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					   Comprehensive
 Curriculum Guide




The Brook Hill School
 Education * Potential * Character
                 Table of Contents


Mission Statement                                       3
Philosophy of Education                                 4
Philosophy of Curriculum                                5
Brook Hill Objectives                                   5
School Profile                                          6-8
Grade-level Requirements:
    Middle School                                       9
    Upper School                                        10
    Graduation Requirements                             11
Academic Departments                                    12
Course Offerings by Department:
    Sequence of Study &
    Course Descriptions                                 13+




                    Education * Potential * Character

                                   2
            Mission Statement




The Brook Hill School provides excellence in
 college preparatory education, affirms the
 gifts and challenges the potential of each
student, and encourages students to honor
    God through Christ-like character.




              Education * Potential * Character

                             3
                  Philosophy of Education

   The Brook Hill School bases its educational philosophy on a Christian
worldview which comes from the truths of the Christian faith found in the
infallible, inerrant, and inspired Word of God. The Bible is authoritative,
reliable, and the final source of truth.

   We believe God created, sustains, and will consummate all things
through his Son, the Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore, the universe and all life
are dynamically related to Him and have the purpose of glorifying Him.

   Man is created in God’s image and therefore of infinite worth. He is
also a sinner by nature and by choice because of the fall of Adam. As
such, he is separated from God and incapable of knowing or glorifying
God apart from a work of reconciliation by God through the atoning
death of Jesus Christ. Man can be reconciled to God only by being born
again through receiving Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord by faith.

   Education can most effectively be accomplished in an environment
which recognizes that all truth is God’s truth. The fear of the Lord is the
foundation of all wisdom and knowledge, and only a redeemed person
can fully comprehend truth as the Holy Spirit reveals it to him. In the
curricula, an emphasis on the unity of all truth and on the development of
an eternal perspective for life naturally follows.

   A Brook Hill education strives to develop the whole child and therefore
offers a balance in instruction so that students may grow in knowledge,
skills, and wisdom which ground young people the rest of their lives for
living as God has designed, free to choose with wisdom and act with love.

   Scripture clearly teaches that parents are responsible for their
children’s education and discipline. The school is not a substitute for the
home, but is an extension of the home and one means through which
parents fulfill the responsibility the Lord has given them.



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                                         4
                  Philosophy of Curriculum

   Our curriculum at The Brook Hill School is designed to provide an
excellent college preparatory education. Brook Hill’s curriculum is drawn
from the classical Christian liberal arts education heritage, which is based
on universal truths, foundational principles, enduring traditions, and the
great literature of history. Each student is challenged not only
academically but also athletically, artistically, and spiritually.

   We are committed to the integration of faith and learning based on
the conviction that God created us to be lovers and learners of Him, of
our neighbors, and of all creation.

   Students at The Brook Hill School are not just taught by a Christian
faculty, but encouraged to develop the disciplines that lead to spiritual
maturity. Chapel, Bible classes, and service projects are incorporated into
the curriculum to energize Brook Hill students to discover and mature in
their spiritual life.



Brook Hill Student Objectives:
   •   Preparing young people to succeed in college and life pursuits
   •   Strengthening their faith so that they may make choices that honor
       God
   •   Developing in them a heart for others so they may respond in a
       Christ-like way
   •   Providing opportunities for them to become effective and dynamic
       leaders
   •   Motivating them to serve their community, nation and the world
   •   Encouraging the desire to do all things to the best of their abilities
   •   Promoting the discovery of each person’s unique purpose in life




                          Education * Potential * Character

                                         5
2004-2005
SCHOOL CODE:     440-989

SCHOOL:          A 6-12 independent, coeducational, college-preparatory
                 day and boarding school founded in 1997; evangelical,
                 interdenominational.
STAFF:           Headmaster – Rod Fletcher
                 Director of Admissions and Marketing - Ginger Bell
                 Dean of Students – Sean Collins
                 Dean of Faculty – Connie Russell
                 Director of Residence/Student Life – Shawn Rhoads
                 Academic Guidance Counselor- Kristi Kirkpatrick
                 Athletic Director – David Collins
ACCREDITATION:   Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

AFFILIATIONS:    College Board; National and Texas Association of College Admission
                 Counselors; Texas
                 Association of Nonpublic Schools; Association of Christian Schools
                 International; The Association of Boarding Schools

STUDENT BODY:    Grade 6 - Grade 12……………………………………..170
                 Upper School………………………………..………….115
                 Senior Class…………………………………………..….28
                 Upper School Student/Teacher Ratio (average class size is 18)...8:1
CALENDAR:        36 weeks; 2 semesters, 2 grading periods; 50 minute class
                 periods, most meeting 5 days a week; five 20 minute
                 backwork periods per week.
FACULTY:         27 full-time teachers; 60% with advanced degrees; all
                 highly skilled and qualified.

GRADUATION:      Class of 2005: “Recommended curriculum” includes 26 ½
                 credits – one credit earned for each yearlong course and 1/2
                 credit for each semester course.
                 (Equivalent to the Texas DAP standards.)
                 English………… 4 credits                  History………..……….                   3 credits
                 Am Gov./Eco….. 1 credit                Mathematics*………….                  3 credits
                 Technology…….. 1 credit                Science (lab course)..….           3 credits
                 Foreign Language 3 credits             Health………………….                     ½ credit
                 Phys. Education… 1 ½ credits           Fine Arts……………….                   2 credits
                 Bible…………… 2 credits                   Elective………………..                   2 credits
                 Speech…………. ½ credit
                 Community Service is required of all students 6-12.
                 *Sequence of courses is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Precalculus, and AP Calculus
                 AB. Students who take Honors Algebra I in eighth grade must take Geometry, Algebra II
                 and Precalculus as minimum requirement.



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HONORS/PRE AP & AP
COURSE OFFERINGS:    Courses currently offered include: Honors Spanish II; III;
                     Honors French II, III; Honors Algebra I (eighth grade
                     only), Honors Algebra II, Honors Geometry, Pre AP
                     Precalculus, AP Calculus; Honors Chemistry, Pre AP
                     Biology, DC Anatomy & Physiology, Honors Physics; Pre
                     AP History 9, 10, 11, DC Government &Economics; Pre
                     AP English 9, 10, 11, AP Language & Composition 11, AP
                     European History 11, AP Literature & Composition 12, AP
                     United States History.
CLASS RANK:          The Valedictorian and the Salutatorian are determined by
                     the GPA derived from the courses completed at The Brook
                     Hill School in grades 9-12; some grades are weighted. No
                     other rank is given.

