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Annual Progress Report and Quarterly Progress Report

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					Government of Belize                                                EUROPEAN
MINISTRY OF ECONOMIC                                         9th EUROPEAN
DEVELOPMENT, BELIZE                                          DEVELOPMENT FUND




                   Belize Rural Development Programme




                     rd
                        Annual Progress Report
                    3FINANCIAL COMMITMENT No 9 ACP BEL 3
                                1st March 2008 TO 28th February 2009


          and 12th Quarterly Progress Report
                               1st December 2008 TO 28th February 2009




                                      Prepared by the

            Programme Coordination & Management Unit
                             (PMU)




The programme is financed by               Government of Belize    The programme is implemented
The European Commission                                             by ICON-INSTITUT Public
                                                                    Sector GmBH in co-operation
                                                                    with Arcadis BMB




2008                                                                                      1
1. Exécutive Summary

(1) This 3rd Annual Progress Report of the Belize Rural Development Programme
(BRDP) covers the period from 1st March 2008 to 28th February 2009. The reporting period
encompasses a period when several important activities were accomplished:
       The completion of PE 2 activities which included 238 micro grants, 42 small
         group projects, 11 small grants to institutional partners and the Cayo Farmers
         Market.
       The 2nd external financial audit was carried out from 16th June to 1st July 2008
         on record of expenditures No 2 and No 3 rat the conclusion of PE 2.
       The Mid-term Evaluation was carried out from 2nd September to 8th October
         2008, to assess progress, identify issues and problems, and chart the way
         forward for BRDP.
       The implementation of PE3 started in September 2008 and field activities were
         initiated after funds were received in early December 2008.
       The M&E framework and methodology is in place, and the M&E work is now a
         major activity of the PMU and being implemented with the strong participation
         of BRDP partners, large grantees and beneficiaries.
       The second quarterly meeting of BRDP grantees involving 8 larger grants.
       Participation in planning and implementation of several visibility activities.

(2)   The PMU of BRDP was downsized in 2008 with the departure of the social
development expert in May, the project director in August and the marketing specialist in
December 2008. The current PMU includes Dr Marcelino Avila (project director), Ms
Sandra Miranda (project accountant/ office manager) and Ms Nerie Sanz (planning,
monitoring and evaluation specialist) who took over in November 2008 from Mr Assad
Magaňa who resigned to pursue postgraduate studies.

(3) The main recommendations made by the mid term evaluation can be summarized as
follow:
    a. BRDP is to significantly increase guidance to the small grant projects especially the
        (12) projects with financial losses and problems,
    b. There is also the urgent need to establish a quarterly monitoring of the large grants
        (technical and economic) by the PMU.
    c. Equally urgent is the setting up of a simple and inexpensive internal BRDP
        monitoring and evaluation system with specific focus on income increase and
        economic growth for all grants, including the large ones.
    d. PMU is to assist the NAO in the development of a five-year Strategy and
        Operational Plan (OP) to revive and formalize the DDCs and the Village Councils;
        covering institutional, technical and financial aspects (DDCs all agreed that this is a
        good idea).

The NAO, PMU and its partners provided a coordinated feedback on the draft final report
and the annexes. The final report was received in late January 2009.

(4) The BRDP-PMU started implementation of the PE3 which focuses on the main
recommendations made by the mid term evaluation and the NAO. The major components
of PE3 action are: capacity building for small projects which are unfinished or weak,
guidance and monitoring of the large grants, setting-up and implementing an internal M&E

2008                                                                                    2
with particular focus on the economic indicators, and EU/GoB visibility through for all
BRDP projects.

(5) BRDP is implementing a participatory M&E as part-and-parcel of the programme
management system. To achieve this, all implementing partners as well as beneficiaries
(stakeholders) have assessed what information and objectively verifiable indicators can
realistically be collected, given available human and financial resources (prioritize) and
decided how the information needs or indicators will be collected and organized. The
stakeholders have participated effectively in the review of the M&E matrix, definition of
the specific OVIs to be used, and the methodologies for data collection and analysis.

(6) BRDP organized two training seminars (22/4/08 and 27/08/08) on administrative and
financial procedures and three quarterly meetings (19/08/08, 3-4/12/08 and 6/03/09) with
the large grantees to review their progress, achievements and any problems encountered by
the grantees thus far. Below is a table with an update on the commitment of BRDP. A
detailed report on each large grant is presented in the main report.

(7) During the reporting period, BRDP had a very busy schedule of successful visibility
activities which were well attended by Government Ministers, CEOs, non-government
dignitaries, project beneficiaries, the general public, and also well covered by national and
local TV and radio stations. It was a very busy schedule, which included the inauguration
of the Cayo Farmers Market, launchings of the 7 large grants, handing over of small
infrastructure and equipment to small group projects, the BRDP 2009 calendar/ planner,
BRDP placards or signs on most small projects and micro-grants, redesign and population
of the BRDP website http://brdp.org/. Large grants have produced their attractive project
banners, brochures, and some have produced calendars and tea-shirts. The UNDP/MAF
Agricultural Enterprise Development Project has produced 3 short videos.

(8)    The 12th Quarterly Progress Report of the Belize Rural Development Programme
(BRDP) covers the period from 1st December 2008 to 28th February 2009, and includes a
report on the progress of implementation of the PE 3, the monitoring and evaluation of
small and large grants, the financial status of PE 3, and the guidance and monitoring of the
large grantees.




2008                                                                                  3
Commitment       Imple-         Budget         Period of       Funds           Expended
                 menter         (Euro)         action         received        to 30/11/08
                                                               (Euro)              %
PE 1             PMU              28,528.55    Aug–Nov 06        €28,528.55       100
PE 2             PMU                           Nov 06-Apr
                                 780,505.60    08                780,505.60       100
PE 3             PMU                           Sept 08–Feb       65,774.00        12
                                 126,771.13    10
Grant 1 Micro    BEST &          172,363.84    Mar 08–Feb       136,440.00        63
grants           Plenty                        10
Grant 2 Rural    UB & ITSB       300,000.00    Jun 08–Feb       240,000.00        35
ITs                                            10
Grant 3 St       CGA             250,000.00    Jun 08–Dec       159,604.53        10
Creek Rur Dev                                  09
Grant 4 Toledo   TTCU, Plenty    198,610.00    Mar 08–Feb       158,988,73        30
Rur Dev          & SHI                         10
Grant 5          YWCA                          Mar 08–Feb       239,992.00        60
Women &                          299,999.00    10
Youth
Grant 6          SIF                           Jun 08-Dec       240,800.00        33
Crooked Tree                     301,000.00    09
Water Supply
Grant 7 Agric    UNDP & MAF       1,299,976    May 08–Apr       652,023.00        55
Enterprise Dev                                 10
Grant 8          SIF                600,000    Jan 08–Sept      480,000.00        33
Hurricane Dean                                 09
Works - Valley   A&N                           Sep 08–Aug                0        0
of Peace Rural   Construction    413,450.96    09
road
Works –          Cisco Cons-                   Sep 08–Aug                0        0
Middlesex        truction Ltd    1,018,798.9   09
Bridge
Mid-term         Framework                     Sept 08                   0       100
evaluation                        44,058.00
Audit 2007       Framework        24,050.00    July 08                   0       100
Audit 2008       Framework        15,890.00    July 09                   0       100
Audit 2009       Framework        25,000.00    April 10                  0        0
                                 € 5,899,000
Total                                                        € 2,848,426.13




2008                                                                                  4
                                                        2. Table of Content
1. Exécutive Summary................................................................................................................................. 2


2. Table of Content ....................................................................................................................................... 5


3. List of Abbreviations ............................................................................................................................... 6

Annual Progress Report in Detail .................................................................................................................. 7

4. Background to BRDP.................................................................................................................................. 7

5. Objectives and expected results of BRDP ................................................................................................. 7

6. PMU and PSC Management .................................................................................................................... 10

7. Completion of Programme Estimate 2..................................................................................................... 11

7.5         Financial Statement and Independent Assurance Report Financial Audit................................ 14

8. Mid-Term Evaluation ............................................................................................................................... 15

9. Monitoring and Evaluation of BRDP ...................................................................................................... 19

10. Progress Report on Large Grants.......................................................................................................... 21

    10.1 Grant No 1: Micro Enterprises for Poor Families Programme...........................................................22
    10.2 Grant No 2: Rural IT Project...............................................................................................................28
    10.3 Grant No 3: Rural Development for Stann Creek District ...................................................................32
    10.4 Grant No 4. Toledo Rural Development: An Enterprise Engine..........................................................36
    10.5 Grant No 5: Women and Youth Project ...............................................................................................41
    10.6 Grant No 6: Water Supply System for Crooked Tree ...........................................................................48
    10.7 Grant No 7: Agricultural Enterprise Development.............................................................................51
    10.8 Grant No 8: Emergency Reconstruction after Hurricane Dean..........................................................61
    10.9         Works Contract: Rehabilitation of the Middlesex Bridge, Stann Creek District............................72
    10.10 Works Contract: Valley of Peace Road, Cayo District .....................................................................73

11. EU/GoB Visibility Events ...................................................................................................................... 74

12. 12th Quarterly Progress Report in Detail ............................................................................................. 78

    12.1 Programme Estimate 3 ........................................................................................................................78
    12.2 Monitoring and Evaluation Implementation .......................................................................................79
    12.3 Financial status of PE 3......................................................................................................................87
    12.4 Guidance and support for Large Grantees ..........................................................................................88




2008                                                                                                                                              5
3. List of Abbreviations


ACP             -        African, Caribbean and Pacific countries signatories to
                         The Cotonou Agreement with the EU
ATWG            -        Advisory Technical Working Group
BZ$             -        Belize dollar
BEST            -        Belize Enterprise for Sustainable Technology
BMS             -        Belize Marketing Study, financed with EU funds
BRDP            -        Belize Rural Development Programme1
CGA             -        Citrus Growers Association
DDC             -        District Development Committee
EC              -        European Commission
EDF             -        European Development Fund
EU              -        European Union
FA              -        Finance Agreement (between EU and GoB)
GoB             -        Government of Belize
ITSB            -        Information Technology Solutions of Belize
M&E             -        monitoring and evaluation
MAF             -        Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries
MED             -        Ministry of Economic Development
MoW             -        Ministry of Works
NAO             -        National Authorizing Officer
NAVCO           -        National Association of Village Councils
NGOs            -        Non-governmental organizations
OVIs            -        Objectively verifiable indicators
PE              -        Programme Estimate
PMU             -        Programme Coordination and Management Unit
PSC             -        Programme Steering Committee
PVOs            -        Private volunteer organizations
ROC             -        Republic of China on Taiwan
SBRC            -        Small Business Resource Center
SHI             -        Sustainable Harvest International
SIF             -        Social Investment Fund
TOR             -        Terms of reference
TTCU            -        Toledo Teachers Credit Union
UB              -        University of Belize
UNDP            -        United Nations Development Programme
US              -        United States of America
YWCA            -        Young Women Christian Association


             EU exchange rate: 1 Euro = 2.50 - 3.11 Belize dollar (floating)
                      Exchange rate 1 US $ = 2.0 BZ$ (fixed)




1
 Mailing address: BRDP, P.O. Box 107, Belmopan City, Belize; Office location: Belmopan Agricultural
Showgrounds; Tel: (501) 660 6732; Fax: (501) 822-0731; E-Mail: brdpbelmopan@gmail.com; website
http://brdp.org/

2008                                                                                            6
Annual Progress Report in Detail


4. Background to BRDP

In November 2005, the European Commission (EC) signed a Financing Agreement
(BEL/001/04) with the Government of Belize (GoB) for the implementation of the Belize
Rural Development Programme (BRDP) with a total budget of Euro 8.675 million, of
which the EU committed up to Euro 7.0 million, the GoB up to Euro 0.8 million, and rural
communities up to Euro 0.875 million. This amount from the EU was later increased by
Euro 199,000 in October 2007, thus increasing the total EU contribution to Euro
7,199,000. In February 2006, the Minister of National Development of Belize and the
European Commission signed a contract with ICON Institut Public Sector GmbH to
provide technical assistance to BRDP and agreed on the 1st March 2006 as the start-up
date for BRDP. The BRDP is managed via an externalised direct labour operation
(managed by ICON GmbH) and the main implementation partner is the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF).


5. Objectives and expected results of BRDP


The overall objective of BRDP is to support sustainable economic growth as the primary
means of alleviating poverty in the rural areas of the country. One of the Programme
indicators is to increase average monthly rural income from BZ$ 620 to BZ$ 780 (2 BZ$ =
1 US$ - fixed rate exchange; 1 Euro = 2.45 – 3.10 BZ$ - fluctuating rate). The expected
results of BRDP are to:
         Facilitate development of efficient small, medium and micro enterprises at
          community/village level; the target is to support the creation of 100-200
          productive rural enterprises.
         Develop rural infrastructure for basic services; the target is that 115,000 rural
          people should have access to the 100-200 new infrastructures supported by
          BRDP.
         Strengthen policies, institutions and communities; the target is that 10% of rural
          families in the country should benefit from BRDP, and at least 30% of the
          beneficiaries should be women & youth.

The basic strategy of BRDP is to follow a participatory, bottom up and decentralized
approach, by supporting the communities (or villages) and districts in defining their
development priorities and identifying specific projects and enterprises for support from
BRDP. Such proposals are reviewed and - based on technical and other aspects - may be
improved/ modified by the PMU before submission to the Programme Steering Committee
(PSC) for final approval. To implement this strategy, BRDP engages existing departments
of government, village councils, NGOs, community/ village based organizations, producer
and farmer organizations, women and youth groups, and credit and marketing agencies.
BRDP works through District Development Committees (DDCs) – there is one DDC in
each of the 6 districts of Belize (the 6 districts are: Corozal, Orange Walk, Belize, Cayo,


2008                                                                                 7
Stann Creek, and Toledo). The PMU provides a small allowance to the DDCs for day-to-
day management, supervision, and monitoring of the projects that have been approved.

                    Fig. 2: The organizational structure of BRDP




5.1 BRDP Stakeholders

The BRDP has several stakeholder groups:

Group 1: Government Ministries and semi-public Agencies:
      The Ministry of Economic Development is the lead Ministry
      The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF) is the implementing
      Ministry
      Ministry of Human Development, i.e. Women’s Department
      Ministry of Labour, Local Government and Rural Development
      The Belize Marketing Development Corporation
      Tourism, environment and conservation organizations

Group 2: Rural Groups:
       Smallholder farmer cooperative associations
       Village councils
       Women’s groups
       Youth groups
       Vocational training course graduates
       Market vendors
       Vegetable production groups
       Beekeepers, livestock groups, and others
       Rural enterprises that provide key market services
       NGOs and PVOs

Group 3: Special underprivileged Groups and Individuals

A deliberate effort is made to identify and support especially underprivileged groups and
individuals like single women, unemployed youth, handicapped groups, etc. While, in
2008                                                                               8
general, a group approach will be followed, BRDP has provisions for small micro-grants (
maximum of BZ$ 1,000 = 400 Euro under PE 2) to be made available to underprivileged
individuals on a case by case basis, if proposed activities will lead to economic benefits or
(self) employment (e.g. an investment for a handicapped person to put up a simple shoe
repair stall at a public market). Support to these groups and individuals may not have a
high initial macro-economic impact but social research has shown that the provision of
micro-grants can have a dramatic impact on the livelihoods of the poorest of the society. It
should be noted that this is a new addition to the programme design and was agreed upon
by the PSC, the relevant Ministries, and endorsed by the EC Delegation as part of the 2nd
PE. This reflects a clearer emphasis on the poverty reduction objective of BRDP.

Group 4: International cooperation partners

BRDP works closely with a number of international development partners in Belize.
Examples are the cooperation with US Peace Corps volunteers who are stationed in remote
villages and who help villagers implement their respective programmes. Other cooperation
partners are IICA, CARDI, the Republic of China (ROC Technical Mission, and others.


5.2 Types of assistance provided by BRDP

BRDP provides the following types of assistance to beneficiaries in macro- and micro
economic critical areas that were identified during the design and the present inception
phase of the Programme:

        Marketing support: The EU originally earmarked approximately BZ$ 1.38
       million to interventions such as developing marketing strategies and information
       systems, market access, marketing depots, storage and packaging units,
       transportation, and export development. However, due to hurricane Dean and other
       developments funds for this activity were reprogrammed and reduced to Euro
       100,000.

        Small, medium and micro-enterprise development: The EU has reserved up to
       Euro 2.69 million for the creation of rural enterprises and rural businesses and related
       training activities, for productive sector related services that generate income or
       employment, for cooperative development, group formation, and assistance for the
       formulation of business plans and marketing studies.

        Small infrastructure: The EU will support with up to Euro 2.379 million the
       creation or improvement of processing and conservation facilities, the improvement
       of feeder roads, energy access, sanitation and wastewater treatment, health, social
       infrastructure, education, social services and environmental recovery.

        Empowerment of rural communities and institutional strengthening: The EU
       has earmarked up to Euro 230,000 for improving the enabling policy and legal
       frameworks, training workshops, physical resources, and organizational and
       community markets.

The contribution of the GoB is in kind and includes 6 vehicles (all 6 have been
delivered), fuel and vehicle maintenance costs, office equipment and supplies, the time of
the implementation officers, and has adjusted part of the regular MAF budget (capital

2008                                                                                    9
projects) to be in support of BRDP activities, and provides general support during BRDP
implementation.

Criteria to be considered for prioritizing and selecting project proposals include the
following:
     that they be beneficial for the rural poor
     that they be productive and income generating
     that they are financially viable, economically efficient and competitive
     that they are gender sensitive, culturally acceptable, and environmentally
       sustainable
     that they can be easily replicated.

To ensure local commitment and ownership, the recipient will need to contribute at least
25% of the total investment involved in cash or in kind.


6. PMU and PSC Management


As envisaged from the start, the PMU team was downsized in 2008. Ms Anita Tzec
concluded her contract in May, Mr. Karl Goeppert departed on 25 August 2008, and Dr
Gordon Holder continued until December 2008. Mr Assad Magaňa resigned in September
to pursue postgraduate studies, so Ms Nerie Sanz replaced him in November 2008. For the
remaining project period, Dr Marcelino Avila will the project director, Ms Sandra Miranda
the project accountant/ office manager, Ms Nerie Sanz the planning, monitoring and
evaluation officer, and the team will be supported by service providers and interns as
needed for the operations of BRDP.

During the reporting period there were two Project Steering Committee meetings. The first
was held on 29th May which was chaired by Mr. Gabino Canto, the CEO of MAF, which
mainly covered:

   1. An update of grant projects that had started implementation, i.e. BEST and
      Plenty with the micro grants in Belize, Cayo and Toledo; TTCU and Plenty with the
      Stann Creek rural development; YWCA with the Women and Youth project;
      UNDP and MAF with the Agricultural enterprise Development; and SIF with the
      Hurricane Dean project.

   2. Monitoring and evaluation (M&E). A powerpoint presentation was made by
      Assad Magaňa on the M&E in the form of an pictorial update of most field projects
      being implemented with small groups in the 6 districts. Questions were asked on
      the PMU’s method for Monitoring and Evaluation the projects. It was suggested
      that a proper system be put in place as soon as possible now that many field
      projects have been completed.

   3. Programme Estimate 3 (PE 3). An overview of PE 3 was given in terms of main
      justification, specific objectives, proposed activities and budget. The proposal was
      approved.



2008                                                                               10
The second meeting of the Project Steering Committee was held on 12th December 2008 at
the NAVCO conference room in Belmopan City and chaired by the NAO.

   1. The PSC was informed of the main results and recommendations of the mid-term
      evaluation which was carried out from 2 September to 8 October 2008. The PSC
      noted them with satisfaction, congratulated the PMU for the favourable report, and
      suggested that the NAVCO and DAVCOs play a greater role in the DDCs in the
      future.

   2. The presentation on the M&E matrix was well received and endorsed by the PSC as
      practical, doable and necessary for BRDP. The PSC recommended that priority be
      given to quantifying the performance and impact of current and future BRDP
      actions, and that it include the local contribution (25%) of beneficiaries.

   3. The PSC endorsed the four key components of Programme Estimate 3, which are:
      capacity building for ongoing small grants; guiding and supporting the large
      grantees; carrying out M&E of all BRDP actions including support for those of the
      large grants; and promoting EU/GoB visibility.

   4. The good performance of BRDP is the reason why the 10th European Development
      Fund will essentially be a second phase of BRDP but with improvement based on
      the lessons learnt. The PSC agreed to the establishment of a 10th EDF Steering
      Committee with representatives of the relevant ministries and non-state actors to
      guide and support a technical working group who will be tasked to produce the
      draft Financial Agreement by mid 2009. It is planned that the FA will be signed by
      December 2009, and implementation to commence by February 2010.


7. Completion of Programme Estimate 2


The 2nd programme estimate (PE 2) covered the seventeen-month period from 21st
November, 2006 to 30th April, 2008 with a budget of BZ$ 2,757,047 (Euro 1,025,700). It
contained a total of some 90 defined projects and activities. Virtually all field projects and
activities are below the Euro 10,000 level (BZ$ 25,000) and thus count as small grants to
local communities under the relevant EC guidelines. The intention of the 2nd PE was to
make actual investments with beneficiaries through bottom-up and community
participatory approaches but also to serve as a test of internal programme procedures, to
familiarize the service providers and government staff with EU regulations, and to test the
institutional cooperation mechanisms amongst some eleven government agencies and
semi-government departments, cooperative groups, and supporting private sector actors.

