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RO3 Complete.ppt - The Sea Cadet Communications Branch

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									Communications 3rd Class


      PPO (SCC) J G Copeland
   Communications Instructor (G)
       Introduction
Instructor:

PPO (SCC) James Copeland

Ground Rules

Speaking, Writing, Notes, Handouts
Course Outline
Job 1: Basic Admin Voice Procedures
Job 2: Introduction to Data Communications
Job 3: Introduction to Tactical Communications
Job 4: Phonetic Alphabet
Job 5: Speaking & Writing
Job 6: Use of a telephone
Job 7: Messenger Duties
Job 8: Communications History
Job 9: Basic Safety
Job 10: Unit Communications Equipment
References

SCC Communications Training Manual


Available online from
www.sccheadquarters.com


   Take notes as you feel you need to, handouts
   will be given out for certain subjects.
Job 1: Basic Admin
 Voice Procedure
   Job 1: Basic Admin Voice
       Basic Terminology

Call Sign           Transmitter   Radio Net


Receiver            Radio Net     Operator


Call                Ending Sign   Radio Station
Call sign
  A unique ‘name’ for a
  person/station on a radio net.


   Transmitter
        A device that is capable of
        transmitting an electromagnetic
        signal but cannot receive them.

          Closing Down
               Ending a transmission.
Operator
  A ‘name’ for a person using a
  radio set to transmit/receive
  messages.

     Call
            A Message sent between
            operators can be initial or general.

     Ending Sign
         Finish transmitting messages,
          using the words over OR out.
Receiver
  A device able to receive
  electromagnetic signals but
  unable to broadcast.
     Radio Check
         Test strength/readability of
         your signal.
     Radio Station
          A place capable of
         transmitting/receiving or varying size.
  Basic ProWords
Admin Voice Procedure: Standard language on Radios

Roger                  Say Again                 Over

                           Out
Roger
 Acknowledgement and total
 understanding of last message
 received.



        Say Again
           Ask to repeat message because it
           was not heard or misunderstood.
Over
 Acknowledgement of receipt
 of last message.

    Out
          Acknowledgement of receipt of
          last message sent no reply
          expected.
Calling another Station

 When calling another station you make
 an initial call, this is to confirm they can
 hear you.

 MF99 this is MJ99 over

        this is MF99 over
        Types of Net

Directed: A net where permission is required to
transmit, think of it as a controlled airway.

Free: An airway where no control is exercised,
hence ‘free’

Engineering: Discuss equipment and set ups.
Sending them a Message...

MF99 this is MJ99, We will be commencing
Pulling training at 1200 Zulu, over

What ProWord would you acknowledge it with
if:

i) You heard it clearly?
ii) You didn’t quite make it out?
Now for something
practical…
 Radio Check:
 Check quality and loudness of
 transmission
 1: GF99 this is GG99, radio check, over
 2: this is GF99 ______________ over
 2: this is GG99, ____________ out
Radio Check Quality & Loudness

 Loudness:                        Quality:

 Loud            Say as Roger      Clear
 Good                              Readable
 Weak                              Distorted
 Very Weak                         With interference
 Fading                            Intermittent

 Grab a partner and have a go at experimenting!
                  Closing down

When finished transmitting, you MUST close
down!

You must ask permission first, you can
specify a time period.

Then.... GF99 this is GG99, closing down at
1100 ZULU, OUT
Date/Time Groups

Format: DDHHMMSS(A/Z) Mon YYYY
i.e 251606Z May 2010

Set by NATO
Time zones, different letters in
different countries
 DTG’s (2)

28 1545        Z      SEP 10

Day   Time   Time Zone Month   Year
Precedence's
How ‘urgent’ the message is, kind of like a 2nd or
1st class stamp

  Z   = FLASH NOT TO USED BY SCC
  O   = IMMEDIATE
  P   = PRIORITY
  R   = ROUTINE
Protective Markings
Top Secret = TSEC
Secret = SEC
Confidential = CONF
Restricted = REST
Unclassified = UNCLAS
Any Questions?
Job 2: Introduction to Data
    Communications
What is Data Communications?

 Data Communications is where the communications
 goes through a digital source. Some examples:
 Internet, fax machine, text message.

 • Less susceptible to interference
 • Error Detection
 • Clarity
 • Multiplexing
Data Communications block diagram




   PC – Human Interface
   TNC – Digital to analogue signal and reverse
   Tx/Rx – Converts to electromagnetic signal (Radio Wave)

  AERIAL          VHF            PC          TNC
                 TX/RX
Any Questions?
  Job 3: Introduction to
Tactical Communications
Flags & Masts…




          Union Flag
     Made up of what flags?
Union Flag...
England


          Scotland



                     Northern Ireland
 Which Patron Saint belongs to which flag




NORTHERN
                   ENGLAND             SCOTLAND
 IRELAND

ST ANDREW          ST PATRICK         ST GEORGE
 What about Wales?!
WALES IS A PRINCIPALITY AND IT HAS NEVER BEEN REPRESENTED
         IN THE UNION FLAG BY THE FLAG OF ST.DAVID




                 THE WELSH         FLAG OF ST.DAVID
                  DRAGON
Common Sea Cadet Flags...