CURRICULAR
DISTINCTIVES:        Brook Hill offers a classical education from a Christian
                     worldview based on universal truths, foundational
                     principles, enduring traditions and the great literature of
                     history taught in a multi-sensory, integrated format. Brook
                     Hill’s history and English program focuses on an intensive
                     study of great writings, people, events, works and ideas that
                     have formed and reformed civilization, as we know it.
                     Normative works of our culture are studied within their
                     historical settings. This helps the students understand how
                     the works and the people who wrote them were influenced
                     by their times. It also reveals the universal nature of the
                     great works, which are classics because they somehow
                     speak to all men at all times. The courses are organized
                     chronologically, moving from ancient civilizations to
                     modern times. Emphasis is placed upon reading, writing,
                     and speaking/listening skills.
GRADING:             Letter GPA Numerical                  Letter GPA
    Numerical
                     Grade              Average            Grade
Average
                     A+      4.3        98-100       C+    2.3      77-79
                     A       4.0        93-97        C     2.0      73-76
                     A-      3.7        90-92        C-    1.7      70-72
                     B+      3.3        87-89        D+    1.3      67-69
                     B       3.0        83-86        D     1.0      63-66
                     B-      2.7        80-82        D-    0.7      60-62
                                                     F     0.0     Below 60


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GPA COMPUTATION:    Each student has a cumulative GPA calculated from the
                    beginning of ninth grade. Since the School is selective in
                    admission, rank in class is of little significance in
                    predicting success in college. Our strength is such that all
                    of our students have a solid academic foundation and are
                    well-prepared to perform in a demanding college
                    environment. Therefore, we do not rank; however, we do
                    weight classes. AP denotes an Advanced Placement course
                    which is given a weight of 1.0, Pre AP is given 0.75, and
                    H, for Honors classes, is given 0.5 for level of difficulty.
NATIONAL MERIT      The Brook Hill School has had 3 graduating classes with 2
PROGRAM:            Commended Scholars.


CEEB SAT SUMMARY:           Brook Hill              Texas           National
                            (Class of 2003-2004)        (2003)       (2003)
         Mean Verbal            543                      493        507
         Mean Math              533                      500        519
         Mean Composite        1076                      993        1026

ACT SUMMARY:                Brook Hill              Texas           National
                           (Class of 2002-2003)     (2002)           (2002)
         Mean Composite         23.8                    19.9        20.8
COLLEGE CHOICES:    Brook Hill graduates have been accepted to the following
                    colleges and universities: Agnes Scott College, Barnard
                    College, Baylor University, Converse College, Cornell
                    University, Cornell College, Dallas Baptist University, Embry-
                    Riddle Aeronautical University, George Fox, Harding
                    University, Hobart and William Smith College, John Brown
                    University, Johnson & Wales University, Le Tourneau
                    University, Mount Holyoke College, Prairie View A & M
                    University, Randolph Macon College, Randolph Macon
                    Women’s College, Sam Houston State University, Smith
                    College, Southeastern Missouri State University, Southern
                    Methodist University, Southwestern University, Southwest
                    Texas University, St. Edward’s University, St. John’s College,
                    Stephen F. Austin State University, Texas A & M at College
                    Station, Texas A & M at Galveston, Texas Christian University,
                    Texas Tech University, Trinity University, Tyler Junior College,
                    Tulane University, University of Houston, University of
                    Mississippi, University of Missouri, University of North Texas,
                    University of Texas at Arlington, University of Texas at Austin,
                    University of Texas at San Antonio, University of Texas at
                    Tyler, Wade College, Wellesley College, and Wesleyan College.




                    Education * Potential * Character

                                     8
The Brook Hill School                                  2004-2005

Middle School- Course of Study


  Department         Credits           6                       7                    8


   Humanities:                        H/E                     H/E                  H/E




                                      H/E                     H/E                  H/E




                                   Bible (2)               Bible (2)            Bible (3)



                                                                                 Alg 1 A
Math/Science/Tech:     1*            Math                   Pre-Alg
                                                                                 Alg 1 *



                                      Sci                     Sci                  Sci



                                 Keyboarding
   Keyboarding:
                                     (1)


                               Exploring Foreign                              French 1A*
Foreign Languages:     1*                               Intro Latin (3)
                                Languages (2)                               Spanish 1A* (3)

                                                           Speech
    Speech:
                                                             (1)
                               Fine Arts Rotation
                                                       Fine Arts Elective   Fine Arts Elective
    Fine Arts:                    - Art, Drama,
                                                              (4)                  (4)
                                Choir, Orchestra

  PE/Athletics:                   PE/Ath (4)             PE/Ath (4)           PE/Ath (4)

* receives upper
  school credit




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The Brook Hill School                                2004-2005

Upper School- Course of Study
    Department          Credits          9                 10                11                  12

                                                                        H/E (Pre-AP)          Eng H
     Humanities:          4       H/E/B (Pre-AP)     H/E/B (Pre-AP)
                                                                        H/E AP Lang          Eng AP Lit

                                                                         H/E (Pre-AP)
                          3       H/E/B (Pre-AP)     H/E/B (Pre-AP)                       AP US History*
                                                                       H/E AP Euro Hist
                                                                                          DC Govt / Govt
                                                                                              (1/2)
                          1
                                                                                          DC Econ / Eco
                                                                                              (1/2)
                          2                                                 Bible               Bible


                          ½                            Logic (1/2)      Logic (1/2)*        Logic (1/2)*

                                       Alg 1           Geometry             Alg 2         Pre-Cal (Pre-AP)*
  Math/Science/Tech:      3
                                     Geometry            Alg 2         Pre-Cal (Pre-AP)      AP Calculus*

                                                                           Physics           DC A & P*
                          3            Bio 1            Chem 1
                                                                          Physics H         AP Chem 2*

                          ½        Health (1/2)
                                                       Intro Tech       Web Design*         Web Design*
                          1
                                                     (1- self-paced)     Yearbook*           Yearbook*

  Foreign Languages:      3          French 1          French 2           French 3
                                     Spanish 1         Spanish 2          Spanish 3

