Title I and Title V Application for Federal Funding

Document Sample
Title I and Title V Application for Federal Funding Powered By Docstoc
					THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT OF 2001 (P.L. 107-110) TITLE I APPLICATION - 2004-2005 IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED LEA NAME MAILING ADDRESS CONTACT PERSON TELEPHONE NUMBER E-MAIL ADDRESS Guilford County Schools 120 Franklin Boulevard, Greensboro, NC 27401 Ms. Judy Dunlap TITLE FAX NUMBER 336/370-2368 dunlapj@guilford.k12.nc.us LEA 410 CODE: Director of Title I Program 336/378-8801

CERTIFICATION The applicant designated above hereby applies for a grant of federal funds to provide instructional activities and services to help disadvantaged children meet high standards as set forth in this application. I HEREBY CERTIFY that to the best of my knowledge, the information contained in this application is correct; the agency named above has authorized me as its representative to file this application; and such action is recorded in the minutes of the agency’s meeting held on 6/10/2004 (Month/Day/Year) STATEMENT OF ASSURANCES Assurances are hereby provided to the State Education Agency (SEA) that the Local Education Agency (LEA) will: • identify eligible school attendance areas/schools and will allocate funds received under this Title to those areas/schools in accordance with section 1113. • develop an LEA plan that is consistent with the requirements of section 1112. • make provisions to implement schoolwide and/or targeted assistance programs in accordance with sections 1114 and 1115. • use Federal funds under this part to supplement not supplant State and local funds, consistent with section 1120A. • ensure that all teachers and paraprofessionals working in programs supported by funds under this part are highly qualified as consistent with section 1119 as verified by each school principal served under this part. • make provisions for services to eligible children attending private elementary and secondary schools in accordance with section 1120. • annually review program effectiveness and make provisions for the implementation of school improvement procedures consistent with the requirements of section 1116. • implement programs, activities and procedures for the involvement of parents consistent with provisions of section 1118. • significantly improve the quality of instruction by providing staff in participating schools with substantial opportunities for professional development as required by section 1119. • maintain its fiscal effort in accordance with section 9521. • comply with comparability requirements specified in sections 1120A, 1114 and 1115. • use fiscal control and fund accounting procedures that will ensure proper disbursement of, and accounting for, federal funds allotted to the LEA as required by GEPA. • retain title and control of property and equipment purchased under this title consistent with the requirements of GEPA. • prepare and disseminate individual school performance profiles, as specified in section 1111. • cooperate, by keeping records and providing information, in carrying out the evaluation of the Title I program conducted by or for the SEA, the Secretary or other Federal officials as required by GEPA. • be responsible for repayment of Title I funds in the event of an audit exception. [GEPA] • adopt effective procedures for acquiring and disseminating to teachers and administrators participating in this program significant information from scientifically-based educational research, demonstrations, and similar projects, and for adopting, where appropriate, promising educational practices developed through such projects. [sections 1114 & 1115]

Dr. Terry B. Grier Superintendent

Signature of Superintendent

Date

STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCY

APPROVAL DATE

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

CERTIFICATION REGARDING DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION, INELIGIBILITY AND VOLUNTARY EXCLUSION LOWER TIER COVERED TRANSACTIONS This certification is required by the regulations implementing Executive Order 12549, debarment and suspension, 34 CFR Part 85, Section 85.510, Participants’ responsibilities. The regulations were published as Part VII of the May 26, 1988 Federal Register (pages 160-19211). Copies of the regulations may be obtained by contacting the person to which this proposal is submitted. Before Completing Certification, read the instructions. 1) The prospective lower tier participant certifies, by submission of this proposal, that neither it nor its principals are presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this transaction by any Federal department or agency. Where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, such prospective participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.