A detailed analysis of the investment, status of implementation, lessons learnt and future
needs, was presented in the 10th and 11th Quarterly Progress Reports.

7.1 Small Group projects

Below is the distribution of 42 small group projects across six districts of the country.
Important to note that approximately 45% of these projects deal with agriculture, involve
54 villages, and have benefited 549 families in rural communities. Approximately 50% of
all group members are women across the board.

2008                                                                                  11
Table 7.1a Distribution of Small Projects (< € 10,000) by district & beneficiaries

District                  No. Projects         Villages         Family              No. Women
                                               Involved       Beneficiaries          involved
Corozal                         6                  7               61                   35
Orange Walk                     6                 10               59                   31
Belize                          7                 11              102                   71
Cayo                            6                  6               83                   63
Stann Creek                     8                  6               95                   35
Toledo                          9                 14              149                   42
Total                          42                 54              549               277 (50%)

The projects are classified into three sectors: agriculture, small industries/manufacturing
and services. The agricultural sector is further divided into crops, livestock and agro-
processing; whilst the services sector is subdivided into IT and others.

Table 7.1b Distribution of Small Projects (< € 10,000) by district & sector

                                      Agriculture                Small             Services
District            No     Crops    Livestock        Agro       industry      Others     Internet
                                                    Process   /manufacture
Corozal               6        1       1              0            1            0           3
Orange Walk           6        2       1              1            0            2           0
Belize                7        1       2              2            1            1           0
Cayo                  6        0       0              1            3            0           2
Stann Creek           8        2       2              1            1            2           0
Toledo                9        1       2              2            1            0           3
Total                42        7       8              7            7            5           8
7.2 National institutional strengthening projects

BRDP also invested in institutional strengthening projects (below the Euro 10,000 limit)
with several collaborating organizations such as:

      Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (info systems, internet, M&E and a weekly
       radio program), and the District Development Committees in terms of capacity
       building and operational support,
      National Authorising Office in terms of internet services
      University of Belize in terms of village development and internet services
      Department of Cooperatives in terms of capacity development and support for
       group training on enterprise management, book keeping and conflict resolution
      National Association of Village Councils (NAVCO) in terms of capacity building
       and information and communication systems in the district offices.
      NGOs in terms of service provisions for BRDP, e.g. BEST, Plenty Belize, Belize
       Audubon Society and three credit unions.
      Intern program: up to 20 interns so far have been gaining work experience with
       BRDP
      Service providers: some 20 service providers have been undertaking field
       assignments for BRDP



2008                                                                                      12
A detailed table in the 10th Quarterly progress report presents the main results in terms of
the status, the exact investment made, as well as the lesson learnt and required actions to
ensure the success, in the case of each project, which are being addressed in PE 3, together
with the recommendations of the mid term evaluation.

7.3 Micro grants

A total of 298 very poor families received a micro-grant each. Of these 298, 240 grants (or
80% of all grants) went to women-headed households. Only 21% of the grants deal with
agriculture. Noteworthy is that the micro-grant project reached as many as 111 villages
throughout the country.

Table 6.3 Distribution of Micro grants by districts and beneficiaries

District                No.           No. Women         No. Projects on    No. villages
                        families      as grantees       agriculture        involved
Toledo                      46              36                 28                 16
Stann Creek                 38              28                 10                 16
Cayo                        40              34                  4                 17
Belize                      76              69                  5                 20
Orange Walk                 48              32                  3                 22
Corozal                     52              41                 12                 20
TOTAL                       298            240                 62                111


The mid term evaluation gave high marks to the micro grant projects due to the rather rapid
turn around time from planning to generation income, the high net return of the investment
made, and the relative ease of working with individual families as opposed to the small
group projects.

7.4 Cayo Farmers Market

The construction of the Cayo Farmers Market was the largest single project of PE2. The
project was in the planning stage since October 2006. The Cayo Market tender contract
was signed on 13th August, 2007 with Modern Construk, the construction company that
won the tender. The cost for BRDP for the construction of this market was BZ$ 499,371
with the Council of San Ignacio/ Santa Elena contributing a further BZ$ 42,751.38. The
market was inaugurated and handed over by the EC Ambassador to the City of San Ignacio
on Tuesday 4th March, 2008. The legal handing over of the market was done on 29th April,
2008 which was also the start of the six month guarantee period by the contractor. The
project was officially closed on the 14th of November 2008.

There are 17 permanent market stalls in operation, and on average some 225 temporary
vendors use the premises on weekends, especially Saturday which is the busiest day of the
week A head-count survey was conducted by two students under the supervision of the
market keeper and the PMU M&E officer to determine the number of shoppers who visited
the Cayo Farmers market on Saturday, 26th July 2008. According to the head count, there
were 5,206 (five thousand two hundred and six) visitors of whom 2,502 (two thousand five
hundred and two) or 48% of the total were female. Using this estimate as a baseline, it was
estimated that at least 15,000 customers visit the market every week.

2008                                                                                13
Based on three monitoring visits (including one with the mid term evaluator), the market is
doing excellent financially. The actual expenditure and income data for the first year of
operation are presented under Section 11, the 12th Quarterly Progress Report.

The San Ignacio/ Santa Elena Council is extremely pleased with the performance of the
Cayo Central Market. The vendors with permanent stall are well stocked, and none of them
have any intention of leaving their stalls, on the contrary there is a waiting list of new
applicants. The number of temporary vendors keeps increasing, all of which means that
there is good business for them too.

7.5 Financial Statement and Independent Assurance Report Financial Audit

Below is the summary of the total income and expenses incurred under PE2 from January
2007 (when the first funds were received) to the 31st July 2008 when all cheques issued by
the PMU before 31 April 2008 had been cashed. The detailed financial report was included
in the 10th Quarterly Progress Report

 INCOME                                                                     BZ$

 3100 · EU Deposit                                                         2,131,395.61
 3200 · GST Refund                                                            57,250.07
 Total income                                                              2,188,645.68

 EXPENSES
 66900 · Reconciliation Discrepancies                                            -2.25
 68700 · General Sales Tax                                                   54,332.81
 68800 · Discount                                                            -3,196.34

 A2 · Empowerment of Communities etc.                                       260,000.27

 A3 · Capacity Building (A3.01 to A3.23)                                   1,333,614.09
 A4 · Marketing                                                                   903.60
 A5 · Infrastructure & Facilities (Cayo Farmers Market)                     499,371.00

 Total Expenses of BRDP.                                             2,145,023.18

The above accounts were audited by the AC team on 16th June to 01st July, 2008. Mr
Thierry Martens and Ms Donna Hill of AC audited the Record of Expenditure N°2 and
N°3 as set out in Annex 1for the period from 01 July, 2007 to 30 April, 2008 of BRDP.
The audit was conducted in accordance with the International Standards on Auditing and in
accordance with the basic principles and concepts of the International Framework for
Assurance Engagements established by the IFAC. The opinion of the auditors, as
expressed in their report of 8th July 20008 to the Head of Delegation, was as follows:
 The Records of Expenditure N°2 and N°3 of the Project for the period from 01 July,
  2007 to 30 April, 2008 present, in all material respects, accurately the expenditure
  actually incurred and the revenue received for the Project in conformity with the
  applicable Agreement Terms and Conditions; and


2008                                                                                       14
 The Project funds provided by the European Commission have, in all material respects,
  been used in conformity with the applicable Agreement Terms and Conditions.

 Physical inspections of the small projects sites have been performed. Equipment or
  items purchased through the grants have been physically seen on premises and
  compared with list of items indicated in the Grant Contract, Completion and results on
  the ground have been verified against Completion Reports.




The auditors made some specific observations and recommendations in relation to some
management and operational issues that would further enhance the fine performance of the
project, which are: a) increasing the frequency PSC meetings, b) preparing the “Record of
Expenditure” on an «Excel» sheet and transferred on a «Word» sheet only after verification
and approval by the Project Director; c) that the “Cash Flow Reconciliation” and
“Financial report” sheet be filled in by Project Accountant/ Imprest Account Officer, and
formally approved by Project director / Imprest Administrator, d) that a list of supporting
documents be provided so that every beneficiary of grants has to return to the PMU unit on
a timely manner (weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc.), e) that the “Status of field projects”
report be prepared by the Technical Director for technical updated information with the
Imprest Account Officer to avoid any discrepancies in reporting, and f) that the PMU
should assist the Internet Cafés in formalizing their enterprise to protect them from raiders,
teachers, principals, or from people only interested with the profit margin realised by the
“group”. These recommendations have been put to good use in the management and
operation of BRDP.


8. Mid-Term Evaluation


From 2nd September to 8th October 2008, the external mid-term evaluation of BRDP was
carried to assess progress, identify issues and problems, and chart the way forward for
BRDP. This evaluation was carried out by an international consultant (Mr. Rudy Oiijen)
from the company ECORYS based in the Netherlands. The evaluation was coordinated by
the EC Delegation to Jamaica, the Ministry of Economic Development and the Programme
Management Unit (PMU) in Belmopan, Belize. This evaluation was based on an analysis
of factual information (i.e. study of project documentation, intervention tools and
methodologies), as well as on in-depth interviews with the project stakeholders (national
and district authorities, NGOs, final beneficiaries), and was further complemented by a
three-week field visit to the project sites in all six districts of Belize. During this field visit,
interviews were held with the local authorities, several NGOs, and a large group of final
beneficiaries. Although in process of finalization, the final report was well received by the


2008                                                                                        15
NAO and the PMU, and it offers high quality, encouraging results and meaningful
recommendations on the way forward for BRDP.

After the draft report was presented for comments, there was also a special forum on 17
November with the NAO, MAF, the Ministry responsible for Rural Development and the
PMU to review the draft final report and to provide specific feedback on the main results,
the lessons learnt and proposed recommendations of the evaluation. The NAO expressed
appreciation for the basic content, depth of analysis of the project design and field projects,
and the quality of the recommendations of the report. The consultant invested adequate
time, work effort and methods to understand BRDP and to justify and explain his basic
conclusions and recommendations. In addition the NAO offered specific feedback on the
specific recommendations of the evaluation, the recommendations for the NAO in relation
to 7 Grants; the main suggestions on the Way Forward; and in addition highlighted
marketing as a New Suggestion on the Way Forward. All of these were forwarded on 20
November to the consultant to finalize the MTE report, along with specific corrections or
comments indicated on track mode on the draft report and annexes.

A hard copy of the final report of the mid term evaluation was received on 5th February 2009. Here
are key extracts from the report, first on the valuable lessons from the BRDP experience thus far:

   Micro grants are effective and fast: Micro grants have been quite effective in
    reducing poverty in terms of time, ease of implementation and the level of income
    increase achieved. The average time of implementation is two months, which is very
    acceptable. The implementation of micro grants is led by BEST and Plenty Belize,
    NGOs specialized and having a good track record in this type of work. Average income
    increase has been around 50% as per field observations.

   Small group projects (<B$ 25,000) take more time in being effective. These small
    group enterprises have proven to be less speedy in showing results because it is more
    difficult to work with groups than with individual families, they require more
    manpower and access to specific know how (in SMEs), and close guidance and
    frequent interventions from the project. Small grants took on average 9 to 10 months to
    implement and so far just about 50% of the small group projects have so far realized
    income for its beneficiaries.

   Cayo Farmers Market is a very good investment. The Cayo market (large grant)
    project (retail/wholesale) can be very lucrative in financial terms and very likely in
    economic terms. Financially the Cayo market performs very well with net income
    largely surpassing projections. Economically - when including all the extra financial
    gains from the market vendors and buyers (not done) - the project’s performance could
    be even greater.

   NGOs can be cost-effective. Using specialised local NGOs, associations, development
    agencies, etc. for sub-contracting can be very cost effective. Average investment costs
    per rural household are quite favourable, especially for micro grants. Their experience
    regarding local situations is generally high and often based on an extensive track record
    in the districts. However, maintaining cost effectiveness will largely depend on close
    monitoring of activities - especially for those contractors dealing with “group”
    enterprise development.



2008                                                                                      16
    DDCs and Village Councils have performed below expectation. The DDCs and the
     Village Councils have not been able to do what they were supposed to do, with some
     exceptions. BRDP was greatly hampered in project implementation due to these
     institutional deficiencies at the district and village levels. There is an urgent need to
     come up with practical suggestions on how to strengthen the DDCs, DAVCOs and
     village councils so they can perform better in BRDP like projects.

The main recommendations made by the mid term evaluation can be summarized as
follow:
    o During its last phase, the BRDP is to significantly increase guidance to the small
        grant projects especially the (12) projects with financial losses and problems;
        using specialized service providers if there is a need to.

     o There is also the urgent need to establish a quarterly monitoring of the large
       grants (technical and economic) by the PMU: to be formally appointed by the
       NAO as external monitor of the seven large grants.

     o Equally urgent is the setting up of a simple and inexpensive internal BRDP
       monitoring and evaluation system with specific focus on income increase and
       economic growth for all grants, including the large ones. The key is to keep the
       system simple and to use as much as possible already existing structures (e.g.
       extension services, statistical departments, etc.).

     o PMU is to assist the NAO in developing a five-year Strategy and Operational
       Plan (OP) to formalize the DDCs and strengthen Village Councils; covering
       institutional, technical and financial aspects, which all DDCs agreed is a good idea.
       The OPs should be made fit for local and external financing for the five year period.
       The role of the PMU would be to facilitate the process, not to actually write the
       strategy and operational plan.

     o With respect to the large grants, there is a need for quick attention from the NAO
       to: (i) set up a quarterly external monitoring and reporting procedure to NAO; (ii)
       renegotiate the TTCU contract to ensure larger coverage (Toledo); (iii) closely
       follow the UNDP/MAF project as a number of targets have not been quantified
       (post harvest handling in particular); (iv) check on the establishment of an internal
       monitoring system by the recipients; and (iv) check that the recipient keeps a record
       of own contributions (25% as per contract).

On the way forward, particularly for the future BRDP, the mid term evaluation suggested
that the BRDP-second phase, should:
  1. Assist the Government of Belize in developing District Development Plans. Key to
      this process is having plans that clearly spell out the priorities for the medium and
      long terms, and which are in line with the key Ministries’ plans. All DDCs agree that
      external assistance would be needed to make this happen, particularly when it comes
      to synchronizing their plans with those of the key Ministries in a cohesive and
      complementary manner.

    2. Support to the institutional strengthening of the DDCs in line with the first
       suggestion, which would require: (1) discussions within Government in order to
       produce a formal agreement with key ministries to accept the DDCs as key partners
       in the country’s overall development; (2) appoint the MED as lead ministry to guide

2008                                                                                  17
       the process of institutionalizing the DDCs; (3) providing operational funds to the
       DDCs for logistic and secretarial support as well as payment of DDC members; and
       (4) formal appointment of a DDC chairman who is very conversant with a broad
       range of district development issues.

 3. Continue with the large grant approach. The implementation of small grant
    projects using the original project approach (PMU, DDCs, Project Steering
    Committee, etc.) is very time consuming, slow and with small overall impact in the
    districts. It is felt that the efficiency and effectiveness of implementation will improve
    considerably with the large grant approach by contracting out the work to
    (specialized) national implementing agencies. Hence, it is considered the most
    effective way to achieve economic growth in rural areas within a typical time frame
    of five years, with an additional advantage of strengthening more local development
    partners and helping them to gain more experience in rural development.

 4. Continue support to agricultural research and development, which is key to
    agricultural sector development in terms of improving the efficiency and
    competitiveness of the sector (production and farm management, post harvest
    handling, processing and marketing). Pending the results of the UNDP/MAF
    Agricultural Enterprise Development project, support to agricultural research and
    development should be continued.

 5. Use the exit management approach for BRDP in line with the above suggestions
    on the institutional strengthening of the rural development processes in Belize. This
    strategy would aim to gradually transfer responsibilities of programme
    implementation to the Go, which was the original design of the BRDP during its first
    phase. The PMU is to play an important role in this transformation process by
    assisting in the realization of the above three suggestions. It also means that the PMU
    is not to involve itself anymore in the actual implementation of the grant projects.

 6. Some concluding remarks on the 10th EDF and rural development in Belize: Based
    on the findings of this mid term evaluation, he concluded that continued EC funding
    of rural development programmes in Belize has much merit. The BRDP is coherent
    with EC and GoB policies and the programme has made important inroads towards
    reducing rural poverty and improving the standard of living of the rural population of
    Belize. Also, as the EC is currently the only major donor dealing with rural
    development in Belize, visibility of EC interventions in the country is very high and
    well received by all major stakeholders and final beneficiaries.

The design of BRDP phase 2, he recommended, would not differ very much from the one
used in phase 1, except that the focus would be on exit management. Hence the role of the
PMU would be more in facilitating and providing support and guidance to the GoB to
make this possible. More specifically and in line with the above suggestions, it is proposed
that the main tasks of the PMU would be:
   Institutional capacity building and strengthening (NAO office, DDCs, NAVCO,
    national implementing agencies, etc.);
   Assisting and providing guidance in preparing district development plans for all
    districts (together with specialised external consultants contracted for this task);
   Assisting NAO in the preparation and management of the Programme Estimates in
    compliance with EDF rules and procedures;


2008                                                                                  18
   Carrying out regular internal monitoring of the entire BRDP programme second phase,
    reporting and advising the NAO.

Accordingly the PMU staff should be kept to a minimum with a local project
director/institutional specialist, financial/accounting specialist, and a monitoring specialist.
The PMU should have access to a pool of local and external specialists for very specific
short term assignments in capacity building, rural development programming, small
business administration, marketing, etc.




9. Monitoring and Evaluation of BRDP


    9.1 Purpose and scope

The BRDP is funded by the EU and GoB to support sustainable economic growth as the
primary means of alleviating poverty in the rural areas of the country. The M&E system
for the BRDP in Belize is essentially to measure the impact of the overall objective which
is to reduce the number of people living below the poverty line from 115,000 to 92,000 by
2011, to ensure compliance with the project purpose that is to improve the standard of
living of the rural population through a decrease of unemployment from 9.5% to 8.5% and
an increase in the median monthly rural income from $620. to $780 by 2011. The project
results are to have at least 30% of the beneficiaries as women and youth (between the ages
of 14 to 24), to complete the investments in 12 projects started under PE2, mentor up to 42
projects that were finished under PE2 and to guide and monitor the large grants in terms of
technical and financial/ administrative aspects..

The M&E Matrix was endorsed by the Project Steering Committee at its 12 December
2008 meeting held at the NAVCO conference room in Belmopan City. This tool will
provide the data and information that measure progress towards established objectives and
targets and that assess overall relevance and performance of actions undertaken. With the
clear set of objective verifiable indicators (OVIs) established as follows: number of
targeted beneficiaries (number of rural poor), their sex, age, years of formal education and
village, and the employment, monthly income, production of goods and services, costs, net
profits generated by the sub-projects, as well as their own contribution (at least 25%) and
best practices being used in their enteprises.

The translation of the evaluation criteria (REEIS) into survey questionnaires will follow
basically the same strategy of listing of specific questions used to generate primary data in
the mid-term evaluation of BRDP, which was carried out by Mr. Rudy Ooijen of
ECORYS.

An interview hand book has been prepared since January 2009 to guide in conducting the
different types of surveying of beneficiaries. A hard copy of the handbook was shared with
Nicolas Ritzenthaler of the EC Delegation on 29 January 2009.

    9.2 Methodology:




2008                                                                                    19
The M&E system will capture the technical, economic and financial data on project
interventions in the area of farm and non-farm activities, infrastructures, etc. in order to
determine the value the project has generated (the value-for-money criteria). The quarterly
progress reporting format is the means by which the above will be captured for the large
grants.

The methods listed in the matrix below will provide for a more robust analysis of the
expected results of the project:

Methods                                       M&E Objective Addressed
                              Rele-       Effective-     Efficien-   Impact    Sustaina-
                              vance       ness           cy                    bility
Secondary literature review       X                                     X
Stakeholder analysis                            X                                   X
Beneficiary pictorial story                     X            X
Project closing reports           X             X                                   X
Survey questionnaires                                        X          X
Financial record keeping                                     X          X
Focus group discussions           X                                     X           X
Case studies                                                 X          X           X


In terms of secondary literature review, the mid-term evaluation report of BRDP has
proven very useful. Through the grantees quarterly meeting some degree of stakeholder
analysis and focus group meeting is conducted to enrich the interrelationships for a greater
success story of BRDP. As events unfold, Kodak moments are taken to create a final
beneficiary pictorial story by the various grantees. The development and testing of various
survey questionnaires has facilitated the monitoring of four internet cafés and the farmers
market in San Ignacio. All other survey questionnaires have been drafted and are ready for
testing. At all opportunities during field visits, beneficiaries are informed of the
importance of financial record keeping (cash inflows and cash outflows) to the level that a
note book is provided to the beneficiary for future monitoring. Towards the end of the
project, it is envisioned that selected case studies will be conducted.

The monitoring and field visits are also being used to define and fine-tune technical
assistance and training needs. Accordingly Mr. Arnoldo Melendez signed a service
provider contract with BRDP on 11 February 2009. His immediate tasks are to assist the
arts and craft groups in the Cayo District and the sewing groups with specialized training as
identified.