                                  Select One – Art    Select One -      Elective* - Art    Elective* - Art
                                       Drama          Art   Drama           Drama              Drama
      Fine Arts:          2
                                       Choir              Choir              Choir              Choir
                                     Orchestra         Orchestra          Orchestra          Orchestra

                          ½        Speech (1/2)

    PE/Athletics:
  1 ath season =
                         1 ½          PE/Ath            PE/Ath            PE/Ath*             PE/Ath*
     1/2 credit
max 3 credits counted
                                                                         Study Hall*        Study Hall*
     Electives*:          2
                                                                         (no credit)       ( no credit)
                                                      Study Hall                          CollegeQuest
                                                         upon          CollegeQuest            (1/2)
       Other:            1½
                                                     completion of         (1/2)            Leadership
                                                      Intro Tech                               (1/2)
                                                                       6 1/2 required      4 required +
                                   7 required +      7 1/2 required
                                                                       +1-2 electives     1-3 electives +
                                     athletics         + athletics
                                                                         + athletics         athletics


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                 Graduation Requirements
                                      for
                       Brook Hill Diploma

Class of 2005: “Recommended curriculum” includes 26 1/2 credits – one credit
earned for each year-long course and 1/2 credit for each semester course.

English…………………4 credits                  History………..………….3 credits
Am Gov/Eco…………....1 credit               Mathematics*……..…….3 credits
Technology……………..1 credit                Science (lab course)..….3 credits
Foreign Language….…3 credits**           Health……………….….1/2 credit
Phys. Education…..1 1/2 credits          Fine Arts……………..….2 credits
Bible………………….…2 credits
Speech……………..…1/2 credit                 Elective……………..….. 2 credits

Community Service is required of all students.

*Sequence of courses is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, and AP
Calculus AB. Students who successfully complete Honors Algebra I in eighth
grade must take Geometry, Algebra II and Pre-Calculus as minimum
requirement.

**Recommended, but not required


          Criteria for Diploma with Honors
Students who complete the “recommended curriculum” without waivers and
whose final cumulative GPA is 3.295 or higher, will graduate with the special
distinction of “Honor Graduate.”


   Criteria for Diploma with Highest Honors
Students who complete the “recommended curriculum” without waivers and
whose final cumulative GPA is 3.795 or above and have successfully completed
one or more dual credit courses with a “B” average or above or received a 3 or
higher on a College Board Advanced Placement exam, will graduate with the
special distinction of “ Distinguished Graduate.”
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Academic Departments



              Bible
          Fine Arts
   Foreign Language
        Humanities
      Mathematics
  Physical Education
            Science
        Technology




   Education * Potential * Character

                  12
           Course Offerings by Department

BIBLE DEPARTMENT
  The school is committed to the Bible as God’s revealed Word: therefore our emphasis
in the Bible curriculum is to teach our students to read and study the Bible for
themselves. Our approach is inductive, raising the questions necessary to involve the
learner in the text and make valid conclusions from the reading. Our desire is that the
reading and study will lead each student into a deeper walk with Christ. The Bible
classes are designed to help the students develop a Christian worldview and an
understanding of how biblical principles apply to the situations they face today.


Bible 6
 This course in Old Testament will introduce students to the Hebrew scripture. The Old
Testament will be studied in its geographical, historical, and theological contexts. An
emphasis will be placed on learning the major places, people, and events of the Old
Testament.

Bible 7
  This course in Old Testament (continued) will introduce students to the Hebrew
scripture. The Old Testament will be studied in its geographical, historical, and
theological contexts. An emphasis will be placed on learning the major places, people,
and events of the Old Testament.

Bible 8
  This course in New Testament will introduce students to the New Testament
scriptures. The New Testament will be studied in its geographical, historical, and
theological contexts.

Bible 9 & 10
  In 9th and 10th grades, Bible is integrated into the History/English curriculum. Key
books and sections of the Old Testament are studied in 9th grade along with the history
and literature of the ancient world. In the 10th grade, New Testament books (including
Luke, Acts and Revelation) are studied in connection with the Roman world of the first
century.


Bible 11
  This course is designed to cover the major themes of Christian doctrine and compare
these themes with various world religions and contemporary religious views. This class
begins with an assumption that God exists and desires to communicate with man who
He is and what He desires. The class studies the themes of God, Christ, the Holy Spirit,
the Bible, angels, salvation, and end times, to name a few. This area of study is
followed by a research project that focuses on current world religions and cults. The
students compare the major themes they have studied with these various world religions
and cults. The students also do an in-depth study of Galatians and I Corinthians during
their major themes research.

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Bible 12
  The senior year builds on the junior year study. While in Bible 11 we began with the
assumption that God exists and desires to communicate with man, this assumption is
not made in Bible 12. This course focuses on the classical study of apologetics and
gives students the tools to articulate their faith from an intellectual perspective. The
course begins with an in-depth study of Romans. We then examine the Christian life as
we read Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis and other relevant biblical texts. We end with
the study of contemporary issues that the students are wrestling with now, and the ones
anticipated to be faced after high school.




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FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT
    The role of the Fine Arts Department is to develop the talents, ideas, skill, and
creativity of each Brook Hill student through the study of the visual and performing arts,
as well as to enrich their lives. Through this process the student gains an appreciation
for beauty and a cultivation of the skills necessary for self-expression and
communication.
   The study of the Fine Arts nurtures a perception of the beauty of God’s creation and
through it, the beauty of God, the Creator. The student begins to discover, as Dr.
Francis Schaeffer summarizes, that “the Christian is one whose imagination should soar
beyond the stars.”


Art 6 (9-week rotation)


Art 7-8
    In the introductory art course, students will learn the basic elements and foundational
principles of art that provide the necessary tools for the creation of artworks. Drawing
will be emphasized in the course. Students will use a variety of media including
charcoal, oil pastels, watercolor, pen and ink, and tempera. Projects will include resists,
block printing, relief sculpture, mask-making, collage, and numerous drawing studies.


US Art
    This course explores the elements of art and the principles of design while analyzing
the work of numerous artists. Students will be learning drawing skills and techniques as
well as experimenting with different types of drawing media. . Through guided practice,
students will learn drawing in terms of the perception of edges, spaces, relationships,
light and shadow, and the object as a whole. Later, the student will experiment with
charcoal, oil pastels, watercolor, pen and ink, tempera, acrylics, and various sculptural
materials. Projects will be based on the art element, media, method of production, or art
history lesson that the class is studying in each segment. Fee $75.