2)

Dr. Terry B. Grier Name Of Superintendent (Please Print)

Signature Of Superintendent

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code:

410

Parental Involvement Set-Aside. Where applicable, Title I law requires LEAs to set-aside at least 1% of their Title I funds for parental involvement activities, 95% of which is to be allotted to participating schools. 1. The amount reserved for parental involvement activities is (please check one): x The required 1% set-aside More than the required 1% set-aside 2. Briefly describe how the funds are distributed, equitably, to participating schools. Parent Involvement: The entire 1% ($124,618.00) is included in the amount to be allocated to public and private schools. Total amount to be distributed to participating public schools is: $124,281.00 and the total amount to be distribued to private schools is: $337.00. It will be distributed as a per pupil amount based on free/reduced numbers for each participating school. (See page 3a)

School Improvement Set-Aside. For schools in Title I school improvement, the LEA is required to reserve an amount equal to 20% of its Title I allocation for school choice and/or supplemental educational services, unless a lesser amount is needed. Are there schools in Title I school improvement? (check one) X Y N $623,087.45 How many? 4

The amount to be reserved for school improvement sanctions is: (Up to 20% of the LEA’s Title I allocation, unless is needed) Will the total set-aside be funded by Title I only? (check one) x Y N

If "no," please list the other funding sources and the amount to be provided from each source listed. Funding Source Amount

TOTAL

$0.00

Page 3 (a)

Distribution of Parent Involvement and Professional Development Set-Asides
*RESIDENT CHILDREN Professional Parent Involvement Development Allotment Allotment STATUS $11,350 Schoolwide $6,241 $6.02 per Targeted pupil 2,925.72 1,583.26 1,643.46 1,751.82 1,577.24 1,787.94 1,998.64 3,292.94 2,594.62 1,938.44 2,739.10 3,509.66 3,943.10 2,799.30 1,643.46 1,860.18 3,208.66 1,962.52 1,775.90 2,076.90 1,408.68 1,185.94 1,793.96 2,113.02 2,931.74 3,852.80 1,661.52 1,354.50 2,432.08 1,679.58 2,257.50 3,070.20 1,523.06 1,107.68 5,971.84 1,240.12 3,401.30 1,775.90 4,677.54 1,468.88 4,653.46 1,462.86 1,191.96 3,931.06 2,359.84 2,137.10 1,402.66 1,986.60 1,342.46 981.26 2,648.80 1,667.54 1,348.48 1,005.34 1,125.74 487.62 1,059.52 124,313.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 6,241.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 6,241.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 6,241.00 6,241.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 6,241.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 11,350.00 621,405.00 SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-M SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-M SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-M SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-M SW-M SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E TA-M SW-E SW-E SW-H SW-E TA-M SW-E SW-H SW-E SW-H SW-E SW-E SW-H TA-M TA-M SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E TA-M SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E SW-E

School Grade Code Span

LOW-INCOME

Rank School 1 Fairview Elementary 2 Washington Elementary 3 Gillespie Park Elementary 4 WM Hampton Elementary 5 Kirkman Park Elementary 6 Clara J. Peck Elementary 7 Oak Hill Elementary 8 Jackson Middle 9 Ceasar Cone Elementary 10 Union Hill Elementary 11 Waldo C. Falkener Sr. Elementary 12 Rankin Elementary 13 Otis L. Hairston Sr. Middle 15 Montlieu Avenue Elementary 16 Julius I. Foust Elementary 17 Bessemer Elementary 18 Ferndale Middle 19 Parkview Village Elementary 20 Cyrus P. Frazier Elementary 21 Sedgefield Elementary 23 Wiley Accel/Enrichment 24 Vandalia Elementary 25 Archer Elementary 26 Allen Jay Elementary 27 Alfred J. Griffin Middle 28 Allen Middle 29 Sumner Elementary 30 Edwin A. Alderman Elementary 31 Brightwood Elementary 32 Hunter Elementary 33 Northwood Elementary 34 Laurin Welborn Middle 35 Murphey Traditional Academy 36 Johnson Street Elementary 37 Ben L. Smith High 38 John Van Lindley Elementary 39 Eastern Middle 40 Triangle Lake Montessori Elem 41 Dudley High 42 Bluford Elementary 43 High Point Central High 44 Oak View Elementary 45 Guilford Primary 46 T. Wingate Andrews High 47 Allen Jay Middle 48 Aycock Middle 49 Sedalia Elementary 50 David D. Jones Elementary 51 Morehead Elementary 52 Peeler Open Elementary 53 Kiser Middle 54 Irving Park Elementary 55 Jamestown Elementary 56 James Y. Joyner Elementary 59 Gibsonville Elementary 60 Erwin Montessori 62 Madison Elementary

