS490 ..........   Hospitality Senior Project ......................................................................... 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                   45

Lower-Level Core Concentration Requirements

      Students enrolled in the BA degree in Hospitality Management are required to complete one of
the three lower-level core concentrations or their equivalent in order to advance to the upper level
core requirements.


70
Number                Course Name                                                                                                  Credits

                      A. Hotel and Restaurant Management Concentration
HOS105 ..........     Analysis of the Hospitality Industry ....................................................... ......              4.5
HOS110 ..........     Food and Beverage Management ........................................................ .........                  4.5
HOS120 ..........     Front Office Procedures ..................................................................... ...........        4.5
HOS125 ..........     Housekeeping Management ......................................................................                   4.5
HOS130 ..........     Hospitality Management Communication .............................................. ....                         4.5
HOS220 ..........     Hospitality Accounting .............................................................................             4.5
HOS225 ..........     Sales and Marketing .................................................................................            4.5
HOS230 ..........     Special Events Planning ...........................................................................              4.5
HOS250 ..........     Hospitality Resort Tourism ...........................................................................           4.5
HOS270 ..........     Hospitality Supervision .................................................................................        4.5
CUL215 ...........    Dining Room Service ......................................................................... ...........        4.5
CIS110 ............   Computer Office Applications ...................................................................                 4.5
HOS271 ..........     Hotel and Restaurant Externship I ...........................................................                    4.5
                      Total Core Concentration Requirements                                                                            45

                      B. Advanced Culinary Arts Concentration
CUL111 ...........    Culinary Theory and Sanitation ............................................................ ......                4.5
CUL121 ...........    Kitchen Fundamentals ............................................................................                 4.5
CUL140 ...........    Introduction to Cooking Techniques ........................................................                       4.5
CUL142 .........      Garde Manger .................................................................................. ..............    4.5
CUL150 .........      Sauces, Soups, & Stocks ...........................................................................               4.5
CUL152...........     Elements of Entree Production .................................................................                   4.5
CUL160 ...........    Fundamentals of Baking ..................................................................... .........            4.5
CUL162 ...........    Pastry Arts ...............................................................................................       4.5
CUL170 ...........    Advanced Culinary Theory .......................................................................                  4.5
CUL210 ...........    Nutrition & Menu Planning .....................................................................                   4.5
CUL215 ..........     Dining Room Service ...............................................................................               4.5
HOS270 ..........     Hospitality Supervision.............................................................................              4.5
CUL271 ..........     Culinary Skills Externship I ....................................................................                 4.5
                      Total Core Concentration Requirements                                                                            58.5

                      C. Baking and Pastry Arts Concentration
CUL111 ...........    Culinary Theory and Sanitation ..............................................................                    4.5
CUL160 ...........    Fundamentals of Baking ..........................................................................                4.5
BAK124 ...........    Artisan Breads ..........................................................................................        4.5
BAK134 ...........    Cakes, Custards, and Creams ...................................................................                  4.5
BAK144 ...........    Culinary Arts for Bakers ...........................................................................             4.5
BAK154 ...........    Specialty and Wedding Cakes ...................................................................                  4.5
BAK164 ...........    Plated Desserts .........................................................................................        4.5
BAK174 ...........    Confectionary Production ........................................................................                4.5
CUL170 ...........    Advanced Culinary Theory .......................................................................                 4.5
CUL210 ...........    Nutrition & Menu Planning .....................................................................                  4.5
CUL215 ...........    Dining Room Service ...............................................................................              4.5
HOS270 ..........     Hospitality Supervision.............................................................................             4.5


                                                                                                                                              71
     CUL270 .......... Food Science............................................................................................. 4.5
     CUL271 ........... Culinary Skills Externship I .................................................................... 4.5
                        Total Core Concentration Requirements                                                                    63

Elective Requirements

      Students are required to complete 13.5 quarter credits of the 300/400 level elective courses and
9.0 quarter credits of 100/200 level elective courses for concentrations A & B, or 4.5 quarter credits
for concentration C. In conjunction with an academic advisor, students will choose from the list
of department elective courses to fulfill the elective requirements. Other elective options including
general education may be taken with the approval from the Program Dean.

Upper-Level Elective Choices:

     Number                 Course Name                                                                                          Credits
     HOS350 .........       Wine Appreciation .................................................................................... 4.5
     HOS355 .........       Catering Management .............................................................................. 4.5
     HOS365 .........       International Hotel Management ............................................................. 4.5
     HOS415 ..........      Convention Management .......................................................................... 4.5
     HOS435 ..........      Revenue Management .............................................................................. 4.5
     HOS491 ..........      Current Topics in Hospitality I ................................................................. 4.5
     HOS492 ..........      Current Topics in Hospitality II ................................................................ 4.5
     HOS493 ..........      Current Topics in Hospitality III .............................................................. 4.5
     HOS494 ..........      Current Topics in Hospitality IV ............................................................... 4.5

Lower-Level Elective Choices:
     Number                 Course Name                                                                                                Credits
     HOS220 ......... .     Hospitality Accounting ............................................................................. 4.5
     CUL240 ...........     Purchasing and Receiving ....................................................................... 4.5
     CUL241 ...........     Catering.................................................................................................... 4.5
     CUL251 ...........     Bounty of the Sea .................................................................................... 4.5
     CUL252 ...........     Chiles in the Global Kitchen .................................................................... 4.5
     CUL253 ...........     American Regional Cuisine ...................................................................... 4.5
     CUL254 ...........     International Cuisine ............................................................................... 4.5
     CUL255 ...........     Italian Cuisine ......................................................................................... 4.5
     CUL256 ...........     Indian Cuisine ......................................................................................... 4.5
     CUL257 ...........     French Cuisine ......................................................................................... 4.5
     CUL270 ...........     Food Science............................................................................................. 4.5
     BAK232 ...........     International Desserts .............................................................................. 4.5
     BAK233 ...........     Food Sensitivities and Spa Desserts .......................................................... 4.5
     BAK234 ...........     Holiday Breads ......................................................................................... 4.5
     BAK235 ...........     Chocolate Arts .......................................................................................... 4.5
     BAK236 ...........     Sugar Arts ................................................................................................. 4.5
     CUL272 ...........     Culinary Skills Externship II ................................................................... 4.5
     CUL273 ...........     Culinary Skills Externship III .................................................................. 4.5
     CUL291 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts I ............................................................. 4.5


72
     CUL292 ...........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts II ............................................................         4.5
     CUL293 ...........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts III ..........................................................          4.5
     CUL294 ...........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts IV ...........................................................          4.5
     HOS245 ..........    Event Management ...................................................................................    4.5
     HOS272 ..........    Hotel and Restaurant Externship II .........................................................            4.5
     HOS273 ..........    Hotel and Restaurant Externship III ........................................................            4.5
     HOS291 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant I .................................................              4.5
     HOS292 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant II ...............................................               4.5
     HOS293 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant III ..............................................               4.5
     HOS294 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant IV ...............................................               4.5
                          Total Elective Requirements Concentration A & B                                                        22.5

                          Total Elective Requirements Concentration C                                                            18

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                          Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                   54

                          Total Upper Level Requirements                                                                         90
                          Total Lower Level Requirements*                                                                        90

                          Bachelor of Arts Degree in Hospitality Management
                          Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                  180
                          * Based on AAS or equivalent in Hotel and Restaurant Management,
                          Advanced Culinary Arts, or Baking and Pastry Arts.


Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Advanced Culinary Arts
      The mission of the AAS degree program in Advanced Culinary Arts is to give students the culinary
skills required for entry into the food service industry with the additional liberal arts education needed
for management positions in the food service industry. The program focuses on culinary skills, theory
and communication and problem solving skills. The American Culinary Federation (ACF) accredits
this program.
      The AAS in Advanced Culinary Arts program includes core requirements, elective requirements,
and general education requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits and normally takes 60
weeks (6 quarters) to complete. Students will be required to complete 4 hours in the fifth quarter of the
program of voluntary community service activities as a prerequisite for completion of their program of
study. Students are required to pass a standardized Food Sanitation exam or possess a Food Handler’s
license prior to graduation.
      This program is primarily residential. Students may choose to take some of the courses through
on-line delivery. Students should note that all courses are not offered each term. Please check term
schedules for details.

                                                                                                                                        73
Core Requirements
      Number             Course Name                                                                                               Credits
      CUL111 ........... Culinary Theory and Sanitation .............................................................. 4.5
      CUL121 ........... Kitchen Fundamentals ............................................................................ 4.5
      CUL140 ........... Introduction to Cooking Techniques ....................................................... 4.5
      CUL142 ........... Garde Manger .......................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL150 ........... Sauces, Soups, & Stocks .......................................................................... 4.5
      CUL152 ........... Elements of Entree Production ................................................................ 4.5
      CUL160 ........... Fundamentals of Baking ......................................................................... 4.5
      CUL162 ........... Pastry Arts ............................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL170 ........... Advanced Culinary Theory ...................................................................... 4.5
      CUL210 ........... Nutrition & Menu Planning .................................................................... 4.5
      CUL215 ........... Dining Room Service ............................................................................... 4.5
      CUL271 ........... Culinary Skills Externship I ................................................................... 4.5
      HOS270 .......... Hospitality Supervision ............................................................................ 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                     58.5

Elective Requirements

     Students are required to complete 9.0 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfi ll the elective requirements.
Other elective options may be available with the approval of the Program Dean or faculty advisor.

      Number                  Course Name                                                                                               Credits
      HOS220 ..........      Hospitality Accounting ............................................................................. 4.5
      CUL240 ...........     Purchasing and Receiving ....................................................................... 4.5
      CUL241 ...........     Catering.................................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL251 ...........     Bounty of the Sea ..................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL252 ...........     Chiles in the Global Kitchen .................................................................... 4.5
      CUL253 ...........     American Regional Cuisine ...................................................................... 4.5
      CUL254 ...........     International Cuisine ............................................................................... 4.5
      CUL255 ...........     Italian Cuisine ......................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL256 ...........     Indian Cuisine ......................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL257 ...........     French Cuisine ........................................................................................ 4.5
      CUL270 ...........     Food Science ............................................................................................ 4.5
      BAK232 ...........     International Desserts ............................................................................. 4.5
      BAK233 ...........     Food Sensitivities and Spa Desserts ......................................................... 4.5
      BAK234 ...........     Holiday Breads ........................................................................................ 4.5
      BAK235 ...........     Chocolate Arts ......................................................................................... 4.5
      BAK236 ...........     Sugar Arts ................................................................................................ 4.5
      CUL272 ...........     Culinary Skills Externship II .................................................................. 4.5
      CUL273 ...........     Culinary Skills Externship III ................................................................. 4.5
      CUL291 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts I ............................................................ 4.5
      CUL292 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts II ........................................................... 4.5
      CUL293 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts III ......................................................... 4.5
      CUL294 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts IV .......................................................... 4.5

74
     HOS291 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant I ................................................             4.5
     HOS292 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant II ..............................................              4.5
     HOS293 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant III .............................................              4.5
     HOS294 ..........    Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant IV ..............................................              4.5
                          Total Elective Requirements                                                                            9

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                          Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                 22.5

                          Associate of Applied Science Degree in Advanced Culinary Arts
                          Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                 90



Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Baking and Pastry Arts
      The mission of the AAS Degree in Baking and Pastry Arts program is to give students the skills in
order to pursue careers as pastry chefs. This program will stress the general skills required of all food
service professionals from critical thinking and professionalism to an understanding of food safety,
nutrition, and service, while emphasizing baking and pastry-specific skills.
      The AAS in Baking and Pastry Arts program includes core requirements, elective requirements,
and general education requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits and normally takes 60
weeks (6 quarters) to complete. Students will be required to complete 4 hours in the fifth quarter of the
program of voluntary community service activities as a prerequisite for completion of their program of
study. Students are required to pass a standardized Food Sanitation exam or possess a Food Handler’s
license prior to graduation.
      The hospitality and general education courses required in this program are now available
online. Students should note that all courses are not offered each term. Please check term schedules
for details.

Core Requirements

     Number               Course Name                                                                                            Credits
     CUL111 ...........   Culinary Theory and Sanitation .............................................................. 4.5
     CUL160 ...........   Fundamentals of Baking ......................................................................... 4.5
     BAK124 ...........   Artisan Breads ......................................................................................... 4.5
     BAK134 ...........   Cakes, Custards, and Creams .................................................................. 4.5
     BAK144 ...........   Culinary Arts for Bakers .......................................................................... 4.5
     BAK154 ...........   Specialty and Wedding Cakes .................................................................. 4.5
     BAK164 ...........   Plated Desserts ........................................................................................ 4.5
     BAK174 ...........   Confectionary Production ........................................................................ 4.5
     CUL170 ...........   Advanced Culinary Theory ...................................................................... 4.5
     CUL210 ...........   Nutrition & Menu Planning .................................................................... 4.5

                                                                                                                                           75
      CUL215 ........... Dining Room Service ...............................................................................           4.5
      CUL270 .......... Food Science.............................................................................................      4.5
      CUL271 ........... Culinary Skills Externship I ....................................................................             4.5
      HOS270 .......... Hospitality Supervision.............................................................................           4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                       63

Elective Requirements

     Students are required to complete 4.5 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfi ll the elective requirements.
Other elective options may be available with the approval from the Program Dean or faculty advisor.

      Number                 Course Name                                                                                                Credits
      HOS220 ..........      Hospitality Accounting ............................................................................ 4.5
      CUL240 ...........     Purchasing and Receiving ...................................................................... 4.5
      CUL241 ...........     Catering ................................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL251 ...........     Bounty of the Sea .................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL252 ...........     Chiles in the Global Kitchen ................................................................... 4.5
      CUL253 ...........     American Regional Cuisine ..................................................................... 4.5
      CUL254 ...........     International Cuisine .............................................................................. 4.5
      CUL255 ...........     Italian Cuisine ........................................................................................ 4.5
      CUL256 ...........     Indian Cuisine ........................................................................................ 4.5
      CUL257 ...........     French Cuisine ........................................................................................ 4.5
      BAK232 ...........     International Desserts ............................................................................. 4.5
      BAK233 ...........     Food Sensitivities and Spa Desserts ......................................................... 4.5
      BAK234 ...........     Holiday Breads ........................................................................................ 4.5
      BAK235 ...........     Chocolate Arts ......................................................................................... 4.5
      BAK236 ...........     Sugar Arts ................................................................................................ 4.5
      CUL272 ...........     Culinary Skills Externship II .................................................................. 4.5
      CUL273 ...........     Culinary Skills Externship III ................................................................. 4.5
      CUL291 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts I ............................................................ 4.5
      CUL292 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts II ........................................................... 4.5
      CUL293 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts III ......................................................... 4.5
      CUL294 ...........     Current Topics in Culinary Arts IV .......................................................... 4.5
      HOS291 ..........      Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant I ................................................ 4.5
      HOS292 ..........      Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant II .............................................. 4.5
      HOS293 ..........      Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant III ............................................. 4.5
      HOS294 ..........      Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant IV .............................................. 4.5
                             Total Elective Requirements                                                                                  4.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

      See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                             Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                     22.5

                             Associate of Applied Science Degree in Baking and Pastry Arts
                             Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                     90

76
Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Hotel and Restaurant Management
      The mission of the AAS Degree in Hotel and Restaurant Management program is to provide
students with a foundation in hotel and restaurant management skills to prepare them for
career advancement.
      The associate’s degree in Hotel and Restaurant Management program includes core requirements,
elective requirements, and general education requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits
and normally takes 60 weeks (6 quarters) to complete. Students will be required to complete 4 hours
in the fifth quarter of the program of voluntary community service activities as a prerequisite for
completion of their program of study.
      Students may choose to take courses through classroom instructions or online. Students should
note that all courses are not offered each term. Please check term schedules for details.

Core Requirements

     Number                Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     HOS105 ..........     Analysis of the Hospitality Industry .......................................................... 4.5
     HOS110 ..........     Food and Beverage Management ........................................................ ......... 4.5
     HOS120 ..........     Front Office Procedures ..................................................................... ........... 4.5
     HOS125 ..........     Housekeeping Management ..................................................................... 4.5
     HOS130 ..........     Hospitality Management Communication ............................................... 4.5
     HOS220 ..........     Hospitality Accounting ............................................................................ 4.5
     HOS225 ..........     Sales and Marketing ................................................................................ 4.5
     HOS230 ..........     Special Events Planning .......................................................................... 4.5
     HOS250 ..........     Hospitality Resort Tourism ...................................................................... 4.5
     HOS270 ..........     Hospitality Supervision ............................................................................ 4.5
     CUL215 ...........    Dining Room Service .............................................................................. 4.5
     CIS110 ............   Computer Office Applications .................................................................. 4.5
     HOS271 ..........     Hotel and Restaurant Externship I .......................................................... 4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                                   58.5

Elective Requirements

     Students are required to complete 9.0 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfill the elective
requirements. Other elective options may be available with the approval from the Program Dean.

     Number                Course Name                                                                                       Credits
     HOS245 ..........     Event Management .................................................................................. 4.5
     HOS272 ..........     Hotel and Restaurant Externship II ........................................................ 4.5
     HOS273 ..........     Hotel and Restaurant Externship III ....................................................... 4.5
     HOS291 ..........     Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant I ................................................ 4.5
     HOS292 ..........     Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant II .............................................. 4.5
     HOS293 ..........     Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant III ............................................. 4.5
     HOS294 ..........     Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant IV .............................................. 4.5


                                                                                                                                             77
     CUL240 ........... Purchasing and Receiving ...................................................................... 4.5
     CUL241 ........... Catering ................................................................................................... 4.5
                        Total Elective Requirements                                                                                   9

Arts and Sciences Requirements
     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                             Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                     22.5

                             Associate of Applied Science Degree in Hotel and Restaurant Management
                             Total Credits Required for Graduation                              90



Diploma Program
Advanced Culinary Arts Professional
      The mission of the Advanced Culinary Arts Professional diploma program is to give students the
culinary skills required for entry into the food service industry. The American Culinary Federation
(ACF) accredits this program.
      The Advanced Culinary Arts Professional Diploma program includes core and elective requirements.
The total requirement is 63 quarter credits and normally takes 50 weeks (5 quarters) to complete.
      Students will be required to complete 4 hours in the fifth quarter of the program of voluntary
community service activities as a prerequisite for completion of their program of study. Students
are required to pass a standardized Food Sanitation exam or possess a Food Handler’s license prior
to graduation.
      The hospitality courses required in this program are now available online. Students should note
that all courses are not offered each term. Please check term schedules for details.

Core Requirements
     Number                  Course Name                                                                                                Credits
     CUL111...........       Culinary Theory and Sanitation .............................................................. 4.5
     CUL121 .........        Kitchen Fundamentals ............................................................................. 4.5
     CUL140 .........        Introduction to Cooking Techniques ........................................................ 4.5
     CUL142 .........        Garde Manger .......................................................................................... 4.5
     CUL150 .........        Sauces, Soups, & Stocks .......................................................................... 4.5
     CUL152 ..........       Elements of Entree Production ................................................................ 4.5
     CUL160 .........        Fundamentals of Baking .......................................................................... 4.5
     CUL162 .........        Pastry Arts ................................................................................................ 4.5
     CUL170 .........        Advanced Culinary Theory ....................................................................... 4.5
     CUL210 .........        Nutrition & Menu Planning ..................................................................... 4.5
     CUL215 .........        Dining Room Service ............................................................................... 4.5
     HOS270 .........        Hospitality Supervision............................................................................. 4.5
     CUL271 .........        Culinary Skills Externship I .................................................................... 4.5
     CUL272 ..........       Culinary Skills Externship II ................................................................... 4.5
                             Total Core Requirements                                                                                      63

78
Elective Requirements
     Students are required to complete 4.5 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfi ll the elective requirements.
Other elective options may be available with the approval of the Program Dean or faculty advisor.

      Number              Course Name                                                                                                Credits
      HOS220 .........    Hospitality Accounting ........................................................................... 4.5
      CUL240 ..........   Purchasing and Receiving ..................................................................... 4.5
      CUL241 ..........   Catering ................................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL251 ..........   Bounty of the Sea .................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL252 ..........   Chiles in the Global Kitchen .................................................................. 4.5
      CUL253 ..........   American Regional Cuisine ..................................................................... 4.5
      CUL254 ..........   International Cuisine ............................................................................. 4.5
      CUL255 ..........   Italian Cuisine ....................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL256 ..........   Indian Cuisine ....................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL257 .........    French Cuisine ....................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL270 ..........   Food Science ............................................................................................ 4.5
      BAK232 ..........   International Desserts ............................................................................ 4.5
      BAK233 ..........   Food Sensitivities and Spa Desserts ........................................................ 4.5
      BAK234 ..........   Holiday Breads ....................................................................................... 4.5
      BAK235 ..........   Chocolate Arts ........................................................................................ 4.5
      BAK236 ..........   Sugar Arts ............................................................................................... 4.5
      CUL273 .........    Culinary Skills Externship III ................................................................ 4.5
      CUL291 ..........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts I ........................................................... 4.5
      CUL292 ..........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts II .......................................................... 4.5
      CUL293 ..........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts III ......................................................... 4.5
      CUL294 ..........   Current Topics in Culinary Arts IV ......................................................... 4.5
      HOS291 ..........   Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant I ............................................... 4.5
      HOS292 ..........   Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant II ............................................. 4.5
      HOS293 ..........   Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant III ............................................ 4.5
      HOS294 ..........   Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant IV ............................................. 4.5
                          Total Elective Requirements                                                                                  4.5

                          Advanced Culinary Arts Professional Diploma Program
                          Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                    67.5




                                                                                                                                               79
SCHOOL OF COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Bachelor of Science (BS) Degree
Information Technology
     The bachelor’s degree in Information Technology program prepares students to become
professionals in the digital age by building a solid foundation around leading technologies. Students
in the program learn the skills necessary to analyze, design, implement, and use modern tools to
administer computer networks. The program reinforces a broad understanding of information systems
and technologies through the application of industry standardized competencies.
     The BS degree program includes core technology requirements, elective requirements, and
general education requirements. The total requirement is 180 quarter credits. It typically takes 120
weeks (2.5 years) to complete the entire bachelor’s program without breaks. Students should note
that not all courses are offered each term.