Choral Music 6 (9-week rotation)

Choral Music 7-8
   This course is a progressive study of choral literature and techniques through a
variety of styles and genres of music. Students will progress from unison singing
through multiple part sight-singing and performance music. Basic musical notation will
be reviewed and reinforced throughout the year. Sight-singing will be taught using the
solfege (Do-Re-Mi) system. Students will be given opportunities to perform both
individually and corporately.




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US Choir
   This course is designed to teach proper technique for choral singing and sight-
reading through a progressive study of choral literature from classical to contemporary
music. A variety of styles and genres are taught to give the students a complete
experience of choral music. Also incorporated into the class is a thorough study of sight-
reading skills. Students will progress from unison singing through multiple part sight-
singing and performance music. Basic musical notation will be reviewed and reinforced
throughout the year. Sight-singing will be taught using the solfege (Do-Re-Mi) system.
While exposed to group singing, the students are encouraged to perform on the
individual level as well.


US Praise Band
    This course is designed for students who wish to participate in regular chapel
services during the year at Brook Hill. Students who are eligible include those who sing
or play an instrument (piano, guitar, horns, percussion, etc…). Students will be required
to learn the music and participate in chapel on a regular basis, as well as other events
scheduled throughout the year. Students will also be responsible for planning chapel
music and bringing in new songs for the praise band to use. Students will be instructed
in theory, performance techniques, and praise and worship literature. Class size will be
limited to 15. Students are selected through audition.


Drama 6 (9-week rotation)


Drama 7-8
   Students in this course will discover and develop their communication skills, develop
the internal creative process, and develop an appreciation for the dramatic art form. By
participating as part of a cast or crew working toward a creative goal, students will
develop qualities such as teamwork, cooperation and dependability. Students gain
confidence from frequent participation in front of their peers. Improved body
coordination and vocal flexibility are all goals of this course.


US Drama
   This drama course introduces students to theatre and to the basic acting concepts of
stage voice, characterization, and stage direction. Students will begin to develop their
acting abilities through oral interpretations and improvisational exercises followed by
monologues and duet-scenes. More advanced students will be afforded the
opportunity to experience competitive aspects of speech and drama. Selection of
competition level pieces and preparation for the TAPPS district, state meets and the
other regional tournaments will be a principle activity. Exercises will include classroom
performances and peer critiques of humorous and dramatic oral interpretations, poetry
reading, monologues, improvisational games and duet acting. Advanced instruction in
acting technique will be given. Additionally, students will be working on the various
aspects of play production and stage crafting. Students will create a personal portfolio of
design work in the areas of costumes, sets, programs, house and publicity, make-up,
and lighting. Students will receive hands-on instruction in play production techniques
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and may serve as technical crew heads for Brook Hill productions. The course includes
a mandatory observation component that may be satisfied by attending pre-approved
theatrical productions.


MS Speech
        The purpose of this course is to help students feel confident speaking before
their peers. Individual and small group activities will be designed for fun as well as skill
building. Students will present informal and formal speeches throughout the year.


US Speech (1 semester)
       The purpose of this course is to help students gain poise before groups, learn the
psychology of successful interpersonal and public communication, and begin to develop
skill in writing and delivering effective speeches. Students will gain experience in
preparing informative and persuasive speeches, as well as effective interview
techniques. The semester will culminate in oral interpretations of prose and poetry.


Beginner Orchestra 6 (9-week rotation)
    This introductory course is designed to provide the student with basic skills for
stringed instrument playing, rhythm, and musical notation. Students electing to remain
in beginner orchestra following the nine week required rotation will receive instruction in
instrumental techniques, practice methods, music reading and ear training.


Intermediate Orchestra 7-8
   This course is for students who have studied a string instrument for one year or more
and is designed to equip students with the necessary instrument technique and music
reading skills in preparation for advanced orchestra. Students will have opportunities to
participate in solo and ensemble performances and competitions throughout the year.


US Orchestra
   This class is designed for students who have studied a string instrument for at least
one year, are playing music grade level 1-2.5 and are not yet ready for advanced
orchestra. Students will continue to hone their technical and musical skills. School
performances required.


US Advanced Orchestra (Honors credit)
   This class is designed for students who have studied a string instrument for three or
more years and are playing at least music grade level 3. Students will receive individual
and group instruction in advanced instrumental techniques and ensemble playing.
There will be both required and optional school and community performances with this
course. Enrollment in this course is by audition and/or teacher recommendation.
.

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT
   God is a communicator. In fact, He calls Himself the Word. The study of a foreign
language and culture helps the student understand more the diversity of God’s creation
and reinforces the statement: only as we communicate to others can we really
communicate God’s truth to them.
   Foreign language is the study of another people’s language and culture. Through
study, the student obtains proficiency in speaking a new language conversationally and
also begins to understand a different culture. The process of learning a new language
also enriches the student’s English vocabulary. In today’s world, knowledge of another
language is a great asset in obtaining a job in many highly competitive fields.
   Each foreign language class will integrate a variety of lab activities, software
programs, and internet activities into the curriculum to improve speaking, listening, and
reading skills and to aid in the acquisition of structure, vocabulary and culture.


Exploring Foreign Languages 6
  This course will introduce the students to Latin, Spanish and French and provides an
opportunity to explore various cultures. This course is designed to give students an idea
of the language they will later explore in depth.


Introductory Latin 7
   This introductory course is designed to expand the base of language through the
exploration of our Latin roots. Students will learn basic Latin vocabulary as well as
elements of history and culture.


French 1
    French 1 is an in-depth introduction to the French language, culture and history of the
Francophone world. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading, writing,
pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic grammatical structures. The students’ strong
English grammar skills facilitate a faster progress and increase the amount of material
covered. Students should be able to discuss topics such as greetings, introductions,
likes, dislikes, activities, French school, giving and receiving information, classes in
school, sports and hobbies, food and ordering, telling time, dates, seasons, descriptions
of family, people, places and things, shopping, using the telephone, clothing, and giving
directions. Students will also master the use of present tense verbs, commands, near
future and past tenses.