                                 SEA CADET
  PREPARATIVE   CHURCH PENNANT
                                   ENSIGN
What two countries flags make up the
church Pennant ?




  ENGLAND                 NETHERLANDS
 Parts of a flag...
 Head




Tac
Cantons of a Flag
        Hoist   Fly



Upper




Lower
                                                             Red
                                        The Senior Ensign.
                                        May be worn by all British-Registered Vessels which
                                        are not entitled to wear a White or Blue Ensign.



               White
Worn by HM Ships, HM Ships’ boats, RN & RM
shore establishments, Trinity House Vessels (when
accompanying HM Ships which are dressed overall),
and vessels of the Royal Yacht Squadron.



                                                              Blue
                                      Worn by vessels of other Government Departments,
                                      e.g. Royal Fleet Auxiliary, HM Customs etc.,
                                      Police Launches, Royal Mail Ships and Sea Cadet
                                      Units, Ships and Boats.
The Sea Cadet Ensign




Blue Ensign defaced with the Sea Cadet Badge
Commissioning Pennants



                Royal Navy




                Sea Cadets
  Preparative Pennant




• Given as the executive command before a
manoeuvre
• Used in the Sea Cadet Colours/Evening Colours
Ceremony
         Flag Officers’ Flags


Commodore                             Vice Admiral




Rear Admiral                            Admiral




               Admiral of the Fleet
   Signalling Mast                                11
                                                         10



 1. Masthead
 2. Tabernacle
 3. Yard (Two Yardarms)
 4. Gaff
 5. Blocks
 6. Pinrail
 7. Belaying Pins or Cleats
 8. Halyards
 9. Button
10. Peak
11. Truck


                      (Key - Follow the Colour-Coding)
And now for something Practical!

 Carry out Signalman duties at Colours/Evening
Colours
• Half Mast for both routines
Any Questions?
Job 4: The Phonetic
     Alphabet
The Phonetic Alphabet

What is it?
The Phonetic Alphabet is the alphabet, but
instead of using single letters like A, B, C,
we use words which begin with the letter, i.e.
A = Alpha. When speaking on a radio or
  telephone, it stops any ambiguity.
                        Key to
                        Slides
Letter in Morse
Code

                       A     Letter


                                              Flag A

                             ALPHA
                                   Phonetic



             Letter in semaphore
A
    ALPHA
B
BRAVO
C
CHARLIE
 D
DELTA
Spy Test
• You have ONE minute to remember the four letters that
you have just learnt
A=
B=
C=
D=
E
ECHO
  F
FOXTROT
G
GOLF
 H

HOTEL
                   Spy Test
          You have just spotted a stolen car and you need to
          report it but your partner on the other end of the radio
          can’t hear you properly. Work out the phonetic
          equivalent for the letters on the number plate




FGA EHD
 I
INDIA
 J
JULIE
T
K
KILO
L
LIMA
              Spy Test
Unscramble the following words to reveal their phonetic terms:


1.   Dinai
2.   Lijuet
3.   Loik
4.   mial
M
MIKE
  N
NOVEMBE
R
O
OSCAR
 P
PAPA
Spy Test
    Match the flags to
    the letters and
    work out the
    phonetic term for
    each flag:
    M
    N
    O
    P
 Q
QUEBE
C
 R
ROME
O
S
SIERR
A
 T
TANGO
Spy Test
  You have TWO minutes to write down as many of the
  phonetic words you have learnt today.


  Share them with your partner – what did you forget?
 U
UNIFORM
 V

VICTOR
W
WHISK
Y
 X
X-RAY
 Y
YANKE
E
Z
ZULU
Spy Tasks
       Spell out the following words in phonetics
       BOOTS,
       ORLOP,
       BROWN,
       PORT
       STARBOARD
       SEA CADETS
       HASTINGS
CHARACTER        MORSE CODE            TELEPHONY    PHONIC (PRONOUNCIATION)