Core Requirements

     Number                Course Name                                                                                     Credits
     IST101 ............   Fundamentals of Information Systems .................................................... 4.5
     CIS141 ............   Hardware and OS Architecture ................................................................. 4.5
     CIS143 ............   Data Communications ............................................................................. 4.5
     CIS145 ............   Client Operating Systems Technology ..................................................... 4.5
     CIS150 ............   Server Operating Systems Technology ..................................................... 4.5
     CIS162 ............   Linux Operating Systems ........................................................................ 4.5
     CIS206 ............   Introduction to Relational Database Mgmt Systems ............................... 4.5
     CIS210 ............   Advanced Data Communications ............................................................. 4.5
     CIS226 ............   Network and Directory Services Infrastructure Design ........................... 4.5
     CIS230 ............   Network Security Infrastructure Design .................................................. 4.5
     CIS250 ............   Routers and Switches in the Enterprise .................................................... 4.5
     CIS255 ............   Implementing and Supporting Secure Networks ...................................... 4.5
     CIS281 ............   Wireless Telecommunications Networks ................................................... 4.5
     CIS300 ............   Managing Information Systems ............................................................... 4.5
     CIS305 ............   E-Business IT Infrastructure .................................................................... 4.5
     CIS330 ............   Advanced Linux Administration ............................................................... 4.5
     CIS350 ............   Managing Cisco Network Security ............................................................ 4.5
     CIS415 ............   Wireless Communications and Hybrid Networks ...................................... 4.5
     CIS435 ............   Business Information Systems Security ................................................... 4.5
     CIS490 ............   Information Technology Senior Project ................................................... 4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                           90

Elective Requirements

      Students are required to complete 36 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of departmental elective courses to fulfill the elective
requirements. Other elective options may be available with the approval of the Program Dean or
faculty advisor.

80
     Number                Course Name                                                                                          Credits
     CIS155 ............   Network Infrastructure Management ...................................................... 4.5
     CIS160 ............   Network Directory Services Infrastructure .............................................. 4.5
     CIS202 ............   Fundamentals of Web Design .................................................................. 4.5
     CIS235 ............   Network and Intrusion Forensics ............................................................. 4.5
     CIS240 ............   Enterprise Email Architecture ................................................................. 4.5
     CIS245 ............   Legal and Ethical Aspects in Digital Forensics ........................................ 4.5
     CIS251 ............   Advanced Router Configuration .............................................................. 4.5
     CIS252 ............   Advanced Switch Configuration .............................................................. 4.5
     CIS265 ............   Encryption and Cryptography in Digital Forensics .................................. 4.5
     CIS275 ............   Incident Handling and Computer Forensics ............................................ 4.5
     CIS291 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology I ........................................... 4.5
     CIS292 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology II ......................................... 4.5
     CIS310 ............   E-Business Software Infrastructure ......................................................... 4.5
     CIS320 ............   Remote WAN Access Configuration .......................................................... 4.5
     CIS340 ............   Internetworking Device Troubleshooting ................................................ 4.5
     CIS410 ............   Virtual Private Networks and Firewalls ................................................... 4.5
     CIS420 ............   Intrusion Detection .................................................................................. 4.5
     CIS491 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology III ........................................ 4.5
     CIS492 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology IV .......................................... 4.5
                           Total Elective Requirements                                                                            36

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                           Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                 54

                           Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Technology
                           Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                               180



Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Network Management and Security
      The mission of the Network Management and Security Associate’s degree program is to prepare
the University’s students with the necessary skills to be competitive in the job market. The degree
accentuates current industry competencies to provide the student the opportunity to learn and
understand current trends that drive the IT industry. Students will become professionals who can
install, trouble- shoot and maintain computer networks. Upon completion, students should posses
the necessary skills and techniques using modern tools to administer computer networks. A strong
emphasis is placed on key topics such as network management, system administration, and security
concepts necessary for introductory positions in the computer network industry.
      The AAS degree program includes core requirements, elective requirements, and general
education requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits and normally takes 60 weeks to
complete. Students should note that not all courses are offered each term.

                                                                                                                                          81
Core Requirements
      Number                Course Name                                                                                     Credits
      IST101 ............   Fundamentals of Information Systems .................................................... 4.5
      CIS141 ............   Hardware and OS Architecture ................................................................. 4.5
      CIS143 ............   Data Communications ............................................................................. 4.5
      CIS145 ............   Client Operating Systems Technology ...................................................... 4.5
      CIS150 ............   Server Operating Systems Technology ...................................................... 4.5
      CIS160 ............   Network Directory Services Management ................................................. 4.5
      CIS162 ............   Linux Operating Systems ......................................................................... 4.5
      CIS206 ............   Introduction to Relational Database Mgmt Systems ................................ 4.5
      CIS250 ............   Routers and Switches in the Enterprise .................................................... 4.5
      CIS255 ............   Implementing and Supporting Secure Networks ...................................... 4.5
                            Total Core Requirements                                                                           45

Elective Requirements

     Students are required to complete 22.5 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfill the elective requirements.
Other elective options may be available with the approval of the Program Dean or faculty advisor.

      Number                Course Name                                                                                   Credits
      CIS155 ............   Network Infrastructure Management ....................................................... 4.5
      CIS202 ............   Fundamentals of Web Design .................................................................. 4.5
      CIS210 ............   Advanced Data Communications ............................................................. 4.5
      CIS226 ............   Network and Directory Services Infrastructure Design ........................... 4.5
      CIS230 ...........    Network Security Infrastructure Design ................................................... 4.5
      CIS235 ............   Network and Intrusion Forensics ............................................................. 4.5
      CIS240 ...........    Enterprise E-mail Architecture ................................................................ 4.5
      CIS245 ............   Legal and Ethical Aspects in Digital Forensics ........................................ 4.5
      CIS251 ............   Advanced Router Configuration ............................................................... 4.5
      CIS252 ............   Advanced Switch Configuration ............................................................... 4.5
      CIS265 ............   Encryption and Cryptography in Digital Forensics ................................... 4.5
      CIS275 ............   Incident Handling and Computer Forensics ............................................. 4.5
      CIS281 ............   Wireless Telecommunication Networks .................................................... 4.5
      CIS291 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology I ............................................ 4.5
      CIS292 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology II .......................................... 4.5
                            Total Elective Requirements                                                                     22.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

      See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                            Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                           22.5

                            Associate of Applied Science Degree in Network Management and Security
                            Total Credits Required for Graduation                             90

82
Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree
Digital Design
      To meet the ever-changing requirements of the web design and development industry, students
must be offered hands-on experience with the latest technology, and be exposed to emerging trends.
Essential skills such as defining project constraints and client relationship techniques are built upon
a strong web design and web development foundation.
      This program offers a unique curriculum that has a balanced core of both front-end web page
creation and back-end application engineering. Employers are increasingly looking for candidates
with experience and capability in both sides of web work. While progressing through the Digital
Design track, students can choose from a wide variety of electives, allowing them to create their own
educational concentration.
      In this program, students will learn how to take a web project from the beginning of the planning
stage through to publishing, delivery, and maintenance. Our classes introduce concepts such as design
principles, content delivery, usability, data gathering, and e-commerce theory.
      The AAS degree program includes core requirements, elective requirements, and general
education requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits and normally takes 60 weeks to
complete. Students should note that not all courses are offered each term.

Core Requirements

     Number                Course Name                                                                                           Credits
     IST101............    Fundamentals of Information Systems .................................................... 4.5
     CIS202 ............   Fundamentals of Web Design .................................................................. 4.5
     CIS203 ............   Creating Graphics for the Web ................................................................. 4.5
     CIS206 ............   Introduction to Relational Database Mgmt Systems ................................ 4.5
     CIS212 ............   Internet Applications I.............................................................................. 4.5
     CIS222 ............   Interactive Web Animation ....................................................................... 4.5
     CIS234 ............   Web Programming Design ....................................................................... 4.5
     CIS241 ............   Theory of Information Presentation ........................................................ 4.5
     CIS246 ............   Internet Applications II ............................................................................ 4.5
     CIS290 ............   Portfolios Creation ................................................................................... 4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                                 45

Elective Requirements

      Students are required to complete 22.5 elective quarter credits. In conjunction with an academic
advisor, students will choose from the list of department elective courses to fulfill the elective
requirements. Other elective options may be available with the approval of the Program Dean or
faculty advisor.

     Number                Course Name                                                                                            Credits
     CIS208 ...........    Usability and the Web ............................................................................... 4.5
     CIS213 ............   Digital Photography ................................................................................. 4.5
     CIS218 ............   Graphic Design ......................................................................................... 4.5
     CIS228 ............   Presentation Layer: Client Side Programming ......................................... 4.5

                                                                                                                                            83
     CIS248 ............   Server Side Programming ASP.NET ..........................................................                  4.5
     CIS249 ............   Advanced Interactive Animation ..............................................................               4.5
     CIS257 ............   3-D Modeling............................................................................................    4.5
     CIS259 ............   3-D Animation .........................................................................................     4.5
     CIS284 ............   Systems Analysis and Development ..........................................................                 4.5
     CIS286 ............   Web Application Project Management ......................................................                   4.5
     CIS291 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology I ............................................                     4.5
     CIS292 ............   Current Topics in Information Technology II ..........................................                      4.5
                           Total Elective Requirements                                                                                22.5

Arts and Sciences Requirements

     See the Arts and Sciences elective pool requirements listed on page 10 and 11 of this catalog.

                           Total Arts and Sciences Requirements                                                                       22.5

                           Associate of Applied Science Degree in Digital Design
                           Total Required for Graduation                                                                              90




84
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Overview
The Information Technology field and the field of Business Administration now recognize
their importance to each other. An effective IT manager must understand not only the
possibilities and limitations of the technology but also the requirements and constraints
of the business world. Effective business owners and executive managers must be familiar
with the underlying technologies which allow their company’s success.

Using these guiding principles, Stratford University provides graduate degrees in areas
critical to the overall economic and technical success of U.S as well as global companies.
The content of the degrees will help these companies maintain a competitive edge in a
dynamic global economy.

  1. Master of Science in Accounting (MS) – The objective of the Master of Science
     in Accounting program is to equip persons seeking positions as professional
     accountants in industrial, financial, governmental, global and non-profit
     institutions with the specialized knowledge and skills demanded of the profession
     and necessary for success. The program also aims to provide graduates with much
     of the academic background necessary to pursue certifications such as public
     accounting (CPA) and management accounting (CMA). The program provides
     a global focus with a balanced integration of standard theoretical and practical
     accounting standards blended with quantitative methods in decision making and
     a response to current trends and demands in the profession – especially forensic
     accounting, advanced accounting practices, and use of technology and accounting
     information systems in the workplace. Professors and students will access and use
     Internet databases and websites, Stratford University research databases and basic
     accounting software programs. The MS program includes nine core requirements
     and three elective requirements, a total of 54 quarter credits. Students who enroll
     in two classes per quarter should complete the program in 60 weeks.

  2. Master of Business Administration (MBA) – The MBA program at Stratford
     University focuses on creating the world’s future business leaders. The curriculum
     incorporates the industry reliance on information technology and the need to
     undergo frequent transformation. The program assists students develop and nurture
     their analytical, technical, and interpersonal skills. The first year of the program
     is focused on foundation courses that will offer students the ability to discover the
     area of concentration they want to explore during their second year. These courses
     also give the student a diverse and broad understanding of all facets of business
     administration. The second year of study allows the student to choose an area of
     concentration from finance, information technology, management and leadership,


                                                                                      85
     or entrepreneurship. This allows the ability to hone one’s skills in a particular area
     and be able to conduct research and excel in that specific field of interest.

 3. International Master of Business Administration (IMBA) – The IMBA degree
    at Stratford University aims to help managers gain a distinct advantage in their
    profession, whether they are in industrial, financial, global, government or
    non-profit institutions. To achieve this goal, Stratford University offers a broad-
    based program curriculum which strikes a balance between technical training
    and practical problem-solving that is founded on current management theories
    and approaches. It is complemented by case analyses, company/industry studies,
    business games and other experiential learning methods. A conscious effort has
    been made to develop a curriculum responsive to the unique features of global
    environments. Students may focus in one of five areas of specialization: (a)
    Finance, (b) Information Technology and e-Commerce, (c) Global Leadership,
    (d) Entrepreneurship, or (e) Marketing.

 4. Enterprise Business Management (MS) – Information is the newest weapon
    in the business arena. Companies that can get the right information, to the right
    people, at the right time will prevail in the competitive marketplace. The employees
    of those companies will be able to make better collective decisions using the timely
    and relevant information provided by the Information Infrastructure. The MS
    degree program in Business Management will enable graduates to manage the
    planning and deployment of the critical infrastructure.

 5. Information Systems (MS) – Today’s corporations have the highest expectations
    from their IT staff to develop and deliver quality technical applications and service.
    The MS degree program in Information Systems at Stratford University focuses on
    developing the solid technical skills demanded by today’s evolving marketplace.
    The program develops an in-depth understanding of the current and upcoming
    technologies widely used in the industry. The primary focus is to align the academic
    approach with the real-world current practices used in industry, thus giving the
    student hands on experience as well as a solid understanding of the theoretical basis
    behind each of the technologies. Also, the students will develop the fundamental
    skills needed to excel in the areas of software engineering, networking, database
    administration, and telecommunications. The MSIS program re- quires students
    to have a background in either the areas of computer science or engineering, or to
    have a significant amount of experience in IT.

 6. Software Engineering (MS) – The Master of Science degree program in Software
    Engineering at Stratford University is focused on developing a strong fundamental
    background in designing, developing, and deploying high quality software. Today’s

86
      corporations require complex software systems held to the highest standards in
      order to stay competitive. The IT industry will require software engineers to be
      multi-skilled with a solid grasp of the full software lifecycle and the skills needed to
      develop mission-critical software. The program explores cutting-edge technologies
      and involves developing systems currently used in the industry.

The Stratford graduate program is supported by an academic staff and facility that are
state-of-the-art. Research-driven academic projects are central to the educational structure.
Projects may include computer networking, satellite system design, signal processing,
microelectronics, website design, database design, business plans, and venture capital
proposals. Both students and faculty pursue scholarly work related to the disciplines addressed
in this program. Facilities are in place that utilize the latest technology for teaching,
research and other scholarly activities. Participants in this program are expected to write
and present scholarly work related to their areas of study. Graduates will be qualified for a
number of high level technical and management positions in industry and government.


Master of Science (MS) Degree
Accounting
      The objective of the Master of Science in Accounting Program is to equip persons seeking positions
as professional accountants I industrial, financial, governmental, global and non-profit institutions
with the specialized knowledge and skills demanded of the profession and necessary for success. The
program also aims to provide graduates with much of the academic background necessary to pursue
certifications such as public accounting (CPA) and management accounting (CMA).
      The program provides a global focus with a balanced integration of standard theoretical and
practical accounting standards blended with quantitative methods in decision making and a response
to current trends and demands in the profession – especially forensic accounting, advanced accounting
practices, and use of technology and accounting information systems in the workplace. Professors and
students will access and use Internet databases and websites, Stratford University research databases
and basic accounting software programs.

Core Requirements
     Number               Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     EBM530 ..........    Business Law ............................................................................................ 4.5
     EBM560..........     Managerial Accounting ............................................................................ 4.5
                          or
     EBM562 ..........    International Accounting .........................................................................       4.5
     EBM570 ..........    Microeconomics .......................................................................................   4.5
     EBM610 ..........    Financial Management ............................................................................        4.5
     ACC563 ...........   Accounting Information Systems ...........................................................               4.5
     ACC564...........    Advanced Managerial Accounting ............................................................              4.5
     ACC565 ...........   Advanced Auditing ....................................................................................   4.5
                          or

                                                                                                                                            87
     ACC566...........    Forensic Accounting .................................................................................      4.5
     ACC569 ...........   Systems Auditing ......................................................................................    4.5
     ACC571 ...........   Advanced Financial Auditing....................................................................            4.5
                          Total Core Requirements                                                                                   40.5

Elective Requirements

     Students will complete three elective classes selected in conjunction with an academic advisor.

     Number               Course Name                                                                                           Credits
     EBM504 .........     International Organizational Behavior .................................................... 4.5
     EBM640 .........     International Business ............................................................................. 4.5
     ACC567 ...........   Federal Taxation ...................................................................................... 4.5
     ACC568...........    International Taxation ............................................................................. 4.5
     ACC572 ...........   Advanced Accounting Theory ................................................................... 4.5
                          Total Elective Requirements                                                                             13.5

                          Master of Science in Accounting Degree
                          Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                     54



Master of Business Administration (MBA) Degree
      The Master of Business Administration program is designed to prepare students for careers
in various aspects of business, management and leadership in both the private and public sectors.
Students acquire a comprehensive foundation in the fundamentals of business, the global environment
in which they will function, and the analytical tools for intelligent decision making. Students gain
added functional expertise by selecting specialization courses. The MBA students can develop expertise
in their chosen areas of specialization: (a) Finance, (b) Information Technology and e-Commerce,
(c) Management and Organization, or (d) Entrepreneurship. In choosing the non-specialization
requirements, students can develop expertise in another field through an individualized field designed
in consultation with and approved by the dean of graduate studies. After successful completion
of the program, our graduates should find jobs in various disciplines with the government as well
as the private sector.
      The MBA program is available to students through classroom instruction, online instruction,
or a combination of both. The curriculum includes core requirements, specialization requirements,
and non-specialization requirements. The total requirement is 90 quarter credits and normally takes
120 weeks (12 quarters) to complete. Students should note that not all courses are offered each term.
This program is not currently available at the Woodbridge Campus.

Core Requirements

     Number               Course Name                                                                                         Credits
     EBM502 ..........    Research Methods .................................................................................... 4.5
     EBM505 ..........    Global Leadership in Business Enterprise I .............................................. 4.5
     EBM510 ..........    Information Processing and the Web ....................................................... 4.5

88
    EBM515 ..........    Electronic Commerce: Business Models & Technologies ..........................                                4.5
    EBM520 ..........    Human Resource Management ................................................................                    4.5
    EBM530 ..........    Business Law ............................................................................................     4.5
    EBM550 ..........    Sales and Marketing .................................................................................         4.5
    EBM560 ..........    Managerial Accounting ............................................................................            4.5
    EBM570 ..........    Microeconomics .......................................................................................        4.5
    EBM610 ..........    Financial Management ............................................................................             4.5
    EBM640 ..........    Geopolitics................................................................................................   4.5
    EBM690 ..........    Capstone Project .......................................................................................      4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                       54

Specialization Requirements

    Students must select one of the following specialization areas.

    Number               Course Name                                                                                              Credits
                         A. Finance Requirements
                         (4 Courses Required)
    EBM600 ..........    Investments .............................................................................................. 4.5
    EBM615 ..........    Capital Formation .................................................................................... 4.5
    EBM620 ..........    Financial Decision Making ...................................................................... 4.5
    EBM625 ..........    Advanced Financial Management ............................................................ 4.5
                         B. Information Technology and E-commerce Requirements
                         (4 Courses Required)
    EBM500 .........     Business Applications over the Internet .................................................... 4.5
    EBM535 ..........    Information Technology and Corporate Transformation ......................... 4.5
    EBM540 ..........    E-Commerce Web Site Development Theory and Management I .............. 4.5
    EBM545 ..........    E-Commerce Web Site Development Theory and Management II ............ 4.5
    SOF515 ...........   Relational Database Management ............................................................ 4.5
    SOF540 ..........    Distributed Systems .................................................................................. 4.5
                         C. Management and Organization Requirements
                         (4 Courses Required)
    EBM525 ..........    Global Leadership in Business Enterprise II ............................................ 4.5
    EBM555 ..........    Business and Public Policy ....................................................................... 4.5
    EBM635 ..........    Business Transformation .......................................................................... 4.5
    EBM640 ..........    International Business ............................................................................. 4.5
    EBM680 ..........    Project Management ................................................................................ 4.5
                         D. Entrepreneurship Requirements
                         (4 Courses Required)
    EBM572 ..........    International Economics.......................................................................... 4.5
    EBM660 ..........    Growth Strategies for Emerging Companies ............................................. 4.5
    EBM665 .........     New Venture Financing ............................................................................ 4.5
    EBM670 ..........    New Venture Creation ............................................................................... 4.5
    EBM675 ..........    Business Plan for the New Venture ........................................................... 4.5
                         Total Specialization Requirements                                                                          18




                                                                                                                                             89
Non-Specialization Requirements
     Students must select three (3) additional courses from the approved courses .................... 13.5
     EBM630 ......... Special Projects ........................................................................................ 4.5
                      Total Non-Specialization Requirements                                                                     18

                            Master of Business Administration (MBA) Degree
                            Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                  90

Students normally enroll in two classes per quarter, which requires attendance of two classes per week.




International Master of Business Administration
(IMBA) Degree
      The International Master of Business Administration degree program of Stratford University aims
to help managers gain a distinct advantage in their profession, whether they are in industrial, fi nancial,
global, government or non-profit institutions. To achieve this goal, Stratford University offers a broad-based
program curriculum which strikes a balance between technical training and practical problem-solving
that is founded on current management theories and approaches. It is complemented by case analyses,
company/industry studies, business games and other experiential learning methods. A conscious effort
has been made to develop a curriculum responsive to the unique features of global environments. IMBA
students engage in an intensive study in current management concepts and techniques through a core
curriculum covering the functional areas in business as well analytical decision making. Students gain
added functional expertise by selecting specialization courses. The IMBA offers five areas of specialization:
(a) Finance, (b) Information Technology and e-Commerce, (c) Global Leadership, (d) Entrepreneurship,
and (e) Marketing. The requirement for graduation is 54 quarter credits and normally takes 60 weeks
(6 quarters) to complete. This program is not currently available at the Woodbridge Campus.

