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					      PITCH


AGENDA:
• Brainstorming Map
• Definitions
• Teaching order for pitches
• Pentatonic
      PITCH


Teaching strategies:
1. Pitch maps
2. Hand signs & body signs
3. Kinesthetic rhythm
4. Pat clap patterns
           PITCH
       (Hookey, 2000, p. 51- 55)




It refers to the highness or
lowness of each sound or the
placement of whole melodies.
          PITCH

• Direction:
   – movement up, down or the same
• Intervals between pitches:
   – may be steps, skips or jumps
• Phrases:
   – melodic patterns that in simple songs are usually
     indicated by where one would naturally take a
     breath when singing
     PITCH




N.B.
Before we teach specific pitches we use
 pitch maps to show relative pitch.
      PITCH


TEACHING ORDER FOR PITCHES:
1. s m tone call responses and simple
   chants (Grade 1)
2. s l s m tone call responses and simple
   songs (Grade 1 & 2)
3. d r m songs with instruments (Grade 2
   and 3)
      PITCH




TEACHING ORDER FOR PITCHES:
1. s m tone call responses and simple
   chants (Grade 1)
      PITCH


TEACHING ORDER FOR PITCHES:


2. s l s m tone call responses and simple
    songs (Grade 1 & 2)
      PITCH




TEACHING ORDER FOR PITCHES:


3. d r m songs with instruments (Grade 2
  and 3)
  PENTATONIC SCALE



Definition:
• It is a 5 note pattern of whole tones and
  tones and a half. It is the black notes on
  the piano. When any of these notes are
  played at the same time it makes a sound
  that is pleasant to the ear. The pattern is:
   –d r m s l            (d’)
                         d
  PENTATONIC
    SCALE:
  HANDSIGNS              l
                         s

                         m
                         r
The hand signs for the   d
pentatonic scale are:
d r m s l d.
   PENTATONIC SCALE

Pentatonic Songs:
• Musicanada 3: Rocky Mountain p. 21,
  Iroquois Lullaby p. 23, Jim Along Josie p.
  32, Little Tommy Tinker p. 31
• Musicanada 4: Canoe Song p. 14, Liza
  Jane p. 36 Sourwood Mountain p. 79
• Others: Head and Shoulders Baby, Jingle
  At the Windows, Burnie Bee, Bell Horses,
  Blue Bells, Thanks a Lot, Gitsigakomim
  Music Play 3 and 4
      PITCH


RECAP:
• Brainstorming Map
• Definitions
• Teaching order for pitches
• Pentatonic
      PITCH


RECAP:
Teaching strategies:
1. Pitch maps
2. Hand signs & body signs
3. Kinesthetic rhythm
4. Pat clap patterns
            References

Brooks, P. et al (1982). Musicanada 3, 4 & 5.
   Toronto:Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
Gagne, D. (1997). Musicplay Grade 3, 4 &5. Red
   Deer Alberta: Themes & Variations
Harrison, J. & Harrison, M. (2000) Canada Is
   Music…3/4. Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson
Hookey, M. (2000). Learning Music: A team
   approach to elementary music education.
   Toronto: Museworks
Schafer, P. & Stack, Y. (1991). Musicanada 2.
   Toronto: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
       PITCH


AGENDA:
Scales:
• major scale, warm up and hand signs
  – related songs
• minor scale, warm up and hand signs
  – related songs
          PITCH

Scales:
• Patterns of tones and semi tones.
• The distance between any two tones on a
  piano keyboard is a semitone.
• The distance between c and d is an
  example of a tone because there is a black
  note in between.
    MAJOR SCALE


• It is a pattern of tones and semi tones. The
  syllable pattern is:
   – d r m f s l t d.
• Interval pattern:tone, tone, half tone, tone,
  tone, tone, half tone.
    MAJOR SCALE



• Do lesson 24 Music Ace 1 to learn about major
  scales.
• Create C major Scale in Music Ace Doodle Pad

• Interval pattern:tone, tone, half tone, tone, tone,
  tone, half tone.
    MAJOR SCALE


If you need to go up to a note then it is sharp.
(When you are pricked with something sharp
   you say OW!)
If you need to go down to a note then it is a
   flat.
(The note is a flat like a tire is flat and it lowers
   the whole car.)
   MAJOR SCALE           d
    HANDSIGNS            t
                         l
                         s
                         f
                         m
• The hand signs for
                         r
  the major scale are:
                         d
  -d r m f s l t d.
   MAJOR SCALE



Major Scale examples:
  Musicanada 3: Five Little Pumpkins, p. 26
   and Do-Re-Mi p. 38
   MAJOR SCALE