More work needs to be done on the sustainability of the M&E system as it relates to the
preparation of manuals of procedures for data collection – this needs to be disseminated
widely; the relevance and usefulness of analysis and reporting, this needs to be
emphasized; M&E training program at different levels of operation, this needs to be
planned and executed in the next quarter; and the institutionalization of M&E unit of
management and programming to the Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries implemented
within the 14th quarter of BRDP’s operational phase.



2008                                                                                 20
10. Progress Report on Large Grants


During the reporting period, the BRDP-PMU has assisted the grantees in getting their
projects off the ground, for example in applying for derogation from the rules of origin,
following the EU procedures in the management of their financial resources, registering
with the GST office so they can be refunded for GST, and participating as members of
steering or evaluation committees. The PMU accountant has made specific
recommendations on the relevant EU procedures and supporting documentation needed for
purchases of equipment, supplies and/or services, and on the need to follow budget line
times on Annex 3 of their contracts. The grantees are making progress and responding
positively to the recommendations of the PMU.

There are eight large grants (excluding the works contracts with the Middlesex Bridge and
the Valley of Peace Road) who attend the quarterly meetings. These include the senior and
technical staffs of the NAO, MAF, SIF, UNDP, TTCU, Plenty Belize, Sustainable Harvest
International (SHI), UB, CGA, BEST, YWCA, and DDC Chairs and Vice chairs. In
addition, on the request of the NAO, the two credit unions in the sugar belt who will
receive a large grant under BAMS, participated in the last 2 quarterly meetings. During n
the reporting period, these are the main activities the PMU has organised for the large
grantees:

   o 22 April 2008, George Price Center, Belmopan City: Seminar for Large Grantees
     on EDF Administrative and Financial Procedures

   o 27 May 2008, BAHA Conference Room, Belize City: Procedures for General Sales
     Tax exemption, application, reporting and reimbursement

   o 19 August 2008, Belmopan Convention Center, Belmopan City: 1st Quarterly
     progress review meeting.

   o 3 - 4 December 2008, Parish Hall, Punta Gorda Town, Toledo : 2nd Quarterly
     progress review meeting.

   o   6 March 2009, La Inmaculada Credit Union Conference Room, Orange Walk
       Town: 3nd Quarterly progress review meeting.

Here is a synopsis of some key issues raised, for which specific recommendations have
been made and lessons are being learnt by the participants:

1. Roles and problems of the District Development Committees: DDCs currently provide
   assistance primarily to large grants with agriculture-type enterprises for UNDP, BEST
   and SIF and little or no contribution to UB, YWCA or CGA projects.

2. Critical need for interventions in marketing capacity and skills: there is a certain level
   of insecurity as it relates to this matter; situation has shown that at the commencement
   of the project the market was available however at the end the buyer disappears. Need
   for formal marketing arrangements, possibly contract farming, like in other countries.
   Market development and market led approach should be a priority in 10th EDF

2008                                                                                 21
 3. Capacity building in terms of practical business planning, value chain analysis, and
     marketing for stakeholders, partners and rural beneficiaries, is a requirement to
     ensure success of enterprise.

 4. Relationships and collaboration among grantees: grantees experience the need to work
     closer to avoid duplication and to assist each other in promotion, coordination and
     implementation of activities of common interest, e.g. YWCA with BEST, CGA,
     TTCU and others. SIF Hurricane Dean works well with the DDCs on its agriculture
     projects; BEST with CGA.

 5. M&E: PMU specialist is collaborating already with BEST, YWCA and AED in
    harmonizing indicators, methods and the timing of activities.

 6. Administrative Procedures: based on key issues identified at each meeting, the PMU
     organizes and visits all large grantees to review procedures, advise on sensitive
     issues, and identify corrective measures to be compliant with EU procedures.

7.     Main problems being encountered and managed, such as long distances and bad roads
       to reach most needy remote areas, natural disasters/ flooding, personnel and staff
       management, political influence, social obligations, limited enterprise options,

8.     Visibility: Grantees are aware that they must be more creative when planning future
       visibility activities, similar to what UNDP does with AED, MAF with Richard
       Merrill of Love FM, and the new proposals being planned for EU Day, 9th May.



10.1 Grant No 1: Micro Enterprises for Poor Families Programme

           QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
            Reporting Period: 15 May 2008 to 28th February 2009

1.0 Description:
    1.1 Name of beneficiary of Grant Contract: Belize Enterprise for Sustainable
          Technology (BEST)
     1.2 Name and title of the Contact Person: Dennis Jones, Managing Director
     1.3 Name of Partners in the Action: Plenty International Belize Limited
     1.4 Title of the Action: Micro Enterprises for Poor Families Programme
     1.5 Contract Number: Agreement No. 9366/BEL (EuropeAid/125987/M/ACT/BZ)
     1.6 Start Date and end of Project: April 7th, 2008, for 24 months
     1.7 Financial status: Funds received: Bz$ 424,629.32 Date received _April 2008__
            Funds disbursed: $268,966.61 (63%) Funds Committed: 8%




2008                                                                                22
Main Budget Line                           Budgeted          Disbursed to              Local
                                                                28/02/09           Contribution
 1.Human resources                      $116,621.77        $49,906.07            $10,114.57
 2.Travel                               $21,922.28         $11,597.89
 3.Equipment & supplies                 $3,472.87          $3,023.50
 4.Local office                         $46,883.98         $21,586.89
 5.Other costs, services                $19,969.00         $3,637.09             $544.00
 6.Other                                -                  -
 7.Total direct eligible cost (add 1    $208,870.60        $89,751.44
   to 6)
 8.Contingency (max 5% of 7)            -                  -
 9.Total direct eligible cost (7+8)     $208,870.60        $89,751.44
10. Administrative cost (7% of 9)       $14,620.94         $7,310.47
11. Total eligible cost (7+10)          $223,491.54        $97,061.91
12. Micro Grants                        $280,000.00        $171,904.70           $42,976.00
13. TOTAL:                              $503,491.54        $268,966.61           $53,634.57



   a.             Assessment of implementation of Action activities

              2.1 Activities and results

           Activity 1:

        Assessment of approximately three hundred (300) potential beneficiaries to determine
        their eligibility for participation in the project.

        Three hundred and eighty nine (389) applications have been received from all three districts.
        Due to the large number of applications received, acceptance of applications had to be halted
        several times to give time for field assessment. Of the applications accepted, approximately
        two hundred and seventy five (275) potential beneficiaries have been visited and assessed to
        determine their eligibility. This continues to be done with at least one member of the
        District Development Committee (DDC).

        Activity 2:

        Disbursement of two hundred (200) micro grants to eligible poor households.

        As of February 28, 2009, one hundred and forty four (144) grants have been approved from
        all three districts. Of these, one hundred and thirty five (135) grants have been disbursed.

        Activity 3:

        Provision of basic hands on business management training to two hundred (200) micro
        entrepreneurs.




2008                                                                                          23
       As at the end of February 2009, nine (9) training sessions have been conducted in all three
       districts. These sessions have resulted in eighty eight (88) people being trained. The
       majority of these sessions continue to be in the Toledo district. A problem has been
       encountered in the Belize and Cayo districts where beneficiaries whom have already
       received the grant, do not show up for training. One training session had to be postponed as
       only one person came to the training. As a result of this, all new applicants must come to a
       training session before their grant is approved. This is already being done in the Toledo
       district.

  District        Applications               Approvals               Disbursements         Beneficiaries
                                                                                             Trained

  Belize        102                    57                      58      $82,096.22          7

  Cayo          151                    52                      49      $60,650.20          11

  Toledo        136                    35                      28      $29,158.28          70

  Total:        389                    144                     135 $171,904.70             88



             b. Please list all contracts (works, supplies, services) above €5000 awarded for
                the implementation of the action during the reporting period, giving for each
                contract the amount, the award procedure followed and the name of the
                contractor

         Not applicable

             c. Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date, i.e. end of this
                  reporting period:

        Activity                    Actual         Projected          Quantify Major               %
       # and Title                 Starting       Completion             Outputs               Completion
     (per Contract)                  Date            Date             (per Logframe)             to date
Activity 1: 300 needs
assessment conducted to
determine eligibility.
1.1 Development of               April 01, 2008   April 30, 2008 List of criteria developed 100%
     eligibility criteria for
     participation in the
     project.
1.2 Publication of eligibility   May 01, 2008     June 30, 2008        -   Circulated to DDCs
criteria in local and                                                  -   One Radio show
national media for broad
information.
1.3 Design of check list for     April 01, 2008   April 30, 2008 Check list developed          100%
use by project staff and
project beneficiaries.
1.4 Acceptance of                May 01, 2008     Ongoing           389 applications accepted
applications for micro
grants from eligible
beneficiaries.
1.5 Approval and                 June 01, 2008 Ongoing              144 grants approved        67%
disbursement of grants to                                           135 grants disbursed
qualified individuals.



2008                                                                                                  24
       Activity                  Actual        Projected       Quantify Major               %
      # and Title               Starting      Completion          Outputs               Completion
    (per Contract)                Date           Date          (per Logframe)             to date
Activity 2: Disbursement of
200 micro grants to eligible
poor households.
2.1 Negotiation of             June 01, 2008 July 31, 2008   Negotiations completed 100%
agreements with suppliers
of goods and services.
2.2 Procurement of goods       June 11, 2008 Ongoing         Goods procured for 135 67%
and services from                                            micro entrepreneurs
suppliers.
2.3 Deliver goods and          June 11, 2008 Ongoing         - Goods delivered to 135 67%
services procured to                                         grantees.
grantees for                                                 - 135 businesses begun
commencement of                                              operating.
business.
2.4 Formal transfer of         Nov. 01, 2009 Dec. 31, 2009 - Transfers being done as67%
assets to project                                          soon as assets are
beneficiaries at the end of                                purchased.
project implementation.
2.5 Develop and                Aug. 01, 2008 Dec. 31, 2008 - Quarterly and mid-term project
                                                                                    100%
implement a monitoring                                     monitoring form developed.
plan.                                                      - Have visited 55 grantees and
                                                           gathered information.
Activity 3: Provision of
basic hands-on business
training to 200 micro
entrepreneurs.
3.1 Review existing            May 01, 2008   May 31, 2008                               100%
                                                             - All training materials revised
training materials for
relevance.
3.2 Develop appropriate        May 01, 2008   May 31, 2008   - All necessary training   100%
training materials.                                          materials developed.

3.3 Conduct hands-on           June 02, 2008 Ongoing         - 9 training workshops 44%
training for participants.                                   completed;
                                                             - 88 people trained



    2.4 Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:

          a.     What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?
          Train all prospective beneficiaries in business management before they receive the
          grant so that they can better manage their businesses. This will ensure that they
          attend the training sessions.

          b.     Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not?
          Yes, we believe resources are being used in the best possible way. Beneficiaries
          actually have something they can call their own as a result of this project.

          c.    What could you do differently to improve the project implementation
            process?
          Not applicable.




2008                                                                                            25
        d.    Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this
          point?
        Not applicable.

   2.5 If you have done training please indicate:

       a. Training events, dates and topics covered

       Training sessions took place as follows:
       June 02 and 06, 2008         Plenty Belize, Toledo
       June 23 and 27, 2008         Plenty Belize, Toledo
       July 21 and 25, 2008         Plenty Belize, Toledo
       August 18 and 22, 2008       Plenty Belize, Toledo
       Sept. 08 and 12, 2008        Plenty Belize, Toledo
       Sept. 26 and 29, 2008        Plenty Belize, Toledo
       Nov. 10 and 14, 2008         Plenty Belize, Toledo
       Nov. 20, 2008                BEST, Belize
       Nov. 27, 2008                BEST, Cayo

       c. Number of professionals (which institutions), beneficiaries or rural people
           trained.
       The training was conducted by staff from BEST and Plenty Belize, the two
       institutions implementing this project. Eighty eight (88) project beneficiaries have
       benefited from this training in the Belize, Cayo and Toledo districts.

       d. Results of evaluation of training carried out.

       All beneficiaries have expressed satisfaction with the training.


   3) Partners and other Co-operation

             d. Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the actions,
                per contract, in terms:
         Staff time: $10,114.57

         Logistic support (if applicable): $544.00

         Other resources (if applicable): $42,976.00 (from micro grant beneficiaries
             e. How do you assess the relationship between the formal partners of this
                Action (i.e. those partners which have signed a partnership statement)?
                Please specify for each partner organisation.

   The relationship between the two formal partners is working well. Regular meetings are held
   to keep each other updated and reports are submitted on a constant basis.




2008                                                                                    26
           f.   How would you assess the relationship between your organisation and State
                authorities in the Action countries? How has this relationship affected the
                Action?

   The relationship between the implementing agencies and the state authorities is a good one.
   The Ministry of Agriculture has been especially helpful as well as the Rural Development
   Department and Ministry of National Development.

           g. Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other organisations
              involved in implementing the Action:
         Associate(s) (if any): Not applicable
         Sub-contractor(s) (if any): Not applicable
         Final Beneficiaries and Target groups:
       The beneficiaries are very excited about the project and are especially please that they
       actually have a business to work with and a source of income.
         Other third parties involved. Not applicable

           h. Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other actions

   Not applicable.



   (4) Visibility

  Have conducted one talk show and have used exercise books for workshops with EU and other
  relevant logos. Stickers are being negotiated. Have requested additional funds for visibility.




         Mario Tzot – Barber                         Anna Portillo – Clothing




2008                                                                                    27
        Christine Perrera - Food                Elvis Williams – Agriculture
                                                  (cabbage)




10.2 Grant No 2: Rural IT Project

           QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
            Reporting Period: August 2008 to 28 February 2009

 1. Description of project

 1.1 Name of beneficiary of grant contract: University of Belize
 1.2 Name and title of the Contact person : Dr. Santos Mahung, President, University of
       Belize, University Boulevard, P.O. Box 340, Belmopan City, Belize C.A.
 1.3 Name of partners in the Action: None.
         Associates: Information Technology Solutions of Belize (ITSB)
 1.4 Title of the Action: Rural IT Project
 1.5 Contract number: 9366/BEL (EuropeAid/126764/D/ACT/BZ)
 1.6 Start date and end of project : 27th June, 2008, for 20 months
 1.7 Financial status: Funds received: 240,000 Euros approximately BZ$ 678, 003

        Date received: August 31, 2008; Funds disbursed: 80 % Funds Committed %

Main Budget Line                         Budgeted             Disbursed to          Local
                                                                28/02/09         Contribution
1.   Human resources                      94,372.50              75,498         To be done.
2.   Travel                               26,715.00              21,372
3.   Equipment & supplies                490,697.50             392,558
4.   Local office                         3,000.00                2,400
5.   Other costs, services                16,192.50              12,954


2008                                                                                   28
Main Budget Line                           Budgeted              Disbursed to             Local
                                                                   28/02/09            Contribution
6. Other                                   69,957.50                55,966
7. Total direct eligible cost (add        700,935.00               560,748
    1 to 6)
8. Contingency (max 5%of 7)                    -                       0
9. Total direct eligible cost (7+8)       700,935.00                560,748
10. Administrative cost (7% of             49,065.00                39,252
    9)
11. Total eligible cost (7+10)            750,000.00                600,000


All equipment and supplies have being procured since all installations will take place before the
year is completed. These numbers are based on a 2.5 exchange rate.


  2. Assessment of implementation of Action activities

       2.1 Activities and results

   Please list all the activities in line with Annex 1 of the contract during the reporting period

         Activity 1: Identifying eleven communities, sites and final beneficiaries in rural areas in
         the Toledo, Stann Creek, and Cayo District
                 -application forms evaluated
                 -physical structures accessed
                 -four installed and configured

         Activity 2: Acquired all necessary equipment for all ITs including electronic equipment,
         tables and chairs and site signs

         Activity 3: Installation and configuration of nine ITs; three of them in the Toledo
         District and one in the Stann Creek District; Internet connectivity has been completed in
         five sites; two in Corozal; two in Orange Walk and one in Belize District

         Reason for modification for the planned activity:

         Activity 1: So far a total of eighteen ITs have being finalized with the beneficiaries.
         Four are pending since the ones chosen; especially in the Belize District have not yet
         able to invest in the refurbishment of the proposed location. The beneficiaries had to be
         cancelled and other applicants considered within the available applications. Initially
         three sites were allocated for the Belize District, however due to inability of two pre-
         selected groups to refurbish the proposed location, the plan is to relocate these two sites
         to other districts. This has not being done yet since we are still receiving new
         applications from other groups. The final beneficiaries so far are:

             District                             Villages of the Beneficiaries with ITs
1. Corozal                            Xaibe, Concepcion
2. Orange Walk                        Douglas, Santa Cruz, Chan Pine Ridge, Guinea Grass
3. Belize                             Burrell Boom
4. Cayo                               San Antonio, Cristo Rey, Buena Vista
5. Stann Creek                        Red Bank, Hopkins, Hope Creek, Hummingbird, Georgetown
6. Toledo                             Bella Vista, San Antonio, Santa Anna

2008                                                                                          29
           Results: The delay that has occurred has been due to beneficiaries’ inability to meet
           refurbishment deadlines. We do extend the one month period allotted for this purpose in
           most cases and work closely together with beneficiaries to get the job done in a timely
           fashion.

         Activity 2: All equipment has being acquired. Two of the deadlines stated within tenders
         were not met due to the goods being shipped elsewhere instead of its final destination;
         Belize. Delays were experienced in terms of hooking up sites to the internet. As soon as
         our equipment was re-routed, suppliers quickly responded to connection claims.

         Result: This has allowed the connection of five sites including Xaibe, Concepcion, Guinea
         Grass, and Burrell Boom. These sites are operational now and are just awaiting training
         before an official launch is done.

         Activity 3: Delays for installation and configuration for other beneficiaries is due to
         refurbishment deadlines not being met. Expected time for all configurations and
         connectivity to be done for the eighteen beneficiaries is mid April.

    2.2 Please list all contracts (works, supplies, services) above €5000 awarded for the
        implementation of the action during the reporting period, giving for each contract the
        amount, the award procedure followed and the name of the contractor.

         All contracts were reported in the previous progress report.

       2.3 Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date, i.e. end of this reporting
          period:

    Activity             Actual       Projected             Quantify Major               %
   # and Title          Starting     Completion                 Outputs                  Completion
 (per Contract)           Date          Date                (per Log frame)                 to date
Activity 1: identify    November    January 2009     - Meetings have being held          90 percent
final beneficiaries     2008                         - physical structure for all
for Stann Creek,                                      beneficiaries in the said
Toledo & Cayo                                        area is complete
District                                             - reinforcing and retrofitting of
                                                     Location by 7 beneficiaries
                                                     In the area completed
Activity 2: tender      October     January 2009 for - tendering closed and all          100 percent
and acquire all         2008        electronic       equipment procured
necessary                           equipment & plan
equipment including     January     March 2009 for -satellite service plan for five      23 percent
Internet plan and       2009        signs             sites procured
signs

Activity 3: Install &   December    April 2009        -network setup completed           41 percent
configure sites         2008                          for nine sites
                                                      -PC configuration completed
                                                       for nine sites
                                                      -equipment installation &
                                                      Configuration for nine sites



   2.4    Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:




2008                                                                                           30
     e. What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact? Increase the
        visibility of the project.
     Visibility funds that were budgeted for has already being exhausted and no major
        visibility has being done so far.

     f. Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not? Yes resources are
        being used in the possible way.
     Costs are minimized as much as possible especially since the project requires
        tremendous traveling to sites all over the country of Belize.

     g. What could you do differently to improve the project implementation process?
     This is an issue that strongly depends on how fast beneficiaries can move on getting
        ready for installation of their equipment.

     h. Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this point?
     Assumptions are holding up to now in terms of the number of beneficiaries that will be
        selected. Changing assumption relates to the income that can be generated from
        these sites. Two cases have risen in which the café installed have competitors now.
        Guinea Grass Village in the Orange Walk district is also receiving some electronic
        equipment from SIF and this will drastically decrease demand for the project’s
        product. In the Toledo District an internet café also emerged from another
        international donor. In both cases the cafés emerged when contracts were already
        signed and groups had made a significant investment and effort in refurbishing the
        proposed location.

     2.5 If you have done training please indicate:

     No training has being done so far.


3     Partners and other Co-operation

              3.1 Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the actions, per
                  contract, in terms:
            Staff time: Associates invest approximately 50 percent of their time to the project.
             This is consumed through logistic support, verification trips, evaluations, assessments,
             and installation and configuration works.
            Logistic support (if applicable): associates are well aware of every activity that is
             undergoing and have offered logistic support when needed.
            Other resources (if applicable) Associates have offered their personal vehicle for
             travelling to all sites on all trips.
              3.2 How do you assess the relationship between the formal partners of this Action (i.e.
                  those partners which have signed a partnership statement)? Please specify for each
                  partner organisation.

    No partners are involved with this project only associates.

              3.3 How would you assess the relationship between your organisation and State
                  authorities in the Action countries? How has this relationship affected the Action?




2008                                                                                         31
            The relationship with state authorities has being good. Responses have being prompt
            and employees are always more than willing to help. This includes but is not limited
            to the BRDP and the NAO office.