Core Requirements
     Number                 Course Name                                                                                             Credits
     EBM502 ..........      Research Methods .................................................................................... 4.5
     EBM504 ..........      International Organizational Behavior .................................................... 4.5
     EBM505 ..........      Global Leadership in Business Enterprise I .............................................. 4.5
     EBM530 ..........      Business Law ............................................................................................ 4.5
     EBM535 ..........      Information Technology and Corporate Transformation ............................ 4.5
     EBM562 ..........      International Managerial Accounting ...................................................... 4.5
     EBM572 ..........      International Economics.......................................................................... 4.5
     EBM610 ..........      Financial Management ............................................................................ 4.5
     EBM642 ..........      Managerial International Business .......................................................... 4.5
     EBM692 ..........      International MBA Capstone .................................................................... 4.5
                            Total Core Requirements                                                                                   45



90
Specialization Requirements
     Students must select two classes from one of the following specialization areas:

     Number              Course Name                                                                                               Credits
                         A. Finance Specialization Requirements
     EBM590 ..........   International Money, Banking, and Financial Markets .............................. 4.5
     EBM622 ..........   International Managerial Financial Decision Making ................................ 4.5
     EBM627 ..........   International Financial Management ...................................................... 4.5
                         B. Information Technology and e-Commerce Specialization Requirements
     EBM500 ..........    Business Application Over the Internet ................................................... 4.5
     EBM515 ..........   Electronic Commerce: Business Models and Technologies ...................... 4.5
     EBM552 ..........   Internet Marketing Strategies .................................................................. 4.5
                         C. Global Leadership Specialization Requirements
     EBM525 ..........   Global Leadership in Business Enterprise II ............................................ 4.5
     EBM557 ..........   Corporate Governance .............................................................................. 4.5
     EBM645 ..........   Geopolitics................................................................................................ 4.5
                         D. Entrepreneurship Specialization Requirements
     EBM662 ..........    Growth Strategies for Emerging Markets ................................................. 4.5
     EBM670 ..........   New Venture Creation .............................................................................. 4.5
     EBM672 ..........   International Competitive Strategy and Innovation ................................ 4.5
                         E. Marketing Specialization Requirements
     EBM580 ..........   Managerial Marketing and Market Research ........................................... 4.5
     EBM587 ..........   Strategic Business Marketing ................................................................... 4.5
     EBM650 ..........   International Marketing Management ..................................................... 4.5
                         Total Specialization Requirements                                                                            9

                         International Master of Business Administration (IMBA) Degree
                         Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                    54



Master of Science (MS) Degree
Enterprise Business Management
      The Master of Science degree program in Enterprise Business Management enables students to
manage the planning and deployment of the critical infrastructure to help their company achieve a
sustained competitive advantage. The program includes best practices and case studies in fundamental
business procedures, including research methods, accounting, sales and marketing, business and
public policy, and human resource management. The capstone course gives the EBM student the
opportunity to pull together and build upon what has been learned in separate business fields and
utilizes this knowledge in the analysis of complex business challenges. Students should be prepared for
strategic technical aspects of business and management positions of an enterprise.
      The Master of Science degree program includes core requirements and elective requirements. The
total requirement is 54 quarter credits and normally takes 60 weeks (6 quarters) to complete. Students
should note that not all courses are offered each term. This program is not currently available at
the Woodbridge Campus.

                                                                                                                                             91
Core Requirements
     Number              Course Name                                                                                            Credits
     EBM500 .........    Business Applications over the Internet .................................................... 4.5
     EBM502 ..........   Research Methods .................................................................................... 4.5
     EBM520 ..........   Human Resource Management ................................................................ 4.5
     EBM550 ..........   Managerial Sales and Marketing .............................................................. 4.5
     EBM555 ..........   Business and Public Policy ....................................................................... 4.5
     EBM560..........    Managerial Accounting ............................................................................ 4.5
     EBM685 .........    Capstone Project ....................................................................................... 4.5
                         Total Core Requirements                                                                                  31.5

Elective Requirements (5 Courses Required)

     Number              Course Name                                                                                               Credits
     EBM505 ..........   Global Leadership of Business Enterprise I .............................................. 4.5
     EBM515 ..........   Electronic Commerce: Business Models and Technologies ....................... 4.5
     EBM525 ..........   Global Leadership of Business Enterprise II ............................................. 4.5
     EBM530 ..........   Business Law ............................................................................................ 4.5
     EBM535 ..........   Information Technology and Corporate Transformation ......................... 4.5
     EBM570 ..........   Microeconomics ....................................................................................... 4.5
     EBM572 ..........   International Economics.......................................................................... 4.5
     EBM599 ..........   Curricular Practical Training Practicum................................................. 4.5
     EBM630 ..........   Special Projects ........................................................................................ 4.5
     EBM635 ..........   Business Transformation .......................................................................... 4.5
     EBM640 ..........   International Business ............................................................................. 4.5
     EBM645..........    Geopolitics................................................................................................ 4.5
     EBM660 .........    Growth Strategies for Emerging Companies ............................................. 4.5
     EBM675 ..........   Business Plan for the New Venture ........................................................... 4.5
     EBM680 .........    Project Management ................................................................................ 4.5
                         Total Elective Requirements                                                                                 22.5

                         Master of Science (MS) Degree in Enterprise Business Management
                         Total Credits Required for Graduation                           54

Students normally enroll in two classes per quarter, which requires attendance of two classes per week.



Master of Science (MS) Degree
Information Systems
     The MS degree program in Information Systems at Stratford University focuses on the critical
functions that support software development and maintenance, including Quality Assurance,
Configuration Management, Data Management, Verification and Validation, and Project Management.
The program develops an in-depth understanding of the current and upcoming technologies widely
used in the industry. The primary focus is to align the academic approach with the real-world

92
current practices used in industry, thus giving the student hands on experience as well as a solid
understanding of the theoretical basis behind each of the technologies. Graduates will have a broad
technical understanding of current and emerging technologies in the IT field. This program is not
currently available at the Woodbridge Campus.

Core Requirements
     Number                Course Name                                                                                         Credits
     ISM 500 ..........    Information Systems in Organizations .................................................... 4.5
     ISM 510 ..........    Information Management Analysis & Design ........................................... 4.5
     ISM 520 ..........    Information System Evaluation ............................................................... 4.5
     ISM 530 ..........    Decision Systems Technology ................................................................... 4.5
     ISM 540 ..........    Independent Project in Information Systems Management ...................... 4.5
     EBM502 ..........     Research Methods .................................................................................... 4.5
     EBM 680 .........     Project Management ................................................................................ 4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                               31.5

Elective Requirements
     Student must choose five (5) of the following courses.

     Number                Course Name                                                                                               Credits
     SOF 510 ..........    Data Structures and Algorithms ............................................................... 4.5
     SOF 515 ..........    Relational Database Management ............................................................ 4.5
     SOF 520 ..........    Software Verification and Validation ........................................................ 4.5
     SOF 525 ..........    Software Maintenance .............................................................................. 4.5
     SOF 535 ..........    Object Oriented Analysis and Design ........................................................ 4.5
     SOF 540 ..........    Distributed Systems .................................................................................. 4.5
     SOF 545 ..........    Middleware & Components Based Software Development ........................ 4.5
     SOF 560 ..........    Operating Systems .................................................................................... 4.5
     SOF 570..........     Network Security ...................................................................................... 4.5
     SOF 575 ..........    Internet Protocols .................................................................................... 4.5
     SOF 580 ..........    Data Communications ............................................................................ 4.5
     EBM535 ..........     Information Technology & Corporate Transformation ........................... 4.5
     EBM545 ..........     E-Commerce Web Site Development Theory & Management II ............... 4.5
     EBM550 ..........     Sales and Marketing ................................................................................ 4.5
     EBM560 ..........     Accounting .............................................................................................. 4.5
     EBM610 ..........     Financial Management ........................................................................... 4.5
     CIS520 ............   Wireless Telecommunications ................................................................. 4.5
     CIS530 ............   Digital Communications ......................................................................... 4.5
     CIS540 ............   Signal Processing .................................................................................... 4.5
     CIS550 ............   Wireless/Fixed Hybrid Networks ............................................................... 4.5
     CIS560 ............   Satellite Communications ........................................................................ 4.5
     CIS570 ............   Fiber-Optic Communications ................................................................... 4.5
     CIS580 ............   Data Networking ...................................................................................... 4.5
     CIS585 ............   Voice over IP ............................................................................................. 4.5
     CIS590 ............   Broadband Networking ............................................................................. 4.5


                                                                                                                                               93
     CIS620 ............   Telecommunications Applications Architecture .......................................                4.5
     ISM590 ...........    Current Topics in Information Systems I .................................................           4.5
     ISM591 ...........    Current Topics in Information Systems II ...............................................            4.5
     ISM592 ...........    Current Topics in Information Systems III ..............................................            4.5
     ISM593 ...........    Current Topics in Information Systems IV ...............................................            4.5
     ISM599 ...........    Curricular Practical Training Practicum ................................................            4.5
                           Total Elective Requirements                                                                        22.5

                           Master of Science (MS) Degree in Information Systems
                           Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                               54

Students normally enroll in two classes per quarter, which requires attendance of two classes per week.




Master of Science (MS) Degree
Software Engineering
      The MS degree program in Software Engineering provides a basic foundation in technical software
concepts and design techniques as well as management and teamwork approaches that are needed to
oversee software projects of high technical complexity. The program will prepare students to develop
efficient and scalable software products and services for industry and government in a cost-effective
manner. The emphasis of the program is on implementing software engineering projects within cost
and schedule by applying proven and innovative practices that overcome the shortcomings of the
current paradigm. Graduates of the program will be able to define software requirements, understand
core concepts, develop detailed designs, verify and validate the software product, identify key issues
and trends in the software engineering industry, and manage key phases of the software life cycle.
      The MS degree program includes core requirements and elective requirements. The total
requirement is 54 quarter credits and normally takes 60 weeks (6 quarters) to complete. Students
should note that not all courses are offered each term. This program is not currently available at
the Woodbridge Campus.

Core Requirements
     Number                Course Name                                                                                         Credits
     SOF500 ..........     Software Engineering ............................................................................... 4.5
     SOF585 ...........    Issues and Trends in Software Engineering ............................................. 4.5
     SOF590 ...........    Software Engineering Project ................................................................... 4.5
     EBM502 ..........     Research Methods .................................................................................... 4.5
     EBM680 ..........     Project Management ................................................................................ 4.5
                           Total Core Requirements                                                                               22.5




94
Elective Requirements
     Student must choose seven (7) of the following courses.

     Number                Course Name                                                                                               Credits
     SOF 510 ..........    Data Structures and Algorithms ............................................................... 4.5
     SOF 515 ..........    Relational Database Management ............................................................ 4.5
     SOF 520 ..........    Software Verification and Validation ........................................................ 4.5
     SOF 525 ..........    Software Maintenance .............................................................................. 4.5
     SOF 535 ..........    Object Oriented Analysis and Design ........................................................ 4.5
     SOF 540 ..........    Distributed Systems .................................................................................. 4.5
     SOF 545 ..........    Middleware & Components Based Software Development ........................ 4.5
     SOF 560 ..........    Operating Systems .................................................................................... 4.5
     SOF 570 ..........    Network Security ...................................................................................... 4.5
     SOF 575 ..........    Internet Protocols..................................................................................... 4.5
     SOF 580 ..........    Data Communications ............................................................................. 4.5
     SOF 595 ..........    Current Topics in Software Engineering I ................................................ 4.5
     SOF596 ...........    Current Topics in Software Engineering II ............................................... 4.5
     SOF597 ...........    Current Topics in Software Engineering III ............................................. 4.5
     SOF598 ...........    Current Topics in Software Engineering IV .............................................. 4.5
     SOF599 ...........    Curricular Practical Training Practicum................................................. 4.5
     EBM535 ..........     Information Technology & Corporate Transformation ............................ 4.5
     EBM545 ..........     E-Commerce Web Site Development Theory and Management II ............ 4.5
     CIS520 ............   Wireless Telecommunications .................................................................. 4.5
     CIS530 ............   Digital Communications .......................................................................... 4.5
     CIS540 ............   Signal Processing ..................................................................................... 4.5
     CIS550 ............   Wireless/Fixed Hybrid Networks ............................................................... 4.5
     CIS560 ............   Satellite Communications ........................................................................ 4.5
     CIS570 ............   Fiber-Optic Communications ................................................................... 4.5
     CIS580 ............   Data Networking ...................................................................................... 4.5
     CIS585 ............   Voice over IP ............................................................................................. 4.5
     CIS590 ............   Broadband Networking ............................................................................. 4.5
     CIS620 ............   Telecommunications Applications Architecture ....................................... 4.5
                           Total Elective Requirements                                                                                 31.5

                           Master of Science (MS) Degree in Software Engineering
                           Total Credits Required for Graduation                                                                    54

Students normally enroll in two classes per quarter, which requires attendance of two classes per week.




                                                                                                                                               95
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Stratford University offers a wide range courses in both the graduate and undergraduate
programs. Undergraduate courses have course numbers 499 and below. Graduate
courses have numbers 500 and above. Consult with your advisor prior to enrollment
to make certain that your course selection will meet your degree or diploma requirements
and that you satisfy all prerequisites. Each course description includes all pre-
requisite requirements in bold text. Any exceptions to these requirements must
be approved by the dean.

Undergraduate Courses
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

ACC 299         Intermediate Accounting I                                                              4.5
This course provides an in-depth study of accounting theory and a review of the accounting cycle.
Concentrates on the preparation of financial statements, the valuation of cash and temporary investments,
receivables, and accounting for inventories. Refers to pronouncements of the Financial Accounting
Standards Board (FASB). Prerequisite: BUS 122 or Experience.

ACC 300         Intermediate Accounting II                                                             4.5
This course covers the accounting for intangible assets, current and non-current liabilities, stockholders’
equity, investments, income taxes, compensation, leases, additional reporting issues, and discounted
cash flows. The material refers to pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the
American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Prerequisite: Intermediate Accounting I.

ACC 301         Intermediate Accounting III                                                            4.5
This course is an extension of ACC 304, Intermediate II. Topics covered include the accounting for investments,
revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions and postretirement benefits, and leases; accounting changes
and error analysis; preparation of the statement of cash flows; and full disclosure in financial reporting.
The material refers to pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the American
Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Prerequisite: Intermediate Accounting II.

ACC 330         Cost Accounting                                                                        4.5
This course covers accounting procedures relating to the process cost system, the estimated cost system, and
the standard cost system. Examines the accounting for by-products and includes comprehensive coverage of
budgeting for all areas of business enterprise: sales, production, commercial expenses, capital investments,
and forecasting. Prerequisite: Accounting II.

ACC 335         Auditing                                                                               4.5
This course covers theory of auditing, including the educational and moral qualifications for auditors,
as well as the role of the auditor in the American economy. Emphasizes professional standards, profess-
ional ethics, and the legal liability of auditors. Comprehensively covers planning and designing the audit
program, gathering and summarizing evidence, and internal control. Prerequisite: Intermediate
Accounting II.


96
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

ACC 350         Non-Profit/Municipal Accounting                                                          4.5
This course analyzes accounting procedures peculiar to non-profit organizations and municipalities. It
illustrates statements commonly prepared for each type of organization, fund, and account group. The course
also encompasses GAAP standards and reporting requirements that pertain to non-profit organizations
and GASB standards and reporting requirements that relate to government accounting. Prerequisite:
Intermediate Accounting II.

ACC 410         Advanced Accounting                                                                     4.5
This course covers accounting for home office and branches, business combinations, and consolidations.
It provides a continuation of the preparation for the CPA examination as well as various techniques for
solving some of the more complex problems in the business environment. Prerequisite: Intermediate
Accounting II.

ACC 460         Advanced Federal Taxation                                                               4.5
This course includes a comprehensive study of the federal income tax structure and the practical application
of income tax accounting to specific problems as related to individuals and proprietorships. Emphasizes the
general filing status, includable and excludable income, analysis of the categories of itemized and other
deductions, tax treatment of sales and exchange of property, available depreciation methods and recapture
provisions. Introduces the alternative minimum tax on individuals, the earned income credit, child care
credit, and credit for the elderly. Prerequisite: BUS 122.

ACC 490         Accounting Capstone: Senior Seminar in Accounting                                       4.5
This course is designed to aid the student in synthesizing and applying knowledge gained in earlier courses
and to conduct applied professional research in accounting. Discussion questions, exercises, and research
cases will be assigned and reviewed from the research textbook. The initial class sessions will also be used
to assist the students to define a research project, develop a research proposal, and initiate a research effort.
The final report will be defended by the student in a presentation to the instructor. Prerequisite: None.

BAK124          Artisan Breads                                                                          4.5
This course focuses on the art of bread baking from quick and yeast breads to laminated doughs and
international and breakfast breads. Students will also learn how artisan baking differs from commercial
bread baking. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK134          Cakes, Custards, and Creams                                                             4.5
This course covers the wide range of smooth and creamy textured desserts including puddings, custards,
mousses, soufflés, and ice cream. A range of cakes and pies will also be studied and prepared. Food Usage
and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK144          Culinary Arts for Bakers                                                                4.5
This course focuses on the basics of cooking including the preparation of sandwiches, appetizers, grains,
vegetables, soups, salads, and meat/seafood cookery. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee
applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.


                                                                                                              97
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

BAK154          Specialty and Wedding Cakes                                                           4.5
This course teaches students the advanced skills of cake decorating using a range of media. Students will work
with royal icing, fondant, gum paste, and pastillage, just to name a few. Food Usage and Supplemental
Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK164          Plated Desserts                                                                       4.5
In this course, students will learn the skills specific to a pastry chef who needs to create plated desserts.
Desserts studied will include a range of both American and International works, while also teaching students
how to work with fruits, liqueurs, and dessert sauces. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee
applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK174          Confectionary Production                                                              4.5
In this class, students will focus on sweet confections including cookies, candies, and petit fours, while
learning to create dessert displays using chocolate and sugar sculpture. Food Usage and Supplemental
Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK232          International Desserts                                                                4.5
This course is designed to introduce students to the history and preparation of a variety of international
pastries and desserts. Cuisines from Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas will be covered. Food Usage and
Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK233          Food Sensitivities and Spa Desserts                                                   4.5
This course is designed to introduce preparation and production methods for bakery/pastry products
for food sensitivities. This course includes theory and production of desserts, breakfast items, cakes and
cookies designed for low fat, gluten free, lactose intolerant, diabetic, and vegan people. Food Usage and
Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK234          Holiday Breads                                                                        4.5
This course focuses on the art of holiday bread baking including quick, yeast, international, and breakfast
breads. Students will also learn how breads have symbolic significance during various holidays from all over
the world. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK235          Chocolate Arts                                                                        4.5
This course introduces students to the art of working with chocolate. Topics include: chocolate tempering,
cutting shapes, transfer sheets, display pieces, and candies. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional
Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

BAK236          Sugar Arts                                                                            4.5
This course introduces students to the art of working with sugar and the design of showpieces. Students will
be exposed to the idea of sugar as art, covering techniques in poured, pulled, blown, and spun sugar. Food
Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.



98
Number         Course Name                                                                       Credits

BUS100         Introduction to Business                                                             4.5
This course provides a background on business and management. Students will discuss human relations,
organizational structure, communications, and technology in business, and strategic planning.
Prerequisite: None.

BUS112         Principles of Accounting I                                                           4.5
This course is an introduction to the basics of accounting procedures. Topics include, accounting techniques
and cycles, billings, balance sheets, and financial statements. Prerequisite: None.

BUS120         Sales and Marketing                                                                  4.5
This course introduces the student to effective methods for marketing products and services. Direct mail,
print time and other advertising techniques are discussed. Problem solving relative to customer relations is
addressed. Consumer profiled, organizational personalities, and demographics are presented as components
of market research and analysis. Prerequisite: None.

BUS122         Principles of Accounting II                                                          4.5
This course expands the student’s knowledge of preparing balance sheets and financial statements. Students
prepare general ledger entries, prepare payroll, and discuss budget control. Prerequisite: BUS112
or equivalent.

BUS135         Principles of Management                                                             4.5
This course presents management theory and the functions of planning, organizing, directing, staffing and
controlling. This course also focuses on the application of management principles to realistic work related
situations. Prerequisite: None.

BUS200         Business Law: Business, Government, and Society                                      4.5
This course is an introduction to law and ethics and outlines the ethical responsibilities managers face
when conducting business. This course includes vulnerability to lawsuits and litigation. American and
international perspective and interpretations of laws and ethical standards are discussed. Prerequisite:
BUS 100 or equivalent.

BUS210         Human Resource Management                                                            4.5
This introductory course concentrates on human resource management issues confronting organizations.
These issues include organizational practices and legal aspects of recruitment, selection, training,
orientation, and performance appraisals. Labor relations are discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 100
or equivalent.

BUS220         Business Communications                                                              4.5
This course prepares the student for communication in the workplace. The student prepares memorandums,
letters, proposals, presentations, newsletters, and flyers. Discussions focus on information exchange in and
outside of the organization. Student’s presentations are be critiqued on the message intended and message
received. Prerequisite: None.


                                                                                                          99
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

BUS235         Operations Management                                                                 4.5
This course addresses the management of operations in manufacturing and service organizations. Diverse
activities such as production process, raw materials purchase, scheduling, and quality control are discussed.
Prerequisite: BUS 100 or equivalent.

BUS240         International Business                                                                4.5
This course discusses how the global economic, political, and cultural environment affects domestic
and international businesses, international operations and dependency, and public policy decisions.
Prerequisite: BUS 100 or equivalent.

BUS250         Principles of Economics                                                               4.5
This course examines supply and demand, market demand and elasticity, cost theory, market structures,
pricing theory, and consumer behavior. Regulation, antitrust policy, and income distribution are also
discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 100 or equivalent.

BUS300         Financial Management                                                                  4.5
This course teaches the concepts and skills of financial planning within a business. Concepts covered include
how to use financial statements and how to plan appropriate action. Specific topics are preparing budgets,
analyze investment options, and assess risk and return of financing business endeavors. Prerequisite:
BUS 122 or equivalent.

BUS302         Microeconomics                                                                        4.5
In this course, students learn to apply an analytical approach to the study of how individuals and societies
deal with the fundamental problem of scarce resources. This approach is applied to everyday decisions faced
by individuals as they try to maximize their utility, to businesses that try to maximize profits and to the
whole of society as it attempts to use its resources efficiently. Prerequisite: BUS 250 or equivalent.

BUS305         International Business Strategies                                                     4.5
This course focuses on the strategies and structures of international businesses. Topics include cultural
differences, economics and politics of international trade and investment, functions and form of the global
monetary system, and assessment of the special roles of an international business’s various functions.
Prerequisite: BUS240 or equivalent.

BUS310          Introduction to Financial Management                                                 4.5
This course is for non-business majors only. This course introduces the student to topics in financial
management such as financial statement analysis, capital budgeting analysis, working capital (accounts
receivable, inventory, and cash) management, capital structure and cost of capital, and interest rate
determination methods. Some integration of international finance in these topics is also presented, because
of its significant impact on financial management. This course also presents a general view of the financial
system, including the financial market system, financial institutions, the firm’s objective in the business
environment, and the history of financial management. Note: Not open to students with credit for Financial
Management (BUS300). Prerequisite: None.