French 2
   Emphasis in French 2 continues to be placed on listening, speaking, reading, writing,
pronunciation, vocabulary, culture in Francophone countries, and grammar. At an
accelerated pace a more intensive study of French grammar will allow students to use
more complex structures in daily conversation. Students will expand their ability to greet
people and socialize; communicate with phrases about numbers, time, dates; ask and
                              Education * Potential * Character

                                             18
answer questions about daily life activities; describe people, places, things and events in
the present; narrate past events and activities; describe past circumstances and
conditions; talk about future events and conditions and express wishes, obligations and
opinions. Students will be able to use the present, near future, past tense, imperfect,
and use commands in simple expressions.


French 3 (Honors)
    Students in French 3 will continue building their written and oral skills through
extensive conversational practice and grammar instruction. Students will focus on an
intensive study of grammar, which will aid the students in forming more complex
sentences, and help them to heighten their ability to communicate. Taught primarily in
French, greater oral proficiency is a major goal and particular emphasis is placed on the
acquisition of extensive, practical vocabulary.


French 3 (Pre-AP)
    Students in French 3 will continue building their written and oral skills through
extensive conversational practice and grammar instruction. Students will focus on an
intensive study of grammar, which will aid the students in forming more complex
sentences, and help them to heighten their ability to communicate. Taught primarily in
French, greater oral proficiency is a major goal and particular emphasis is placed on the
acquisition of extensive, practical vocabulary. This course is highly recommended to
those students who want a strong preparation for college foreign language and a higher
degree of proficiency in French. Designed to prepare the French student for AP
French 4.


Spanish 1
    Spanish 1 is an in-depth introduction to the Spanish language, culture and history of
the Spanish- speaking world. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading,
writing, pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic grammatical structures. The students’
strong English grammar skills facilitate a faster progress and increase the amount of
material covered. Students should be able to discuss topics such as greetings,
introductions, likes, dislikes, activities, Spanish school, giving and receiving information,
classes in school, sports and hobbies, food and ordering, telling time, dates, seasons,
descriptions of family, people, places and things, shopping, using the telephone,
clothing, and giving directions. Students will also master the use of present tense verbs,
commands, and past tenses.


Spanish 2
  Emphasis Spanish continues to be placed on listening, speaking, reading, writing,
pronunciation, vocabulary, culture in Spanish-speaking countries, and grammar. At an
accelerated pace, a more intensive study of Spanish grammar will allow students to use
more complex structures in daily conversation. Students will expand their ability to greet
people and socialize; communicate with phrases about numbers, time, dates; ask and
answer questions about daily life activities; describe people, places, things and events in
the present; narrate past events and activities; describe past circumstances and
                               Education * Potential * Character

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conditions; talk about future events and conditions and express wishes, obligations and
opinions. Students will be able to use the present, present perfect, past tense, imperfect,
commands, and begin to use the present subjunctive in simple expressions.

Spanish 3 (Honors)
    Students in Spanish 3 will continue building their written and oral skills through
extensive conversational practice and grammar instruction. Students will focus on an
intensive study of grammar, which will aid the student in forming the ability to
communicate. Taught primarily in Spanish, greater oral proficiency is a major goal and
particular emphasis is placed on the acquisition of extensive, practical vocabulary.


Spanish 3 (Pre-AP)
    Students in Spanish 3 will continue building their written and oral skills through
extensive conversational practice and grammar instruction. Students will focus on an
intensive study of grammar, which will aid the student in forming the ability to
communicate. Taught primarily in Spanish, greater oral proficiency is a major goal and
particular emphasis is placed on the acquisition of extensive, practical vocabulary. This
course is highly recommended for those students who want a strong preparation for
college foreign language and a high degree in Spanish speaking proficiency. Designed
to prepare the Spanish student for AP Spanish 4.




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HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT
    History/English is the intensive study of the great writings, people, events, works and
ideas that have formed and reformed civilization, as we know it. It is not two courses
taught by one teacher. Rather, it is one course in which a teacher teaches the normative
works of our culture within their historical settings. This helps the student understand
how the works and the people who wrote them were influenced by their times. It also
reveals the universal nature of the great works, which are classics precisely because
they somehow speak to all men at all times. Through such historical/literary integration
students are grounded in a worldview that enhances and illuminates their more
specialized studies of math, science, art, and foreign languages. The Upper School
courses are organized chronologically in grades 9–11, moving from ancient civilizations
to modern times. Each of these courses includes a history text, which gives the
historical flow of the periods under study. This allows the senior year to draw upon a
wide range of places and times.
     Not only does such a course of study help the student integrate knowledge, it also
enables him to refine his reading/writing and speaking/listening skills. The teacher
attends carefully to evaluating the reading, writing and communication skills of each
student. In short, a major emphasis of this course is to help the students grow in the
strategic skills of communication - reading, writing, speaking and listening – which
enable them to move into any arena of life as confident, articulate, truthful, and
persuasive Christians.
    *In both the 9th and 10th grades, the Bible is also studied in its relationship to and in
contrast with the history and literature which surround it.


History/English 6 (Double block)
  This course which includes reading, writing, listening, and speaking is an integration of
English grammar and writing skills and the study of ancient civilizations through the
Renaissance. Students will read from a variety of literary works and historical
documents. The writing component progresses from sentence structure to the well-
developed short essay. A formal sequential study of grammar and spelling is included in
this course. Punctuation, the parts of speech and diagramming will be stressed.


History/English 7 (Double block)
  This course will lead the student through the history and significant literature of
America from its early colonization to the Civil War by way of reading, writing, listening
and speaking. American history and the structure of government are emphasized.
Students will study the role of Christianity in the foundations of our country. Formal
grammar studies will continue and writing will focus on development in conciseness and
coherence. Vocabulary development will be emphasized.

History/English 8 (Double block)
   This course surveys the historical events leading to the Civil War and continues
through the issues facing our nation today while connecting the literature of our nation to
its historical context. The study of language includes vocabulary, parts of speech,
mechanics, sentence structures, and the process of writing. Critical thinking skills will be
developed through analysis of literary works and through writing responses – both formal
and informal. Utilization of research, persuasion, and comparison/contrast techniques

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will further develop the effective writing skills necessary for high school and beyond.
Students will be encouraged to write both creatively and analytically to further enhance
understanding of the history/literature connection. The concept of God’s sovereignty will
be emphasized as we evaluate our place in the “cycle of a nation,” the legacy we
received and the legacy that is being passed on the future generations.