            3.4 Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other organisations
                involved in implementing the Action:

           Associate(s) (if any) The relationship between the associates has being excellent
            so far. ITSB is a team that is working for the people and with the people to get
            positive results from the project. A team that is knowledgeable of what it is
            doing and is working diligently to meet the objectives of the project and make
            an impact in the alleviation of poverty.
            Sub-contractor(s) (if any)
            Final Beneficiaries and Target groups: Final beneficiaries are well aware of the
             objectives of the project and are eager to contribute to the development of their
             community. No conflict has risen so far with any of the beneficiaries. Team work,
             responsibility, and initiative characterize the target groups.
            Other third parties involved.
            3.5 Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other actions.
4   Visibility

            For the reporting period, visibility actions have included labelling all equipment with
            the EU sticker and having CD’s with pictures of the work being done by groups and
            the implementing body as well as the associates.

            Some pictures would be helpful. A copy of the CD pictures will be emailed.




10.3 Grant No 3: Rural Development for Stann Creek District

            QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
                  Reporting Period: August – 28 February 2009

    1. Description of project :

    1.1 Name of beneficiary of grant contract: Citrus Growers Association

    1.2 Name and title of the Contact person : Ms. Barbara Y. Locke

    1.3 Name of partners in the Action: None

    1.4 Title of the Action: Rural Development for Stann Creek District of Belize

    1.5 Contract number: 9366/BEL/001/004

    1.6 Start date and end date of the reporting period: June 2008 to November 30, 2008

    1.7 Financial status: Funds received: BZ$ 494,003.90 Date received: July 31, 2008

                        Funds disbursed to date: BZ$78,085.47
                        Funds committed to date: BZ$0.00

2008                                                                                         32
Main Budget Line                                    Budgeted       Disbursed to     Local Contri-
                                                                     28/02/09          bution
1. Human resources                                  263,581           65,440       To be done
2. Travel                                            29,030           519.49
3. Equipment & supplies                             400,221           448.42
4. Local office                                    80,594.50          686.52
5. Other costs, services                             87,788          5,644.71
6. Other
7. Total direct eligible cost (add 1 to 6)          861,216          72,739.14
8. Contingency (max 5%of 7)                          31,153              0
9. Total direct eligible cost (7+8)                 892,368          76,376.04
10. Administrative cost (7% of 9)                    45,794          5,346.33
11. Total eligible cost (7+10)                      938,163          78,085.47



    2. Assessment of implementation of Action activities

              2.1 Activities and results

         1. Training/Interpretive Center Development. The plan for the centre has been
            approved and tender for building of centre was advertised. Building of the Center
            will commence in March 2009.

         2. Tropical Fruit Juice Network. There were 5 applications received from each of the
            following villages (Hopkins, Hummingbird Community, King’s Village, Silkgrass
            and Valley Community and 3 groups have been considered for approval. There is an
            ongoing review with these groups to work out details of business plan and budget for
            the implementation of these projects. The groups are being evaluated and are due to
            be implemented in December 2009 and projected to be completed by April 2009.
            The expected results are the creation of at least 3 small businesses for the processing
            and marketing of fresh fruit juice with 50 families benefitting from this project.

         3. Traditional/Non Traditional Arts and Craft network. Six applications were received.
            These applications were from Hope Creek, Hopkins, Maya Center, Maya Mopan and
            Sittee River. There are 4 projects that look promising. These are being evaluated and
            field visits are being conducted to interview group members, and to develop business
            plan and budget. At the end of the project, 3 small business groups developing,
            marketing and distributing traditional and non traditional arts and crafts will be
            developed.

         4.     Cultural Dance and Drumming Network. There are six applications from the
               following villages (Georgetown(1), Hopkins(2), Maya Center(2) and Seine Bight(2).
               At the end of the project at least 2 small professional dance and drumming groups
               will be marketing their services within the Tourism Industry of the Stann Creek
               District.

         5. Cottage Industry of Bed and Breakfast home stay and local cuisine restaurants. There
            are 27 applications distributed as follows: Altavista(2), Hopkins(7),
            Independence(2), Maya Center(1), Maya Mopan(2),Middlesex(1), Santa Rosa(1),



2008                                                                                       33
                Seine Bight(3), Silkgrass(6) and Valley Community (2). At the end of the project at
                least 3 small business will be created and operational.

          6. Microgrant for the poor. There were 97 applications received and 39 applicants have
             been screened and approved. The applicants have submitted their budgets and cost
             for the items needed and disbursement of the first set of microgrants are scheduled
             for mid March 2009. The rest will be disbursed in April, May and June 2009. At the
             end of the project at least 80 microgrants will be granted creating 80 small
             businesses in the villages of the Stann Creek District.

               a. Please list all contracts (works, supplies, services) above €5000 awarded for the
                  implementation of the action during the reporting period, giving for each contract
                  the amount, the award procedure followed and the name of the contractor.

         We have done a blue print of the Training centre that will be at CGA. Costing was also
         done to match design of the project. We now need to advertise for tender applications
         then start the construction of the building

               b. Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date, i.e. end of this
                  reporting period:

      Activity              Actual       Projected       Quantify Major % Completion
    # and Title            Starting     Completion           Outputs         to date
  (per Contract)             Date          Date          (per Log frame)
Activity 1 (Training       January     April 2009        BZ$ 58,847.80        In tendering process
Center)                    2009                         / EUR 21,017.07

Activity 2 (Tropical       Dec 2009    June 2009        BZ$ 71,768/           Under evaluation
Fruit Juice Network)                                    EUR 25,631.43

Activity 3 (Cultural Dec 2009          June 2009        BZ$ 19,800/           Under evaluation
Dance and Drumming                                      EUR 7,071.43
network)

Activity 4 (Traditional/   Dec 2009    June 2009        BZ$ 73,839/           Under evaluation
non-traditional arts                                    EUR 26,371.07
and crafts trade
network)
Activity 5(Cottage         Dec 2009    June 2009        BZ$ 63,966/           Under evaluation
industry of bed and                                     EUR 22,845
breakfast home stay
and local cuisine
restaurants)
Activity 6 (Micro-         Dec 2009    Mar 2009         BZ$ 112,000/          50%
Grant)                                                  EUR 40,000



    c.     Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:

          i.      What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?
                  Zoning approach to project awareness.
          j.      Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not? Yes
          .
          k.      What could you do differently to improve the project implementation
               process?


2008                                                                                        34
        Divide the district in three zones and cover the each zone thoroughly and move on
        to the next zone. This would have improved field visits since efforts would be
        concentrated in a reduced area instead of the entire district.

        l. Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this point?
        The project is on schedule and no delays are expected.


       2.5 If you have done training please indicate:

       None to date. Training for micro grants recipients are planned for January
       and February 2009.


   3. Partners and other Co-operation

           a. Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the actions, per
              contract, in terms:
         Staff time (One day monthly visit from the PMU to review progress. This is very
          helpful since it keeps us on track and improves the execution of the project).
         Logistic support: (if applicable)
         Other resources (if applicable)
           b. How do you assess the relationship between the formal partners of this Action (i.e.
              those partners which have signed a partnership statement)? Please specify for each
              partner organisation.

           The PMU has been very helpful in guiding and reviewing progress of the project.

           c. How would you assess the relationship between your organisation and State
              authorities in the Action countries? How has this relationship affected the Action?

           d. Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other organisations
              involved in implementing the Action:

               This project has worked with UB on their internet service and with the YMCA
           projects on training. This will help to complement the groups and micro-grants and
           other interested partners in other areas of interest.
      Associate(s) (if any) This project is being implemented in partnership with help
       from Village Councils’ Chair and Contacts of the CGA citrus network which is
       present is almost all villages of Stann Creek.

      Sub-contractor(s) (if any) None.

      Final Beneficiaries and Target groups. The CGA has maintained a continuous
       contact with groups and beneficiaries through meetings, phones, individual visits to
       successful applicants for micro grants which continue on a weekly basis. All
       villages in the district have already been reached, through project activities.
       Applications are received, on a constant basis, and at times applications have to be
       put on hold to allow field assessments to be conducted. It is expected that due to the
       number of applications being received, the grants will be disbursed long before the
       end of the project period. This will allow for the training and monitoring of groups

2008                                                                                     35
       and micro enterprises to develop business plans and skills to ensure expansion of
       these enterprises in the future.

      Other third parties involved. It is planned that this project will link up with other projects
       to complement training and access to other business being offered for example in
       agriculture where certain villages have expressed interest.
           e. Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other actions



   4. Visibility

The project launching ceremony was done on February 11th 2009. Officials from the
difference ministries, NGOs, beneficiaries and grantees from other projects were also invited.
The CGA Board Chairman delivered 9 awards to beneficiaries through the Micro grant
component. Beneficiaries had the opportunity to say how their project will work and what
impact it will have in their community. Love TV was on hand to air the launching.

The purchase of stickers for all equipment purchased by grant funds is in place. All documents
made public in advertising our projects, and Application Forms carries the logos of the
European Commission and the Government of Belize and says ‘This project is being funded by
the European Union.’ The brochures are still being circulated to areas which have not been
active.

Constant information is being disseminated monthly through the CGA publications called the
CitroScope.




10.4 Grant No 4. Toledo Rural Development: An Enterprise Engine


          QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
            Reporting Period: March 2008 – 28 February 2009

1. Description of project

   1.1. Name of beneficiary of grant contract: Toledo Teachers’ Credit Union (TTCU)
   1.3. Name of partners in the Action:               Plenty Belize and Sustainable Harvest
        International
   1.4. Title of the Action: An Enterprise Engine for Rural Communities in Toledo,
        Belize
   1.5. Contract Number: Agreement No. 9366/BEL (EuropeAid/125990/M/ACT/BZ)
  1.6. Start date and end of project: 5th of March, 2008, for 24 months.
  1.7 Financial status: Funds received: Bz $494,820.64 Date received April 9th 2008
                          Funds disbursed ___145,246.39__% Funds Committed 104,950.43%




2008                                                                                         36
Main Budget Line                                 Budgeted           Disbursed to           Local
                                                                      28/02/09          Contribution
 1. Human resources                             270,312.08        66,988.84            To be done
 2. Travel                                         3648           1,350.00
 3. Equipment & supplies                          28,980.00       15,918.26
 4. Local office                                                  3,913.64
                                                  70,120.00
 5. Other costs, services                                         3903.90
                                                 29,100.00
 6. Other                                       300,000.00        30,287.25
 7. Total direct eligible cost (add 1 to         702160.08        122,361.89
     6)
 8. Contingency (max 5%of 7)                                      6,118.09
 9. Total direct eligible cost (7+8)            702, 160.08       128,479.98
1. Administrative cost (7% of 9)                 49,151.28        22,884.50
2. Total eligible cost (7+10)                   751, 311.29       145,246.39



    2. Assessment of implementation of Action activities

       2.1 Activities and results

    Please list all the activities in line with Annex 1 of the contract during the reporting period

        1. Launching of Toledo Rural Development Project held on December 3rd at the Father
           Ring Parish Hall. Representative from all members of 7 grantees, BRDP and NAO
           were present.

        2. Between December and February, 7 detailed business plans were completed.

        3. Signing of Contract with four of the final grant beneficiaries, namely:

             o     Hinchosonez Rice Hulling Group                   Date of signing: Jan 12 2009
             A women’s group consisting of ten (10) women from the Village of Santa
             Theresa. They intend to operate the first Rice Huller in that branch of the
             Toledo District to serve their community and all the surrounding communities.
             o     Fajina Craft Center and Food            Date of signing: Jan 26 2009

             A women’s group consisting of ten (10) women from various villages in
             Toledo who are already operating a Craft Center in Punta Gorda Town and are
             seeking funding to establish a restaurant on the upper floor of the Craft Center;
             they intend to sell traditional Maya food.

             o     San Vicente Poultry Producers                    Date of signing: Feb 10, 2009

             A group of 10 women from San Vicente Village, intending to venture into
             local poultry production.

             o     Mabilha Cattle Raisers Association      Date of signing: Feb 9 2009

2008                                                                                           37
                 A group of 6 men from Mabilha village, who needs financing for additional
                 cattle. They already have a pasture and some animals, and have received no
                 prior funding.
         4. First purchase and handing over of items for Hinchosonez Group was conducted on
            January 23rd, 2009. Three quotations were obtained for the Rice Hulling Machine. It
            has been ordered already.

         5. Bids for the construction of the restaurant building for the Fajina Group were
            requested and are being submitted to the Consortium Office .

         6. First purchase and handing over of items for the San Vicente Poultry Producers Group
            was conducted on Febraury 20th, 2009.

         7. 19 Heads of cattle and a 3000 lbs capacity Livestock scale have been acquired for the
            Mabilha Cattle Raisers Association. First purchases were made on February 17th, 2009

             8. First book-keeping training session for capacity building of group was conducted on
                February 2nd, 2009. Members from 3 groups attended.

             9. Extension Officers have started their weekly monitoring of the 4 beneficiary groups

             10. SBRC is presently working on 3 more Business Plans and one is out to a private
                 consultant.

             11. Applications are still reaching the office.

       2.2     Please list all contracts (works, supplies, services) above €5000 awarded for the
               implementation of the action during the reporting period, giving for each contract the
               amount, the award procedure followed and the name of the contractor

       None

       2.3     Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date, i.e. end of this reporting
               period:

    Activity                Actual          Projected             Quantify Major           %
   # and Title             Starting        Completion                 Outputs              Completion
 (per Contract)              Date             Date                (per Log frame)             to date
Groups Applying           June 2008      On-going              Prospective Beneficiaries   On-going
for Grant Funding
Business Plans (15) October 08  On-going                       Selecting groups with high On-going (7 out
(SBRC &                                                        chance of success          Of 15)
Consultant)
Selecting business January 2009 On-going                       Groups ready to start       4 out of 10
& signing of                                                   Businesses
contracts
Businesses to start January 09                                 Groups ready to embark on On-going
                                                               Proposed business
Capacity Building         February 2009On-going                Group Members learning    On-going
Trainings                                                      Proper business skills
Extension Officers        January 2009 On-going                Proper guidance to Groups On-going
Monitoring Groups


       2.4 Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:


2008                                                                                              38
        What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?

           Increasing the number of field visits we do to communities. With more visits,
           we could be better able to determine who really are low-income and could
           greatly benefit from the grants; ensuring that the grants are awarded to people
           who need it most and not because it is available.

        Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not?

           Yes, resources are being utilized in all the best possible ways. Examples of
           these would be the partner’s vehicles that are readily available upon request;
           extension officers conducting site visits and assisting in acquiring quotation for
           the groups.

        What could you do differently to improve the project implementation process?

           I just have to work harder and abide by the time-line, keeping the objectives
           priority.

        Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this point?

           All major activities stated in the grant proposal are being followed. The cost of
           writing a business plan was underestimated in the budget; also, the length of
           time that it takes to complete a proper business plan is much longer than was
           assumed, because of the amount of information to be compiled.

    2.5 If you have done training please indicate:

        a. Training events, dates and topics covered

            One (1) Training session conducted on February 2nd, 2009. Introduction to
            Book-keeping. First of a series of capacity building trainings to the groups.

           Number of professionals (which institutions), beneficiaries or rural people
           trained.

            Eleven (11) people attended the session, mostly being treasurers, secretaries
            and chairpersons. All of them from the group beneficiaries that we have signed
            contracts with. Mr. Romero conducted the session with Ms. Cal being the
            translator.

           Results of evaluation of training carried out
           Members (trainees) trained have to attend a practical part of the training
           session.

3   Partners and other Co-operation

           3.1 Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the actions, per
               contract, in terms:
         Staff time


2008                                                                                     39
            Directors are active in meeting on Consortium issues when needs be. Site visits to
            groups are also conducted by them if an issue is not too clear to them before making a
            decision on a group.

            3.2 How do you assess the relationship between the formal partners of this Action (i.e.
                those partners which have signed a partnership statement)? Please specify for each
                partner organisation
         Toledo Teachers Credit Union (TTCU): TTCU maintains its role as the lead
         partner. The manager and the accountant, along with the other two directors, are
         very active in meetings and decision making on Consortium issues. They control
         the financial aspect of the project and work closely with the project coordinator.

         Plenty Belize: Active in meetings and decision making. Plenty oversee the daily
         activities of the Small Business Resource Center and their extension officers
         assigned to our beneficiary groups.

         Sustainable Harvest International: Active in meetings and decision making. SHI
         oversee the daily activities of the Remote Extensionist as well as its extension
         officers assigned to our beneficiary groups.

            3.3 Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other organisations
                involved in implementing the Action:
            Final Beneficiaries and Target groups
             Contracts have been signed with four of our final beneficiaries already.

            Other third parties involved.
            3.4 Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other actions.



4   Visibility

    The Launching was held, with all the groups present, which were involved with the
    Consortium project. They listened to speakers on various EU Funding issues, thereby giving
    them a bigger picture of what the EU is about. Launching of the project was done on
    December 3rd 2008. Members from all the groups involved with the project present along with
    representative from 7 other EU funded grantees, BRDP and NAO.

    During signing of Contracts with groups, they are made to understand contract, which is in
    compliance with EU regulations. Pictures were taken during handing over of items.

    A banner was developed.

    All documents made public in advertising our projects, and Application Forms, letters going
    out of the office carries the logos of the European Commission and the Government of Belize
    and a phrase stating ‘This project is being funded by the European Union.’ The Office sign
    carries the Logos as well.




2008                                                                                         40
10.5 Grant No 5: Women and Youth Project

            QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
              Reporting Period: April 2008 – 28 February 2009

 1. Description of project
   1.1. Name of beneficiary of grant contract: Young Women’s Christian Association
   (YWCA)

   1.2. Name and title of the Contact person: Mrs. Sonia Lenares, General Secretary

   1.3. Name of partners in the Action: None

   1.4. Title of the Action: YWCA Gender-Based Rural Sustainable Livelihoods
   Project

   1.5 Contract number: 9366/BEL (Europe Aid/125991/M/ACT/BZ)

   1.6 Start date and end date of project: 16 April, 2008, for 24 months

   1.7 Financial status: Funds received: B$735,697.48 Date received: 7 May 2008;
             Funds disbursed: $358,607.88; Funds committed to date: $188,270


2. Assessment of implementation of Action activities

Activity 1.2.3/1.2.4 - Produce multi-media (television and radio ads, posters)

         Radio and TV coverage of the launching of the Belmopan Training Program

Results

1 – Increased public awareness

Activity 1.3 – Develop and apply a Project Monitoring and Evaluation System to establish
baseline data and tract participant progress during the project and beyond


The initial contract signed by the M&E consultant was revised with input from the BRDP
staff and a new contract was signed in January 2009. This did not in anyway delay the
monitoring and evaluation activities for the project. The consultant submitted a M&E
strategy for the project which was accepted by the project management unit. The strategy
includes the collection of demographics, a KAP study, an economic impact assessment and
observations, interviews and video documentations. Additionally monitoring tools such as
a pretest and a checklist were designed by the consultant to be used by the Trainers as a
means of assessing the participants. To date all the participants have completed a pre test
form. This data will be entered as a part of the existing database and will be used as
baseline information to measure the impact of the project at the end of its implementation.




2008                                                                                41
                                              The Project Coordinator conducted an internal
                                              assessment of the students in the second year of the
                                              HELP program and made recommendations for
                                              improvement in the delivery of the trainings.

                                         Workplans were developed and submitted for all
                                         training programs to guide the delivery of training
and also to ensure that resources are provided on a timely basis.
Results

         Baseline information is being gathered and database developed

         Skills training curriculum is being delivered on a timely basis

         Skills training delivery assessed

Activity 2 – Recruitment and Skills Building
Processing of New Applicants
Twenty nine new applications were received from PG. and 20 from the Corozal Districts.
These were entered into the database bringing the total number of applicants up to 330.

Belmopan Training Program
Selection of Participants
All applicants from the Cayo District were invited to a meeting in San Ignacio. During the
meeting the project was presented and individual interviews were conducted to screen the
applicants.




Launch
The Belmopan Training Program was officially launched on February 4th 2009. In
attendance at the launch was the Mayor of Belmopan, the Director of BRDP,
representatives from NGOs, YWCA staff and board members and the project participants.

A total of 42 women and youth are registered for the program and are participating in skills
training in Sewing, Food Preparation and Cake Decorating classes. Ms. Carolyn Pandy was
hired as an instructor for the Food Prep classes and will also be responsible for managing
the center.




2008                                                                                      42
The Center was furbished with a refrigerator, stove and five sewing machines. Other
miscellaneous equipment for cooking and sewing were purchased as well. All the major
equipments were contributed by the YWCA through its general funds.


Evening Program Belize City

Skills training continued in the evenings at the YWCA Building in Belize City.
Participants in the Food Preparation classes are learning to prepare a variety of local
cuisines as well as international dishes. Some participants are already using their skills to
generate income. The students in the cosmetology program were being taught to do acrylic
nails and improve on their nail design skills. This month they also learnt how to do hair
cuts. The motivation level among the participants remains high and attendance is very
good.




                                                                                     HELP

An assessment was conducted of all second year students who are in the HELP Program.
The results of the assessment indicates that the students knowledge in their respective
program is very good . However the students expressed the need for more time to do
practice and less time spent on theory. The result of the assessment was prepared and
submitted to the General Secretary and the Principal with specific recommendations to
ensure that by the end of the school year the students will have marketable skills that they
can use to generate income.