100
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

BUS320          Taxation Principles                                                                     4.5
This course provides a sufficient understanding of the tax environment to evaluate business transactions.
Fundamental tax concepts are applied to a variety of business, investment, employment, and personal
transactions. Topics include business formation, capital expenditures, employee and executive compensation,
international and multi-state operations and disclosure. Prerequisite: BUS122 or equivalent.

BUS325          Entrepreneurial Leadership                                                              4.5
Through the study of successful leaders and their companies, students learn techniques to move a company
from mediocre to great. Topics include goal setting, culture development, vision, profits, technology, and
effects of change, discipline, and necessary leadership qualities. Prerequisite: BUS135 or HOS270
or equivalent.

BUS340          Managerial Accounting                                                                   4.5
This course covers financial accounting concepts and managerial accounting topics. The course introduces
finance and its importance and relevance to business operations. It covers the internal financial environment
of a business. Topics include financial statements analysis, cost accounting, job order costing, and process
product costing. Prerequisite: BUS300 or equivalent.

BUS360          Business Ethics                                                                         4.5
This course analyzes basic principles of business ethics, moral reasoning and the capitalistic market
economic system. Topics include a framework for moral reasoning, government regulation, ethics of bribery,
price fixing, pollution, resource depletion, product safety, consumer protection as well as rights and duties
of employees and corporations. Prerequisite: BUS200 or equivalent.

BUS375          New Venture Creation                                                                    4.5
This course provides research and knowledge about the entrepreneurial process. Materials include the driving
forces of entrepreneurship: opportunity recognition, team, resource requirements, and an effective business
plan. Topics include equity creation, recognizing opportunities, effect of the Internet, attitudes and behaviors,
rewards and incentives, ethics, finance, and a business plan. Prerequisite: BUS300 or equivalent.

BUS380          Project Management                                                                      4.5
This course will allow students to manage a project within their major field of study. Students prepare a
project plan that includes details of their project, deliverables, dates when they will be completed, and the
associated learning that will be exhibited. Students implement their plan and record weekly status on their
progress, issues, decisions, and learning. At the conclusion of the course, students complete their projects
and summarize their results in a final report. Prerequisite: BUS100.

BUS400          Advanced Financial Management                                                           4.5
This course analyzes applied issues in corporate finance through a series of cases. Several concepts are
covered including: advanced capital budgeting, valuation techniques, corporate risk management, currency
hedging and valuation of start-ups. Prerequisite: BUS300 or equivalent.



                                                                                                           101
Number         Course Name                                                                       Credits

BUS 405        Business Law: Legal Environment for Business                                         4.5
This course addresses the changing dynamics of business in the legal system. Covered are the basic theories
of business law including the legal environment and legal theory and structure of the legal system. The
course goes beyond the basic concepts and addresses challenging issues such as contract law, Uniform
Commercial Code (UCC), and copyright, trademark and protection of intellectual property. Prerequisite:
BUS 200 or equivalent.

BUS415         Organizational Theory and Development                                                4.5
This course examines the field of organizational development and provides a background in organizational
development theory and application. Topics include history of organizational development theory, models for
organizational structure and change, and advances in organizational development theory. Prerequisite:
BUS210 or equivalent.

BUS420         Accounting Information Systems                                                       4.5
This course focuses on the impact of information technology on accounting including developments in
the Internet, electronic commerce, EDI and databases. Additionally, the course provides information on
developing, implementing, and maintaining an accounting information system. Also addressed are the
increasingly competitive business environment and techniques to reap the most value at the least cost.
Prerequisite: BUS122 or equivalent.

BUS425         Diversity in the Workplace                                                           4.5
This course examines the management of a diverse workforce and the benefits of creating this diversity.
Topics include understanding human behavior in an organization, changing marketplace realities,
employment systems, affirmative action, behavior modification for employees and other topics related to a
multicultural workforce. Prerequisite: BUS210 or equivalent.

BUS430         Competitive Strategies                                                               4.5
This course addresses the complex future faced by existing businesses. Materials will cover strategic and
organizational issues, restructuring, mergers and acquisitions, technological change, strategic alliances,
and the challenges of creating and serving markets around the world. Topics include strategic goals,
competitive environment, value chains, focus strategies, ethics, diversification, globalization, cooperation
and competition, organization design practices, and implementing change. Prerequisite: BUS120
or equivalent.

BUS435         Business Statistics and Econometrics                                                 4.5
This course will include a review of fundamental statistical methods, regression analysis, and hypothesis
testing. Students well then learn how to apply these methods and concepts to business and economic data.
Prerequisite: MAT310 or equivalent.




102
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

BUS440          Business Forecasting and Simulation                                                   4.5
This course examines the application of economic theory and methodology needed by business managers
to forecast both technical and non-technical needs. Topics include tools and techniques for analysis,
consumer and firm behavior, product demand, evaluation of decisions, technology benefits and challenges
and interactions between firms and the marketplace. Prerequisite: BUS300 or equivalent.

BUS450          Personal Financial Management                                                         4.5
This course introduces the student to the concepts, tools, and applications of personal finance and
investments. The course assumes little or no prior knowledge of the subject matter and focuses on helping
the student understand the process of financial planning and the logic that drives it. Prerequisite: None.

BUS460          Project Management                                                                    4.5
This course examines the direction and control of processes that convert resources into goods and services.
It examines the broad areas of system design, operation, and control. It provides the conceptual framework
and practical tools to effectively plan and manage the activities of small, medium, and complex projects.
Prerequisite: None.

BUS490          Business Administration Senior Project                                                4.5
This is a capstone course. The course will encompass the key elements of business operations which have
been studied throughout the bachelor’s program. Students work under the supervision of a faculty advisor
to further refine and develop their skills and knowledge through a student-created independent project or
case study. Project proposals must be submitted to the faculty advisor of the student’s choosing and approved
by the advisor and the dean before the student may register for this course. The student’s final grade for
the project will be determined by a faculty committee. Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director
or Equivalent.

CHT110          Principles of Hemodialysis                                                            4.5
This course will focus on the theoretical and clinical aspects of hemodialysis, including the duties and
responsibilities essential to the delivery of patient care in the chronic outpatient setting. This course also
covers the processes across membranes and will review the regulation of fluid and electrolytes and acid/base
balance in normal kidney functioning. Classification and causes of acute and chronic renal failure as well
as diagnostic procedures and findings in renal disease will also be covered. Prerequisite: MED 110 &
MED 120.

CHT210          Dialysis Delivery Systems                                                             4.5
This course discusses hemodialysis treatment and the complications of hemodialysis. The principles related
to solute and fluid removal, measures of clearance, and determination of adequacy will also be considered.
The components of the hemodialysis system are covered, including the dialyzer, the blood circuit, the
dialysate solution, the heparin pump, the ultrafiltration controller, and variable sodium options. Methods
of preparing dialysis quality water for dialysate are considered as well. Supplemental Lab Fee Required.
Prerequisite: CHT 110. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.



                                                                                                        103
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

CHT220          Pre and Post Patient Assessment                                                        4.5
Patient assessment before the initiation of treatment, treatment procedures, intradialytic monitoring,
termination of treatment and post treatment assessment, and blood work are discussed. The coverage of
peritoneal dialysis (PD) includes the anatomy and physiology of the peritoneal membrane and patient
selection criteria. The types of PD access, methods of insertion, care of the access, and access complications
are included as well. Additionally, the elements of the PD prescription are discussed. Patient care,
documentation, complications of treatment, and measures of treatment adequacy are considered. The use
of infection control strategies is stressed. The coverage of transplantation will include initial work up, donor
selection, and recipient matching with both living related and cadaveric donors. Patient care in the pre and
postoperative periods will be covered to include the immune reaction, immunosuppressive therapy, and
long-term complications. The psychological adjustment for the patient and family will be a point of focus.
Prerequisite: CHT 110 & MED 140.

CHT230          Dialysis Treatment Renal Disease                                                       4.5
This course discusses the phases of illness from pre-dialysis assessment and conservative care to deterioration
to CRF and further long term and palliative care. Finally, the decision to withdraw from treatment will be
discussed along with the significant psychosocial implications for family, patient, and staff. The development
of acute renal failure (ARF) will be discussed in terms of its causes, symptoms, treatment, and recovery.
Vascular access (both temporary and long term/permanent) will be covered along with access care and
trouble-shooting. The components of the dialysis prescription will be covered, including anticoagulation.
The complications of dialysis will be an important focal point. Prerequisite: CHT 210 & MIB 130.

CHT240          Fundamentals of Renal Nutrition                                                        4.5
This course details the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs and how these are significantly
different for the renal patient. Patient drug profiles are used as examples. The problem of polypharmacy
and the use of drugs in special populations of CRF patients are discussed as well. This course provides an
overview of the principles of nutrition throughout all stages of kidney disease. The course covers nutritional
assessment considerations and guidelines for the patient with renal disease. Measures to minimize risk
of malnutrition and promote optimal intake are discussed for both adult and pediatric patients. Vitamin
supplementation, specialized diets, (diabetic etc.) and patient education are examined with sample diets
being previewed for their adequacy. Prerequisite: CHT 220 & MED 240.

CHT250          Dialysis Quality and Safety Procedures                                                 4.5
The course presents safety issues including safe handling and mixing of dialysate. The student will learn
how to monitor the water treatment system, and why water quality is maintained, along with learning how
to monitor a variety of filters, meters and the devices used to remove microorganisms, sediment, heavy
metals, chemicals, and ions before drinking water can be used for dialysis. Common contaminants and
how they affect patients are discussed. The course also covers the benefits and risks for patients receiving
dialysis. The course addresses risk management, safety regulations, and guidelines for handling, labeling,
reprocessing, inspecting, and storing dialyzers. Prerequisite: CHT 210.




104
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

CHT260          Advanced Dialysis Procedures                                                         4.5
This course provides information about the effects of kidney failure and its treatment options: hemodialysis,
peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplantation, including medications, potential complications, and expected
goals of treatment. Topics include the Personal Protective Equipments and dialysis procedures and devices,
the monitoring of patients being treated for acute/chronic renal diseases, and a discussion of selected
renal pharmacology. Upon completion of the course, students will demonstrate the clinical skills necessary
for care of patients with specialized dialysis treatments in a chronic care setting. Supplemental Lab Fee
Required. Prerequisite: CHT 230. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

CHT290          Hemodialysis Externship                                                              4.5
This clinical course includes application of theoretical concepts and laboratory techniques learned in the
classroom. The student will practice in a dialysis setting with nurses and technicians on patients who are
receiving dialysis processing. Prerequisite: “C” grade or higher in all curriculum courses (with
the exception of one General Education course which should be taken concurrently with
CHT 290). Lecture Hours: 0; Lab Hours: 135.

CIS110         Computer Office Applications                                                           4.5
In this course, students learn how to generate word, spreadsheet, database, and presentation documents
using the Microsoft Office Professional suite of products. Topics include: editing methods, document
merging, templates, document preparation, file naming and storage conventions, backup methods,
macros, desktop publishing, object linking and embedding (OLE), and Visual Basic application extensions.
Prerequisite: None.

CIS141         Advanced Hardware and OS Architecture                                                 4.5
This course provides knowledge in preventative maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of expansion
buses, multimedia, video, modems, SCSI controllers, laptops, and printers. In addition, this course provides
a brief introduction to networking technology, including the components necessary to attach a client to a
local area network LAN). Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS143          Data Communications                                                                  4.5
This course covers the basic concepts of networking technology within Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide
Area Network (WAN) environments. Topics include the dominant network topologies (Ethernet, Token Ring,
FDDI), network protocols (TCP/IP, SPX/IPX and NetBIOS), cabling systems (coaxial, twisted pair, fiber
optic), as well as wireless communication. The course introduces the primary features of internetworking
devices (bridges, routers, repeaters, hubs, gateways, and switches) and the OSI software model for computer
communication. All topics are related to the historical development of the field. Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS145          Client Operating Systems Technology                                                  4.5
The student will learn how to install, configure, optimize, and troubleshoot a Windows XP Professional client
operating system. The student will become familiar with resource administration, hardware devices and
drivers, system performance and reliability, the desktop environment, network protocols and services, and
security. These concepts will be reinforced through a series of hand-on exercises. Prerequisite: IST101.


                                                                                                       105
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

CIS150          Server Operating Systems Technology                                                     4.5
The student will learn how to install, configure, optimize, and troubleshoot a Windows 2003 server operating
system. The student will become familiar with access to resources, hardware devices and drivers, storage
configuration and optimization, network connections, and security. In particular, the student will focus
on managing, monitoring, and optimizing server system performance, reliability, and availability. These
concepts will be reinforced through a series of hands-on exercises. Prerequisite: CIS145.

CIS155          Network Infrastructure Management                                                       4.5
In this course, the student will learn to install, manage, monitor, configure, and troubleshoot the services that
are required for the efficient operation of a TCP/IP Windows 2003 network infrastructure, including Domain
Name Servers (DNS), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Remote Access, Network Protocols, IP
Routing, Windows Name Servers (WINS), Network Address Translation (NAT), and Certificate Services in a
Windows 2003 network infrastructure. Students will understand the conceptual and practical framework for
this TCP/IP infrastructure through a series of hands-on exercises. Prerequisite: CIS141 and CIS143.

CIS160          Network Directory Services Management                                                   4.5
In this course, students learn to install, configure, and troubleshoot the Windows 2003 Active Directory
components, DNS for Active Directory, and Active Directory security solutions. In addition, each student will
be developing the skills required to manage, monitor, and optimize the desktop environment by using Group
Policy. Through a series of hands-on exercises, the student will become familiar with directory organization
unit structures, connection objects and links, global catalog servers, directory backup and restore
integration of directory services with DNS, inter-site replication of data, directory change and configuration
management, group policy, remote installation, and network security. Prerequisite: CIS150.

CIS162          Linux Operating Systems                                                                 4.5
In this course, students will learn how to install and optimize Red Hat Linux, a multi-user and multitasking
Unix-like operating system. In particular each student will become familiar with: the Linux file system;
shell programming; filters and pipelines; GUI desktop and application environments; and virtual memory.
Through a series of laboratory exercises, each student will configure a server for remote access using the
standard suite of TCP/IP tools and application packages. Prerequisite: CIS143.

CIS202          Fundamentals of Web Design                                                               4.5
This course applies effective graphic design techniques and methods to the web. Students learn to write
HTML code directly and are to use HTML code generators such as Macromedia Dreamweaver. The course
emphasizes the creation of web pages that are displayed properly in multiple browsers. Special attention is
be paid to well-designed web pages that meet site requirements. Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS203          Creating Graphics for the Web                                                           4.5
Students learn the fundamentals of creating graphics for use in website design and modifying existing
graphics and photos for inclusion in websites. Special emphasis is placed on creating appropriate graphics
for both new and existing websites. Students use a graphic editor such as Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop to
create and edit vector and bitmapped images. Prerequisite: IST101.


106
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

CIS206          Introduction to Relational Database Management Systems                                  4.5
This course is designed for students with limited or no previous database experience. Course outcomes
include a solid understanding of fundamental database terms and concepts such as tables, queries, forms
and reports, and their application using a popular database. This course also introduces database analysis,
database design, and N-tiered client-server database systems. A problem-based approach using SQL is used
in this course. Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS208          Usability and the Web                                                                   4.5
Students learn the fundamentals of human factors as they apply to website design and how to balance
these principles with current technologies. Students also learn what factors to take into account when
designing websites that appeal to specific audiences and how to communicate that with managers and
clients. Prerequisite: CIS202.

CIS210          Advanced Data Communications                                                            4.5
In this class the student develops an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of various
communication protocols and datalink subnetworks, including TCP/IP, SNA, SPX/IPX, X.25, frame
relay, and ATM. Students design and analyze a wide area network infrastructure. This analysis includes
congestion, bandwidth versus performance trades, bandwidth versus cost trades, equipment specifications,
protocol standards, LAN/WAN integration, and network performance in terms of latency and jitter.
Prerequisite: CIS143.

CIS212          Internet Applications I                                                                 4.5
This course is designed to allow students to build and test interactive Internet applications. Working in a
graphical user interface (GUI) environment, students learn to customize forms with user input items such
as check boxes, list items, and radio groups. Students also learn to modify data access by creating event-
related triggers. Prerequisite: CIS202.

CIS213          Digital Photography                                                                     4.5
In this course, students learn to take digital images using a digital camera. The student learns to manipulate
the images using a bitmap photo-editing application such as Photoshop. Techniques include using scanners
and cameras, and applying compression and photo effects. Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS218          Graphic Design                                                                          4.5
This course explains effective graphic design techniques and how they relate to the viewing audience’s
experience. Students learn the fundamentals of graphic design, including typography, color theory, layout
and style and recognize the importance of consistency and “branding.” The course emphasizes the creation
and application of graphic design precepts, and their current uses in presentations and web pages. Special
attention is paid to well-designed layouts that work well for multiple uses and their consistency and flexibility
across multiple platforms. Prerequisite: CIS202.




                                                                                                           107
Number         Course Name                                                                       Credits

CIS222         Interactive Web Animation                                                            4.5
In this course, students develop highly visual and interactive graphic content using industry-standard,
timeline-based software, such as Adobe Flash. This course focuses on understanding the application of
traditional animation techniques with contemporary design practices. Prerequisite: CIS203.

CIS226         Network and Directory Services Infrastructure Design                                 4.5
In this course, the students learn to analyze the business requirements for a network and Active Directory
services infrastructure and design a network infrastructure that meets those business requirements.
Network infrastructure elements include: network topology, routing, IP addressing, name resolution using
DNS, virtual private networks, and remote access. Various network designs are covered, including issues
such as bandwidth requirements, latency, statistical access patterns, multi-protocol requirements, internet
connectivity, and WAN infrastructure telecommunication costs. Students also design a directory services
architecture, including forest and domain structure, naming strategy, and organization unit structure,
replication strategy, site topology, operations masters, global catalog servers, domain controllers, and DNS
servers. Prerequisite: CIS150.

CIS228         Presentation Layer: Client Side Programming                                          4.5
This course focuses on client-side programming with a basic introduction to server side programming.
Topics include dynamic HTML, Javascript, Java Applets, cascading style sheets, design templates, and
principles of user-centered design. Students are also introduced to multimedia and plug-in functionalities.
The course includes a basic introduction to Server Side Includes (SSI). Students apply their knowledge of
client-side programming as they enhance their personal e-portfolio website and construct a rudimentary
e-business site. Prerequisite: CIS212.

CIS230         Network Security Infrastructure Design                                               4.5
Students learn to analyze the business requirements for security and to design security solutions that
meet business requirements. The student learns best practices in security including: controlling access
to resources, auditing access to resources, authentication, and encryption. Security topics include: audit
policy, encryption file system, authentication strategy, security group strategy, public key infrastructure,
DNS, SNMP, terminal services, remote access, signing, and IPSec. The student design a security baseline for
a Windows 2003 network that includes domain controllers, operations masters, application servers, file and
print servers, RAS servers, desktop computers, portable computers, and kiosks. Prerequisite: CIS150.

CIS234         Web Programming Design                                                               4.5
This course involves extensive work in the solution of problems on a digital computer and covers structured
programming concepts, proper documentation techniques, coding, debugging, and running programs
using I/O files, subroutines, arrays, searching, and sorting. Prerequisite: IST101.




108
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

CIS235          Network and Intrusion Forensics                                                      4.5
The student will develop a comprehensive understanding of forensics as it relates to data communication
networks and intrusions. Students will learn the relationship between computer security, computer
crimes, and forensics. Special emphasis will be placed on computer crimes and forensics in law
enforcement and financial accounting practices. Forensic tools will be discussed and used in lab sections.
Prerequisite: CIS143.

CIS240          Enterprise Email Architecture                                                        4.5
In this course, the student develops the ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot information
systems that incorporate Microsoft Exchange 2003 Server. Students install and upgrade Exchange 2003;
manage coexistence with Exchange Server 2000; deploy Microsoft Outlook 2003, Outlook Web Access, POP3,
IMAP4, and IRC; configure Exchange Server for disaster recovery; create and manage administrative groups,
security, and public folders; and configure and monitor client connectivity. Prerequisite: CIS160.

CIS241          Theory of Information Presentation                                                   4.5
Students will learn more in depth standards and practices for the presentation of information on the web.
This course will cover web color, typography, imagery, and branding in depth as they apply to professional
web sites. Students will learn about writing for the web, maintaining content for the web, navigation issues,
and ways to use visual information to create a specific customer experience. Prerequisite: CIS202
and CIS203.

CIS 245         Legal and Ethical Aspects in Digital Forensics                                       4.5
This course uses current events to exploit the impact of civil, criminal, and regulatory law on network
and intrusion forensics. Current and future affairs are discussed. Sources of information include articles,
journals and papers. Other topics discussed include legislative concerns affecting digital forensics, a study
of the legislative process, ethical issues and standards. Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS246          Internet Applications II                                                             4.5
This course provides the student with the skills to build a Web application, which interfaces to an existing
database. It builds upon the knowledge gained from Internet Applications I. In this course, students install
a basic web server on a PC and create simple web pages that display data from a small database located
on their PCs. Students learn how to upload those pages to a remote Web server, and run them using a
remote database. Throughout the course students will reinforce their SQL skills, and become proficient
connecting a Web page to a database, and using SQL Select statements to create dynamic Web pages.
Prerequisite: CIS212.




                                                                                                       109
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

CIS248          Server Side Programming ASP.NET                                                        4.5
This course provides the student with advanced skills to build a professional web application using .NET
technology. It builds upon the knowledge and skills gained from Internet Applications II. Students will
learn how to develop administrative Web pages that can add/delete/update records in a remote database
table. Students will refresh their knowledge of SQL JOINs, and use it to create more complicated web pages.
Students will extend their final project in Internet Applications II to allow customers to register and create
their own accounts, and to accept customer orders and implement a full check-out sequence. Students
learn more advanced ASP.NET techniques including session state and two different kinds of authentication.
Prerequisite: CIS246.

CIS249          Advanced Interactive Animation                                                         4.5
In this course, students learn more complex methods of digital animation, as well as various techniques
for interactivity. The focus is on tracking user movement, timing actions, and user interface design.
Prerequisite: CIS222.

CIS250          Routers and Switches in the Enterprise                                                 4.5
Students learn how to work with networks that include routers and switches. They will be able to install,
configure, and operate Cisco routers and switches within LAN and WAN environments. Students will
configure IP, IPX, and IGRP protocols, as well as frame relay and remote access dial-up router interfaces.
Prerequisite: CIS143.