    A       •−                Alfa                 AL-FAH

    B       −•••              Bravo                BRAH-VOH

    C       −•−•              Charlie              CHAR-LEE

    D       −••               Delta                DELL-TAH

    E       •                 Echo                 ECK-OH

     F      ••−•              Foxtrot              FOKS-TROT

    G       −−•               Golf                 GOLF

    H       ••••              Hotel                HOH-TEL

     I      ••                India                IN-DEE-AH

     J      •−−−              Juliet               JEW-LEE-ETT

    K       −•−               Kilo                 KEE-LOH

    L       •−••              Lima                 LEE-MAH

    M       −−                Mike                 MIKE

    N       −•                November             NO-VEM-BER

    O       −−−               Oscar                OSS-CAH
P   •−−•    Papa      PAH-PAH
Q   −−•−    Quebec    KEH-BECK
R   •−•     Romeo     ROE-ME-OH
S   •••     Sierra    SEE-AIR-RAH
T   −       Tango     TANG-GO
U   ••−     Uniform   YOU-NEE-FORM
V   •••−    Victor    VIK-TAH
W   •−−     Whiskey   WISS-KEY
X   −••−    Xray      ECKS-RAY
Y   −•−−    Yankee    YANG-KEY
Z   −−••    Zulu      ZOO-LOO
1   •−−−−   One       WUN
2   ••−−−   Two       TOO
3   •••−−   Three     TREE
4   ••••−   Four      FOW-ER
5   •••••   Five      FIFE
6   −••••   Six       SIX
7   −−•••   Seven     SEVEN
8   −−−••   Eight     AIT
9   −−−−•   Nine      NIN-ER
0   −−−−−   Zero      ZEE-RO
                Spy Tasks
Solve the following clues and spell out the word
phonetically
ANY QUESTIONS ?
Job 5: Speaking & Writing
Speaking
When speaking on the circuit there are some things that
need to be considered:

•Do not shout down the microphone because this will
over modulate the signal and make it unreadable.

• Speak with a slightly higher tone.

• Speak as slowly as the slowest operator on the net.
Writing
Being on the net requires a lot of writing down, such as
logging activities and signals.

WRITE IN BLOCK CAPITALS

WRITE IN BLACK INK

WRITE DOWN EXACTLY AS HEARD, NO
PARAPHRASING MESSAGES

Listen to the short piece and write it in the style above!
Any Questions?
Job 6: Using the Telephone
 Calling the Emergency Services


6 step Protocol....
1. Stay Calm
2. Pick up the phone and dial 999 or 112
3. Listen carefully for the service, whom you
   require help from
 Calling the Emergency Services

4. The operator will ask you where you are
calling from, carefully an correctly give your
number & location.
5. You will then speak to the service in
question, listen carefully and give the nature of
the problem.
6. When you have finished HANG UP, you may
    stop someone else getting through!
 Now for something practical!


Run through the Emergency Phone call
procedure with your partner.
 Answering a unit telephone
Why answer in a clear and smart manner?


• Send out right impression
• Messages can be passed correctly and
clearly
• Good Etiquette
•Any more you can think of?
 Answering a unit telephone
1. Have a pen and paper ready to take any
   message.
2. Pick up the phone speak slowly and clearly
   ‘Good Evening, TS Hastings Sea Cadets,
   Able Cadet Bloggs Speaking. How can I
   help you?’
 Answering a unit telephone
3. If they are looking for somebody, say ‘Thank
    you, could you hold the line please’ and then
    lay down pipe/find them.
4. If not available, say ‘I am sorry, xxx is not
    available, may I take a message?’
5. If the caller leaves a message, write it down
    and read it back to them. Add time and date
       message taken!
 Answering a unit telephone

6. If the caller has finished, say ‘Thank you for
    calling, goodbye’ and hang up.
7. Ensure the message is delivered to the
   person concerned.
 You guessed it!

Practice with your partner calling the unit and
  taking messages... Use caller message
  paper.
Any Questions?
Job 7: Messenger Duties
 Messenger Duties
  BE SMART AND ENSURE YOUR UNIFORM IS
       PRESSED/CLEANED CORRECTLY
1. Approach the person whom you are taking the
   message from and give correct marks of respect.
2. Stand to attention whilst you are being instructed
   of the message. If the message is verbal repeat it
   back to ensure it was heard correctly. Speak slowly
   and carefully and EXACTLY AS YOU WERE
   TOLD IT do not paraphrase.
 Messenger Duties
3. Know who the addressee is...
4. Approach the addressee, give appropriate marks of
   respect and say ‘Message for you
   Sir/Ma’am/Chief/PO’. If verbal say ‘PO Bloggins
   respects, ... Message’ Compliments up and
   sideways and respects go upwards.
5. Say the message slowly, carefully and EXACTLY
   as you were told it, no paraphrasing.
6. Wait for a reply and return it to originator.
 Messenger Duties



7. Even if there is no reply you must return to the
   originator and say ‘No reply Sir/Ma’am, Chief/PO’.


SIMPLE EFFICIANT and remember to speak
  CLEARLY and EXACTLY AS YOU WERE TOLD
  IT!
Practical Task


Send a Message from one person to
another in the correct format!