Orange Walk Training Program

Through the efforts of the Women’s Development Officer in Corozal, several more
applications were received from the Corozal District. These applications have not yet been

2008                                                                                 43
submitted to the project office for processing. Negotiations continued with the Executive
Director of YFF for the use of their building located in Orange Walk Town to be used as a
training center. An agreement has been reached and a contract was drafted and submitted
for YFF to review. The training program is expected to commence by mid March 2009 and
will last for approximately 3 months.

Tubal Training Program
At the beginning of the school year the program started with 15 students. It is now down to
10. To date they have produced carvings using Cow Horn and are presently learning how
to carve using Zericote Wood.




Childcare Training

The childcare training is now in its third month and is expected to be completed on time at the end
of the fifth month.

Business

2.3.7 – 2.3.9 – Housekeeping, Marketing, Business Management, Public Health & Personal
Development Training -

Prospective instructors are presently being identified for the Housekeeping, Marketing, Business
management, Public Health and Personnel Development training. The trainings will be conducted
during the next three months. A proposal was submitted by BEST for the Business Management
training which will occur during the month of March 2009.

Results

         One Hundred and twenty-four (124) women and youth participating in a variety of skills
          training. This represents 65% of actual target for the project.

         A portion of the participants have reported that they started using skills learnt to generate
          income

2.4 – Provide $1,000 in Starter Kits -

A criteria is being developed for the distribution of the micro enterprise grants. Consideration
will be given to economic status, family size, and performance in the skills training among others.
Applications will be distributed to the participants in March and the selection will be conducted in
April of this year.

3 – Business Mentoring / Technical Support

2008                                                                                           44
The business mentoring and technical support strategy was developed. This involves the
contracting of business mentors in the three main training sites to work with the participants to
develop personal business plans and marketing strategies. As well the mentors will be assisting
with the identification of employment opportunities for the participants.
4 – Institutional Strengthening - Expansion of YWCA Building - The completion of the first
floor construction for the expansion project was expected to be completed by the end of
January 2009. So far only the Cosmetology classroom is fully completed and in use.
Finishing work such as tiling and wiring are still underway and expected to be completed
by the end of March. The second floor expansion will commence at that time.
Results

   Four new classrooms constructed to
    facilitate the delivery of sills training
    programs.

   New environment more conducive            to
    educational development of students



Contracts over EU 5000

No new contracts over EU 5000.

2.3 Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to end of this reporting period:



Activity              Actual   Projected   Quantify Major                             %
# and Title           Start    Comple-     Outputs                                    Comple-
(per                  Date     tion Date   (per Logframe)                             tion to
Contract)                                                                             date
1.1 Hire Project
Mgr & Admin           May      May 2008    -Project Mgr. and 1 Asst. Hired to work    100%
Asst.                 2008                 full time on project

                                           -Narrative and financial reports to BRDP,
                                           EU and YWCA Board are timely & accurate.

1.2 –Develop a        June     May 2009    # of project related ads, brochures &      80%
marketing &           2008                 signs produced & aired/published
communications                              3 radio ads produced & aired in 3
strategy to give                               districts
visibility to the                           Project Brochure Produced & disseminated
project at the                              Visibility Sign produced for Construction project
village, district &                             Two Banners produced & displayed
int’l level

1.3 – M & E           Sept 2008 Mar 2009   M&E system developed and Functional
                                            M&E strategy developed                 100%
                                            M&E tools designed
                                            Baseline data gathered
                                           Two evaluations conducted and reports
                                            submitted
                                               Assessment of participants Conducted
                                                                                    10%



2008                                                                                       45
Activity            Actual   Projected    Quantify Major                                %
# and Title         Start    Comple-      Outputs                                       Comple-
(per Contract)      Date     tion Date    (per Logframe)                                tion to date
2.1 Recruitment     May 2008 Nov, 2009    # of women & youth who access         65%
& Skills building                         Sustainable livelihoods training
                                          Program (At least 200 rural women & youth targeted
                                          overall for enrolment)
                                             129 women and youth
                                               participating in skills training

                                          18 skills training modules developed
                                          (9 income generation,3 marketing &            50%
                                          business mgmt, 1 public health & 5
                                          Personal development)
                                                9 income generating
                                          Skills training modules developed

                                          At least 164 rural women & youth
                                          participants successfully complete skills
                                          Training program (skills bldg Training        0%
                                          is still underway, Child care training will
                                          be completed in May while others will
                                          be completed in June 2009).

                                          50 successful participants receive starter
                                          kits with tools & equipment for income
                                          generation (selection process for starter
                                          kits is being developed and distribution      0%
                                          will be done between April – June).
3 - Business        Aug. 2008 Oct. 2008   MOU with Beltrade & BEST for                  50%
Mentoring &                               marketing & business mgmt
Technical                                 training & follow-up technical
Support                                   support.

                                          MOU with BEST for access to                   25%
                                          Loans for participants re:
                                          Micro financing (negotiations
                                          are underway with BEST)

                                          MOU with the Ministry of Labor                25%
                                          For employment placements
                                          (a meeting was held with officials
                                          From the Labor Dept and they
                                          have agreed to collaborate in the
                                          area of training and placements)

                                          # of successful rural women (150)             5%
                                          & Youth who have started their
                                          own businesses or are employed




2008                                                                                          46
Activity              Actual   Projected    Quantify Major                         %
# and Title           Start    Comple-      Outputs                                Comple-
(per Contract)        Date     tion Date    (per Logframe)                         tion to date

4 - Institutional     June 2008 Dec. 2008   # of new training rooms and 4 new      50%
Strengthening                               Dorms built to accommodate the
                                            delivery of ongoing skills building
                                            program for rural women & youth.
                                                  4 new training rooms
                                                     built

                                            # of rehabilitated dorms to            100%
                                            Accommodate rural women &
                                            Youth who need residential
                                            Services
                                                  4 dorms, 1 restroom & 1
                                                    Kitchen area rehabilitated

                                            Fee for service structure              20%
                                            established & applied to non-
                                            Rural users (in process)




    a. Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:

          1.8       What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?

          Project impact could be maximized if more funding was allotted to M&E to
          facilitate data collection on economic assessment.

          1.9       Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not?

          Resources have been maximized by establishing the training center in Belmopan
          and the other that is being proposed for Orange Walk. Hence less expenditure on
          transportation and more rural women and youth able to access the training.

          1.10 What could you do differently to improve the project implementation
             process?

         At this point everything is being done to facilitate the implementation process.
         However in the future more resources could be allocated for additional full time
         project staff due to the magnitude of the project.

          1.11 Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this point?

         All of the assumptions in the proposal are holding up. Of note is the high number
         of women and youth who have expressed interest in applying for and participating
         in the program.




2008                                                                                     47
3.     Partners and other Co-operation

     Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the actions, per contract, in
     terms:
           Staff time
           Logistic support (if applicable)
           Other resources (if applicable)

         Staff Time: The principal & Director of Tubal Trade & Vocational Institute have been
         collaborating closely with the project staff in relation to the Wood carving training. They
         also supervise the project consultant who was hired to conduct the training at Tubal.

How do you assess the relationship between the formal partners of this Action (i.e. those partners
which have signed a partnership statement)? Please specify for each partner organisation.

             See 3.1

Tubal Trade & Vocations Institute is the only formal partner of this action. The YWCA project
and Tubal continues to maintain a very good relationship. Both parties have been adhering to the
agreements in the MOU. YWCA continues to provide the equipment and human resources while
Tubal provides the environment and students.

         1.12    How would you assess the relationship between your organisation and State
             authorities in the Action countries? How has this relationship affected the Action? n/a

         1.13    Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other organisations
             involved in implementing the Action:

         1.14     Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other actions

             Agencies such as Plenty Belize, Citrus Growers Associations and members of the
             DDC assisted the project with the recruitment of participants.

             The YWCA is presently working with BEST for the delivery of the business
             management & marketing training and also to identify opportunities for project
             participants to access micro enterprise grants & loans.



2    Visibility

     In early February the Belmopan Training Program was launched and received extensive radio
     and TV coverage.



10.6 Grant No 6: Water Supply System for Crooked Tree

           QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
             Reporting Period: June 2008 to 28 February 2009

     1. Description of project:

        1.1 Name of beneficiaries of grant Contract: Social Investment Fund (SIF)

2008                                                                                          48
         1.2 Name and title of the Contact person: Mr. Ian McMillan, Executive Director
         1.3 Name of Partners in the Action: None
         1.4 Title of the Action: Water Supply System for Crooked Tree Village in Belize
               District
         1.5. Contract Number: 9366/BEL (EuropeAid/126752/D/ACT/BZ)
               Start date and end date for project: 10th June 2008 for 12 months
         1.7   Financial status:    Funds received: BZ$754,735.27 (Rate: 3.1343 less bank
               charge of $12.00) Date received 15/7/08
                     Funds disbursed 32% Funds Committed 87 %

Main Budget Line (BZ$)                       Budgeted         Disbursed to         Local
                                                                28/02/09       Contribution
1. Human resources                                                           $114,212.00
2. Travel
3. Equipment & supplies                   $53,000.00      NIL                $6,000.00
4. Local office                                                              $118,776.00
1. Other costs, services                  $25,200.00      $11,500.00
2. Service and Work Contracts,            $671,955.76     $260,178.78        $215,047.67
   Community Contribution to
   Trenching
3. Total direct eligible cost (add 1 to   $750,155.76
   6)
4. Contingency (max 5%of 7)               $37,507.79      $500.00
5. Total direct eligible cost (7+8)       $787,663.55
6.Administrative cost (7% of 9)           $55,136.45
7.Total eligible cost (7+10)              $842,800.00     272,178.78

  2.      Assessment of implementation of Action activities

   2.1 Activities and results

   The commencement of the implementation Crooked Tree Water Supply System was
   severely delayed due to the excessive flooding of the Crooked Tree Causeway as a
   result of incessant rains brought about by Tropical Depression #16. The causeway was
   opened in early December to all levels of traffic. An additional delay evolved when
   time was taken out to set a meeting with the Village Council Chairman and the Belize
   Rural North Area Representative to ensure that the skilled and unskilled villagers
   attained employment from the project. This entailed getting names of persons from the
   area from both men who would be invited to bid for the tank and pump house, and pipe
   installation. All who desired to work during the pipe installation would have the
   opportunity with over ten miles of pipes to be placed in trenches. SIF held a meeting
   with these parties on February 25, 2009 and the parties agreed to work together. The
   following shows what has been done so far.

       Activity 1:


2008                                                                                  49
       Title of the activity: Procurement of Supply of Pipes and Fittings

       Tender notice was placed in the newspapers for supply and delivery of pipes and
       fittings. Deadline for submission of bids was October 3, 2008. The only bid submitted
       was evaluated on October 8, 2008. Benny’s Wholesale Depot was recommended by
       the bid evaluation committee, approved by the Executive Director and approved by the
       SIF Board of Directors (BOD) on November 4, 2008.

       The pipes were delivered on February 5, 2009, were unloaded by the Community and
       are situated on the property of the Chairman. Due to tensions in the Village, SIF is in
       the process of paying security for 5 months to prevent burglary.

       One contract above €5000 was awarded:

       1. BZ$273,842.40 - National Competitive Bidding, Benny’s Wholesale Depot

    2.3 Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date, i.e. end of this reporting
            period:

          Activity                Actual       Projected            Quantify Major            Comple-
         # and Title             Starting     Completion               Outputs                 tion to
       (per Contract)              Date          Date               (per Logframe)            date, %
 Activity 6 (Supply of          November     February 5, 2009 Pipes and fittings              100%
 pipes and fittings             21, 2008                      delivered to Community
 [including meters)

 Activity 9-Construction        April 2009   October 2009    No output as yet                 0%
 of elevated tank &
 pump house
 Activity 12 (Installation of   April 2009   August 2009     No output as yet                 0%
 pipes and fittings)
 Activity 13 (Supply of         May 2009     May 2009        No output as yet                 0%
 pump and chlorinator)
 Activity 14 (Installation of   July 2009    September 2009 No output as yet                  0%
 electricity to pump
 house)
 Activity 16 (Installation of   Not yet      August 2009     No output as yet                 0%
 pump and chlorinator)          determined
 Activity 17 (Training of       November    November 2009 Community is in agreement with water system.
                                                                                           25%
 Community)                     2007                      importance of potable water
                                                          .
 Activity 19 (Testing of        October 2009November 2009 No output as yet                 0%
 System)


    2.4 Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:

         What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?
         Nothing can be said so far as the civil works have not commenced as yet

         Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not?
         Yes so far

          What could you do differently to improve the project implementation process?
          Not applicable


2008                                                                                     50
         Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this point?

          Not applicable

   2.5 If you have done training please indicate:

          a. Training events, dates and topics covered

          Seven newly appointed members of newly appointed Crooked Tree water board
          attended training in mid-February in Rockstone Pond for water boards in that area.
          It was training in water usage and conservation, treatment of water, and vector and
          water borne diseases

   3.      Partners and other Co-operation
       No comment

   4.     Visibility

   On October 8, 2008, there was a launching ceremony held at the well site in Crooked Tree
   Village. The keynote speaker at the event was Honourable Edmund Castro, Minister of
   State in the Ministry of Works and Belize Rural North Area Representative. Other
   speakers included Ms. Yvonne Hyde, Chief Executive Officer in the Ministry of
   Economic Development, Commerce, Industry and Consumer Protection and National
   Authorizing Officer to the European Union; Mr. Ian McMillan, Executive Director of
   the Social Investment Fund; and Mr. George Guest, Chairman of the Crooked Tree
   Village Council. Some 200 villagers were in attendance. Dr. Marcelino Avila, Project
   Director of the BRDP; and Ms. Catherine Mendez, Deputy National Authorizing
   Officer to the European Union were in attendance. Books, pencils and pens with the
   SIF and EU logo were distributed to the children of the Crooked Tree Government
   School.     Honourable Erwin Contreras, Minister of Economic Development,
   Commerce, Industry and Consumer Protection gave his apologies for not attending.
   Lunch was served.

   In December 2008, SIF calendars for 2008 were produced with the SIF and EU logos to
   promote the work of the SIF including the investment in Crooked Tree Village. Also,
   the visibility funds were used to invite bids by newspaper for the supply of pipes and
   fittings. The ads have both SIF and EU logo.




10.7 Grant No 7: Agricultural Enterprise Development

           QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
             Reporting Period: May 2008 – 28 February 2009

1.0 Description of project:


   1.1 Name of beneficiary of grant contract: United Nations Development Programme

2008                                                                                  51
   1.2 Name and title of the Contact person: Kristine Blokhus (Assistant Resident
             Representative, UNDP-Belize)

   1.3 Name of partners in the Action: Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Department of
             Agriculture

   1.4 Title of the Action: Agriculture Enterprise Development for Rural Belize

   1.5 Contract number: Agreement No. 9366/BEL (Europe Aid//125993/M/ACT/BZ)

   1.6 Start date and end date of project: 1st May 2008 for 24 months

   1.7 Financial status:          Funds received: USD$ 1,028,427.44 (BZE$ 2,056,854.88) Date
                           th
             received: 8 April 2008

                   EU Funds disbursed: USD$ 425,137.60 (BZE$ 850,275.20) 41.3%
                   EU Funds Committed: 33.2%

Main Budget Line                                   Budgeted       Disbursed to           Local
                                                     Bz$             28/02/09         Contribution
                                                                       Bz$
 1.Human resources                            787,811             113,547.54        58,840
 2.Travel                                     25,337              12,039.08         6,609.65
 3.Equipment & supplies                       2,101,346           554,428.24        115,000
 4.Local office                               110,580             62,346.56                 -
 5.Other costs, services                      325,392             95,919.14                 -
 6.Other                                      543,192             74,640.06         160,000
 7.Total direct eligible cost (add 1 to 6)    $ 3,893,658         799,373.08        340,449.70
 8.Contingency (max 5%of 7)                   $0                  $0                $0
 9.Total direct eligible cost (7+8)           3,893,658           799,373.08        340,449.70
 10. Administrative cost (7% of 9)            272,556             50,902.12                 -
 11. Total eligible cost (7+10)               4,166,214           850,275.20



2. Assessment of implementation of Action activities

       2.1    Activities and results

   Please list all the activities in line with Annex 1 of the contract during the reporting period
Activity 1.1 (a) Introducing to and piloting relevant water management systems (irrigation and
              drainage) among onion, vegetable, potato and root crop producers of participating
              farms in the Cayo, Stann Creek, Belize and Toledo Districts
             (b)Installation of water capture and storage systems.

Actions undertaken

   1. Consultancy/ Contract for design of site specific water management systems (water
      storage/ irrigation/ drainage)
   2. Procurement of required equipment/ materials
   3. Consultancy/ Contract for drilling of wells to serve irrigation needs


2008                                                                                          52
    4. Consultancy for installation of storage tanks
    5. Initiate installation of storage tanks

Related Contracts awarded
   1. Irrigation and Drainage Systems Design Consultancy ($24,050 USD) Awarded through
       competitive bidding process. (Payment1 & 2 of USD 3607.50 and USD 6012.50 disbursed
       to
       Contractor Lucien Chung of Chung’s Engineering Company Limited)
   2. Contract to perform works associated with the drilling of 15 production wells
        awarded to Ministry of Labour, Local Government & Rural Development,
        Belmopan ($27,750 USD). Awarded through Request for Quotations based on
        principles of lowest bidder/ value for money.

Activity 1.2 Irrigation and Drainage Support services provided to participating farmers group
through national extension services, Irrigation Unit

Actions undertaken
   1. PMU, Irrigation extension officer and irrigation consultant participate in identification of
       and consultations with potential beneficiary groups

Related Contracts awarded
       No significant contract awarded during this period

Activity 1.3 Deploying Protected Cropping Structures for improved crop production among small
vegetable producers

Actions undertaken
   1. Continued farm assessment of participating farmers.
   2. Call for bids for supply of protected cropping structures (Dead-line for Bid submission 6th
       March 2009- 13 Request for Bid package received by UNDP)
   3. 3 commercial Rototillers purchased to support producer groups
   4. Contracting of Central Farm completed for the design and development of 50 individual
       seedling nurseries

Related Contracts awarded
    1. Requisition for protective structures posted on UNDP Procurement notice Web site
       http://procurement-notices.undp.org and call advertised in local papers. 13 Bid packages
       requested from international and national manufacturers/suppliers.

    2. Contract to central Farm for design and construction of 50 seedling nurseries awarded
       through request for quotations. (USD 8445.00)
Activity 1.4: Establishing Integrated Farming Systems (IFS) in southern Belize

Actions undertaken
   1. Co-financing from UNDP SLM Project Confirmed
   2. Contract finalized with CARDI for the establishment if IFS (Signing ceremony for
       Contract 6th March 2009)
   3. Continued beneficiary visitation by Project and CARDI to finalize suitable IFS type and to
       initiate development of feasibility studies and collection of baseline.

Related Contracts awarded
    1. CARDI contract USD 96,903.19 (USD 46,000- 47.5% of total co-financed by UNDP)



2008                                                                                      53
Activity 1.5 Establishing Regional Nucleus breeding farms/ bull rental facilities as sources of
improved stock to small farmers

Actions undertaken
   1. Livestock training component launched through a partnership agreement with the Belize
       Livestock Association (330 small cattle farmers to be trained as well as 6 extension officer
       and 6 lead farmers one per district to serve as future trainers)
   2. Equipment procured to support the development of the progeny tracking database
   3. Contract awarded to develop progeny tracking database

Related Contracts awarded
   1. Contract awarded to Belize Livestock Producers association through direct contracting
       Modality. (USD 6,000)
   2. Selection of progeny tracking consultant completed. Contract awarded through
       competitive bidding process. (USD 9,000)

Activity 1.6 Refurbishing the facility at MAF Stann Creek Station to enable quality pineapple
and traditional root crops seed multiplication

Actions undertaken
   1. Refurbishment of facility completed
   2. Work to propagate pineapple seedling commenced

Related Contracts awarded
No significant contracts awarded. UNDP co-finance project by provision of plantain seedling
material for small farmers supporting national diversification efforts. (USD 7,500)

Activity 1.7 Developing capacity of farmers groups in cooperative building, farm management,
good agriculture practices and use of cost effective agro-techniques.

Actions undertaken
   1. Capacity development contract negotiated awarded to CARDI
   2. Cooperative Department of MAF Central Farm and PMU facilitated 5 training session
       (Practical and theory) for the CYDP beneficiary group on Cooperative building for team
       management (15 individuals trained)
   *** To date a total of 134 small farmers trained by project)

Related Contracts awarded
   1. CARDI contract awarded through submission of Proposal/ direct contracting.(USD 96,
       903)

Activity 2.1 Developing a formalized Quality Policy and Plan for supported produces

Actions undertaken
    1. First policy products delivered to PMU and BAHA under Marsha Echols contract
Related Contracts awarded
    1. Contract for Ms. Marsha Echols for USD 18,000 awarded in Quarter 2. Ms. Echols was
       selected through a competitive bidding process. First payment of USD 9,000 paid to
       consultant.

Activity2.2: Improving capacities of the third party verification body (BAHA) for on farm
inspection and testing.