CIS251          Advanced Router Configuration                                                           4.5
Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot various routed environments (Access, Distributed and
Core). Students learn to manage access and control overhead traffic in growing, routed networks once
basic connectivity has been established. An additional focus is on router capabilities as well as connecting
corporate enterprise networks to an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Prerequisite: CIS250.

CIS252          Advanced Switch Configuration                                                           4.5
Students learn to build networks using multilayer switching technologies over high-speed Ethernet
connections. Students encounter routing and switching concepts and implementations including the use of
appropriate devices and external management tools. Prerequisite: CIS250.

CIS255          Implementing and Supporting Secure Networks                                            4.5
In this course, students learn and implement best practices in the creation of a secure wide area network
that includes both Microsoft and non-Microsoft products. Students design a security system that degrades
gracefully under attack both from within and without. As part of this course, students learn published hacking
techniques, such as IP address spoofing, source routing, routing table corruption, password cracking, denial
of service zombies, and several methods to get access to the root directory. The course then focuses on the
patches and methods to disable these security breaches. Vulnerabilities of Microsoft, Linux, and Unix operating
systems are addressed. Several well-known hacking case studies are analyzed. Prerequisite: CIS150.




110
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

CIS 257         3-D Modeling                                                                           4.5
In this course, students explore principles of 3-dimension graphics and apply them in the creation of 3D
computer representations using industry-standard software packages such as Maya or Lightwave. The course
emphasizes creation of accurate models rendered with color, shading, texture mapping and lighting to
simulate the effects of materials, finishes, and surface graphics. Prerequisite: CIS 222.

CIS259          3-D Animation                                                                          4.5
In this course, students explore the principles of form topology, visual design, and movement, and apply
them in the creation of simple animated sequences using industry-standard 3D animation software. The
course emphasizes the fine details of life-like motion graphics. Prerequisite: CIS 257.

CIS265          Encryption and Cryptography in Digital Forensics                                       4.5
This course covers the basics of cryptography. The differences between Symmetric and Asymmetric encryption
will be examined and examples of each type of algorithm are discussed. Prerequisite CIS143.

CIS 275         Incident Handling and Computer Forensics                                               4.5
Students will learn how to identify an attack in progress or that an attack has occurred and how to properly
handle each situation. Students will learn to monitor different types of computers systems and platforms for
evidence of crime and learn how to gather and preserve such evidence. Prerequisite: CIS275.

CIS281          Wireless Telecommunication Networks                                                    4.5
Students develop a fundamental understanding of fixed and wireless networks, including satellites, in terms
of design and deployment engineering practices. The course considers indoor and outdoor propagation effects,
modulation and data encoding technologies, antenna design and placement, and personal communications
device design constraints. Current and future systems in the U. S., Europe and Asia are included, with
particular emphasis on the standards development process. The impact of new Low Earth Orbit (LEOs)
Satellites and other technologies on the use of wireless Personal Communications Systems (PCS) will be
analyzed. Students will work in teams on a specific practical project. Prerequisite: CIS210.

CIS284          Systems Analysis and Development                                                       4.5
This course provides an understanding of the methodology and scope of business information systems
analysis and design, and their relationship to the management process. The systems approach and its
techniques of problem solving are stressed. Prerequisite: IST101.

CIS286          Web Application Project Management                                                     4.5
This course will allow students to propose a web application project. Students prepare a project plan that
includes details of their project, deliverables, dates when they will be completed, and the associated learning
that will be exhibited. Students implement their plan and record weekly status on their progress, issues,
decisions, and learning. At the conclusion of the course, students complete their projects and summarize
their results in a final report. Prerequisite: CIS246.




                                                                                                         111
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

CIS290          Portfolios Creation                                                                  4.5
In this course, students work through entire projects from inspiration to completion. Students prepare their
own resumes and portfolios, while balancing a full website group project. This class focuses on web design
contracting, expectations, and maintenance, as well as professional skills. Prerequisites: CIS222,
CIS241, and CIS246.

CIS291          Current Topics in Information Technology I                                           4.5
This course offers comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the technology field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topics will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of Student
Advisor or Dean.

CIS292          Current Topics in Information Technology II                                          4.5
This course offers comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the technology field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topics will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of Student
Advisor or Dean.

CIS300          Managing Information Systems                                                         4.5
This course will focus on information system which supports business decisions, internal business
processes, customer relations, and interaction with suppliers. It deals with the organizational foundations
of such systems, their strategic role, and the organizational and management changes driving electronic
commerce, electronic business and the emerging digital firm. The course includes an overview of the
hardware, software, data storage, and telecommunications technologies needed for information systems.
The impact of such systems on the reengineering of critical business processes and on the decision making
cycle are discussed in detail. Prerequisite: CIS210, CIS250 and CIS281.

CIS305          E-Business IT Infrastructure                                                         4.5
This course discusses the basic networking infrastructure used in e-business and the typical multi-tiered
e-business architectures. Technologies include the OSI Reference Architecture, IP protocol, (connection
establishment, error control, congestion control) and the HTTP protocols. Topics also include load balancers,
web servers, application servers, and database servers in an e-business site architecture as well as software
architecture elements. Prerequisite: CIS255.

CIS310         E-Business Software Infrastructure                                                    4.5
This course focuses on flow analysis of e-business transactions and the role of the various software servers
(web servers, applications servers, database servers) in executing e-commerce transactions. Topics include
protocols used for authentication and payment in e-commerce, introduction to symmetric and public-key
encryption, digital signatures, digital certificates, Secure Socket Layer protocol, Transport Layer Services,
and secure electronic payment protocols. Prerequisites: CIS255 and CIS265.




112
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

CIS320          Remote WAN Access Configuration                                                         4.5
Students learn to build a remote access network and to interconnect central sites to branch offices for home
office/telecommuters. Students learn additional procedures for controlling access to the central site as well
as maximizing bandwidth over the remote links. Prerequisite: CIS250.

CIS330          Advanced Linux Administration                                                          4.5
This course focuses on the key competencies needed to install and maintain a Linux production server. Topics
include system planning, installation, configuration, administration, networking, security, and recovery.
It includes, but is not limited to, dual booting, RAID configuration, disk quotas, kernel recompilation, X-
Windowing; Apache web services, FTP, mail services, DNS/ bind, proxy services, NFS, firewall, and routing.
Prerequisite: CIS162.

CIS340          Internetworking Device Troubleshooting                                                 4.5
Students learn advanced functionality and developments of router IOS software and multilayer switching
software releases. Students learn to troubleshoot an environment possessing routers and switches to connect
multiprotocol client-hosts, servers, LANs and WANs using Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Token Ring LANs, Serial,
Frame Relay, ISDN BRI and ISDN PRI WANs. Prerequisite: CIS250.

CIS350          Managing Cisco Network Security                                                        4.5
This course reviews the development and evaluation of a network security policy and best practices in
securing a Cisco network infrastructure. Specific topics include, but are not limited to dialup security (AAA,
ACS, AND TACACS/RADIUS), hardening perimeter device (routers, PIX firewalls), encryption technology,
and VPNs with IPSec. The impact of security systems on scalability is discussed. Prerequisites: CIS250
and CIS255.

CIS410          Virtual Private Networks & Firewalls                                                   4.5
This course includes the theoretical foundation of Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) including Insect and
IKE. Students review Cisco VPN technology, including IOS Software Router and PIX firewalls. Students
configure routers and firewalls for site-to-site VPNs and remote access using both preshared keys and
digital certificates. The course includes configuration and advanced configuration of the Cisco PIX firewall
including AAA, attack guards, IPSec, and context-based access control. Students learn how to monitor and
scale Cisco VPN technology. Prerequisites: CIS250 CIS255.

CIS415          Wireless Communications and Hybrid Networks                                            4.5
This course will concentrate on digital wireless communications theory. The student will master analog-to-
digital conversion, digital modulation, coding, multiplexing, and distribution of digital data over analog and
digital media. The practical implementation of digital systems will be emphasized. The course also covers the
design and implementation of hybrid networks that include both wireless and fixed networks. Topics covered
include cellular interfaces to fixed networks, access to the Internet, network management, transmission systems,
and IP over wireless. Students learn how to design and implement hybrid systems, including performance,
traffic analysis, protocol formulation, hand-off and multiplexing design. Prerequisite: CIS281.



                                                                                                          113
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

CIS420          Intrusion Detection                                                                    4.5
This course includes the major aspects of the Cisco Secure Intrusion Detection System (CSIDS). Students
review network security concepts, installation and major components of the Cisco Secure IDS, alarm
management and intrusion detection signatures, CSIDS Configuration, and installation and configuration
of the Cisco Secure Intrusion Detection Director (CSIDD). Prerequisites: CIS 250 and CIS 255.

CIS435          Business Information Systems Security                                                  4.5
This course focuses on the development of a security policy that balances access, protection and cost, and
the importance of a global policy that is consistent throughout the organization. Topics include security
threats, security tools, system security, firewalls, voice systems, and security deployment and management.
This course deals primarily with management and enforcement of security system requirements, rather
than with the actual configuration of hardware. Prerequisite: CIS300.

CIS490          Information Technology Senior Project                                                  4.5
Students work under the supervision of a faculty advisor to further refine and develop their skills and
knowledge through a student-created independent project. Project proposals must be submitted to the
faculty advisor of the student’s choosing and approved by the advisor and the dean before the student may
register for this course. The student’s final grade for the project will be determined by a faculty committee.
Prerequisite: Must have completed a minimum of 160 credit hours.

CIS491          Current Topics in Information Technology III                                           4.5
This course offers comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the technology field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topics will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of Student
Advisor or Dean.

CIS492          Current Topics in Information Technology IV                                            4.5
This course offers comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the technology field. Students
analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career. The exact topics
will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of Student Advisor or Dean.

CUL111          Culinary Theory and Sanitation                                                         4.5
This course focuses on basic food service sanitation practices and discussion of selected culinary topics. The
selected topics will include: culinary professionalism, kitchen staples, basic kitchen tools and equipment,
dairy products, and culinary weights and measures. Students will prepare for a nationally administrated
sanitation examination. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: None.

CUL121          Kitchen Fundamentals                                                                   4.5
This course will consist of practical training in the kitchen as well as classroom discussion of cooking
techniques and meat, fish, and poultry. In full uniform, students will learn knife skills and basic food
preparation techniques as well as practical sanitation skills. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional
Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL111.


114
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

CUL140          Introduction to Cooking Techniques                                                     4.5
This course examines the basic aspects of fruit and vegetable preparation including salads, cold sauces, and
dressing. The fundamental aspects of breakfast cookery and sandwich presentation are also included. Food
Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL121 or BAK144.

CUL142          Garde Manger                                                                           4.5
This course examines the advanced aspects of Garde Manger and includes Hors d’oeuvres, charcuterie, and
the basics of ice carving. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite:
CUL140 or BAK144.

CUL150          Sauces, Soups, & Stocks                                                                4.5
This course is designed to introduce production methods for sauces and stock production. This course
includes basic stocks and soups, reduction and clarification of stocks, five leading and small sauces. It covers
the three main categories of soups and the basics of meat fabrication. Food Usage and Supplemental
Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL140 or BAK144.

CUL152          Elements of Entrée Production                                                          4.5
This course will examine the various aspects of a la carte and production cooking skills with a focus on the
principal cooking methods. The importance of timing and plate presentation are also emphasized. Food
Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL150 or BAK144.

CUL160          Fundamentals of Baking                                                                 4.5
This course is designed to introduce preparation and production methods for baking. This course includes
bake shop layout, work flow, and equipment; theory and production of yeast breads, quick breads, cakes
and cookies; fruit, pudding and custard pies; and puff pastry and pate a choux items. Food Usage and
Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL111

CUL162          Pastry Arts                                                                            4.5
This class focuses on techniques and fundamentals of classical and contemporary plated desserts, laminated
fermented doughs, cake decorating, sorbets and mousses. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional
Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL160.

CUL170          Advanced Culinary Theory                                                               4.5
This course will introduce students to basic, practical application of culinary mathematics. Each
student will be required to use a calculator. Areas of study will include calculation of food cost, recipe
yields, recipe costing, purchasing amounts, and other topics relevant to food service mathematics.
Prerequisite: CUL111.

CUL210          Nutrition & Menu Planning                                                              4.5
This course will examine the basic elements of nutrition and the responsibilities of restaurants to provide
nutritious cuisine to their clients. Students will create a variety of menus, each focusing on a different
nutritional issue. In addition to nutrition concerns, students will discuss the basic elements of menu creation.
Prerequisite: None.

                                                                                                          115
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

CUL215          Dining Room Service                                                                  4.5
The purpose of this course is to develop the skills of the future dining room server and to create a common
language between the dining room and the kitchen. Through this course, we hope that students, through
theoretical and practical applications of table service, will gain an appreciation of all the elements of the
front of the house. Supplemental Fee Required. Prerequisite: None

CUL240          Purchasing and Receiving                                                             4.5
This course examines the basic aspects of procurement within the foodservice industry. Topics include
ordering, menu forecasting, and delivery schedules. The course also introduces receiving, proper storage
and handling techniques, and inspections of deliveries and invoices. Students will learn basics of electronic
purchasing, inventory controls, FIFO, security, legal and ethical aspects of procurement and resources
available in the industry. Prerequisite: None.

CUL241          Catering                                                                             4.5
This course introduces the skills needed to manage both on-premise and off-premise catering operations.
Subject matter includes marketing and sales, recipe costing, menu development, kitchen and dining room
layouts, staff requirements and cooking and serving skills particular to catered events. Prerequisite: None.

CUL251          Bounty of the Sea                                                                    4.5
This course exposes students to many types of seafood and gives them an understanding of the cleaning,
safe handling, cooking methods, sauces, and accompaniments that lend themselves to seafood. Food Usage
and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152 or BAK144.

CUL252          Chiles in the Global Kitchen                                                         4.5
This course examines the use of chiles in cuisines around the world. Students prepare dishes demonstrating
the range of flavors and heat levels possible through the use of chiles. Food Usage and Supplemental
Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152 or BAK144.

CUL253          American Regional Cuisine                                                            4.5
This course introduces the production of American regional cuisines through a focus on various ingredients,
cooking methods, food textures, flavor combinations, and plate presentations. Students also learn the
impact of immigration patterns and indigenous products on the development of each cuisine. Food Usage
and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152 or BAK144.

CUL254          International Cuisine                                                                4.5
This course exposes students to the preparation of international dishes made in the traditional manner.
Cuisines from Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas will be covered. Food Usage and Supplemental
Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152 or BAK144.




116
Number          Course Name                                                                           Credits

CUL255          Italian Cuisine                                                                          4.5
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the many regions of Italy and their unique
and distinct styles of cooking. Students will learn the names of the regions and the specific products of
each region. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152
or BAK144.

CUL256          Indian Cuisine                                                                           4.5
This course is designed to introduce students to the taste, preparation methods and techniques that are
used in various regional Indian cuisines. This course will help students to understand common culinary
practices and the relationship between the resources and cuisines of different regions of India. Food Usage
and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152 or BAK144.

CUL257          French Cuisine                                                                           4.5
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the many regions of France and their unique and
distinct styles of cooking. Students will learn the names of the regions and the specific products of each region.
Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee applies. Prerequisite: CUL152 or BAK144

CUL270          Food Science                                                                             4.5
This course is designed to introduce students to scientific principles related to food preparation. Students
will also conduct experiments and discuss results. Food Usage and Supplemental Instructional Fee
applies. Prerequisite: CUL111.

CUL271          Culinary Skills Externship I                                                             4.5
This course provides the student with on the job experience. Students will work at approved sites in the
preparation of food. Students also document their work hours and submit reports evaluating their experience.
Prerequisite: CUL111.

CUL272          Culinary Skills Externship II                                                            4.5
This course provides the student with on the job experience. Students will work at approved sites in the
preparation of food Students also document their work hours and submit reports evaluating their experience.
Prerequisite: CUL111.

CUL273          Culinary Skills Externship III                                                           4.5
This course provides the student with on the job experience. Students will work at approved sites in
the preparation of food. Students also document their work hours and submit reports evaluating their
experience. Prerequisite: CUL111.

CUL291          Current Topics in Culinary Arts I                                                        4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the culinary or
baking fields. Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the
student’s career. The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. This course includes a lab
component. Prerequisite: Approval of the Program Advisor or Dean.


                                                                                                            117
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

CUL292          Current Topics in Culinary Arts II                                                     4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the culinary or
baking fields. Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the
student’s career. The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. This course includes a lab
component. Prerequisite: Approval of the Program Advisor or Dean.

CUL293          Current Topics in Culinary Arts III                                                    4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the culinary or
baking fields. Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the
student’s career. The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. This course includes a lab
component. Prerequisite: Approval of the Program Advisor or Dean.

CUL294          Current Topics in Culinary Arts IV                                                     4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the culinary or baking
fields. Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s
career. The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the
Program Advisor or Dean.

ENG111          College Composition                                                                    4.5
This course focuses on reviewing grammar, sentence structure, punctuation skills, and style points required for
effective written communication. Students use a standard handbook and apply proofreading skills to all types
of written communications. The student is guided in learning writing as a process: understanding audience
and purpose, exploring ideas and information, composing, revising, and editing. Prerequisite: None.

ENG290          Current Topics in English                                                              4.5
This course concentrates on current issues in English including, but not limited to, introductory topics in
understanding and creating various genres of English communication such as narrative prose, technical
communication, poetry, and cinematic forms. Prerequisite: None.

ENG310          Oral Communications                                                                    4.5
This course presents the principles and functions of spoken communications. The student learns how to
prepare to deliver various types of oral presentations. Emphasis is on planning and on how to orient content
to a particular audience. Students present short talks and plan and present longer, more formal speeches on
assigned topics and/or on topics of choice. Prerequisite: ENG111 or equivalent.

ENG320          Advanced Composition and Research                                                      4.5
This course emphasizes advanced writing and research including understanding the documentation
process, presenting material in academic form, and academic research techniques. Materials may include
MLA and APA styles, effective use of internet research tools, critical reading processes, and research writing
techniques. Prerequisite: ENG111 or equivalent.




118
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

ENG490          Special Topics in English                                                              4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in English. Topics may include, but are not limited to, advanced
topics such as English philology and etymology, as well advanced topics in rhetoric and critical interpretation
of texts. Prerequisite: ENG111 or equivalent.

EPT210          Blood Chemistry Analysis                                                               4.5
This course introduces students to various methods of analysis used in clinical chemistry laboratories to
assist in diagnosing, monitoring treatment, and preventing disease. The course also includes theory and
analysis of chemical constituents of the blood. In addition, the course includes detailed theory, testing
methodologies, reference ranges, clinical significance, and laboratory analysis of carbohydrates, proteins,
lipids, and liver function tests. After learning proper methods of specimen collection, preservation, and the
processing of patient specimens, the students learn tests that measure carbohydrate metabolism including
glucose testing for hyper and hypoglycemia. The course includes as well detailed theory and laboratory
analysis of the following: renal function test (BUN, creatinine, and clearance tests), lipid metabolism (total
cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, CHD risk), and liver function tests (bilirubin). Additional units of study
include serum electrolytes, pH and blood gases, therapeutic drug monitoring automation, and laboratory
information systems. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED 155. Lecture Hours: 30;
Lab Hours: 30.

EPT220          Clinical Hematology I                                                                  4.5
This is a basic hematology course that studies the cells of the blood. Diseases and conditions that would
result in abnormalities in laboratory tests performed are also discussed. This course introduces the learner
to basic techniques in performing and interpreting tests of blood group serology. The ABO and Rh systems
are studied with an emphasis on accurate grouping and typing, donation, blood components, hemolytic
disease of the newborn, and transfusion practices. This course also exposes students to practices/techniques
used in a transfusion laboratory/department. Additional topics of discussion include major hematological
disorders with identification of typical findings on blood smears are emphasized. The anemias and
leukemias are studied in detail; cytochemical stains are introduced. The course also includes a study of the
blood coagulation process, its theory and practical application. Prerequisite: MED 155.

EPT230          Clinical Hematology II                                                                 4.5
This course provides further instruction and study of the techniques of blood group serology, compatibility
testing, and the selection of the proper blood component for the patient. Adverse reaction to blood products
and reaction investigations are discussed. Basic concepts of humoral and cell mediated immunity are
also considered. The role and pathways of complement are discussed and diagrammed. Types of antigen-
antibody reactions are studied including agglutination, precipitation, and labeled immunoassays.
Lab procedures include the use and interpretation of commercial serology test kits. Immune disorders
including hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, transplantation, and tumor immunology are studied in detail.
The serological diagnosis of infectious diseases such as spirochetes, streptococcal, viral infections, and
HIV are discussed. This course is intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of blood bank analysis
and procedures performed in a hospital setting. Discussions of donor screening, blood processing, and
component preparations are in accordance with the American Association of Blood Bank Standards.
Prerequisite: MED 155.

                                                                                                         119
Number          Course Name                                                                           Credits

EPT250          Advanced Electrocardiographic Interpretation                                             4.5
This course will prepare students to operate a 12-lead EKG machine utilizing the proper techniques of
performing electrocardiograms, stress tests, and holter monitor exams. Students will be able to perform
EKG mountings and tracings, will learn the cardiovascular system, and interpret EKG readings including
recognition or normal and abnormal arrhythmias. Students will also become cognizant of advanced
heart diseases such as myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure including interpretation of
advanced arrhythmias, hypertrophies, heart blocks, premature ventricular contractions, and fibrillations.
Prerequisite: MED 285.

EPT260          Cardiac Rehabilitation                                                                   4.5
This course studies the role of exercise in health and disease, specifically acute and chronic effects of
exercise upon the cardiovascular system. Students explore therapeutic benefits of exercise intervention and
rehabilitation for individuals with heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. The course provides students with
an opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding of physiological principles and concepts related to
clinical cardiopulmonary assessment. Students will gain knowledge of the graded exercise stress test (GXT)
in terms of specificity and sensitivity. Students will also identify advantages and disadvantages various
GXT protocols. Students will explain the normal and abnormal physiological adaptations during the GXT.
Students also list and explain absolute and relative contraindications to the GXT and the exercise therapy
session. In addition, students interpret GXT and EKG results to appropriately assess exercise response,
identify EKG changes during the GXT, explain the appropriate response, explain the effects of the major
cardiovascular drugs on the GXT and Rx responses, and list the normal emergency equipment and drugs
available during GXT and Rx therapy sessions. Prerequisite: MED 285.