Remember the key points!
Any Questions?
Job 8: Communications
        History
Early forms of Naval Signalling
The First
Recorded
Naval Signal

480 B.C.
Battle of Salamis
    28
September The First Recorded use of a
   1066   Lamp for Signalling at Sea
           k

       o




1338 Publication of the First
    Written Authority on
   Signalling in the Royal Navy
1530   Use of Gunfire ordered to signal the weighing
   or letting go of anchors and to warn of a ship
   which had “in the night fallen in leake or breaken
   his maste.”
1714

Mr. Greenwood
Edits and
Publishes his
“Half-Minute”
Signal Book
1776
Admiral
Lord Howe
Revolutionises
Naval
Signalling


(Even Nelson
was impressed!)
1795 The Rev. Lord George Murray invents
               Semaphore
 Admiralty Edict
Number 9,128,765
                   1799
Stop making up
your own signal    The Admiralty
codes. Use ours.   Board
By order.          standardises
                   Naval Signalling
                   in one printed
                   book
From 1799 Admiral Sir Home
          Popham refines the
          Admiralty’s Signal
          Code using numbers
          in 3- or 4- Flag hoists
          so that Admirals at
          Sea can say almost
          anything by Flag.


In 1805 Popham’s Code
        was used to send . . .
         The World’s “Most Famous” Naval Signal
                                           MAIN MAST
                          STARBOARD



                                                                            FOREMAST



                                                             PORT
                  MIZZEN MAST
                                                             STARBOARD

     STARBOARD

PEAK                             DO
(gaff)                                                                                     PORT
                                PORT
                                                                D
                                                                         THAT
                                       ENGLAND
                                                       HIS
           T
                 MAN

                            Y                                                          U



WILL
                                                                         EVERY
                                       EXPECTS

                           BLUNT END                   SHARP END
1816


Admiral Popham
introduces his
revised
Semaphore
Apparatus
         January

           6                Samuel
                            Morse
                            Introduce
         1838               s
                            His New
                            Telegraph
Notes for January
     New telegraph system
     Monday.
                 1845
                            =




Morse’s new Code begins to be adopted by
                       the
emerging U.S. railroad companies, after he
proves its ability to pass messages instantly
18                         67




     Captain Columb introduces
      Flashing Light Signalling
     into the Royal Navy using
         Morse’s new code
7 May 1896 Guglielmo Marconi impresses Admiral
            Jackson by sending and receiving Morse over
            14 miles between Bournemouth and
             the Isle of Wight
   12
December    Marconi makes the first Trans-Atlantic
  1901     Radio Transmission using the Morse Code
  1905. The Royal Navy finally adopts
Wireless Telegraphy in order to prevent the
   fleet falling behind those of Britain’s
               potential enemies.
1908. The Marconi Company replaces CQD




  with the new, easy-to-remember SOS



                    as its
     International Maritime Distress Call
Since
1905 . . .
Any Questions?
    Job 9: Basic
Communications Safety
   Communications Safety
      is the responsibility of

         EVERYONE
   involved in Communications
 Ensuring that everyone is aware of
 their responsibilities is the duty of

THE COMMUNICATIONS INSTRUCTOR
Communications Safety

       Fire Precautions     Electric Shock
CO2   and Extinguishers        Hazards




                 Food and Drink


      Radiation Hazards            Basic
         and Burns                First Aid
       Communications Safety Rules
1. NEVER work inside live equipment
  2. NEVER bypass fuses

     3. NEVER touch an aerial unless it has been disconnected

       4. NEVER eat or drink near communications equipment or
          operate equipment with wet hands

          5. ALWAYS ensure that there is a CO2 extinguisher
             at the entrance to the Radio Room

            6. ALWAYS ensure that there is a mains cut-off switch
               at the entrance to the Radio Room

              7. ALWAYS ensure that there are no wires or cables
                 trailing where someone might trip over them

                 8. ALWAYS ensure that aerials are connected before
                    switching a radio on
     Safety Training Protocol

           I R E
Instruct
            Repeat
                       Examine
       Right from the very outset
 DANGER OF DEATH
    Do Not Rig Aerials
Near Overhead Power Lines
      CAUTION




Non-Ionising Radiation
  No
Smoking
      No
Food or Drink
 in this room
     CAUTION
 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
        INSIDE




NO UNAUTHORISED ENTRY
 QUIET
PLEASE!!
  Communications
        Test
    in Progress
 QUIET
PLEASE!!
 Meeting
    in
 Progress
Any Questions?
  Job 10: Unit
Communications
  Equipment
Any Questions?

								
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