Actions undertaken

2008                                                                                        54
    1. Memorandum of Agreement finalized with Belize Agricultural Health Authority for the
       execution of activities related to the improvement of capacities of third party verification
       body for on farm quality management systems. MAF signing ceremony 11th March 2009.
    2. Co-financing for this component secured through an IAEA funded initiative whose
       objectives are to help ensure that the food placed on the market for consumers from
       national or imported sources is free from harmful chemical contaminants by supporting
       and strengthening the development of a national chemical contaminant residue monitoring
       programme, and to further increase the technical capacity (in the area of residue testing).
       USD 80,000

Related Contracts awarded
    1. MAF negotiated with national partner BAHA for execution of activities related to result 2
       of project proposal. (USD 75,000)

Activity 3.1 Capacity of farmers in appropriate produce specific post harvest practice enhanced

Actions undertaken
   1. CARDI contract finalized

Activity 3.2 Near farm washing and/ or packaging sheds for vegetable, onion, pineapple and
potato producing groups constructed

Actions undertaken
   1. Work package delivery included within CARDI’s contract

Activity 3.3: Producer groups equipped with suitable refrigerated transportation units

Actions undertaken
   1. PMU/UNDP staff preparing product specification and requisition documents

Activity 3.4: Central Farm Processing Facility transformed into a true multi service food-
processing incubator.

Actions undertaken

    1. Taiwanese technical Cooperation mission to Belize have started with the construction of
       the central farm incubator unit as co-financing to this project

Activity 3.5 Localized Facilities in Stann Creek and Belize River Valley created and equipped for
pineapple (fruits) and cohune oil processing respectfully

Actions undertaken
   1. Initial tender call for building of the Cohune oil facility did not yield acceptable results
       although 8 packages received at UNDP, PMU and UNDP currently restructuring tender
       package
   2. Project conducted series of beneficiary scoping meetings with pineapple growers of Stann
       Creek District regarding localized Pineapple Processing Facility

Related Contracts awarded
   1. No contract yet awarded. Recall for tenders expected in March 2009

Activity 3.6 Near farm ambient and or cooling facilities (Refrigerated Storage) constructed

Actions undertaken

2008                                                                                       55
       1. Specification of cold storage unit reviewed and approved by MAF and requisition raised
          on UNDP global procurement networks.
       2. In house exercise at identification of possible manufacturers undertaken

    Related Contracts awarded
    1. No contract yet awarded for cold storage units as procurement process is still underway.
       Process is being facilitated by UNDP El Salvador Finance Unit. Work Package worth
       some 70,000 Euros
    Activity 3.7 Constructing a BAHA certified community slaughter facility in the Belize River
    Valley

    Actions undertaken
    1. PMU and MAF extension officer continues to meet with producers groups to determine
       most suited placement for slaughter facility and most adequate management procedures

    Activity 4.1 Developing and populating Agri-market information system

    Actions undertaken
    1. All activities supporting Result 4: Capacities and facilities for agriculture/ market data
       collection, information exchange and the creation of producer market linkages developed,
       have been consolidated into a single work package being overseen through a MAF/
       BELTRAIDE partnership
    2. MAF with BELTRAIDE near finalization
    3. Agi-market information system software worth some USD 50,000 provided to
       BELTRAIDE by USAID. This serves as direct co financing to the establishment of the
       Agri-market Information System as prescribed in the project proposal
    4. Server to support agri-market information system procured

Related Contracts awarded
    1. MAF currently being finalized with BELTRAIDE for the establishment and hosting of
       AGRI- market information system. To date this component has been co-financed to the
       tune of USD 50,000 through a regional USAID sponsored initiative.

2.3 Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date, i.e. end of this reporting
period:
    Activity           Actual     Projected           Quantify Major                   Completion
   # and Title        Starting    Comple-          Outputs (per Logframe)              to date, %
 (per Contract)         Date      tion Date
Activity 1.1 (a)      September   December 2009 15 irrigation wells dug               45%
Water Management      2008                      Water capture facilities
Systems (irrigation                              established in 4 communities
and drainage)                                    facing deficiencies in availability
(b)Installation of                               of water to support agriculture
water capture and                               200 farmers trained in effective
storage systems.                                 water management
                                                A minimum of 15 feeder systems
                                                 established which has the capacity
                                                 of providing water for in excess
                                                 of 300 acres of farm land
                                                25 farmers assisted in the
                                                 establishment of micro-irrigation
                                                 systems




2008                                                                                         56
    Activity            Actual      Projected          Quantify Major                  Completion
   # and Title         Starting     Comple-         Outputs (per Logframe)             to date, %
 (per Contract)          Date       tion Date
Activity 1.2           June 2008 March 2010       Minimum of 100 farmers assisted     25%
Irrigation and                                     by irrigation extension unit
Drainage Support                                  Irrigation unit benefit from
services provided to                               training and provision of
participating                                      equipment to support their
farmers group                                      extension activities

Activity 1.3                      J
                       October 2008 uly 2009      25 small farms piloting protected   20%
Deploying Protected                                cropping technology
Cropping Structures                               Seedling nursery established on
for improved crop                                  50 participating farms
production among                                  Increased capacity of 200 farmers
small vegetable
producers
Activity 1.4:          April 2009               
                                    December 2009 IFS piloted in 3 communities         10%
Establishing                                      benefiting minimum of 15 farmers
Integrated Farming
Systems (IFS) in
southern Belize
Activity 1.5           July 2008    July 2010 Inclusion of 6 Brahman bulls, 3         65%
Establishing                                   Angus bulls and 6 Angus cows
Regional Nucleus                               into Central Farm Breeding
breeding farms/ bull                           programme
rental facilities as                          3 regional breeding nucleus farms
sources of improved                            stocked with 4 Brahmans each
stock to small                                Minimum of 100 small livestock
farmers                                        owners benefit from introduction
                                               of livestock breeding programme
                                              National Livestock/ progeny
                                               database developed
                                              Minimum 300 small livestock
                                               owners trained in nutrition and
                                               pasture management, animal
                                               husbandry, animal health
Activity 1.6                                 
                       June 2008 December 2009 Functioning national propagation        80%
Refurbishing the                               facility
facility at MAF                               Small farmers have direct access
Stann Creek Station                            to a minimum of 60,000 plantlets
to enable quality                              per 6 months cycle @ minimal
pineapple and                                  cost to the farmers
traditional root
crops seed
multiplication




2008                                                                                         57
    Activity             Actual      Projected           Quantify Major                   Completion
   # and Title          Starting     Comple-          Outputs (per Logframe)              to date, %
 (per Contract)           Date       tion Date
Activity 1.7            June 2008 March 2010        Minimum of 150 farmers trained       30%
Developing capacity                                  in each of the project prescribed
of farmers groups in                                 themes (GAP, cooperative
cooperative                                          building etc.)
building, farm                                      4 GAP demonstration sites
management, good                                     developed
agriculture practices                               Training modules/ delivery
and use of cost                                      materials developed for
effective agro-                                      continuation of capacity building
techniques.                                          of small farmers through the
                                                     national extension services
Activity 2.1                       M
                        October 2008 ay 2009        National Quality Policy for Fruits   70%
Developing a                                         and Vegetables developed
formalized Quality                                  Public Awareness Campaign/
Policy and Plan for                                  Communication plan
supported produces
Activity2.2:                                   
                        March 2009 December 2009 BAHA lab equipped to support             5%
Improving capacities                             On farm quality management
of the third party                               systems
verification body                               Enhanced inspection procedures
(BAHA) for on farm                               in place and benefiting producing
inspection and                                   farms
testing.                                        Database established


Activity 3.1 Capacity   April 2009               
                                     December 2009 200 farmers trained in produce         10%
of farmers in                                      specific post harvesting practices
appropriate produce
specific post harvest
practice enhanced
Activity 3.2 Near       April 2009               
                                     December 2009 10 post harvesting washing and         10%
farm washing and/                                  packaging sheds provided to
or packaging sheds                                 participating farmers groups
for vegetable, onion,
pineapple and potato
producing groups
constructed
Activity 3.3:                                 
                        June 2009 December 2009 3 Farmers/ Food Cooperative               5%
Producer groups                                 groups equipped with refrigerated
equipped with                                   trucks
suitable refrigerated
transportation units




2008                                                                                            58
    Activity             Actual     Projected          Quantify Major                    Completion
   # and Title          Starting    Comple-         Outputs (per Logframe)               to date, %
 (per Contract)           Date      tion Date
Activity 3.4: Central   June 2009 March 2010      Functional processing incubator       35%
Farm Processing                                    units at central Farm facility
Facility transformed                              At least 5 farmers groups utilizing
into a true multi                                  incubator units
service food-
processing
incubator.
Activity 3.5            July 2008   July 2009     Cohune oil processing facility in     35%
Localized Facilities                               Flowers bank benefiting 15 local
in Stann Creek and                                 families
Belize River Valley                               Pineapple (Fruits processing
created and                                        facility in Stann Creek district
equipped for                                       benefiting 25 farmers
pineapple (fruits)
and cohune oil
processing
respectfully
Activity 3.7            June 2008 March 2010      Community slaughter facility in       15%
Constructing a                                     place benefiting 50 small
BAHA certified                                     livestock farmers of BelRiv
commu-nity
slaughter facility in
Belize River Valley
Activity 4.1                       M
                        October 2008 arch 2010    Populated Web-based Agri-             30%
Developing and                                     market information system
populating Agri-                                   benefiting national network of
market info. system                                framers


    2.4 Please provide at least one response to each of the following questions:

             a. What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?
  It is believed that the projects value chain approach will result in significant impact to
  the livelihoods of participating farmers and farmers group. This impact could be
  magnified by ensuring continuity in the interaction between that technical executing
  partners and beneficiary groups as an added means of support to initiatives being
  started.

            b. Are resources used in the best possible way? Why or Why not?
  It is the opinion of UNDP that resources are being used in the best possible ways. All
  major and minor contracts are awarded trough transparent and competitive processes
  and are drive by the principles of best value for money. The PMU through adaptive
  management is continuously making changes to project approach assuring the
  inclusion of as many beneficiary groups as possible. Beneficiary groups are vetted
  using strict criteria specially developed for each area of intervention.

           c. What could you do differently to improve the project implementation
              process?
  There is now a need to include more closely area representatives into the process who
     can work to remove some existing political barriers.

             d. Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this point?

2008                                                                                           59
  The foundation and assumptions made in the development of the proposal are still
     relevant.

2.5 If you have done training please indicate:
During this Quarter 4 training sessions on Cooperative Building was provided to the
CYDP beneficiary group. A Total of 14 individuals were trained.


   3.   Partners and other Co-operation

   Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the actions, per contract, in
terms:

    The Ministry of Agriculture continues to dedicate the full time support of its national
    extension, irrigation and livestock staff to support project implementation. The staffs from
    central farm have contributed to the design and the testing of the small seedling nursery on
    a full time basis over the past month. Staff members from BELTRAIDE and MAF continue
    to work full time on the establishment of the Agrimarket information system.

    UNDP has since September 2008 hired an addition staff in the person of a Programme
    Associate with specific responsibilities to the support of the project management unit.

How do you assess the relationship between the formal partners of this Action (i.e. those partners
which have signed a partnership statement)? Please specify for each partner organisation

    The contribution of the Ministry of Agriculture continues to be outstanding. Relationship
    among the partners is commendable. Communication as it relates to project matters has
    improved significantly with the advancement of the various work packages.

How would you assess the relationship between your organisation and State authorities in the
Action countries? How has this relationship affected the Action?

    UNDP continues to work closely with the Government of Belize in the delivery of national
    development goals. This project has opened possibilities of future collaboration between
    UNDP and the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other organisations involved in
implementing the Action:
    4. Associate(s) (if any)
       N/A

    5. Sub-contractor(s)
       The project has built strong relationships with key national and international
       institutions including CARDI, BELTRAIDE, BAHA, and the Belize Livestock
       Association. These organizations are critical to the implementation success of project
       work packages and provide invaluable technical know how informing project planning
       and execution.

    6. Final Beneficiaries and Target groups
       The project management unit continues its outreach work to project beneficiaries with
       the assistance of the MAF Extension Officers and the District Development
       Committees. Project delivery continues to be informed through participative
       involvement of local beneficiaries. The continued relationship with the project’s
       beneficiary base is key in that these individuals were instrumental in defining project
       outcomes based on their expressed needs.

2008                                                                                      60
   7. Other third parties involved.
      N/A
           a. Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other actions

   This project is directly co-financed through a UNDP supported sustainable land
   management initiative being executed through the Ministry of Natural Resources and
   Environment. The project is also being linked to sustainable livelihood projects being
   executed through UNDP/ GEF small Grant Programme.

   Discussions are ongoing with the Organization of American state who have recently funded
   a project for Southern Belize targeting similar areas of improved agricultural productivity,
   integrated farming systems etc.

   The project Quality Farm Management component is also being linked to an IAEA project
   about to be implemented meant to build technical and laboratory capacities within BAHA.


4. Visibility

   The project has developed various visibility items including pens, shirts, agendas, umbrellas
   etc. for distribution to beneficiary groups.
   A 2 minute documentary spot was created on the launching of the Livestock training session
   was developed and aired on all local television stations during primetime.
   The project produced and printed 2,000 Farmers Calendar for year 2009. Calendars are being
   distributed to national farmers.
   A contract is being negotiated with media groups for the production of quarterly documentary
   highlighting project activities and progress. This documentary is to be aired on all local
   stations.




10.8 Grant No 8: Emergency Reconstruction after Hurricane Dean

         QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
          Reporting Period: 7 January 2008 – 28 February 2009

   1. Description of project:

   1.1 Name of beneficiaries of grant Contract: Social Investment Fund (SIF)
   1.2 Name and tile of contact person: Mr. Ian Mc Millan, Executive Director
   1.3 Name of Partners in the Action: None
   1.4 Title of Action: Emergency Reconstruction after Hurricane Dean in Belize
   1.5 Contract Number: Agreement No. 9366/BEL-1
   1.6 Start date and end of project: 2nd January, 2008 for 12 months.
   1.7. Financial Status: Funds received: BZ$1,385,803.08; Date Received: Feb 7,
       2008; Funds disbursed to date: 59.5%; Funds committed to date: 40.5%



2008                                                                                      61
Main Budget Line        Budgeted       Disbursed Committed     Local
                                       to 31/1/09 to 28/2/09   Contribution
1. Human Resource       117,883.10     98,419.30 19,463.80     No local
2. Travel                                                      contribution
3. Equipment and        76,139.94      61,297.30   14,842.64   required
supplies
4. Local office         51,626.96      36,248.27   15,378.69
5.    Other     cost,   43,350.00      12,157.07   31,192.93
services
6. Other                1,445,000      604,012.49 840,987.60
7.    Total    direct   1,733,999.90   812,134.43 921,865.55
eligible cost (add 1
to 6)
8.     Contingency      -              -           -
(max 5% of 7)
9.    Total    direct   -              -           -
eligible cost (7+8)
10. Administrative      -              -           -
Cost (7% of 9)
11. Total Eligible      -              -           -
cost (7+10)

2.     Assessment of implementation of Action activities____________

2.1    Activities and results:

This quarterly report will focus on works accomplished during the period
from December 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009. However all activities
achieved since the inception of this subject project are incorporated.
Components of the project are:




2008                                                                   62
 Projects     Spent        Work achieved        Status       Comment
Bomba       $21,354.88 - Small Grant           99%       - Project
Beekeepin                Contract singed       complet      benefiting 14
g & Carving            - All supplies          e            families
                         purchased                       - Group
                       - Handing over of                    producing
                         supplies done                      quality carving
                       - Three training                     product for
                         provided                           tourist
Lemonal     $17,206.71 - Small Grant           95%       - Project
Pig                      Contract signed       complet      benefiting 14
Producers              - All supplies for      e            families
                         project purchased               - Pending
                         and delivered                      activities is
                       - 10 pens constructed                delivery of pigs
                                                            by MAF
Santa       $22,900.01 - Small Grant           99%       - 13 farmers will
Marta                    Contract signed       complet      benefit from
Onion                  - All chemicals and     e            project
Project                  irrigation supplies             - Pending activity
                         purchased                          is training in
                       - Handing over                       irrigation
                         supplies done
                       - 4 acres of land
                         panted with onion




2008                                                                  63
 Projects       Spent          Work achieved         Status        Comment
San Carlos    $21,479.89    - Small Grant           95%        - Project will
Pepper                         Contract signed      complete     benefit 12
Production                  - All chemical                       farmers
                               supplies delivered              - Pending
                            - Packing shed                       activities is the
                               constructed                       drilling of well
                            - Land cleared done
Las Palmas    $0.00        - Small Grant Contract   0%         - Although
Fire Burn                     signed                             contract was
                                                                 signed no work
                                                                 has been done
                                                                 with group since
                                                                 no land exists for
                                                                 restaurant
                                                                 building. Group
                                                                 visited Land
                                                                 Dept. but was
                                                                 futile. Requesting
                                                                 to change
                                                                 project to sewing
Santa Cruz    $0.00        - Small Grant Contract   0%         - The group has
Pig Project                   signed                              delayed in
                                                                  submitting
                                                                  quota-tions for
                                                                  pens supplies.
                                                                  Meeting held
                                                                  with them to
                                                                  address issue
Progresso $21,707.50 - Small Grant                  99%        - This project will
Coco Yam               Contract signed              complet       benefit 8 farmers
                     - All chemical and             e             & their families
                       irrigation supplies                     - Coco yam field
                       purchased                                  to be harvest in
                     - Handing over of                            March 2009
                       supplies                                - Corozal Dist to
                     - 4 acres of cocoyam                         benefit from
                       under cultivation                          coco yam
                     - One well drilled                           product at
                     - One training                               reasonable cost
                       provided
Chan Chen $17,877.20 - Small Grant                  95%        - 8 women to
Nursery                Contract signed              complet      benefit from this
                     - 75% of nursery               e            project
                       supplies purchased                      - 50 farmers from
                       and delivered                             the community
                     - Nursery building                          to benefit from
                       constructed                               quality seedlings
                     - Training in
                       management of
                       nursery facilitated

2008                                                                         64
  Projects       Spent         Work achieved          Status        Comment
Norbee          $2,234.71   - Small Grant Contract    10%      - This project will
Honey                         signed                               benefit 13 farmers
Producers                   - Table saw and jointer            - Project delayed
                              purchased and                        since member
                              deliver                              wanted to import
                                                                   bee colonies
                                                                   from Mexico,
                                                                   later found that
                                                                   bees were
                                                                   infected so
                                                                   decided to
                                                                   purchased it in
                                                                   Belize
Libertad        $0.00       - Small Grant Contract    0%       - Group failed to
Delicious                      signed                             move ahead with
Tortilla                                                          this project and a
                                                                  letter was sent to
                                                                  SIF saying they
                                                                  are no longer
                                                                  interested
Corozal         $.00        - Project prepared and    0%       - SIF needs to invite
Storage                       endorsed by DDC                     contractors for
Facility                    - BOQ and design                      the construction
                              prepared                            of the storage
                            - Contractors name                    facility. Once
                              given to SIF                        contractor
                                                                  selected,
                                                                  contract will be
                                                                  signed and
                                                                  construction will
                                                                  proceed
Orange          $0.00       - Project prepared but    0%       - DDC chairman is
Walk Green                     needs to be                        having problems
House                          endorsed by DDC                    getting its
                                                                  member for a
                                                                  meeting to
                                                                  endorse this
                                                                  project

           Construction of 44 houses and provision of construction supplies to
            20 families
           Retrofitting of 10 hurricane shelters
           Implementation of 12 agriculture projects.
           Administrative cost

Activity 1: Construction of houses:

       The housing component project entails the construction of 44 houses
       to rural poor families in areas affected by Hurricane Dean and the
       provision of construction supplies to 20 families whose house was

2008                                                                          65
       partially damage. Since the inception of this project the following
       activities have been accomplished:

             Contract signed with Hardware Stores who are responsible to
              deliver the construction supplies to site.
             Construction supplies are being delivered to construction site by
              phases
             Bids invitation to contractors done
             Return bids evaluated and contractors selected
             Contract signed with 5 selected contractors
             Launching of the housing project done February 2009
             Construction work started February 2009
             25% of all construction work complete

Activity 2:     Retrofitting of 10 Hurricane Shelters:

       The retrofitting of hurricane shelters is a major part of this sub-project
       and all selected shelters are in rural poor communities affected by
       hurricane Dean. Works accomplished are as follow

             All ten shelters selected
             Contractors evaluated and contracts signed
             Nine of the ten shelters are 100% complete
             Pending shelter to be retrofitted is Saint Viator High School but
              management needs to decide on the construction of the
              bathroom for the school. SIF Engineer to discuss works to be done
              with them
             2,250 families will benefit from the retrofitting of these shelters in
              time of natural disaster
             Approximately 1,750 school children are benefiting from
              retrofitted schools

Activity 3.     Agriculture Projects:

       The following table will provide information                  on   activities
       accomplished with all agriculture projects

Result of the activities:
        Nine of the ten hurricane shelters completed and will benefit
           2,250 families in time of natural disaster
        Housing project has started and will benefit 64 families
        7 of the 10 agriculture projects are almost complete and will
           benefit 666 rural poor people
        Progresso Coco Yam will start harvesting in March 2009
        Farmers are self employed due to this agriculture project
        Five contractors and 20 common labour employed in the
           construction of new houses
        Bomba have started producing and selling art and craft for the
           local market

2008                                                                         66
2.2    Please list all contracts (works, supplies, services) above €5,000
       awarded for the implementation of the action during the reporting
       period, giving each contact the amount, the award procedure
       followed and the name of the contractor.