EPT270          Cardiovascular Invasive/Non invasive Procedures                                          4.5
This course introduces the basic principles and applications of echocardiographic procedures. Emphasis
is placed on the physical assessment, physical principles of cardiac ultrasound, and echocardiographic
imaging planes. Upon completion, students should be able to identify echocardiographic views with
application of echocardiographic principles. Students will explore in detail the construction and purpose
of specialized equipment and its utilization during invasive procedures such as coronary angiogram,
percutaneous coronary intervention, balloon angioplasty, coronary stenting, atherectomy, intravascular
ultrasound, angiojet thrombectomy, transesophageal echocardiogram, pacemaker implantation,
peripheral implantation, peripheral artery angiogram/intervention, and EVLT procedures. Prerequisite:
MED 285.

EPT290          EKG/Phlebotomy Externship                                                                4.5
This course will give students the opportunity to apply the techniques and skills learned in MED255 in
a clinical setting. Students will be able to perform medical asepsis techniques, blood collection, patient
identification, finger sticks, venipuncture, heel sticks, and the proper collection of urine samples. In addition,
students will perform electrocardiograms, stress tests, and holter monitor exams. Upon completion of
the course, students will have the necessary skills to practice competently as EKG and Phlebotomy
Technicians. Prerequisite: “C” grade or higher in all curriculum courses (with the exception
of one General Education course which should be taken concurrently with EPT 290). Lecture
Hours: 0; Lab Hours: 135.

120
Number          Course Name                                                                           Credits

HOS105          Analysis of the Hospitality Industry                                                     4.5
This course lays the groundwork for a basic understanding of the lodging and food service industry by
tracing the industry’s growth and development both nationally and internationally, by reviewing the
organization of hotel and food and beverage operations, and by focusing on industry opportunities and
future trends. Prerequisite: None.

HOS110          Food and Beverage Management                                                             4.5
This course provides a basis for understanding the various challenges and responsibilities involved in
managing a food and beverage operation. Levels of management, commercial food service operations and
nutritional concerns will be discussed. Prerequisite: None.

HOS120          Front Office Procedures                                                                   4.5
This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by detailing the flow of business
through a hotel, from the reservations process to check-out and settlement. The course also examines the
various elements of effective front office management, paying particular attention to the planning and
evaluation of front office operations and to human resources management. Prerequisite: None.

HOS125          Housekeeping Management                                                                  4.5
This course offers the student an overview of housekeeping within the hotel and restaurant industries.
Emphasis is placed on terminology, modern management techniques, planning, organizational functions,
staffing, decision making, and problem solving. Prerequisite: None.

HOS130          Hospitality Management Communication                                                     4.5
Managerial level communications skills are required in the hospitality industry. Communications bridge
the gap between the development of solutions to complex operational problems and sharing of those
solutions within organizations. The operational problems usually involve limited human, financial and
material resources. The dissemination of formal and informal business information to upper management,
peers and subordinates is the focus for this course. Prerequisite: None.

HOS220          Hospitality Accounting                                                                   4.5
This course provides a basis for understanding hospitality accounting concepts and procedures, the
processing of hospitality financial data, and the flow of financial information in the accounting cycle that
result in the production of financial statements. Prerequisite: None.

HOS225          Sales and Marketing                                                                      4.5
Success in the hospitality industry begins by making the sale. Sales and marketing for hospitality properties
is unique, requiring special skills and knowledge. This course offers the student an in depth analysis of the
sales office in a hotel, basic sales tactics, techniques, and ideas to enable the properties sales efforts to be a
success. Prerequisite: None.




                                                                                                            121
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

HOS230          Special Events Planning                                                               4.5
This course defines the scope of the meeting and event planning arena. It focuses on all aspects of design,
development and execution of an event. Topics include site selection, marketing, registration, contract
negotiation and food and beverage planning. Prerequisite: None.

HOS245          Event Management                                                                      4.5
This course encompasses all phases of the specialized training needed in Event Management including
design, financing, budgeting, leadership, and integrated marketing. It provides the critical background
needed to improve your effectiveness and profitability as an Event Manager. Prerequisite: None.

HOS250          Hospitality Resort Tourism                                                            4.5
The hospitality industry is made up of a variety of lodging properties. This course will introduce the variety
of management techniques that entail operating hotels that also have facilities such as golf courses, skiing,
water sports, spas and more. The traditional hotel property is being joined by these multi-faceted operations
and in this course the student will learn the fundamentals regarding these types of properties and their
specific issues. Prerequisite: None.

HOS270          Hospitality Supervision                                                               4.5
This course is designed to explain the principles of supervision as they apply specifically to the hospitality
industry. Demonstrating how supervisors deal with demands handed down from higher management levels,
guests, and employees they supervise. Prerequisite: None.

HOS271          Hotel and Restaurant Externship I                                                     4.5
The student will gain hands-on experience in the daily operation of a hospitality property. The student
will rotate through the various workstations of the property and acquire the skills for those positions.
Prerequisite: Approval from the Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS272          Hotel and Restaurant Externship II                                                    4.5
The student will gain hands-on experience in the daily operation of a hospitality property. The student
will rotate through the various workstations of the property and acquire the skills for those positions.
Prerequisite: Approval from the Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS273          Hotel and Restaurant Externship III                                                   4.5
The student will gain hands-on experience in the daily operation of a hospitality property. The student
will rotate through the various workstations of the property and acquire the skills for those positions.
Prerequisite: Approval from the Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS291          Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant I                                              4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval from the
Program Advisor or Dean.


122
Number         Course Name                                                                       Credits

HOS292         Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant II                                            4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval from the
Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS293         Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant III                                           4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval from the
Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS294         Current Topics in Hotel and Restaurant IV                                            4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students will analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career.
The exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval from the
Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS310         Beverage Operations Management                                                       4.5
This course is designed to provide students with the practical knowledge needed to manage a bar or beverage
operation. This course presents principles and theories to support and reinforce the practical aspects.
Federal, state, and local regulations governing operations serving alcoholic beverages are presented.
Prerequisite: None.

HOS320         Hospitality Marketing                                                                4.5
This course takes a practical perspective in introducing students to the marketing of hotels, restaurants,
and clubs. There are chapters on market segmentation, marketing research, advertising, public relations,
promotions, packaging, pricing strategies, revenue maximization, travel purchasing systems and the future
of hospitality marketing. Prerequisite: None.

HOS330         Food and Beverage Controls                                                           4.5
This course covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective food and beverage control system,
including standards determination, the operating budget, cost-volume-profit analysis, income and cost
control, menu pricing, labor cost control, and computer applications. Prerequisite: None.

HOS350         Wine Appreciation                                                                    4.5
This course introduces students to terminology and principles used in the wine industry. Focus will be on
names and characteristics of grape varietals, differences between Old World and New World wines, qualities
and characteristics of Old World wines, and principles of wine and food pairing. In addition, students will
cover a brief overview of other alcoholic beverages, including beer and distilled liquors. Many classes will
include a tasting of four to eight wines so students may experience the flavors, bodies, and aromas that
appear in different wines. You must be 21 years of age to participate in tasting. Prerequisite: None.


                                                                                                      123
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

HOS355          Catering Management                                                                   4.5
This course introduces the skills needed to manage on-premise catering operations. Subject matter includes
marketing and sales, recipe costing, menu development, kitchen and dining room layouts, staff requirements
and cooking and serving skills particular to catered events. Prerequisite: None.

HOS360          Hospitality Law                                                                       4.5
This course provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities the law grants to or imposes
upon an innkeeper and illustrates the possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations.
Prerequisite: None.

HOS365          International Hotel Management                                                        4.5
This course provides the background every graduate will need in today’s rapidly changing global marketplace.
It prepares students to plan, develop, market, and manage hotels in the international arena. It gives students
a solid foundation for understanding and managing cultural diversity in the workplace, and underscores the
importance of protocol in international interactions. Prerequisite: None.

HOS370          Hospitality Leadership                                                                4.5
This course is designed to acquaint students with leadership, management, and quality issues facing
today’s hospitality industry. There are chapters on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award,
continuous improvement, quality service, power and empowerment, communication skills, goal setting,
high-performance teams, diversity, managing organizational change, and strategic career planning.
Prerequisite: None.

HOS410          Financial Analysis of the Hospitality Industry                                        4.5
This course serves as a bridge between basic accounting and managerial accounting courses. This course
covers areas as specialized accounting for hotel revenue and expenses; periodic inventory accounting
for food and beverage areas; hospitality payroll accounting; intangible assets; accounting for inventory,
property and equipment; financial information systems; hotel departmental financial statements; the
income statement and more. Prerequisite: HOS220 or equivalent.

HOS415          Convention Management                                                                 4.5
Defines the scope and segmentation of the convention and group business market, describes marketing and
sales strategies to attract markets with specific needs, and explains techniques to meet those needs as part
of meeting and convention service. Prerequisite: None.

HOS420          Human Resource Management                                                             4.5
The employees are a company’s greatest asset. Human Resource Management is fundamental to a happy
employee. This course introduces the student to personnel law, benefit administration and selection,
productivity reviews, incentives, and more. Today’s employees offer challenges to Human Resources with
cultural diversity and language barriers. This course enables the student to understand the function of HR,
and its role in the hospitality operation. Prerequisite: None.



124
Number           Course Name                                                                            Credits

HOS425           Security and Loss Prevention                                                              4.5
Liability is a risk in the hospitality industry. This course looks at the areas where attention is needed.
Security and safety of the guest is essential, as is the prevention of lawsuits. Training of the employees,
development of inspection checklists, and maintenance of these functions are introduced. Protecting your
assets, your hotel, your employees, and your guests, while being proactive is the necessary step for security
and loss prevention. Prerequisite: None.

HOS430           Hospitality Facilities Design                                                             4.5
This course focuses on the style and design of restaurants to achieve pleasing aesthetics and functionality.
Students will learn from case studies as well as texts the skills needed to design a restaurant. Prerequisite: None.

HOS431           Hospitality Facilities Management                                                         4.5
This course provides hospitality managers and students with information they will need to know to manage
the physical plant of a hotel or restaurant and work effectively with the engineering and maintenance
department. Prerequisite: None.

HOS435           Revenue Management                                                                        4.5
Managing the revenue in a hospitality operation is the key to a profitable operation. Yield is money, and Yield
Management is a technique to maximize your revenue by managing your room rates, minute by minute,
day to day. This course teaches the student how to effectively manage a hotel’s rates, while analyzing its
REVPAR, revenue per available room. Through yield management, front office becomes the central hub of
the hotel, and room revenue becomes more than just selling rooms. Prerequisite: None.

HOS490           Hospitality Senior Project                                                                4.5
Students will work under the supervision of a faculty advisor to further refine and develop their skills
and knowledge through a student-created independent project. Projects may include but are not limited
to: writing a research paper, designing a catered event, designing and preparing a multi-course menu,
designing and teaching a course to faculty and students, creating a system that could be applied to a
hospitality operation for greater efficiency or effectiveness, or performing the role of a general manager in
a hotel. Project proposals must be submitted to the faculty advisor of the student’s choosing and approved
by the advisor and the dean. Faculty committee will determine the student’s final grade for the project.
Prerequisite: Approval from the Program Advisor or Dean.

HOS491           Current Topics in Hospitality I                                                           4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career. The
exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of Program
Director.




                                                                                                              125
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

HOS492          Current Topics in Hospitality II                                                        4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career. The
exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Student
Advisor or Dean.

HOS493          Current Topics in Hospitality III                                                       4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career. The
exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Student
Advisor or Dean.

HOS494           Current Topics in Hospitality IV                                                       4.5
This course offers a comprehensive discussion of current popular or “hot” topics in the Hospitality field.
Students analyze the topic critically and understand how it impacts the field and the student’s career. The
exact topic will be announced in the current term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Student
Advisor or Dean.

HUM110          Principles of Ethics                                                                    4.5
This course focuses on the application of ethics to personal and professional life. Positive and negative sides
to behavior and how this affects self-image and self-respect are discussed. Prerequisite: None.

HUM210          Spanish I                                                                               4.5
This course uses vocabulary and language structure through a series of activities designed for realistic
communication which allow students to achieve both written and spoken Spanish language skills. Through
reading, dialogue, and associated study, students develop an understanding of the language and
cultural distinctions of Spanish speakers worldwide. Prerequisite: None.

HUM290           Current Topics in the Humanities                                                       4.5
This course concentrates on current issues in the humanities. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
introductory topics in philosophy, religion, culture, and/or language arts. Prerequisite: None.

HUM320           World Literature                                                                       4.5
This course emphasizes an understanding and appreciation of world literature. Materials covered include
Western and non- Western literary endeavors. The focus is on similarities among the various literatures,
analysis of literary genre, and appreciation of voice. Prerequisite: ENG111 or equivalent.

HUM330           The American Experience                                                                4.5
This course emphasizes the development of American values and institutions through analysis of social, political,
and economic materials. The course examines the Influence of political, economic, social, and environmental
factors as it explores Ideas of Individualism, success, and national character. Materials may include historical
documents, literature, and social, political, and artistic works. Prerequisite: ENG111 or equivalent.


126
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

HUM410          Understanding World Cultures                                                           4.5
This course discusses civilizations and cultures as they evolved from Eastern, Western, African and South
American influences. The student is enabled to relate diverse cultures to their impact on contemporary y
society, politics, and world events. Prerequisite: None.

HUM420          Spanish II                                                                             4.5
This course reviews the fundamentals of the Spanish language and provides special attention to the continuing
development of students’ conversational and reading skills. Students build upon their understanding of the
language in both written and oral forms. Prerequisite: HUM210.

HUM490          Special Topics in the Humanities                                                       4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in the humanities. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
advanced topics in ethics, philosophy, religious and cultural studies, and/or language arts. Prerequisite: None.

HUM491          Special Topics in the Humanities II                                                    4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in the humanities. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
advanced topics in ethics, philosophy, religious and cultural studies, and/or language arts. Prerequisite: None.

HUM492          Special Topics in the Humanities III                                                   4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in the humanities. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
advanced topics in ethics, philosophy, religious and cultural studies, and/or language arts. Prerequisite: None.

IST101          Fundamentals of Information Systems                                                    4.5
Students learn to analyze systems and quality concepts and learn how information technology can be used
to design, facilitate, and communicate organization goals and objectives. An overview of hardware and
software with its relation to information technology is also presented. Prerequisite: None.

MAT110          Fundamentals of Mathematics                                                            4.5
This course provides an introduction to the basic techniques of mathematics and applies them to problem
solving in different areas of business and industry. The class is intended primarily for AAS-only students; it
is not intended to prepare students for MAT310 or MAT410. Prerequisite: None.

MAT210          College Algebra                                                                        4.5
This course explores a variety of algebraic concepts including rational expressions, radicals and exponents,
quadratic equations, systems of equations, and applications. Prerequisite: High school algebra or
Permission of the Instructor.

MAT290           Current Topics in Mathematics                                                         4.5
This course concentrates on current topics in mathematics. Topics may include, but are not limited to, set
theory, algebraic concepts, geometry, and probability. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.




                                                                                                          127
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

MAT310           Statistics                                                                            4.5
This course presents material essential to providing a new type of competence, quantitative literacy. Topics
include descriptive statistics, collecting and interpreting data, inferential statistics, probability, and growth
and scaling. Prerequisite: MAT210 or equivalent.

MAT410           Introduction to Calculus                                                               4.5
This course focuses on techniques of differential and integral calculus. Students gain a sound, intuitive
understanding of the basic concepts of calculus through a problem-solving approach. Topics include
functions, graphs, and limits; differentiation; derivatives; exponential and logarithmic functions;
integration; and variables. Prerequisite: MAT310 or equivalent.

MAT490           Special Topics in Mathematics                                                          4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in mathematics. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
mathematical history and philosophy, Euclidian and non-Euclidian geometries, linear algebra, polar
coordinates, vectors, partial derivatives, line integrals, and multiple integrals, as well as applications for
these topics. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

MAT491          Special Topics in Mathematics II                                                        4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in mathematics. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
mathematical history and philosophy, Euclidian and non-Euclidian geometries, linear algebra, polar
coordinates, vectors, partial derivatives, line integrals, and multiple integrals, as well as applications for
these topics. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

MED110          Anatomy and Pathophysiology I                                                           4.5
This course is a scientific study of the structure of the human body and its parts, including relationships,
functions, and disease processes of the integumentary, digestive, urinary systems, nutrition and metabolism.
Prerequisite: None.

MED120          Medical Terminology                                                                     4.5
This course presents a study of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms,
special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols are included in the content. A programmed
learning, word building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new
terms. This approach provides students with the opportunity to decipher unfamiliar terms. Emphasis is
placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations introduced as related terms are
presented with each unit. Prerequisite: None.




128
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

MED130          Medical Office Billing, Coding, and Insurance                                          4.5
This course will train the student in the major medical insurances and claims forms processing. It will
include information on national and other common insurance plans, as well as claim form completion
and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily
financial practices including patient fee determining, credit arrangements bookkeeping and bank-keeping
procedures will be discussed. Additionally the process of purchasing equipment and supplies will be covered.
Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Supplemental Lab Fee Required.
Prerequisite: MED120.

MED140          Basic Clinical Procedures                                                             4.5
This course focuses on universal precautions in the medical environment, including understanding blood
borne pathogens, HIV/AIDS and hepatitis, infection control, collecting and handling specimens and an
introduction to microbiology. In addition, the student will gain proficiency in medical asepsis in a simulated
setting. Also covered will be emergency procedures. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED
110. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

MED150          Diagnostic Procedures                                                                 4.5
This course will present to the student the theories and practices related to the common diagnostic
procedures and tests performed in the doctor’s office or medical clinic. Venipuncture, hematology,
specialty lab tests, electrocardiograms and urinalysis will be covered. Supplemental Lab Fee Required.
Prerequisite: MED140.

MED155          Principles of Phlebotomy                                                              4.5
This course discusses the process of blood collection for the purposes of testing and diagnostics. Students
will be exposed to the role of a phlebotomist, quality assurance, anatomy and physiology of the circulatory
system, safety, equipment, technicians, specimen collections, and special procedures. Topics include CLIA,
HIPAA, and OSHA guidelines. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED 120 & MED 210.
Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

MED160          Medical Computer Applications                                                         4.5
This course is designed to give the student the exposure to computer software applications as used in the
medical office environment. This includes the use of medical office management software for organizing
front office procedures and word processing software for typing medical reports and transcription. Other
medical software may be introduced. Prerequisite: IST 101.

MED170          Domestic Violence                                                                     4.5
This course covers the various aspects of family violence, including its legal, social, economic, medical, and
psychological impact on the family, individual, and community. Prerequisite: None.




                                                                                                        129
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

MED210          Anatomy and Pathophysiology II                                                         4.5
This course is a scientific study of the structure of the human body and its parts, including relationships,
functions, and diseases processes of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, and reproductive systems.
Prerequisite: MED 110.

MED220          Professional Procedures                                                                4.5
This course is designed to assist students as they transition from the classroom into professional medical
assisting practice. A comprehensive review of the clinical, administrative, and general areas of competence
required for entry-level practice will be covered as well as the methods of obtaining professional credentials.
Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: Approval from the Dean.

MED230          Medical Law and Ethics                                                                 4.5
This course is designed to cover medical jurisprudence and medical ethics. Legal aspects of office procedures
are covered, including a discussion of various medical and ethical issues in today’s medical environment.
Prerequisite: None.

MED240          Pharmacology                                                                           4.5
Various aspects of clinical pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the various medications
currently prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases based on a systems method. Included in
the course are common abbreviations used in prescription writing, interpretation of prescriptions, and
legal aspects of prescriptions. In addition, dosage calculations and administration will be taught and
practiced. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED 110 & MED 210. Lecture Hours:
30; Lab Hours: 30.

MED245          Pharmacology II                                                                        4.5
This course is a continuation of MED 240 (Pharmacology). Students will examine physiological effects and
medicinal treatments of diseases related to the respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immune, renal,
endocrine, reproductive, muscular and nervous systems. In addition, students will review the Physicians
Desk Reference and the Top 200 drugs used in today’s most common diseases/conditions. Prerequisite:
MED 210 & MED 240.

MED250          Medical Office Practice                                                                 4.5
This course introduces the student to the administrative functions of the medical office or clinic. Emphasis
is placed on written and oral communication, scheduling, medical records, documentation and filing.
In addition, telephone techniques, etiquette and management/human resource skills will be covered.
Prerequisite: MED120.

MED255          Phlebotomy Procedures                                                                  4.5
This course is a review of laboratory and clinical procedures in a medical office. The course includes the
discussion of possible complications with phlebotomy. The student will perform venipuncture and capillary
sticks while using proper safety procedures. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED 210
& MED 120. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.


130
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

MED260          Exams and Specialty Procedures                                                         4.5
This course presents theories and principles of patient care, including taking medical histories and
documentation, the physical examination, rehabilitation medicine, minor surgery, and specialty procedures.
Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED140.

MED270          Medical Finance and Insurance                                                          4.5
This course will provide the student with training in areas such as managing records, billing and
collections, financial management, medical insurance, and medical office management. Computer use in
the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Prerequisite: MED 120.

MED280          Therapeutic Communications                                                             4.5
This course encompasses the nonverbal and verbal therapeutic communication skills needed to deal
effectively with physicians, family members, and other health care professionals. This course will also aid
the student in developing appropriate techniques in dealing with change within the medical environment.
Prerequisite: None.

MED285          Electrocardiography                                                                    4.5
This course enables the student to perform electrocardiography (EKG) and recognize and interpret basic
cardiac rhythms along with atrial, junctional, and ventricular arrhythmias. Recognition and identification
of the location of various myocardial infarctions is also included in the course. Utilizing the skills learned,
the student will be able to identify and respond appropriately to life threatening cardiac arrhythmias and
EKG changes. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisites: Completion of 80% of all core and
concentration requirements and 80% of elective and general education classes.

MED290          Externship                                                                             4.5
Requires Allied Health students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills from all previous medical assistant
courses in actual ambulatory health care settings. Learners perform medical assistant administrative,
clinical, and laboratory duties under the supervision of trained mentors to efficiently transition to the role
of a medical assistant. This is a supervised, unpaired, clinical experience. Prerequisite: All core and
concentration courses plus 80% of the general education classes.

MIB130          Diseases of the Human Body                                                             4.5
This course is a scientific study of the human body’s diseases and disorders, including signs and symptoms,
etiology, diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisite: MED 110 & MED 120.