History/English/Bible 9: Antiquity (Pre-AP; Double block)
   This year’s study is the foundation of a three-year course leading students through
the history and significant literature of mankind from ancient to modern. Ninth grade
begins with what we know of the beginnings of man and recorded history and ends with
the Roman Empire, about AD 400. Also emphasized, is the establishment and
development of the nation of Israel as recorded in the Old Testament and an
examination of the life of Christ as recorded in the Gospel of Mark. Examples of the
great works read include: Genesis, Exodus, The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey,
Plato's Republic and The Aneid.


History/English/Bible 10: Christendom (Pre-AP; Double block)
    This year’s study continues a three-year course, which leads students through the
history and significant literature of humankind in an interdisciplinary fashion. Tenth
grade begins with the early Christian/late Roman world and the Germanic invasions. The
interaction of these cultures and their roles in the development of the Middle Ages, from
the early medieval period (called the “dark ages”), into the High and Late Middle Ages is
traced. Study continues with the Renaissance and Reformation and the rise of Modern
Europe. Major people, events, and ideas that shaped Christendom and the foundations
of modern Western Civilization will be studied. The history text and literature selections
are supplemented with historical documents, films, art and music to enhance the
students’ understanding of the time periods. An example of works read include: The City
of God, The Divine Comedy, Canterbury Tales, Henry IV, Reformation documents, and
Paradise Lost.


History/English 11: Modern Western Civilization (Pre-AP; Double block)
    Eleventh grade studies focus on the period from the Enlightenment to the present
day. Students trace great people and movements and read the great works that gave
rise to our modern world. Works include The Scarlet Letter, Frankenstein, excerpts from
Walden, Red Badge of Courage, Candide, Heart of Darkness, Hard Times, The Great
Gatsby, The Lord of the Flies, and The Stranger. Training in speech includes formal
public speaking, while writing includes both creative writing and the college-style
analysis essay.

History/English 11: Modern Western Civilization (AP; Double block)
    The AP level will follow the same course description for Pre-AP H/E 11, but will
include an additional curriculum component designed in preparation for the AP
Language and Composition Exam and/or AP European History Test. Qualified students
may earn college credit through the Advanced Placement Examination. Enrollment
based upon teacher approval.



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                                            22
English 12: Literary Genres (Honors)
    Twelfth grade English consists of a comparative genre study through the reading of
great works and contemporary pieces of literature. The readings will include Crime and
Punishment, Aristotle's Poetics, Oedipus Rex, Hamlet, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, The Sun
Also Rises, Death of a Salesman, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich,
Metamorphosis, The Waste Land, and Till We Have Faces. Other readings will include
selections from poets such as Donne and Dickinson. These exemplars of the epic, lyric,
tragic, and comic genres present the noble struggle to found and maintain a community,
the splendor and diversity of love, the insight possible out of suffering, and the hope that
sustains a broken world. Through careful reading and analytical writing, seminar
discussion, and research utilizing reference libraries, students develop their skills in
critical reading and writing as well as a practical grasp of the writing process in
preparation for the college-style essay.

English 12: Literary Genres (AP)
    AP English 12 will follow the course study of English 12 but will probe deeper into the
genre study by thorough readings of the great works, of contemporary pieces and full
discussions over the ideas of our time. The readings will include Crime and Punishment,
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Aristotle's Poetics, Oedipus Rex, Othello,
Hamlet, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, The Sun Also Rises, Death of a Salesman, One Day in
the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Metamorphosis, The Waste Land, and Till We Have Faces..
Other readings will include selections from poets such as Donne and Dickinson. This
AP level course will include a curriculum component designed in preparation for the AP
Literature and Composition Test. Qualified students may earn college credit through the
Advanced Placement Exam. Enrollment based on teacher approval.

American Government/Economics (AP/Dual Credit)
   This course includes a brief review of American History and a careful study of
America’s political system from a Christian perspective. It will address such topics as
the nature of good government, the production and distribution of wealth, and the major
political/economic issues facing our nation today. Students taking this course for dual
credit will meet the college’s guidelines.


United States History: Advanced US Studies (AP)
    This course is intended to provide the student with a deeper understanding of and
appreciation for significant events in American history. Some independent study with
classroom discussion will be required as well as a major project each semester. A major
field trip in the fall will be to the battlefield and homes of Vicksburg, Mississippi. In the
spring a field trip will be to the Confederate Museum and WWII Museum in New Orleans,
Louisiana.



Logic (1 semester)
    This course is designed to introduce basic logic to the student through the study of
formal logic in order to improve the reasoning skills of the student and their abilities to
use spoken and written discourse to inform, motivate, and persuade. The course
includes basic deductive logic. Students will look at statements and their relationships,
syllogisms and validity, and various informal fallacies as well as the basic elements of
                              Education * Potential * Character

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classical rhetorical study. Students will learn how to gather support for an argument,
how to appeal to an audience, and how to arrange material for effect. This study will
help the student organize their own thoughts and discourse and will equip him to analyze
the thoughts and discourses of other speakers and writers.


English as a Second Language 1 & 2
   Foreign language speakers will be empowered with appropriate vocabulary and
culture orientation during a summer orientation program. The school year will provide an
opportunity to learn content area vocabulary, written expression and pronunciation skills
and listening. Some students may be assigned to ESL self-paced classes or
independent study classes to enhance their basic English language skills before
progressing to audited classes or core curriculum classes.




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                                            24
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT
    Mathematics is more than the study of numbers, patterns and shapes. Collectively, it
is a language which God uses to describe the physical universe to mankind. It is a
creative, dynamic system which man can use to model and understand his environment.
It reveals glimpses of the nature of God (His orderliness, trustworthiness, omniscience
and omnipotence), while developing important character qualities such as patience,
perseverance, resourcefulness, alertness and creativity.
    Through its study, students cultivate problem-solving skills, analytical thinking,
attention to details and logic. It encourages the development of sound reasoning
techniques and rewards consistent work habits. The Brook Hill School’s mathematics
program is designed to stimulate a student’s intellectual curiosity and give him/her an
exposure to the technology of today’s mathematics. A variety of courses are offered,
enabling students of all abilities to take mathematics all four years of upper school.


Math 6
   The math curriculum for this level is designed to promote the development of the
students’ understanding of practical mathematical concepts and procedures in a way
that fosters their ability to solve problems, to reason, and to communicate in
mathematical terminology.