2008                                                               67
Projects                           Cost         of Award              Contractor
                                   Contract        Procedure
Ranchito Community Center          $18,552.50      Single Tender      Ricardo Marin
Chunox Community Center            $25,805.00      Single Tender      Marcelo Mesh
Libertad Methodist School          $25,546.00      Single Tender      Ricardo Marin
Cornerstone High School            $15,500.00      Single Tender      Ricardo Marin
Santa Clara Adventist School       15,965.00       Single Tender      Roel Tamay
Santa Clara Catholic Primary $29,829.00            Single Tender      Roel Tamay
School
San Narciso Catholic School        $19,205.00      Single Tender      Roel Tamay

2.3. Please state activities, dates and outputs achieved to date i.e. end
of this reporting period:

Activity # and          Starting   Completio    Quantify           Mayor %
Title ( per contract)   Date       n Date       outputs                   Completion
                                                                          to date
Bomba Beekeeping        15/4/08    30/3/09      - All equipment,          99%
and Carving Group                               supplies for the bees
                                                and carving
                                                purchased and
                                                delivered to group
                                                -14 members are
                                                benefitting from this
                                                project
                                                - additional supplies is
                                                being purchased
Lemonal Pig             15/5/08    30/3/09      - All supplies and        99%
Producers Group                                 materials for project
                                                purchased
                                                - 14 members will
                                                benefit
Santa Martha Onion      28/3/08    30/3/09      - all irrigation supplies 100%
Producers Group                                 and chemical inputs
                                                purchased and
                                                delivered
                                                - Diesel water pump
                                                to be purchase
                                                -Project will benefit 12
                                                farmers
San Carlos Pepper       28/3/08    30/3/09      - All chemical and        90%
Producers Group                                 irrigation inputs
                                                purchased and
                                                delivered to group
                                                - Packing Shed
                                                complete
                                                -Stainless Steel Table

2008                                                                         68
                                               purchased and
                                               delivered
                                               - Land prepared
                                               - 10 farmers will
                                               benefit
Progresso Coco          28/3/08    30/3/09     - All chemical and       99%
Yam Group                                      irrigation input
                                               purchased and
                                               delivered
                                               - 8 farmers will benefit
Activity # and          Starting   Completio   Quantify          Mayor %
Title ( per contract)   Date       n Date      outputs                  Completion
                                                                        to date
Chan Chen Nursery       28/3/08    30/3/09     - All equipment and      95%
Producers Group                                supplies purchased
                                               - Nursery building
                                               complete
                                               - 8 women will benefit
Norbee                  28/3/08    30/3/09     - Equipment              10%
Cooperative                                    purchased and
                                               delivered
                                               - 12 farmers will
                                               benefit

2.4   Please provide at least one response to each of the following
questions:

   A) What could you be doing differently to maximize project impact?

       Ensure before hand that the resources are available before approving a
       project. Example; Las Palmas Fire Burn Restaurant cannot proceed
       because group does not have land to place their restaurant
       building. Another project is Delicious Tortilla from Libertad no building
       existed to install the equipment. This slows down the implementation
       process. In would also be good to ensure that when funds are
       granted to organization it will not have the interference of politician.

   B) Are resources used in the best possible way?

       Resources are used only for the said projects. SIF ensure that all
       resources available in the sub-project are directed toward the
       implementation of all components of this project.

   C) What could you be doing differently to improve the project
      implementation process?

       More flexibility in applying the rules of origin in the purchasing of
       equipment and supplies not produced in Belize. Ministry of
       Agriculture to provide the adequate resource in order for the
       Extension Officer from the Agriculture Department to dedicate more
       time and support to the agriculture projects.

2008                                                                        69
      D) Are assumptions made in proposal holding up or changing at this
         point?

         Assumption made in the proposal is still holding since SIF is committed
         to address the need of rural poor in area affected by Hurricane
         Dean. The E.U funds are specifically being used for all components of
         the Emergency Reconstruction Project after Hurricane Dean in Belize.

2.5.     If you have done Training please indicate:

      Trainings carried out with groups since the inception of this sub-
project.
        Three training in Apiculture Management Provided to Bomba
          Beekeeping and Carving Group.
        One training in the Production and Management of Coco Yam
          provided to Progresso Coco Yam Group
        One training in Pest and Disease Management provided to Santa
          Marta Onion Group
        One training in the Management of Nursery provided to Chan
          Chen Vegetable nursery Group

      a) Number of professionals (which institutions), beneficiaries or rural
         people training?
         All training was directed to agriculture group and total farmers
         trained were 50

      b) Results of evaluation of training carried out
         All trainings were facilitated by professional in the agriculture and
         apiculture field. Training was presented in simple language
         understood by members of different groups. Participants have
         assimilated new information and have acquired additional skills and
         knowledge in their project.

3.       Partners and other Co-operation_______________________________________

3.1   Please indicate the amount of contributions of formal partners to the
actions, per contract, in terms:
        Staff time
        Logistic support ( if applicable)
        Other resources ( if applicable)

3.2      How do you access the relationship between the formal partners of
         this Action (i.e.) those partners which have signed a partnership
         statement)? Please specify for each partner organization.
          SIF has had good working relation with the Project Management Unit
         (PMU) of BRDP and with beneficiaries especially the agriculture
         groups. BRDP has been instrumental in clarifying doubt that SIF had in
         the implementation of the project. In addition to this SIF Officers have

2008                                                                       70
       been working with Extension Officers from the three districts where
       this sub-project is being implemented

3.3    How would you assess the relationship between your organization
and the State        Authorities in      the Action Countries? How has this
relationship affected the Action?
       SIF relationships with all partners are excellent.

3.4  Where applicable, describe your relationship with any other
organization involved in the implementing the Action:
     Relationships with all agriculture groups are excellent. Since the
     inception of this sub-project SIF has kept a close working relationship
     with all groups through meetings, field visits and in the delivering of
     items for their respect projects. With some of the groups handing over
     supplies have been done as well as training in order to equipped
     them with the required information and skills.
        Other third parties involved:       Not applicable

3.5   Where applicable, outline any links you have developed with other
actions.   N/A

4.     Visibility:_____________________________________________________

       One of the major activities held for this reporting period was the
launching of the housing project done for both districts. Banners were
prepared and display on this launching depicting the E.U logo and that the
housing project is totally funded by the European Union. SIF has ensured
that E.U visibility is on all projects being funded by the E.U. In addition to the
banner stickers with the E.U logo are stick on all equipment provided to
groups. Pictures of E.U visibility.




2008                                                                       71
  10.9 Works Contract: Rehabilitation of the Middlesex Bridge, Stann Creek District

           QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
                 Reporting Period: Sept 2008 – Feb 2009

   2. Description of project:

   1.1 Name of Contractor: Cisco Construction Ltd
   1.2 Name and tile of contact person: Mr. John Woods, Manager
   1.3 Name of Partners in the Action: None
   1.4 Title of Action: Rehabilitation of Middlesex Bridge
   1.5 Contract Number: Agreement No. MOW/EUBRDP/2008/W/1
   1.6 Start date and end of project: August 2008 for 12 months.
   1.7 Funds received so far: None Date received:
              Amount received:      Total funds committed by EC: Euro
   1.8 Funds spent so far: None

   2. Assessment of Progress:

   The Middlesex Bridge is a very strategic structure because it is located on the main
   highway connecting the two southern districts to the rest of the country, yet the bridge
   structure is a precarious state threatening to collapse at any time, hence the priority for
   the Government of Belize.

   The works contract for the Rehabilitation of the Middlesex Bridge has been advertised,
   tenders have been received and evaluated, and the decision on the contractor, i.e.
   CISCO Construction Ltd, has been made. The works concerned by this tender comprise
   the widening and upgrading of the Middlesex Bridge on the Hummingbird Highway
   between Belmopan and Dangriga, Belize. The contract comprises the supply of labour,
   materials, plant, equipment, survey instruments and any other tools and machinery for
   the execution and completion of the Middlesex Bridge, and for the remedy of any
   defects therein. The works include the supply, construction, installation and
   completion of the following:

          Provision of temporary accommodation for the Supervisor’s Representative
          Removal of existing central two spans and central support
          Piling operation for additional foundations to the bridge
          Contraction of two new central spans and the widening of the remaining
           existing span of the bridge, measuring 130 ft. long

2008                                                                                  72
          Any other works as detailed on the Drawings or in the Specifications, or as
           required completing the contract to the satisfaction of the Supervisor.

   The period for the execution of the work is 12 months. The contract price (excluding
   taxes and duties) amounts to BZ$ 2,148,491. (Approximately Euro 953,384).

   The contract documents were signed by the MED/ NAO as the contracting authority
   and by the contractor and endorsed by the Head of Delegation of the European
   Commission, however no action has taken place on the ground due to the unresolved
   arrangements for the performance guarantee and insurance requirements of the works
   contract.


10.10 Works Contract: Valley of Peace Road, Cayo District

           QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR NAO/ BRDP
                 Reporting Period: Sept 2008 – February 2009

   1. Description of project:

   1.1 Name of Contractor: A & N Construction
   1.2 Name and tile of contact person: Mr. Norman Reimer, Project Manager
   1.3 Name of Partners in the Action: None
   1.4 Title of Action: Valley of Peace Road, Cayo District
   1.5 Contract Number: Agreement No. MOW/EU/BRDP/2008/W/2
   1.6 Start date and end of project: 21ST August 2008 for 12 months.
   1.7 Funds received so far: None      Date received:
              Amount received:
              Total funds committed by EC: Euro 413,450.96 (Approx BZ$ 1,269,707.94)

   2. Assessment of Progress:

   Based on the priority setting analysis for rural feeder roads and given the limitation of
   remaining BRDP funds, the decision of the NAO and the MoW is to invest in the
   rehabilitation of the Valley of Peace Road in the Cayo District. Valley of Peace was
   identified by BRDP as one of ten priority rural communities in the district for poverty
   reduction. This road connecting the village to the Western Highway is very important
   for the development of several rural communities, the daily travel of children to high
   school and colleges, and for the development of agriculture and tourism that offer
   tremendous potential for several communities in the region. This road measures 9.2
   miles or 14.72 km in length and is unpaved and in a horrible state.

   The works contract comprises the supply the supply of labour, materials, plant,
   equipment, survey instruments, soil testing equipment and any other tools and
   machinery for the execution and completion of the above feeder road. The works
   include the supply, construction, installation and completion of the following:

2008                                                                                73
          Site clearance
          Culvert contraction
          Construction of lined drains and associated structure as detailed on the Contract
           drawings
          Provide, transport, placement and compaction of fill material and all other
           earthworks operations required of the construction as detailed in the Contract
           Drawings
          Any other works as detailed on the Contract Drawings or in the Specifications,
           or as required completing the Contract to the satisfaction of the Supervisor.

    The period for the execution of the work is 12 months. The contract price (excluding
   taxes and duties) amounts to BZ$ 1,175,655.50, for contingencies BZ$ 94,052.44, for a
   total contract price BZ$ 1,269,707.94 (approx. Euro 413,451).

   The contract documents were signed by the MED/ NAO as the contracting authority
   and by the contractor and endorsed by the Head of Delegation of the European
   Commission, however no action has taken place on the ground due to the unresolved
   arrangements for the performance guarantee and insurance requirements of the works
   contract.



11. EU/GoB Visibility Events


11.1 Launching and inaugurations of grants and sub-projects

During the reporting period, BRDP had a very busy schedule of successful visibility
activities which were well attended by Government Ministers, CEOs, non-government
dignitaries, project beneficiaries, the general public, and also well covered by national and
local TV and radio stations. It was a very busy schedule, summarized as follows:
  1) Seven large grants were signed and launched from March 2008 to February 2009,
  2) The Cayo Farmers Market was completed and inaugurated in March,
  3) Constructions, equipment, animals etc for approximately 35 small projects were
       handed over to the beneficiaries throughout the whole year,
  4) Special field visits to project sites were carried out with high level government
       officials, national or international visitors,
  5) The BRDP 2008 calendar/ planner and brochure were distributed,
  6) BRDP placards or signs were installed on most small projects and micro-grants, and
       most structures financed by BRDP were painted with EU colours.
  8. All large grants were launched, each has produced attractive project banner and
       brochure, and letterhead, with the EU flag, Belize flag, and a project logo. Some
       projects have produced calendars and tea-shirts. AED has produced 3 short videos.
  9. The BRDP wehsite was redesigned and launched with all the documentation on line
       (see below).

The highlight of the year was the March visit of the Head of Delegation Marco Mazzocchi
Alemanni and his team. The national media coverage was excellent when he, the Ministers
of Economic Development and Agriculture, and the Mayor of San Ignacio jointly
inaugurated the Cayo Farmers Market. Ambassador Alemanni later toured BRDP projects

2008                                                                                 74
        in southern and northern Belize where he interacted directly with scores of BRDP
        beneficiaries. As a result, the EU and BRDP are now very known throughout the country
        and in particular in most rural communities,

        Below are some pictures for important visibility events and visits were carried by BRDP
        and its partners. It is important to note that although such events promote the EU and GoB
        directly, the local communities and beneficiaries benefit tremendously from the national
        attention on their projects and productive activities. The plan is hold at least one such event
        per month, as presented below:


     Date & Event                                               Pictures
3-6 March 2008
Visit of Ambassador Marco
Mazzocchi Alemanni, Head of
EC Delegation for inauguration
of Cayo Farmers’ Market and
field project of BRDP.

Kew speakers at CFM
inauguration: Ambassador
Aleimanni, Hon E. Contreras,
MED, Hon R. Montero, MAF,
BRDP Director, and others
24 – 25 June 2008
Launching of YWCA Women
& Youth, UB IT and CGA
Rural Dev Projects in belzie
City

Participants: Leaders of all 3
origanizations, keynote given
by Deputy NAO, covered by 3
national TV stations

7 July 2008
Visit to BRDP by Mr Federico
Berna. Visited micro grantees
and




3 September
UNDP/ MAF Cohune project
launch

Main speakers: UNDP, BRDP-
PMU, MAF- Agric Enterprise
Development

Participants (40): Residents of
Flowers Bank and Belize river
valley



        2008                                                                                   75
8 October
SIF Crooked Tree Water
Supply launch

Main speakers: Dep.
Minister of Works, NAO, SIF,
Rural Dev, Village Council

Participants (100): Residents of
Crooked Tree, village councils,
water boards, school children

21 November UNDP/MAF
National Livestock Program
launching

Main speakers: Minister of
MAF, BLPA, UNDP, BRDP,
MAF

Participants: livestock
producers & professionals from
all Belize, students, relevant
institutions

28 November
National Symposium
on Local Governance

BRDP presented its progress &
lessons learnt. BRDP assisted
village councils to participate.

Participants (>80): Relevant
GoB depts, Senators, UNDP,
city/ town & village councils,
NAVCO, donors, etc
30 January 2009
SIF launch of Housing
Componnet of Hurricane Dean
Project

SIF and BRDP presented the
SIF project. Keynote speaker
was Hon. Gaspar Vega, Deputy
PM and Minister of Natural
Resources & Envir.
.
Participants: Over 20 officers of
GoB & local orgs + 60
residents of OW
MAF/ Love FM Agric and              There is a special topic for the 15-minute radio program every week, .e.g
Rural Radio Program                 the Cayo Farmers Market, specific small and micro grantees, or BRDP
                                    special events.
         .

         11.2 Redesign of Belize Rural Development Programme Website
                                                   http://brdp.org

         2008                                                                                     76
The Website provides an overall view of BRDP objectives, projects, partners, service
providers, reports and visibility gallery of the projects that had been implemented. The
website is in the developing process, which is being populated with all the BRDP
documentation. The web developer is Brijido Toledano, University of Belize student, under
direction of the PMU and supported by Mr Omar Riverol, staffer of the Information
Technology Solutions of Belize (ITSB), a BRDP partner under the UB Rural IT project.

The Main Menu for eh BRDP website includes:
      Home
      About BRDP
      Types of Support
      BRDP Projects
      Other
      Reports
      Collaborators and Service Providers
      Photo Gallery

Under Reports, one can find different categories of technical and administrative reports
    Progress Reports
    Evaluation Reports
    Programme Estimate Reports
    Baseline Reports
    EDF Documents
    Seminars/ Workshops
    Administrative




2008                                                                                77
12. 12th Quarterly Progress Report in Detail


This quarterly progress report is a short report as many of the data that need to be given
here are already contained in the previous 3rd Annual Progress Report. There were five
main activities during the reporting period:

12.1 Programme Estimate 3

With an approved budget of Euro 126,771 or B$ 385,473, PE 3 will cover the remaining
period of 18 months of the financial agreement. The first payment of Euro 65,774 (Bz$
165,060) was received on 3rd December 2008 through the BRDP account at the Central
Bank of Belize.

The specific objectives of PE 3 are to support grant beneficiaries and other institutional
stakeholders, to ensure that all BRDP activities are completed successfully, and to establish
a solid foundation for the next phase of rural development under the 10th EDF. In the
context of the approved PE 3 and in response to the main recommendations of the mid
term evaluation, BRDP is focusing on 4 key priority activities over the next 12 months, as
follows:

   Provision of remaining investment and capacity building for small group projects
    and micro grantees: Some 14 small group projects were in the process of
    development and required more time to enable the village groups to carry out their
    operational activities. To be successful, other small projects and some micro grantees
    will be evaluated to determine and to render the specific type of capacity building
    needed for success. This capacity building and training fund covers all workshops,
    seminars, and a large variety of technical training courses and planning meetings for all
    beneficiaries and stakeholders.

   Support and guidance for the large grantees to ensure this modality of EU
    investment under the EDF works: the PMU, on behalf of the NAO, will work closely
    with the 8 large grants, guiding and monitoring their technical and financial operations
    so they conform with EU procedures and to ensure that the objectives and target
    indicators are fully achieved in the context of BRDP. For example, grantee review
    meetings are being held every 3 months to assess the implementation of activities,
    disbursement of resources, and progress in achieving project targets, whether it is
    capacity building of the beneficiaries, infrastructure development and /or institutional
    strengthening.

   Monitoring and evaluation of BRDP projects: An M&E system will provide
    decision makers and stakeholders with timely information and data on the relevance,
    effectiveness, efficiency, and impact of the BRDP supported projects during the 4 years
    of operation. Some of the key performance indicators to be considered are, for
    example, time required to complete important project operations, access of
    beneficiaries to training and service facilities, gross and net income and employment


2008                                                                                 78
    generation per family, net returns to labour and to capital by enterprise, and potential
    impact of BRDP projects to export earnings, food security and poverty reduction.

   EU and GoB Visibility and promotion: BRDP will work with villages, beneficiaries,
    and grant recipients to inform all stakeholders and the general public about the work of
    BRDP, for the benefit of the EU, the GoB and to draw attention to the important
    accomplishments of the rural communities. EU-GoB stickers, plaques, and signboards
    will be purchased, EU visibility materials will be put at each project site, to complete
    the task of placing signs on all small group and micro grant projects.

Some of the small group projects were in varying stages of their development and required
more time to enable the village groups to carry out their activities with their scarce
resources For these projects to be successful, the PMU is working to agree on the specific
investments to be completed, to negotiate and finalize the contract agreements, and begin
implementation as soon as the fund arrive. The status of implementation and performance
indicators for each project are presented below


12.2 Monitoring and Evaluation Implementation

    Small Grants

    1. TOLEDO

a. Laguna Internet Café.
Assessment #2: No internet access since 1 October 2008. The group remains interested in
keeping the café open and intends to organize a fund raising campaign to re-open the café.

b. Jalacte Women’s bakery.
Assessment #2: Contract to complete the project signed on 18 December 2008. Bakery
operational since October 2008 and record keeping kept of sales and cost of inputs only.
Two of the eight women received train-of-trainer training in bread and pastry baking as
follows: 26-28 Jan. 2008, 2-4 Feb. 2008 and 9-11 Feb. 2008. Good growth potential and
good sustainability prospects as market and group continues to be solid with good
leadership.

c. Dolores Livestock.
The project is implemented by six male and two female farmers. The assistance is for
continued improvement and sustainability management of the cattle production system.
The bull is being rotated between the member’s pastures and records are kept to follow up
on calving rate.
Assessment #1: Contract to complete the project signed on 18 December 2009. Project is
72% completed and has good growth potential and sustainability.

d. San Miguel Internet Café.
Assessment #1: On first visit (16 January 2009) the internet was not operational, the new
school principal had no ownership of the project and a meeting was rescheduled to meet
with all members at the end of January 2009 to clarify ownership and determine interest of
the group. Group pledged willingness to work together, offer services on cash basis only
and to raise funds to sustain the café once they paid off the outstanding fees. Support is to


2008                                                                                 79
be provided by ITSB and UoB in the repairing of 2 computers, donation of 1 to make a
total of 6 functional computers.

e. Big Falls Internet Café.
Assessment #1: The school co-finances the internet café and although the book-keeping
records of the café shows a deficit of BZ$520.17 fund raising activities are carried out to
ensure payment of internet service. The committee requested for specialized training
which will be organized by UoB and facilitated through ITSB. The committee is desirous
to obtain internet service from Belize Telemedia Limited as soon as such becomes
available in the village in order to ensure consistent service.