MIB210          Introduction to Diagnostic and Procedures Coding                                       4.5
This course will cover the basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM. The focus of the course
will be on the professional guidelines for outpatients. The proper diagnostic assignment based on the
documentation will be discussed as well as the proper use of multiple codes, 1 digit, 4 digits, and 5 digits
specificity. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MIB 130. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab
Hours: 30.



                                                                                                         131
Number          Course Name                                                                          Credits

MIB220          Coding of Clinical Procedures I                                                         4.5
This course covers the basic guidelines and coding conventions in CPT; the focus will continue on the
professional guidelines for outpatients that were introduced in MIB 210. The evaluation and management of
documentation guidelines will be discussed as well as the proper of procedural codes and associated modifiers.
Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MIB 210. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

MIB230          Coding of Clinical and Diagnostic Procedures II                                         4.5
This course will cover advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT and, as a continuation of MIB
220, the focus will be on the professional guidelines for outpatients. The evaluation and management of
documentation guidelines will be discussed as well as the proper use of modifiers. Supplemental Lab Fee
Required. Prerequisite: MIB 220. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

MIB240          Case Studies in Coding of Patients                                                      4.5
This course will cover the abstracting guidelines and coding conventions in ICD and HCPCS coding. This
course will focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines that were discussed in MIB 230. The evolution
and management of documentation guidelines will be discussed as well as the proper use of coding diagnosis
with procedures. Prerequisite: MIB 230.

MIB250          Medical Re-imbursement Systems                                                          4.5
This course will cover the third party payers (Managed Care, Medicaid, tri-care and worker’s compensation)
and related terminology. This course will give the billing and coding student an in-depth look at how third
party payers are billed. It will cover rules and regulations, submission of the correct claim form; the criteria
needed for each payer, the federal laws for each payer, identification of benefits or non-benefits for each third
party payer, and how to calculate payments. Prerequisite: MED 270.

MIB260          Electronic Medical Billing                                                              4.5
Students will be introduced to medical office reimbursement through electronic processes and procedures.
This course covers billing and insurance procedures, contracts and requirements, principles and
compliances to sustain medical practice, coding and claims processing for health plans using medical office
management software, submission of paper and electronic claims, inspecting and monitoring the billing
process. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: None.

MIB290          Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Externship                                         4.5
This course is 135 hours of unpaid, supervised experience as a medical insurance biller and coder in an
in-service setting. Students practice direct application of all administrative and coding functions of a
professional medical biller and coder. Prerequisite: “C” grade or higher in all curriculum courses
(with the exception of one General Education course which should be taken concurrently
with MIB 290). Lecture Hours: 0; Lab Hours: 135.




132
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

PHT110          Pharmacy Calculations                                                                4.5
This course covers a review of basic math and algebraic principles, including numerical systems, fractions,
decimals, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Emphasis is placed on systems of measurement, concentrations,
dilutions, allegations, and basic pharmacological accounting. This course also covers advanced technical
dosage and pharmaceutical calculations. Students will learn to calculate dosages, milliequivalents, and IV
flow rates. Prerequisite: exemption from or successful completion of MAT 110.

PHT220          Institutional and Community Pharmacy Operations                                      4.5
This course covers the process of reading and filling prescriptions in the ambulatory, community, retail,
institutional, and hospital practice setting. The course also examines the evolution of health care up to and
including an in-depth overview of the modern pharmacy in addition to the role of Pharmacy Technicians
in home care, long-term care settings, and infusion. Prerequisite: MED 240.

PHT230          Institutional and Community Pharmacy Lab I                                           4.5
Students will practice receiving, interpreting, entering, and filling various prescription orders common to
community pharmacies. In addition, laboratory assignments will guide students through the documentation
required by pharmacies. The course also introduces students to the machinery, equipment, software
programs, and supplies used in pharmacies. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED 240.
Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

PHT240          Institutional and Community Pharmacy Lab II                                          4.5
This course is a continuation of PHT 230 (Institutional and Community Pharmacy Lab I). Students will
practice in the preparation of non-compounded products, non-sterile and sterile compounded products,
cytological, and hazardous medication products. Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite:
PHT220 & PHT 230. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

PHT250          Advanced Administration Technique Lab                                                4.5
Students will learn current methods for administering and documenting medications in various practice
settings. Topics will include the monitoring of medication therapies and the theoretical skills necessary for
the intravenous admixture of advanced technique. Students will engage in patient case scenarios of common
complications experienced in routine drug administration. Skills sets learned in MED 240 will be revisited.
Supplemental Lab Fee Required. Prerequisite: MED 240. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.

PHT260          Pharmacy Maintenance, Safety & Quality Assurance Issues                              4.5
Students learn an established procedure for purchasing pharmaceuticals, devices, and supplies including
handling their receipt, storage, removal, and documentation. Students will also learn methods of handling
hazardous wastes, sharps, and infection control. In addition, students learn to maintain the security of
inventory, including deterring theft. Students learn as well to identify and report clinically significant
adverse medication events (ADEs) and to participate in determining the presence of any similar potential
ADEs. Finally, students are introduced to the concept of troubleshooting and the maintenance and repairing
of pharmacy equipment and devices as well as the monitoring of medications to insure their use is congruent
with the prescription/medication order for the patient. Prerequisite: None.


                                                                                                       133
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

PHT270          Administrative Inpatient and Outpatient Care Management                               4.5
This course teaches students how to assist the pharmacist in collecting, organizing, and evaluating
information for direct patient care, medication use review, and departmental management. Students learn
to secure information from the patient medical chart, record, and patient profile. Students also practice
creating a new patient profile or entering data into an existing profile according to an established manual
procedure or electronic procedure. In addition, students learn billing as well as the collection of payment
for pharmacy goods and services. Students also learn methods of payment and the verification of coverage
by third party payers. Students learn how to interview patients, their representatives, caregivers, and health
care professionals. Finally, students learn how to use various forms of technology for storing, accessing, and
recording data. Prerequisite: PHT 220.

PHT290          Pharmacy Externship                                                                   4.5
The students complete a minimum of 135 hours in a selected community/retail or institutional/hospital
pharmacy under the supervision of Pharmacists, Pharmacy Technicians, and health care workers. Students
perform skills to assist in dosage calculations, reading, and the filling of prescriptions and medication
orders. The externship contains a balance of administrative and clinical experiences. Upon completion
of the course, students will have acquired the necessary knowledge and skills to practice competently as
Pharmacy Technicians. Prerequisite: “C” grade or higher in all curriculum courses (with the
exception of one General Education course which should be taken concurrently with PHT
290). Lecture Hours: 0; Lab Hours: 135.

PSY110          Social Psychology                                                                     4.5
This course provides an application of psychological principles to the development of a stable social
framework within business and personal environments. Prerequisite: None.

PSY290         Current Topics in Psychology                                                           4.5
This course concentrates on current issues in psychology. Topics may include, but are not limited to,
introductory topics in learning, memory, motivation, emotion, states of consciousness, psychological
assessment, mental health, psychology of personality, and creativity. Prerequisite: None.

PSY320         Human Growth & Development                                                             4.5
This course emphasizes the psychological, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the human
organism. Materials include those related to the various stages of the life span, and the developmental
Influence of social class, the family, the school, and the group. A focus is placed on the abilities, needs,
problems, and concerns of humans to change throughout life, and how people are shaped by their experiences
throughout their development. Prerequisite: PSY110 or equivalent.

PSY490         Special Topics in Psychology                                                           4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in psychology. Topics may include, but are not limited to, advanced
topics in deviant behavior, psychological testing and assessment, religious behavior, neurophysiology, and
psychology and the law. Prerequisite: PSY110 or equivalent.



134
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

SCI110          General Science                                                                        4.5
This course examines scientific concepts and principles in an integrated manner to provide an overview
of the sciences. Topics include physics, astronomy, chemistry, earth science, and biology as a means
to address areas such as growing global population, limited resources and the fragile environment.
Prerequisite: None.

SCI250          Microbiology                                                                           4.5
This course examines the structure, nutrition, growth, genetics, classification, and ecology of bacteria,
viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Attention will be given to methods of microbial control, and the human
immune response to microbes. Students will also learn the fundamentals of microscopy, laboratory
safety, scientific method and techniques of experimentation. Supplemental Lab Fee Required.
Prerequisite: None.

SCI290          Current Topics in Science                                                              4.5
This course concentrates on current issues in science. Topics may include, but are not limited to, introductory
topics in meteorology, geology, ecology, evolutionary biology, and the space sciences. Prerequisite: None.

SCI360          Introduction to Biochemistry                                                           4.5
This course examines the basic structures and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides and proteins
and their role in human metabolism. Vitamins, co-enzymes, and minerals are examined and pathways for
xenobiotic metabolism are discussed. Prerequisites: SCI250 and High School (preferably College-
level) Chemistry and Biology, or Permission of the student’s Program Dean.

SCI410          Impact of Science and Technology                                                       4.5
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of science and future thinking. The content demonstrates
how scientific and technological advances have significantly impacted all aspects of contemporary life.
Prerequisite: None.

SCI490          Special Topics in Science                                                              4.5
This course concentrates on special topics in science. Topics may include, but are not limited to, advanced
topics in interdisciplinary studies such as the history of science and technology, cross-cultural studies
of science, cosmology, biotechnology, the use of science and technology to enhance human abilities
and quality of life, and techniques for assessment and remediation of science and technology hazards.
Prerequisite: None.




                                                                                                         135
Graduate School Courses
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

ACC563          Accounting Information Systems                                                        4.5
This course introduces the student to systems analysis and the application of information systems’ concepts
to the accounting process and accounting models, both manual and automated. Prerequisite: None.

ACC564          Advanced Managerial Accounting                                                        4.5
This course Investigates advanced topics in managerial accounting and expands upon topics covered in
ACC 560. Topics include cost projections, analysis and interpretation, analysis under uncertainty, capital
budgeting, linear programming, and decentralized operations. Prerequisite: EBM 500 or EBM 562.

ACC565          Advanced Auditing                                                                     4.5
This course surveys in-depth analysis of current auditing issues, including professional standards and
ethics, internal control gathering and documentation of evidences, and statistical sampling. Focuses on
detailed analysis of audit programs and EDP as well as concepts concerning the financial condition and
operation of commercial enterprises. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Auditing or experience.

ACC566          Forensic Accounting                                                                   4.5
This course provides a framework for an understanding of forensic accounting. Topics covered include
various foundation areas of importance to the forensic accountant, the basic forensic accounting tool-
oriented areas, and practice areas relevant to forensic accounting. Prerequisite: Undergraduate
Auditing or Experience.

ACC567          Federal Taxation                                                                      4.5
This course presents overview of United States of Taxation individuals and businesses. It also discusses
tax planning necessary for an optimal tax saving. The course involves tax research methodology and the
preparation of business and individual tax returns using some of the latest tax software. Prerequisite:
None.

ACC568          International Taxation                                                                4.5
This course presents a foundational overview of the taxation related to the United States of America and
several other nations in Asia, European, African, and the Americas. The specifies addressed tax issues for
business as well as individuals as it relates to double taxation, transfer taxes and other tax concerns. Also,
the course looks at situations from a planning approach that gives the most beneficial tax situation.
Prerequisite: None.

ACC569          Systems Auditing                                                                      4.5
This course presents the system and principles of auditing accounting and financial information systems.
Current practices of auditing both simple and complex information systems are addressed. Also addressed
are the audit program and testing procedures necessary for conducting an information system audit with a
focus on documentation of evidence. Prerequisite: None.


136
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

ACC571          Advanced Accounting                                                                    4.5
This course covers accounting for home office and branches, business combinations, and consolidations.
It provides a continuation of the preparation for the CPA examination as well as various techniques for
solving some of the more complex problems in the business environment. Prerequisite: Intermediate
Accounting II or Experience.

ACC572          Accounting Theory                                                                      4.5
This course provides a frame of reference for advanced accounting theories. Emphasizes income, liability,
and asset valuation based on inductive, deductive, and capital market approaches. Also surveys price level
changes, monetary and non-monetary aspects, problems of ownership equities and the disclosure of relevant
information to investors and creditors. Prerequisite: Intermediate Accounting 1 or Experience.

CIS520          Wireless Telecommunications                                                            4.5
This course concentrates on developing a fundamental understanding of international wireless networks.
Both fixed and mobile systems are addressed from a practical design and implementation point of view.
This course considers propagation effects for outdoor and indoor systems, modulation technologies, data
encoding, antenna design, cellular layout, and the design of personal communications devices. Particular
emphasis is placed on new Low Earth Orbit (LEOs) Satellites and other technologies emphasizing wireless
communications. Prerequisite: None.

CIS530          Digital Communications                                                                 4.5
This course concentrates on digital communications techniques as utilized in present and future systems.
An emphasis is placed on analog to digital conversions, digital sampling techniques, digital modulation and
transmission, multiplexing and coding techniques. The uses of Laplace, Z transforms and discrete-time systems
are covered. Power spectral density analysis, coherent and noncoherent modulation are important topics.
Realization of digital transmission techniques and medium as well as spread spectrum are covered.
Satellite communications and multiple access techniques are also important topics. Prerequisite: None.

CIS540          Signal Processing                                                                      4.5
This course emphasizes topics involved with digital signal processing. Topics include digital sampling and
filtering techniques. The use of Laplace and Z transforms will be covered. Other topics include discrete-
time systems, frequency analysis, and design of digital filters. Additional topics covered are discrete and
fast Fourier transform, power spectral estimation, and adaptive filters. An emphasis is placed on designing
digital filters for communications processing. Prerequisite: None.

CIS550          Wireless/Fixed Hybrid Networks                                                         4.5
This course emphasizes the design and implementation of wireless/fixed networks needed to deliver wireless
access to customers. Topics covered include: cellular interfaces to wire line networks, access to the internet,
network management, transmission systems, and internet protocols. The designing of networks including
traffic analysis, handoffs, and multiplexing of U.S., European, Asian and Canadian systems are considered.
Prerequisite: None.



                                                                                                         137
Number          Course Name                                                                           Credits

CIS560          Satellite Communications                                                                  4.5
The topics included in this course consider the latest digital communications techniques as related to
satellites. Design, fabrication, and launching techniques are considered. Topics including weight power
and on board payload design are included. Propagation effects and path calculations are discussed. The
consideration of TDMA/CDMA multiplexing for networks and performance are important topics. Bit error
performance for various modulation techniques, and network management as well as synchronization
are considered. Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT) and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) systems are covered.
Prerequisites: CIS530 and CIS540.

CIS570          Fiber Optic Communications                                                               4.5
The theory and practical implementation of fiber optic systems are addressed. Topics related to
electromagnetic transmission over fiber are considered. The design and fabrication of fiber strands will
be explored. Implementations of wide band systems using fiber are addressed. Wave Division Multiplexing
and Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) as well as SONET are addressed. Designs using single and
multimode systems are included. Prerequisite: CIS530.

CIS580          Data Networking                                                                          4.5
The topics in this course include: data communications, data link control, data encoding, wide area networks,
local area networks, network protocols (TCP/IP), and security related to the internet. Communications architec-
ture considering the seven layer protocol system is addressed. Other topics will be: circuit and packet switching,
frame relay and asynchronous transfer (ATM). Network management using SNMP is covered. Understanding
the design and implementation of the internet is emphasized. Prerequisites: CIS530 and CIS540.

CIS585          Voice over IP                                                                            4.5
This course discusses transmission of voice over a packet switched network. Students in this course deal
with typical VoIP network scenarios such as campus and multi-site private networks. Communications
protocols for VoIP such as RTP and RTCP are discussed in detail. In addition, topics such as security and
quality issues are also discussed. Prerequisite: CIS580 or permission of the Dean.

CIS590          Broadband Networking                                                                     4.5
This course emphasizes telecommunications techniques need to communicate at very wide bandwidths.
Topics include transmission and modulation techniques related to communicating at bandwidths of 1.5
Mbps or greater, up to terabits. The consideration of ISDN, frame relay and ATM techniques are addressed.
The use of wide band LANs and WANS is considered. The uses of fiber optics and satellites for broadband
communications are addressed. Topics including Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL), cable systems, and
microwave-based systems are covered. Prerequisite: CIS530.




138
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

CIS620          Telecommunications Applications Architecture                                         4.5
This course emphasizes topics related to telecommunications applications. Specific topics covered are: video
conferencing over networks, picture processing, video and audio streaming, and video over web-enabled
networks. The discussion of mathematical techniques for data compression and picture enhancement is
included. Three dimensional image analysis and transmission of data with low signal-to-noise ratios is
discussed. Prerequisite: CIS580 or Permission of the Dean.

EBM500          Business Applications over the Internet                                              4.5
The purpose of this course is to analyze how computer communications, data storage, and data analysis
technologies have caused strategic shifts in company operating practices. Students learn that information
technology is a tool that can facilitate valuable changes in business processes. This course reviews software
that is available for customer relationship management (CRM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply
chain management, enterprise application integration (EAI), business intelligence (BI), data warehousing,
and decision support. The course consists of case studies of successful and unsuccessful e-business process
improvement projects. Prerequisite: None.

EBM502         Research Methods                                                                      4.5
The course focuses on methods for the conduct of research and development projects. Specifically, students
learn about the scientific method, as well as research/design requirements and objectives. Course work
involves qualitative, quantitative, and case studies; performance metrics; design procedures and control;
sources of error and bias. In addition, evaluation tools and formal validation methods are discussed.
Prerequisite: None.

EBM504         Organizational Behavior                                                               4.5
This course analyzes both the formal and informal aspects of the management process. Topics include:
human behavior in an organizational environment, individual behavior patterns, superior/subordinate
relationships, group dynamics, communication, motivation and decision-making, and the impact of
innovation and change on the organization. Prerequisite: None.

EBM505          Global Leadership in Business Enterprise I                                           4.5
This course focuses on an integrative approach to organizational concepts, management principles, and the
effects of leadership styles and human resource policies and practices on organizational performance in a
global and competitive work environment. Prerequisite: None.

EBM510          Information Processing and the Web                                                   4.5
This course will include the effective use of the Internet for business applications. Topics will include:
Data integration and warehousing, data marts, internet infrastructure and web databases (dB), e-business
information portals and common warehouse model. An internet platform consisting of Oracle 8i with Java VM,
CORBA support will provide a foundation for data warehousing and e-business intelligence. Prerequisite: None.




                                                                                                       139
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

EBM515          Electronic Commerce: Business Models and Technologies                                4.5
This course presents the state-of-the-art in electronic commerce. Its focus is on the current and future
impact of e-commerce on the student’s organization, industry, and professional activities. Specific topics
include creating new business opportunities; identifying new customers and additional value in existing
customers; realigning the organization for the new environment, addressing contemporary uncertainties,
for example, government regulation, taxation, security, privacy, and intellectual property rights; creating
a market presence; measuring success, return on investment, and profitability; and sustaining the pace
of change through appropriate staffing, hiring, outsourcing, and partnering. Students examine recent
successes and failures in e-commerce through case studies and other readings and will develop an
e-commerce business plan for their organization. Prerequisite: EBM500.

EBM520         Human Resource Management                                                             4.5
This course provides the fundamentals of human resource management (HRM). Topics covered are
organizational psychology, human interaction, individual effectiveness and social issues. Other areas
include human resource planning, strategic management, organizational structure, legal environment and
organizational staffing. Prerequisite: None.

EBM525          Global Leadership in Business Enterprise II                                          4.5
This course is a continuation of EBM505. This course will discuss case studies in leadership and addresses
problems that organizations go through because of the leadership flaws. Prerequisite: EBM505.

EBM530          Business Law                                                                         4.5
This course examines the legal environment in which businesses operate. In particular, torts, contracts,
government regulation, types of businesses and formulation of companies are covered. This course
also considers topics related to legal concepts of commercial transactions. Specifically addressed are:
collection of debts, sale of goods (warranties, product liability), secured transactions and bankruptcy.
Prerequisite: None.

EBM535          Information Technology and Corporate Transformation                                  4.5
This course examines how organizations are dependent on information technology not only for management
of operations, but more also as a key enabler of competitive advantage. Also examined is the growth in
corporate spending on IT components such as hardware, software, telecommunications, and for information
systems (IS) personnel. Specific topics to be discussed include strategic planning for IT activities and
projects, project-level planning and management, the role of the IT leader or chief information officer, and
achieving the balance between insourcing and outsourcing of various IS functions. Prerequisite: None.

EBM540          E-Commerce WEB Site Development I                                                    4.5
The emphasis of this course will be on the development of websites. The fundamentals of website development
using HTML and other tools will be addressed. Topics will include: web hosting, Application Service Providers
(ASPs), Oracle and PeopleSoft databases and software, XML, style sheets. The participant will develop a
website as part of the course. Prerequisite: EBM510.



140
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

EBM545          E-Commerce WEB Site Development II                                                   4.5
The emphasis of this course will be the advanced development of websites for business development. In this
course, specific business websites will be studied for content, advertising, structure and usefulness. The
participant will develop a number of business related websites and analyze them for effectiveness. Data
warehousing and retrieval techniques will be addressed. In addition, future website development tools will
be studied. Prerequisite: EBM540.

EBM550         Entrepreneurial Marketing                                                             4.5
This course examines techniques for sales and marketing of e-business applications. In particular, the
following are covered: strategic market planning, analysis, product planning, pricing and promotion
strategy, and management. Other topics covered are design, evaluation and management of marketing
channels. Sales strategies, distribution and techniques are also discussed. Prerequisite: None.

EBM552         Internet Marketing Strategies                                                         4.5
This course introduces the student to concepts, tools, and techniques as they apply in business-to-
consumer (B2C) and business- to-business (B2B) electronic marketing. Specific topics include:
branding and recognition; consumer and organizational behavior in an e-market place; channels and
relationship marketing; tools and techniques in the B2B market; and assessment of e-market opportunities.
Prerequisite: EBM515.

EBM555         Business and Public Policy                                                            4.5
This course discusses political, legal, economic, and ethical forces acting on business as well as the
interaction of the market system and public policy process in the development of law and regulation.
Prerequisite: None.

EBM557         Corporate Governance                                                                  4.5
This course introduces the students to corporate governance as a means of ensuring that companies are
able to achieve strategic objectives, and to analysis techniques to assess how well companies are performing.
Corporate governance is introduced as a system of many components, including regulators, boards of
directors, corporate officers, and internal control systems. The course teaches students about specific
governance and internal control systems leaders can use to promote responsible conduct by companies and
their employees, and shows how personal values can play a critical role in effective leadership. Additional
topics include leadership development, managerial succession, management and board relations,
acquisitions and takeovers, and boardroom conflict. Prerequisite: None.