Math 7
   This course in Pre-Algebra is designed to give the student the skills necessary to be
successful in Algebra 1. The elements taught will include all operations with rational
numbers, solving equations and inequalities, problem solving, measurement, geometry,
probability and statistics, graphing and polynomials.

Math 8: Algebra 1A
    As the foundation course for all higher level mathematics classes, this course is
designed to promote the development of algebraic and problem solving skills. For the
more global student this course will be taught at a slower pace, allowing the student time
to thoroughly master skills before moving on. Students taking this course will be
required to take Algebra 1B in grade nine.


Math 8: Algebra 1 (Honors; Upper-school credit)
    Algebra 1 is an important subject because it is the foundation for all upper-level
mathematics at both high school and college levels. It is our goal to help the students
acquire the skills that they will need to be successful in these courses and to become
excellent problem solvers.
   The curriculum will include the study of integers and rational numbers, equations,
inequalities, graphs and linear equations, systems of equations, absolute value,
exponents and polynomials, polynomials and factoring, the Pythagorean Theorem and
radicals, relations and functions, and quadratic equations.




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US Algebra 1 (grade 9)
  Algebra I is an important subject because it is the foundation for all upper-level
mathematics at both high school and college levels. It is our goal to help the students
acquire the skills that they will need to be successful in these courses and to become
excellent problem solvers.
   The curriculum will include the study of integers and rational numbers, equations,
inequalities, graphs and linear equations, systems of equations, absolute value,
exponents and polynomials, polynomials and factoring, the Pythagorean Theorem and
radicals, relations and functions, and quadratic equations.


US Geometry (grades 9, 10; Honors)
  This course develops a Euclidean system of Geometry through the use of postulates,
definitions and theorems. A study of Geometry will enhance the student’s ability to solve
problems creatively, reason deductively and logically, and visualize spatial relationships.
Topics covered include (but are not limited to) points, lines, planes, angles and angle
relationships, deduction and formal proof, parallel lines and planes, triangles,
parallelograms and quadrilaterals, similar polygons, circles, area and volume of solids,
constructions and coordinate geometry. Right triangle trigonometry will be introduced.
They will also be introduced to transformational and analytical geometry. There is an
emphasis on formal proof throughout the first semester. Applications of geometry within
the AP Calculus curriculum will be investigated. Projects may be required.

US Algebra 2 (grades 10, 11; Honors)
  Included with a brief review of Algebra I skills will be an introduction of the concepts of
functions, elementary analysis, and quadratic equations. Related concepts of domain,
range, set notation, interval notation, and inverse functions will be mastered. Students
will be expected to become proficient in recognizing, knowing (and sometimes proving)
the various analytical and graphical properties of various function families. Mathematical
families include linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, irrational, and higher degree
polynomial functions, along with conic sections. Wherever possible, applications will be
stressed.
  Additional topics will include complex number theory, sequences and series, (and
probability if time permits). Trigonometric concepts from Pre AP Geometry will be
reviewed, and students will finish out their study of trigonometry with developing and
proving identities, solving trigonometric equations, and trigonometric function analysis.
Mathematical induction will be introduced as a proof technique. Heavy use of symbolic
manipulations and transformations will be encouraged as a support to the future physics
student.

Pre-Calculus (grade 11-12; Pre-AP)
   Pre-Calculus continues a student’s training in function analysis by reviewing the basic
function families introduced in Algebra II: linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic,
rational and polynomial. Additional analytical tools are developed which will help a
student better understand those families. These tools include limits, derivatives, trans-
formations, symmetry analysis, inverse functions and compositions. Differentiation laws
for products and composite functions will be introduced. Applications will include finding
extrema and inflection points of functions.
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  Students use their newly found analysis skills when analyzing the periodic functions
from the unit circle. Included with analysis will be traditional trigonometric applications
with right and oblique triangles, identity proofs, and equation solving methodologies.
  Sequences and series will be introduced as a tool for finding derivatives of periodic
and exponential functions via Taylor expansions, and the foundations of integration will
be laid with Riemann sums and area approximations. Students will investigate the
mathematics of finance using sequence analysis. Other topics such as linear algebra,
probability and statistics will be developed as time permits.


Calculus (grade 12; AP)
  Topics include those presented in a traditional first semester college course. An
intuitive introduction to the methods of calculus is followed by several problem-solving
applications. The content includes (but is not limited to) topics covered on the Advanced
Placement (AB) Examination. Whenever possible, real life applications are stressed.
Graphing calculators will be used as an aid to computation and analysis. Personal
computers may be used to demonstrate limits and numerical methods for evaluation,
derivatives and definite integrals. At the beginning of the year students are encouraged
to start their preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam.




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PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
  Physical Education is the study of the total person: physical, mental, emotional, and
social as well as spiritual. Through its study, the student has an increased awareness of
how the body functions and develops. They learn how to deal with stress through
competition. Exposure to sports and lifetime activities enables the students to better
select those activities which will later enhance their lives.
  In II Corinthians 6:16, Paul writes that we are the “temple of the Living God.” It is the
responsibility of all people to cherish and maintain their temple. The study of physical
education clarifies the needs of our physical bodies and how we can best develop,
understand, and care for this physical vessel which is God’s temple.


Physical Education/Athletics
   The Physical Education dept offers both team sports and individual activities. The
objective is to equip students with a number of skills they can carry over into a lifetime of
fitness. In addition to the on-campus program, Brook Hill is presently offering off-
campus PE credit for those students who are involved in team/individual sports or
training programs outside the BH program. Weekly documentation of participation is
mandatory for credit to be given and students must register for, or withdraw from, the
course just as they would for other academic classes. The option is exercised when
students are unable to schedule the regular class due to their academic load.
  The required three semesters may be taken any time during the Upper School years.
NOTE: Participation in one sport counts as one semester of PE credit. Credit can also
be earned through varsity cheerleading and team management.


MS / US PE
  The Life Sports component is designed to introduce students to the world of sports, by
exposing each student to the rules, instruction, and game participation of each sport,
within the guidelines of encouraging each student to honor God through Christ-like
character in victory or loss. The Conditioning component will expose students to the
values of a healthy body through conditioning which will include aerobic activity,
nutrition, maintaining the proper body fat to muscle ratios, and body weight
management. The areas will encourage students to be better stewards of the temple
God has given them.