Major Scale examples-
Hallowe’en songs:
• Five Little Pumpkins
• There Was an Old Witch
•   DO       The stuff that’s in my doughnut
•   RE       The guy who makes my doughnut
•   MI       The one who eats the doughnut
•   FA       A long, long way for doughnuts
•   SO       I think I’ll have a doughnut
•   LA       La-la-la-la-la doughnut
•   TI       No thanks I’ll have a doughnut
•   And that brings us back to DO
•   (doughnut, doughnut, doughnut…)
         MINOR SCALE


What you need to know:
•   what it sounds like
•   what clues are in the music
•   what it often starts on
•   what is the warm up
•   d t l d m d l One two ready sing
 MINOR SCALE
  HANDSIGNS

                             l
                             s
• The handsigns for the      f
  natural minor scale        m
  are:                       r
   – l, t, d, r, m,f, s, l   d
                             t
                             l
     MINOR SCALE


Minor Scale Examples in Seasonal Music:
• Skin and Bones
• Hallowe’en Night
• Hallowe’en 2
• Poor Tom
      MINOR SCALE


Minor Scale Examples: Other
• Musicanada 3: Iroquois Lullaby p. 23,
  Someone p. 108
• Musicanada 4 Drill Ye Tarriers Drill p. 64
• Musicanada 5 Shalom Chaverim p. 147
  Others: Hey Ho Nobody Home,
  Gitsagakomim (Music Play 3 and 4)
   PITCH: Summary


Two tonalities:
• Major: d r m f s l t d
  – home tone is d
  – warm up: d m s m d s (or a variation)
• Minor: l t d r m f s l
  – home tone is l
  – Warm up: d t l d m d l (or a variation)
        PITCH:
  Ministry Expectations


Grade 1 & 2
• Identify higher and lower pitched sounds in
  their environment and in music
• Reproduce specific pitches in group call
  response activities
• Sing music from a variety of cultures and
  periods (all grades)
• Sing expressively showing awareness of the
  meaning of the text (all grades)
       PITCH:
 Ministry Expectations



Grade 3:
• Identify melodic contour
• Create melodic contour maps that
  indicate the direction of pitches (higher
  and lower) using familiar songs.
        PITCH:
  Ministry Expectations

Grade 4:
• Recognize that specific pitches may be
  represented by notes placed on a staff: lines-
  egbdf (Every good boy deserves fun) and
  spaces- face.
• Distinguish between movement by step (one
  note higher) and movement by skip (from line
  to line or space to space).
• Create musical compositions that show
  appropriate use of pitch etc. Grades 4-6
          PITCH:
  Ministry Expectations



Grade 5
• Recognize the major scale through listening and
  through notation
• Demonstrate understanding of the meaning of sharp,
  flat and natural symbols.
• Explain the use of key signature and identify the key
  (key of G) of music they sing or play
• Begin to sing or play the major scale in the keys that
  occur in the music they sing or play.
• Sing or play in tune (unison, partner songs and rounds)
        PITCH:
  Ministry Expectations



Grade 6
• All of the expectations from grades 4
  and 5 and
• Read correctly familiar and unfamiliar
  songs using their knowledge of sharps,
  flats, natural signs and key signatures
      PITCH:
  KEY QUESTIONS

• Can the students identify higher pitches
  from lower pitches?
• Do the intervals in the melody give a
  jagged or smooth feeling?
       PITCH:
   KEY QUESTIONS


• What effect is created by the tonality
  chosen for the melody?
• Does the message in the melody match
  the message in the words?
• Can the children make the appropriate
  handsigns?
PITCH: CONTENT

• A pitch may be higher or lower.
• Melody:
  – is a series of tones sounding one
    after the other in an expressive,
    organized way.
  – Tones in melody are called pitches.
  – They have a shape or contour.
PITCH: CONTENT

– The shape can have repeated
  tones, steps between tones, jumps
  or skips.
– Melodies can have pitches that are
  far apart.
– Melodies may use tones from a
  scale or home tone.
        PITCH
      ACTIVITIES

• Differentiate between high and low
  sounds.
• Represent contrasts through
  movement and mapping.
• Sing melodies to sol-fah syllables.
         PITCH
       ACTIVITIES


• Follow the rise and fall of familiar
  written music.
• Sing using standard hand signs.
• Use a modulator for pitch.
        PITCH
      ACTIVITIES


• Relate melody to scale patterns.
• Improvise a melody for a lullaby or a
  march.
• Improvise a melody for a
  commercial. (toy, cereal)
        PITCH
      ACTIVITIES

• sing a song and link melody to
  feelings of lyrics
• discuss appropriateness of rising and
  falling melody
• respond to pitch through hand
  mapping, body mapping or on paper.

				
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