EBM560         Managerial Accounting                                                                 4.5
In this course, attention is directed towards the core of the management control and financial reporting
systems integrally related to information systems. The fundamentals of accounting and how they relate
to business and an in-depth analysis of the tax consequences of forming, operating, and liquidating a
corporation and transactions with shareholders will be discussed. Analysis of financial records and business
balance sheets will also be addressed. Prerequisite: None.



                                                                                                       141
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

EBM562          International Managerial Accounting                                                   4.5
This course presents generally accepted accounting principles which are used by other countries and the
United States to report financial information to global users. The course familiarizes the student with
the knowledge needed to analyze and interpret consolidated financial statements that are presented by
local, multinational, and transnational corporations. The course content includes international accounting
regulations and practices, as well as some of the current research on the application of worldwide accounting
standards. Prerequisite: None.

EBM570          Microeconomics                                                                        4.5
This course will discuss intermediate microeconomic theory, with emphasis on production and costs, market
structure and pricing, risk analysis, and investment theory and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: None.

EBM572         International Economics                                                                4.5
This course examines key dimensions of the global economy and global economics, including international
business opportunities and risks, trade theory and policy, the balance of payments, foreign exchange
markets, exchange rate systems and risks, and international payment systems. The role of multinational
corporations and elements of international corporate strategies and direct investment are also covered.
Students are required to follow current events in the global economy and discuss how these events impact
managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: None.

EBM575         Global Economy                                                                        4.5
This course discusses key dimensions of the global economy, including international business opportunities
and risks. Trade theory and policy, the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, exchange rate
systems and risks, and international payment systems are also discussed. Additional topics such as foreign
direct investments might also be discussed in addition to the changing role of multinational corporations
and elements of international corporate strategies. Prerequisite: EMB555.

EBM580         Managerial Marketing and Market Research                                               4.5
This course provides an overview of marketing, with special focus on market research as a means of
determining or validating strategy. The course is aimed at the manager, who is the ultimate user of the
research and who is responsible for determining the major scope and direction of marketing activities.
Techniques of data collection, evaluation of alternative sources of information, methods of evaluating data,
and methods of presenting the results are covered. The course also addresses: how to define information
needs; how to test marketing procedures; forms of analysis applicable to market research information, and
the role of models in decision making. Prerequisite: None.

EBM587         Strategic Business Marketing                                                           4.5
This course examines marketing variables and marketing strategy in developed and developing countries.
The importance of differences among nations in language, culture and social forces, politics and laws, values,
channels or distribution, and buyer behavior is examined. The course also emphasizes the importance of
the marketing orientation in the present global competitive environment and the relationships between
marketing and business development and strategy in an international setting. Prerequisite: None.


142
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

EBM590          International Money, Banking, and Financial Markets                                  4.5
This course explores the role that international finance markets play in the business environment. Students
study principles and applications of international financial markets and their impact on the world economy.
The course also addresses currency exchange mechanisms in theory and practice, including inter national
monetary systems; offshore financial markets and currency risk management, including interest rate and
currency futures, options, and swaps. Prerequisite: None.

EBM600          Investments                                                                          4.5
This course will discuss the treatment of equity, debt, speculative markets and formulation of capital.
Emphasis will be placed on Investment strategies for e-businesses. Particular attention will be given
to raising capital for business from various sources. Partnerships and other techniques for corporate
development will be discussed. Some discussion of securities markets will be undertaken with an emphasis
portfolio management. Prerequisite: EBM610.

EBM610          Financial Management                                                                 4.5
This course provides an overview of financial management, with an emphasis on analysis of financial
decisions pertinent to management of a business firm. The course identifies the responsibilities of financial
managers, financial problems facing firms, and the various approaches to financial decision making.
Specific topics covered include capital acquisition, working capital management, capital budgeting,
valuation theories, and dividend and long-term financial policies. Prerequisite: EBM560 or EBM562.

EBM615          Capital Formation                                                                    4.5
Determinants of saving and investment and resultant funds flow are evaluated. Special emphasis on the level
and risk structure and term structure of interest rates. The role and management of financial institutions
is stressed. Prerequisite: EBM610.

EBM620          Financial Decision Making                                                            4.5
This course will discuss theory and practice of business finance, emphasizing the impacts of long- and
short-term uses and sources of funds on the firm’s value. Prerequisite: EBM610

EBM622          International Managerial Financial Decision Making                                   4.5
This course discusses the theory and practice of international managerial finance decision-making,
emphasizing the impacts of long- and short term uses and sources of funds on the firm’s value. Students
learn to evaluate international business opportunities, compare financial alternatives, and identify and
solve problems related to the use of funds. Prerequisites: EBM610.

EBM625         Advanced Financial Management                                                         4.5
In this course we examine advanced case studies in financial management: working capital policy, capital
budgeting, financing with debt and equity, project finance, dividend policy, valuation, and investment
banking in the contexts of private equity, venture capital, initial public offering, leveraged buyout, and
management buyout. Prerequisite: EBM610.



                                                                                                       143
Number          Course Name                                                                         Credits

EBM627          International Financial Management                                                     4.5
This course provides theories and concepts that form the basis for financial decision making. Topics
included advanced case studies in financial management, including: working capital policy, capital
budgeting, financing with debt and equity, project finance, dividend policy, valuation, and investment
banking in the contexts of private equity, venture capital, initial public offering, leveraged buyout, and
management buyout. Topics also include hedging and risk management. Prerequisites: EBM610
and EBM590.

EBM630          Special Projects                                                                       4.5
The participant in this program will develop a written report on some project of interest. This project will be
undertaken with the guidance of a faculty member. A high quality report is expected on the development of
an e-Business utilizing the lessons learned in the course work. An oral presentation of the report is expected.
Prerequisite: Approval by the Dean.

EBM635          Business Transformation                                                                4.5
With today’s fast-paced and hectic way of doing business, change in the workplace has become an everyday
reality. Change happens rapidly and sometimes with very little notice. Major changes such as mergers,
takeovers, and layoffs can leave employees feeling confused, fearful, or disheartened. This course is
designed to help future managers work through organizational change by studying strategies for providing
positive leadership. This course covers multiple perspectives on managing organizational change, including
methodologies for diagnosing management competency, theoretical frameworks for understanding
organizational competency, and strategies for changing organizational culture and personal behavior.
Prerequisite: None.

EBM 640         International Business                                                                 4.5
This course examines current organizations and practices of domestic and foreign businesses in the
international market; problems of trade and foreign government regulation barriers, investment
opportunities and economic arrangements and developments; and the role of the manager in the rapidly
changing economic environment. Prerequisite: None.

EBM642          Managerial International Business                                                      4.5
This course explores the issues which face managers when operating in international environments. The
course exposes students to strategic and operational aspects of international business management. Topics
include: an overview of global management; cultural, legal, and political influences on international
management; international trade and investment; transnational operations and marketing; international
human resource management; cross-cultural communication and decision-making; international
strategies; and organizing international enterprises. Prerequisite: None.




144
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

EBM645         Geopolitics                                                                          4.5
This course examines the complex and turbulent international environment. A manager requires both a
basic conceptual framework that can inform and order political and economic events, and an understanding
of how the international political economy actually affects strategy. Geopolitics explores the structure
and evolution of the inter national political-economic system, and then looks at several critical issues
areas, such as economic and currency unions, technological advances, strategic alliances, and national
competitiveness. Current events and issues are introduced as appropriate. The emphasis of the course is on
implications for domestic and global strategy. Prerequisite: EMB640 or EBM642.

EBM650         International Marketing Management                                                    4.5
The course examines international market segmentation, product attributes, cultural differences, economic
differences, differences in product and technical standards, global advertising, and international pricing in
transnational business operations. It stresses application of marketing concepts, principles and procedures
for planning, development, implementation and control of marketing programs. Course emphasis is on
the matching of organization resources and strengths with global marketing opportunities, and strategies
to overcome environmental threats. Central to the course is a team project involving the development of a
marketing plan for a product or service to be marketed in at least two countries. Prerequisites: EBM580
and EBM640.

EBM660         Growth Strategies for Emerging Companies                                              4.5
This course offers practical management tools to help grow and manage high potential new ventures. Topics
include internal rapid growth strategies (including product development (high and low technology), vertical
expansion, horizontal expansion, etc.), external rapid growth strategies (rollups, exporting, franchising,
and acquisition, etc.), and unique growth techniques for technology product based firms. Leadership,
human relations, and bootstrapping are important supporting topics. This course is useful for those who
intend to start their own companies and those who intend to work in an entrepreneurial company. Future
investment bankers, venture capitalists, merger and acquisition professionals, and business brokers will
benefit as well. Prerequisite: None.

EBM662         Growth Strategies for Emerging Markets                                                4.5
This course examines how firms conduct an analysis and select new international markets for entry, how
fir ms develop strategies for successfully entering these markets, and how firms manage these markets for
growth and subsequent expansion. Prerequisite: None.

EBM665          New Venture Financing                                                                4.5
 Students acquire the knowledge and skills required to finance new ventures. Funding sources are studied:
commercial banks, venture capital companies, small business investment companies, underwriters, private
placement-financial consultants, mortgage bankers, and small business innovative research grants (U.S.
Government). Topics include: methods of financing, techniques for valuing new businesses, financial
structure, and evaluation methods used by investors and lenders. Prerequisite: EBM610.




                                                                                                       145
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

EBM670         New Venture Creation                                                                  4.5
An introduction to the entrepreneurial process from conception to birth of a new venture, attributes of
successful entrepreneurs, business planning, innovation and creativity, opportunity recognition, venture
screening, identification and financing of resources, staffing, feasibility analysis, marketing, and growing
a business into a sustainable enterprise. The course includes case studies of successful and unsuccessful
ventures. Prerequisite: None.

EBM672          International Competitive Strategy and Innovation                                    4.5
This course examines the innovation process, appropriation of economic value from innovation, competition
between technologies, strategies for competing against established firms, and management of innovation.
Prerequisite: EBM670.

EBM675          Business Plan for the New Venture                                                    4.5
In this course each student must produce a business plan that will be accepted for the annual program
business plan competition. It is expected that several business plans will be of sufficient quality that they
will attract financing. Topics include a deep review of business plan construction and its derivative short
forms (1 page summary, 3 pages summary, and executive summary). Prerequisite: None.

EBM680         Project Management                                                                    4.5
The course focuses on the effective organization of projects, tracking of costs and time expenditures,
management of quality and risks, evaluation of human resources requirements, and the overcoming of
potential obstacles. Prerequisite: None.

EBM685         EBM Capstone Course                                                                   4.5
This capstone course gives the EBM student the opportunity to pull together and build upon what has
been learned in separate business fields and utilizes this knowledge in the analysis of complex business
problems. This “capstone course” is designed to aid the student in synthesizing and applying knowledge
gained in earlier courses and applies these skills through actual business cases. Prerequisite: Must have
completed Six Core Courses and Two Electives or Permission of the Dean.

EBM690         MBA Capstone Course                                                                   4.5
This capstone course gives the MBA student the opportunity to pull together and build upon what has been
learned in separate business fields and utilizes this knowledge in the analysis of complex business problems.
This “capstone course” is designed to aid the student in synthesizing and applying knowledge gained in
earlier courses and applies these skills through actual business cases. Prerequisite: All required core
courses and electives within the MBA program. This course must be taken in the final
quarter of enrollment, but may be taken along with another course which will lead to the
completion of the program.




146
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

EBM692         International MBA Capstone                                                            4.5
This capstone course provides the International MBA student the opportunity to draw upon their education and
experience in the major to further their understanding of issues of critical importance to the administration
and development of business in a global economy. In this course students discuss current complex business
problems and enduring issues and cases found in international business management studies and provide
scholarly analysis to defend positions and recommendations. Prerequisite: All required core courses
and electives within the International MBA program. This course must be taken in the final
quarter of enrollment, but may be taken along with another course which will lead to the
completion of the program.

ISM500         Information Systems in Organizations                                                  4.5
This course introduces the field of Information Systems and the study of how people and organizations should
use information technologies effectively. The students examine the major areas in the field, analyzing the
major issues, trends and problems and survey the role of information systems in organizations and how they
relate to organizational objectives and organizational structure. Basic concepts such as the systems point of
view, the organization of a system, the nature of information and information flows, as well as how people
process information and related cognitive concepts are discussed in detail. Various types of information
system applications are also examined. Prerequisite: None.

ISM510         Information Management Analysis and Design                                            4.5
This course covers a wide variety of systems-oriented approaches to solving complex problems. Illustrative
examples are chosen from a wide variety of applications. Mathematical tools are only introduced to the
extent necessary to understand the technique and its application to the problem. Topic areas include
probabilistic and decision theory models, simulation, morphological analysis, cluster analysis, structural
modeling, and dynamic system models. The role for the computer in applying these techniques to complex
problems will be discussed. The student is exposed to some of the fundamental controversies concerning the
appropriateness or validity of systems approaches to human problem solving. Prerequisite: None.

ISM520          Information System Evaluation                                                        4.5
This course introduces the theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to evaluate information
systems within the context of the user and organizational environment. Topics include qualitative
techniques such as protocol analysis and interviews; quantitative techniques such as sample surveys and
controlled experiment; cost-benefit analysis; and analyses of data gathered by these approaches by methods
such as regression, correlation, and analysis of variance. Emphasis is placed on the application of these
approaches to improve functionality, interface, and acceptance of information systems in organizations.
Prerequisite: ISM500.




                                                                                                       147
Number          Course Name                                                                       Credits

ISM530         Decision Systems Technology                                                           4.5
A broad overview of decision making and the systems that are designed to support the process is
presented, in addition to the management process, computer support for management, the technology
of management, decision technology system types, including artificial intelligence, decision support
systems, executive and geographic information systems, and idea processing systems, system architectures,
system integration considerations, system design and development methodologies, system performance
measurement and evaluation, management of decision technology systems, organizational and user issues.
Prerequisite: ISM500.

ISM540          Independent Project in Information Systems Management                                4.5
In this class, students work individually with the faculty member on a mutually agreed project that gives the
student an opportunity to understand the full lifecycle of an IT project. With permission of the instructor
or the Dean, Curricular Practical Training (CPT) may be used to satisfy some requirements of this course.
Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director.

ISM590          Current Topics in Information Systems Management I                                   4.5
Current topics in the field on Information Systems are discussed. Topics will be announced in the current
term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

ISM591          Current Topics in Information Systems Management II                                  4.5
Current topics in the field on Information Systems are discussed. Topics will be announced in the current
term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

ISM592          Current Topics in Information Systems Management III                                 4.5
Current topics in the field on Information Systems are discussed. Topics will be announced in the current
term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

ISM593          Current Topics in Information Systems Management IV                                  4.5
Current topics in the field on Information Systems are discussed. Topics will be announced in the current
term schedule. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

SOF500          Software Engineering                                                                 4.5
The course covers basic concepts and practices within the field important to both the practitioner and the
theorist, as the rate of change in software engineering technology continues to increase. It also examines
current issues in systems engineering, software architectures, product assurance principles, and software
project management, all described in terms of established software process improvement models. Various
industry life-cycle models are presented, with examples of their use. Case studies may also be included.
Prerequisite: None.




148
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

SOF510          Data Structures and Algorithms                                                        4.5
This course introduces the definitions, implementations, and applications of the most commonly used
data structures used in Computer Science, including the concept of abstract data types. The course also
introduces the basic for malism and concepts used in the analysis of algorithms and in algorithm design.
The relative efficiency of the algorithms studied is estimated by the informal application of these ideas. The
algorithms and data structures discussed include those for sorting, searching, graph problems, dynamic
programming, combinatorial search and others. Prerequisite: None.

SOF515         Relational Database Management                                                         4.5
The course aims at explaining the basic concepts of database architecture, data storage, and the relational
database model. The students will be able to express queries in relational algebra, SQL, and ordinary
English, and be able to embed SQL queries in a PL/SQL program. Students design a relational database.
Students also understand and apply the concepts and techniques of concurrency control and database
recovery. Prerequisite: SOF 510.

SOF520         Software Verification and Validation                                                    4.5
The evaluation of software for correctness, efficiency, performance, and reliability is addressed. Specific
skills covered include program proving, code inspection, unit-level testing, and system-level analysis. The
difficulty and cost of some types of analysis are examined in addition to the need for automation of tedious
tasks. Problem-solving skills are stressed, especially in analysis of code. The textbook world is contrasted
with the real world using case studies from the book and personal experiences. Industry attitudes toward
reliability and performance are also discussed. Prerequisite: SOF500.

SOF525         Software Maintenance                                                                   4.5
This course provides a guide for the transition from programming for the short term to programming for
the long term. The role of creation and maintenance in the software development process as well as analysis
and implementation of a software design is reviewed. The need for software maintenance and evolution,
software maintenance process and performance issues, planning for extended software life, and effective
mechanisms to control software change are additional topics of discussion. Prerequisite: SOF500.

SOF535         Object-Oriented Analysis and Design                                                    4.5
The course discusses the following topics: object-oriented systems, software reusability, software modularity,
top-down and bottom-up approaches, object classification, genericity, metaprogramming, and concurrent
object-oriented programming languages. Prerequisite: SOF500.

SOF540          Distributed Systems                                                                   4.5
Topics central to the design and management of distributed computing systems, including distributed
synchronization and resource sharing, concurrency control in distributed databases, distributed simulation
languages for distributed computing, management proof techniques for distributed systems, and distributed
operating systems are covered. Prerequisite: SOF535.




                                                                                                        149
Number          Course Name                                                                        Credits

SOF545          Middleware and Components Based Software Development                                  4.5
This course discusses component-based software development for enterprise applications. Topics include
component models and multi-tier architectures. Specific case studies may include topics such as Enterprise
Java Beans, DCOM, CORBA and .NET. Prerequisite: SOF535.

SOF560          Operating Systems                                                                     4.5
The course offers a hands-on introduction to operating systems, including multiprogramming,
communication and synchronization, memory management, IO subsystems, and resource scheduling
polices. The laboratory component consists of constructing a small kernel, including functions for
device IO, multitasking, memory management, dynamic linking and loading, and socket- driven window
management. Prerequisite: SOF 510.

SOF570         Network Security                                                                      4.5
Security concepts needed for the design, use, and implementation of secure voice and data communications
networks, including the Internet, are introduced. The course provides an overview of networking technology
and standards including an introduction to the Internet communications protocols. Specific security subjects
addressed include firewalls, packet filtering, virtual private networks (VPNs), wireless network security, and
operating system security. Prerequisite: SOF575 or Permission of the Dean.

SOF575         Internet Protocols                                                                     4.5
This course discusses protocol specifications and formal description methods, finite-state descriptions of
internet protocols, specification and description language, and implementation of protocol specification.
Prerequisite: None.

SOF580          Data Communications                                                                   4.5
This course covers the technology underlying data-communications systems, such as transmission media,
modulation and demodulation, multiplexing, packet switching, hardware, software, and network operations.
Topics included are fiber optics, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), T-1 and T-3 multiplexers,
the open systems interconnection (OSI) model, and integrated voice-data equipment. Methods for
determining system requirements as well as approaches to system design are covered in light of current data-
communications equipment, applications, and services, and their future trends. Prerequisite: SOF575.

SOF585          Issues and Trends in Software Engineering                                             4.5
This course examines the technological advances in computer systems and in the many environments
affected by advancing technology. Problems relating to ethics, security, the proliferation of databases, risk
analysis, telecommunications, artificial intelligence, and human-machine interaction are examined. The
rapid development of computer-based information systems in response to management needs, as well as
trends and developments in the field are discussed. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.




150
Number         Course Name                                                                      Credits

SOF590         Software Engineering Project                                                        4.5
This course provides experience in applying software-engineering techniques by giving the students an
opportunity to produce software when working in teams under the schedule constraints commonly
experienced in industry. As a component of the course, the instructor will emulate the vagueness shown
by typical customers in describing requirements. The instructor serves as a guide and mentor, not as a
traditional teacher. With permission of the instructor or the Dean, Curricular Practical Training (CPT) may
be used to satisfy some requirements of this course. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

SOF595         Current Topics in Software Engineering I                                            4.5
This course addresses current topics in the software engineering field. Course topics vary. Check with the
department for details. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

SOF596         Current Topics in Software Engineering II                                           4.5
This course addresses current topics in the software engineering field. Course topics vary. Check with the
department for details. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

SOF597         Current Topics in Software Engineering III                                          4.5
This course addresses current topics in the software engineering field. Course topics vary. Check with the
department for details. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.

SOF598         Current Topics in Software Engineering IV                                           4.5
This course addresses current topics in the software engineering field. Course topics vary. Check with the
department for details. Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean.




                                                                                                      151
GOVERNING BOARD
Stratford University is a proprietary institution of higher education. The control of
the institution’s operations rests with its Governing Board of Directors, which is
composed of the following members:

      Dr. Richard Shurtz, President;
      Mary Ann Shurtz, Executive Vice President;
      Barbara Snyder, Secretary.

Stratford University Governing Board of Directors, the designated policy-making agency
for American Transportation Institute, d.b.a. Stratford University, shall have all of the
powers and duties to ensure that all institutional departments are in compliance with
the corporation policies, procedures and regulation of all accrediting bodies. Although
the Board is responsible for assuring that its policies and regulations are followed, it does
not participate in the details of institutional management, which are hereby delegated to
the university management board. The Management Board is composed of the following
members: President, Vice Presidents, Campus Directors, and Comptroller. Members of
the Management Board, as representatives, may exercise official board authority.

The President is the chief executive officer of the university. The President is responsible to
the Board for the execution of University policies and for the management and direction
of framework of the general policies determined by the Board for the organization. The
President shall be accountable to the Board for performing the following duties within
his designated areas of responsibility:

  1. Providing general leadership for the university.

  2. Making recommendations concerning the mission, scope, and organization of the
     university and concerning plans and policies for the development and enhancement
     of university operations and activities.

  3. Making recommendations concerning the selection and appointment of such
     officers as may be designated by the Board.

  4. Adopting policies and regulations to insure the effective administration and
     management of the university and to encourage the highest quality of instruction,
     scholarship, and appropriate service by the faculty.

  5. Reviewing and approving of educational goals and purposes, including statements
     of the mission and scope.



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