US Athletics: Weight Training (off-season)
  The Weight Training course will cover the aspects of weight training in regard to body
building and muscle tone management, while developing a healthy self image of the
Godly creation they are.




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MS/ US Athletics: (1/2 credit each)
 Fall -
          Soccer (Boys)
          Volleyball (Girls)
          US Golf


 Winter:
          Basketball (Boys & Girls)
          Cheerleading
          US Golf


 Spring:
          Baseball (Boys)
          Softball (Girls)
          Golf (Boys & Girls)
          Tennis (Boys & Girls)


 *Athletic Trainer/Manager for any sport earns 1/2 credit




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                                                 29
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
  Science is the study of the natural world and the things that affect it. It involves
organic and inorganic matter, how they are put together and function. Through its study,
the student sharpens his thinking process and learns how to reason logically and
deductively. Science helps the student to be careful in observing the world around him
and to be thorough in his analysis. Science illuminates the creative majesty of God. As
one studies science, he becomes more aware of the magnificence of the creation and
the Creator.


Science 6: Exploring Earth and Space
  This course focuses on astronomy, chemistry, and geology and analyzes the nature
and properties of energy and non-living matter.


Science 7: Exploring Living Things
  This course surveys such branches of science as biology, anthropology, and ecology.
The student learns about living organisms, their organization, life process, and
relationships to each other and their environment.


Science 8: Physical Science
   This course is designed to introduce students to the study of chemistry and physics.
The course will lay a solid foundation for the upper school sequence of study. The focus
is placed on building scientific vocabulary and concepts and developing problem solving
skills.


Biology 1 (Pre-AP)
  This course is designed to introduce students to basic biology concepts as well as
giving them a more in depth look into particular parts of biology. It teaches basic
laboratory techniques and thinking skills. This course is also designed to involve the
student in actively learning about biology as well as additional topics such as
biochemistry, and cellular energetics. It does this by including one major project for
every unit.


Anatomy & Physiology (AP or Dual Credit)
   This course is designed for those students interested in pursuing some branch of
biology as a career, or those who desire to enter a health/medical-related field. It
provides a solid foundation in biochemistry, cellular energetics, and genetics. Seminars
on ethics in such areas as genetic engineering as well as an in-depth study on the origin
of life are included. Purchase of the textbook is not required, but is encouraged. Field
trips will be taken. Enrollment subject to instructor approval.




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Chemistry 1 (Pre-AP)
  This course covers the basic chemistry concepts and vocabulary as well as general
thinking skills and laboratory techniques that will provide the students with a solid
foundation and prepare them for college science courses. The approach, involves
primarily an exploration of the mathematical relationships involved in chemical change.
Laboratory work is stressed, and focuses on careful analysis of data and the resulting
mathematical relationships. It also provides “hands-on” experience with chemistry and
shows how chemistry concepts apply to the society.


Chemistry 2 (AP)
This second year Chemistry course is designed for the college-bound student who
intends to study in an engineering related field and not related to the medical sciences.
The pace and depth of the course is designed to prepare the student for College Board
Advanced Placement testing in the spring. Enrollment is by instructor approval only.


Physics
  Physics provides the students with an introduction to the study of physics. This course
explores physics primarily from a conceptual basis but includes some mathematical
applications. Topics of study include kinematics, dynamics, simple machines, work,
heat, electricity, magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory experiments
are an integral part of this course. A calculator is required.


Physics (Honors)
   The material covered in Honors Physics is the same as in regular physics, with the
addition of other more advance topics. Topics are approached with a greater emphasis
on mathematical relationships.


Health (1 semester)
        The goal of this course is for students to gain an understanding of wellness or
total health by considering the physical, mental, social and spiritual influences on the
whole person and health. The students will learn health facts, and are encouraged to
put these facts to use in all areas of their lives by establishing health-promoting attitudes
and habits; researching and addressing current and critical health issues; understanding
the implications of high risk behaviors; and recognizing God’s role in creating and
sustaining their life and health.




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TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT
  The Technology Department’s role is to engage students in active learning situations
that will assist them in developing skills and understanding of current technology trends
in order to enable the students to acquire competency in computer usage.


Keyboarding 6
  Whether a beginner or somewhat proficient in word processing this course will
enhance and expand a student's capabilities and understanding of word processing. A
student will also improve in their skills of keyboarding and document layout.


US Introductory Technology: (Self-paced)
Whether a beginner or somewhat proficient in word processing this course will enhance
and expand a student's capabilities and understanding of word processing. A student
will also improve in their skills of keyboarding and document layout. This course will
instruct students in the use and development of spreadsheets and database programs.
Finally, this course will focus its instruction in the usage of computer programs to
develop presentations. Students will generate ideas and prepare layouts from software
programs like Power Point and Corel. They will also receive instruction in the use of clip
art and the digital camera.


US Advanced Technology: Advanced Network Management & Web Design
  This elective is a course designed to equip students to learn Network Management
techniques, including an introduction to Cisco programming. Enrollment subject to
instructor approval.


Yearbook
   Students learn about the collecting and editing of material of interest for presentation
through the medium of the school yearbook. The editorial/photography staff learns to
take acceptable pictures, how to design layouts and learn to use a computer program
designed for yearbook production. The business staff learns how to sell to the public in
a professional manner and create camera-ready patron pages on the computer.
Yearbook counts as a technology credit. Students must make formal application in order
to be selected for the yearbook staff. Enrollment based upon teacher approval.




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Other Courses:

College Quest (Grades 11, 12)
   Students in grades 11 and 12 will receive group instruction as well as one-on-one
help by the Academic Guidance Counselor in order to fully prepare them for the college
admission process. SAT / ACT test taking skills will be discussed and practiced along
with resume preparation and completing the college admission application and essay.
Students will have guidance when attempting to complete scholarship applications and
essays as well.

Leadership (Grade 12)
   Students at The Brook Hill School have been required to participate in community
service throughout their academic years here. Organizations such as Student Council
and National Honor Society stress the need for involvement through required service
hours. As servants of our Lord, we are instructed to serve others. As seniors at The
Brook Hill School, it is important to leave a legacy of involvement and serve as an
example to younger students. Each senior will take part in an individual or small group
project. Students will meet regularly and will be guided through the planning stages and
encouraged to maintain their pace as they implement a community service project of
significance.




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