                                  Toledo District
Contract Enterprise Village    Status of   Growth Income         Net           Sustain-
Number                      Implementation Potential Generator Income           ability
                                                                  $
2/21/6/3(A    Internet   Laguna   Completed        No      Problems   Loss     Problems
     )          cafe
3/1-12/6/3    Baking     Jalacte 28% completed    Good      Good        ?        Good

3/1-13/6/3 Livestock Dolores 72% completed        Good      Good        ?        Good

2/21/6/3(B)   Internet    San     Completed        No      Problems   Loss     Problems
                cafe     Miguel
 2/79/6/3     Internet    Big     Completed      Question- Marginal (520.14)    Average
                cafe      Falls                    able


   2. STANN CREEK

a. Red Bank Honey.
Assessment #2: The apiary was vandalized in December of 2008, 15 of the 58 bee
colonies remained. Contract to complete the project signed on 19 January 2009. Total bee
hives at present is 36. Little honey will be harvested during the 2009 production season
which will end in April.

b. Belfuna culture based enterprise development-Hopkins.
Assessment #2: The contract for completion of the project was signed on 24 February
2009. Completion and opening date of the enterprise was not met as 15 November 2008.
Commercial viability and sustainability is still unclear and uncertain. As a major fund
raising drive of the group, a culture day is planned for 14 March 2009.

c. Bamboo Production-Maya Mopan.
The project is implemented by 15 farmers (including 2 women). The group needs to
establish 15 acres of bamboo after which time material will be harvested for arts and craft
making.
Assessment #1: The contract for completion of the project was signed on 19 January 2009.
The project is 31% completed with the establishment of 4 acres of bamboo. The remaining
planting material will be procured at the onset of the rainy season (June/July 2009).

d. Lebeha Group-Hopkins.
The 12 member group consists of four adults (3 male, 1 female) and eight youth (5 male, 3
female, 12 to 18 years old) all from Hopkins Village. The mentors of the group (include Mr

2008                                                                               80
Jabbar Lambey, Mrs Hilda Martinez and Mrs Dorothy Pettersen). A first meeting arranged
through the treasurer of the group was held on 24 February 2009, the youths were not
present (studying in Belmopan) and the only other group members present was the
Chairperson and two other female members at the time in the village. It was explained to
the group that for reasons of the land title being that of a private individual that the initial
idea of a building could not be financed. The mentors of the group then proceeded to
articulate the interest of the group to use the assistance in the printing and production of
1,000 copies of a CD recorded (12 drumming songs) by the group, procure 2 sets of 10
outfits and drumming materials. No decision made to sign a contract with the group as
other issues of group formation, registration, copy right of the CD etc. need to be met.
There will also need to be a meeting where all the members including the youths are
present to determine their commitment in the group activities.

Assessment #1: Provided that the group is formalized and its members are committed to
the project a recommendation will be made for assistance.




2008                                                                                    81
                                    Stann Creek District

Contract     Enter-    Village      Status of  Growth Income          Net     Sustainabilit
Number        prise                Implemen-   Potential Genera-    Income         y
                                     tation                tor
3/1-11/5/3   Honey  Red          63% completed  Good      Good       None        Good
                    Bank
3/1-10/5/3 Bamboo Maya 31% completed             Good      Good      None        Good
                   Mopan
3/1-09/5/3 Belfuna Hopkins Contract signed       Good      Good      None        Good
                            24 Feb 2009
3/1-08/5/3 Lebeha Hopkins Under discussion         -        -          -           -


   3. BELIZE

a. Flowers Bank- Small Livestock Production.
Assessment #2: The contract to complete the project was signed on 23 February 2009.
The project has good growth potential as meat prices are very good; with good markets in
neighboring countries and group will produce own feed.

b. Dauntless Designer’s Women Group-Double Head Cabbage.
Assessment #2:        Contract to compete the project signed on 19 February 2009. Funds
will provide for electricity connection, training in the use of the heavy duty sewing
machines and training in business management. Access to working capital through small
business credit (about BZ$ 2,500) from a Credit Union (project intervention) will be
explored. Sales potential deemed to be good as confirmed by group. The group needs
specialized training to be provided in the next quarter.

                                       Belize District

Contract Enterprise Village    Status of   Growth Income         Net           Sustaina-
Number                      Implementation Potential Generator Income            bility
3/1-01/3/3   Sewing     D.H. Contract signed      Good     Good        (?)      Average,
                       Cabbage 23 Feb 2009                                    need training
3/1-02/3/3   Pig &     Flowers Contract signed    Good     Good        (?)       Good
             Broiler    Bank    23 Feb 2009



   4. CAYO

a. Bullet Tree Village-women’s art and crafts.

Assessment #2: Contract to complete the project signed on 21 January 2009. Group will
be assisted with marketing through a service provider. The group will be provided a space
at the Farmers Market in San Ignacio for the sale of their products.

b. Cotton Tree Internet Café.
Assessment #1:      The group is functional whilst the internet service is paid for by the
project. Not having service especially in the rainy season has deterred the clientele. With
an average monthly income of BZ$481.70 and an average monthly operational expenditure

2008                                                                                82
(including stipend) of BZ$297.50 the group would break even come the time to meet
monthly internet service fee of BZ$175.00 per month. Investment made to the tune of
BZ$610.00 over the past 10 months was considered as co-financing. The group has
requested for specialized training which will be organized by UoB and facilitated through
ITSB. Potential growth is negligible and sustainability of concern.

                                       Cayo District

Contract Enterprise Village    Status of      Growth Income        Net   Sustainability
Number                      Implementation Potential Generator Income
  3/1-     Arts &   Bullet 47% Completed       Good      Below    None       Need
 05/4/3    Craft     Tree                               average            marketing
                                                                           assistance
2/85/4/3 Internet Cotton       Completed     Negligible Problem    Loss     Problem
            Cafe     Tree
           Cayo     Various    Completed       Good Very good 71,568.00 Very Good
          Farmers’                                                / year
           Market             6 permanent      Good Very good 250.00 to Very Good
                            vendors surveyed                     603.00
                                                                per week


   5. ORANGE WALK

a. Farmers Crop Diversification-Petville.
Assessment #2: Very good growth potential but sustainability uncertain. To date, the
project is owed some BZ$38,000. from its main buyer: Maya Papaya. Fruit production is
projected to last another 4 months.

b. Women’s Group Soy Milk Production- Trial Farm Village.
Assessment #2: The group has been inactive since December 2008. The Cooperative
Officer has been asked to assist the group in re-organization, development of by-laws,
assistance with the development of a business plan and simple book-keeping training. The
project has very good growth potential and sustainability.

c. Women’s Restaurant – Santa Cruz.
Assessment #2: Contract to complete the project was signed on 9 February 2009. The
Cooperative Officer was introduced to the group and he is to provide training in keeping
accounts and assist the group with the development of a business plan. The restaurant has
been closed for business since flooding effects from Tropical Storm #16. The toilet is to be
finalized by the group after inspection by the Public Health Inspector (PHI) and training of
the group in food handling has been requested of the Public Health Department. The
growth potential and sustainability of the project remain as good.

d. Broom Manufacturing – Chan Pine Ridge.
Assessment #1: Contract to complete the project was signed on 9 February 2009. The
group will be able to increase its efficiency in the manufacturing of broom once the broom
sewing machine procured is properly installed. At this time, the national broom market is
available to only this group. The potential and sustainability of the project remain as good.




2008                                                                                 83
                                         Orange Walk District

   Contract Enterprise Village    Status of   Growth Income         Net Sustainabilit
   Number                      Implementation Potential Generator Income     y
    2/13/2/2       Soya      Trial   7 Feb 2009 –       Good         Good         (0)      Re-organize,
                 Products    Farm inactive since Dec                                         By-laws,
                                         2008                                            business plan &
                                                                                             trainingg
    2/16/2/3      Papaya    Petville   7 Feb 2009         3-4        Good         (?)       Maya Fruit
                                                       months to                          Packers owes
                                                        harvest                           group $35,000
   3/1-06/2/3 Restaurant Santa Contract signed 9        Good         Good         (0)     Closed due to
                         Cruz     Feb 2009;                                               losses caused
                                 Incomplete                                                 by TS#16
   3/1-07/2/3     Broom     Chan Contract signed 9       Very      Very good      (?)       Very good
                            Pine    Feb 2009;            good
                            Ridge 9% Completed


          Large Grants

   The implementation of a participatory M&E by BRDP as part-and-parcel of the programme
   management system begun at the 2nd Grantees Quarterly Progress Meeting held on 4
   December 2008 in Punta Gorda Town. This was followed up by individual meetings with
   Large Grantees throughout the month of January 2009: CGA (14 Jan.), TTCU (15 Jan.),
   UoB (20 Jan.), UNDP/MAF (21 Jan.), BEST (22 Jan.), SIF (27 Jan.) and YWCA (28 Jan.).
   As a result of this assessment, BEST has finalized and tested the Beneficiary Interim
   Report form; the YWCA has developed their M&E strategy. The other implementing
   partners as well as beneficiaries have been advised accordingly as to the additional
   information needs and indicators to be collected. In the first instance, the baseline data and
   other monitoring data will be organized and analyzed using Excel. The table below
   presents the status of each large grant in term of the work plan and their objectively
   verifiable indicators (OVIs):


Project          Contract   According to work       OVIs (only those quantified in Log Frame)
(Title)          Duration   plan?
                 (months)
TTCU Rural       24         Yes                     - 50 households increase monthly income by BZ$ 105
Development                                         by 2010 in Toledo district through small business
Programme for                                       activities.
Toledo                                              - Unemployment in rural Toledo decrease 10%
District                    Yes – Feb. 2009         - households increased to 80 as the average number of
                                                    member per group is 8.
BEST Belize      24         Yes                     - 300 assessments (33% done)
Rural Dev                                           - 200 micro grants disbursed (14% done
Programme                                           - 200 entrepreneurs trained
Micro                       Yes – Feb. 2009         - 300 assessments (75% done)
Enterprise for                                      - 200 micro grants disbursed (67% done)
Poor Families                                       - 200 entrepreneurs trained (44% done)
Programme                                           - funds disbursed (63%)

   2008                                                                                           84
Project           Contract     According to work          OVIs (only those quantified in Log Frame)
(Title)           Duration     plan?
                  (months)
SIF Belize        12           Slight delay/tight 12      100% of present households in Crooked Tree
Rural                          month schedule.            connected to fully functioning potable water system
Development                    Waiting for deroga-tion    operational in the community.
Programme                      on import materials
Grant to          Will         Further delay by effects   - No monitoring data available
Implement a       request an   of Tropical Storm (TS)
Water Supply      extension    #16 – Feb. 2009
System for
Crooked Tree
Village in the
Belize district
of Belize.

UNDP/MAF          24           Yes. Some minor            Improve small farm productivity:
Agricultural                   technical changes in       -150 acres with water management technologies
Enterprise                     activities                 (irrigation/drainage/wells/etc)
Development                                               - min. 200 farmers trained in water management
for Rural                                                 - 12 workshops for 200 farmers water management
Belize                                                    -protective structures in place in min. 25 pilot farms
                                                          Intro on-farm management systems:
                                                          -Several publication on farm management
                                                          - TV/Radio spots farm management
                                                          - 3 workshops farm management
                                                          Improved post-harvest handling:
                                                          - Centralized food processing/packaging units (no.?)
                                                          - HACCP slaughter slabs (no.?)
                                                          - Completed cold chain (no.?)
                                                          - 150 farmers received training
                                                          Agro market data collection, information exchange,
                                                          creation producer market linkages:
                                                          - Establishment agri-marketing information system
                                                          - TV/Radio spots marketing information system
                                                          -3 stakeholder workshops
                               Yes. – Feb. 2009. Third    Improved post-harvest handling:
                               party involvement is       - Act. 3.2: Centralized food processing/packaging
                               rated as very good.        units (10)
                                                          - Act. 3.3: Completed cold chain (3)
                                                          - Act. 3.7: HACCP slaughter slabs (1)
UB Rural IT       20           Yes                        - 22 new IT centres established
Project in                                                - 8 existing IT centres refurbished and improved.
Belize.                                                   - at least 30% increase of population in target areas
                                                          accessing IT services.




   2008                                                                                                    85
Project           Contract   According to work          OVIs (only those quantified in Log Frame)
(Title)           Duration   plan?
                  (months)
CGA Rural         18         Yes. Some minor delay      - 200 rural families benefiting from the project (50%
Development                  purchase materials.        citrus farm families)
for the Stann                                           - increased cash income from domestic and tourist
Creek Districts                                         markets (values?)
of Belize                                               - 4 functioning networks for southern tourism
                                                        development
                                                        - 10% increase in production and employment of 200
                                                        rural families
                             No – Feb. 2009.            - there is need to fast track project implementation in
                             10 months remaining to     order to monitor both technical and financial
                             complete 18 months         interventions.
                             project
YWCA              24         Slight delays in trainings. - at least 200 rural women and youth targeted for
Women and                    Major delay in              enrolment.
Youth Project                construction building       - 18 skills training modules developed
                                                         - at least 164 rural women and youth successfully
                                                         completed training programmes
                                                         - 50 successful participants receive starter kits with
                                                         tools/equipment for income generation.
                                                         - at least 150 successful participants have started own
                                                         business or placed in employment
                                                         - 4 new training rooms built
                                                         - 4 dorms built
                                                         - 4 dorms, 1 restroom, 1 kitchen area rehabilitated.
SIF Hurricane     21         Slight delay – Feb. 2009 - Preparing for audit and interim report as nearing
Dean                         - construction behind by further pre-financing eligibility.
                             2 months.
                             - training in O/Walk to
                             commence mid March
                             2009 delay due to effects
                             caused by TS#16
                             - M&E person hired and
                             strategy developed.

   Cayo Farmers Market
   Assessment #2: The market generated a net benefit of an estimated Bz$ 71,808 to date
   (April 2008 – March 2009) based on average monthly revenues of BZ$10,340 and
   expenditures of BZ$ 4,356 (information provided by San Ignacio municipality covering the
   period).
     Monthly revenues:                                          Bz$
          Permanent stalls: 17 stalls X $120 / stall =         1,920
          Temporary stalls: 900 stalls X $7.00 /stall =        6,400
          Use of toilet facilities: 2,000 persons at $1/ use = 2,000
                 Total                                         10,320

      Monthly costs:
         Labour (the manager, toilet keeper, cleaners, etc)                    2,556

   2008                                                                                                   86
       Utilities (water mainly)                                   900
       Other                                                      900
               Total                                            4,356

       Estimated profit: per month Bz$ 5,964 and per year: Bz$ 71,568

An attempt was made at determining the economic viability of the market for the users.
Six of the 17 permanent market vendors were interviewed with net income ranging from
BZ$250. to BZ$ 603.per week, with the fresh meat market stall fetching the upper level net
income. The data collection of the permanent and temporary vendors is ongoing, and by
all indications, this BRDP project has good growth potential and sustainability.

10 Key constraints/Bottlenecks identified
   A. Limited time available by Public Officers, namely Coop Officers and Extension
      Officers of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries to provide follow up to
      agriculture projects and group dynamics needs.
   B. Beneficiaries do not practice record keeping.

11 Lessons Learnt
   A. Groups that are not genuine but driven by one or two individuals’ quickly loose
      ownership value of the project.
   B. Satellite internet café not financially sustainable and service is unreliable especially
      on cloudy days.
   C. Group dynamics and registration a condition to be met prior to project
      implementation.
   D. Markets should be understood fully so as not to misguide the groups. Fro example,
      garment groups have difficulty in getting markets due to cheap imports from
      Mexico and Guatemala and import of used clothing from USA.
   E. Communication between service provider, group and DDC should always follow
      chain of command to ensure good coordination, support and continuity..

12 Recommended actions
   A. PMU to ensure small grants with problems are mentored by efficient and reliable
      service providers.
   B. The Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist to develop a check list and
      schedule to technically monitor the large grants for immediate implementation.
   C. M&E Specialist need not compromise M&E work plan over implementation, a
      limit of 20% of time will be made available.
   D. Implementation of the M&E work plan is to be supported at all levels.


12.3 Financial status of PE 3

The table below presents in brief the financial status of BRDP to the end of February 2009.




2008                                                                                  87
                           Criteria                                 Nov '08 - Feb 09
Ordinary Income/Expense
Income
35100 · EU Transfer                                                             75,285.00
Total Income                                                                    75,285.00
Expenses
   63100 · General Sales Tax                                                      870.32
   68500 · Discount                                                               -33.72

   A2 · Emp. of Comm. Grassroots, Facilitators                                  30,068.06
      A2.02 · Agric & Rural Dev Radio Project.                                     240.00
      A2.03 · Contract with Service Providers                                    3,677.50
      A2.04 · Support for Internship                                               328.15
      A2.05 · Cap Building Ment Proj Dev & Management                           13,119.46
      A2.06 · EU & GoB Visibility & Promotion                                    3,527.60
      A2.07 · Operational & Admin Charges                                        9,175.35
   A3 · Cap. Buling & Dir. Supp. SME                                            11,178.21
      A3.05 · Bullett Tree Production of Arts & Craft                              999.44
      A3.07 · Chan Pine Ridge Broom Production                                     250.00
      A3.10 · Maya Mopan Bamboo Project.                                         3,826.44
      A3.11 · Red Bank Honey Production                                          2,591.95
      A3.12 · Jalacte Micro Women Business Dev                                   1,056.11
      A3.13 · Dolores Livestock Prod & Marketing                                 2,454.27

   Total Expense                                                                42,082.87

Net Ordinary Income                                                             33,202.13


12.4 Guidance and support for Large Grantees

Report on visits to the large grants between the periods December 2008 to February 2009.
These visits were made to verify the grantee’s accounting system and record keeping is in
compliance with EU’s procedures.

Assistance was also rendered to them on the preparation of their manuals and the
procurement plans. Most of them now have a manual where two of them are using their
existing manuals with a little modification to be compliant with EU procedures. All the
procurement plans are now in and are in compliance with the regulations.

Some findings from the visits are listed below along with recommendations given to the
beneficiaries:
   Most of the beneficiaries are using the QuickBooks Accounting package, assistance
     and training was given to some of them (YWCA, TTCU, CGA) on a one-on-one
     basis on entering the chart of accounts in accordance with their grant budget;
     preparing purchase orders in the accounting system; preparation of bank

2008                                                                              88
       reconciliation and the generation of the different reports, for internal and external
       purposes.
      They were all advised to prepare purchase orders for all purchases, one beneficiary
       has not complied, and another is not consistent with the preparation of purchase
       orders. This has been re-iterated to them several times since the use of purchase
       orders is a method of committing funds for future payment. Purchase orders are to be
       prepared, authorized and approved by the appropriate officer.
      While on the visits, time was taken to go through certain sections of the General
       Conditions (Annex II) of their contracts with them. Emphasis was made to article 15,
       16 and some segments of article 2 and 9.
      Some beneficiaries have photocopied and faxed invoices, they were advised to secure
       the originals of these invoices and in the future to make payments off originals only
       after item has been received and proper documentation of goods or services received
       should be indicated on the invoice and stamp paid after payment is effected. They
       were advised the EU will not accept photocopied or faxed invoice.
      Contracts were reviewed. It is clear that most of them are aware of the procedures and
       the contract forms. Two of them are using their organization’s contract format which
       is not compliant with the EU’s format. They were advised on how to download the
       EU format of the website along with the relevant annexes for future use.
      Most of the staff paid from EU funds did not have a proper contract, were not
       preparing time sheets and invoices. This discussed with then and they were advised to
       start using the time sheets immediately and to start invoicing the project for their
       payment. This caused resistance from some beneficiaries. They were referred to
       article 16 of the general conditions that detailed the documentation required for staff.
      Payments were made for food without any signatures taken from those who ate. They
       were advised to get the signatures and where possible minutes and or agenda to the
       event that gave rise to the purchase of food.
      For one beneficiary payments are made without any relevant documentation, only the
       payment order form was found as documentation. It was advised that this is
       unacceptable each payment is to be supported by an original invoice.
      Large amounts were paid out as re-imbursements on a regularly basis to one
       individual. This was found with two of the beneficiaries, although these were
       supported by invoices or receipts, they were advised that they should keep away from
       re-imbursement and review their accounting system to allow for direct purchase from
       the supplier.

A meeting was held with Mr Nicolas Ritzenthaler from the EC Delegation on 29 January
2009 to clear up some issues and misconceptions with grant beneficiaries. As a result of
this meeting, a seminar was held on 12 February, by PMU staff and assistance from Mr.
Anthony Acheampong, TA assigned to the NAO, on the guidelines and procedures to
follow in the implementation of their grant contract. The seminar was very informative, it
was well attended and quite interactive. The beneficiaries are now well informed and it is
expected that they will manage their funds better.

At the seminar all were advised that they should record their own contribution (co-
financing) as this is also a requirement of their grant contracts. From the visits made none

2008                                                                                   89
of the beneficiaries are recording their own contributions. They were informed that this can
also be entered and monitored in the accounting system differentiating the EU grant funds
from the organization’s contribution.

Internal expenditure verification is currently being conducted for all the beneficiaries. Four
of the beneficiaries are complete. All should be completed by the end of March 2009. A
report will be provided separately for each beneficiary.




2008                                                                                  90

				
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