364 586 385 403 439 514 499 415 349 580 366 532 402 469 373 328 367 511 376 538 598 583 322 310 391 316 577 307 334 409 496 592 478 427 544 451 460 578 355 331 406 505 400 319 313 325 535 430 472 517 442 412 418 436 382 361 454

PK-05 PK-05 PK-05 PK-05 PK-05 0K-05 PK-05 05-08 0K-05 PK-05 PK-05 PK-05 05-08 PK-05 PK-05 0K-05 05-08 PK-05 0K-05 0K-05 PK-05 0K-05 0K-05 PK-05 05-08 05-08 PK-05 0K-05 PK-05 PK-05 PK-05 05-08 PK-05 0K-05 08-12 PK-05 05-08 PK-01 08-12 0K-05 08-12 0K-05 0K-02 08-12 05-08 05-08 0K-05 0K-05 0K-05 0K-05 05-08 0K-05 0K-05 0K-05 PK-05 PK-01 0K-05

Total Number Percent 488 486 99.59 274 263 95.99 293 273 93.17 313 291 92.97 282 262 92.91 333 297 89.19 375 332 88.53 622 547 87.94 499 431 86.37 384 322 83.85 547 455 83.18 705 583 82.70 798 655 82.08 575 465 80.87 338 273 80.77 383 309 80.68 678 533 78.61 418 326 77.99 389 295 75.84 468 345 73.72 320 234 73.13 270 197 72.96 420 298 70.95 498 351 70.48 693 487 70.27 923 640 69.34 408 276 67.65 334 225 67.37 608 404 66.45 421 279 66.27 567 375 66.14 782 510 65.22 390 253 64.87 284 184 64.79 1536 992 64.58 326 206 63.19 913 565 61.88 485 295 60.82 1294 777 60.05 412 244 59.22 1339 773 57.73 422 243 57.58 350 198 56.57 1162 653 56.20 715 392 54.83 666 355 53.30 448 233 52.01 642 330 51.40 436 223 51.15 321 163 50.78 889 440 49.49 575 277 48.17 481 224 46.57 373 167 44.77 441 187 42.40 195 81 41.54 436 176 40.37

TOTALS

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code: Title I Equitable Services For Private Schools Set-Aside Proportion. In participating public school attendance areas: # of Private School Children from low-income families 56 # of Private School Children from low-income families 56 # of Public School Children from low-income families 20,650 Total number of children from low-income families 20,706 =

410

+

Total number of children from low-income families 20,706 Percent of Set-Aside 0.27%

=

÷

Districtwide Instructional Programs Set-Aside (does not apply to preschool programs) Percent of Set-Aside 0.27 X Set-Aside Amount 0 = Amount for Equitable Services $0.00

Parent Involvement Set-Aside Percent of Set-Aside 0.27 X Set-Aside Amount 124,617.49 = Amount for Equitable Services $336.47

Professional Development Set-Aside Percent of Set-Aside 0.27 X Set-Aside Amount 623,087.45 = Amount for Equitable Services $1,682.34

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code:

410

1. DISTRICT SET-ASIDES. Briefly summarize each applicable district set-aside (operated by and at district level). Include the total amount of Title I, Part A funds set-aside for each. Use additional pages as necessary. District program description District Administration: (10% maximum) Parental Involvement: (1% minimum ) Private School (if applicable) Pre-Kindergarten: Professional Development: (5% minimum ) Private School (if applicable) School Improvement (funds to be reserved from Title I) District-wide Instructional Program (please specify) Private School (if applicable) Homeless: (# students x per pupil cost) Neglected/Delinquent (if applicable) Other (Please specify): Indirect Costs LEA Improvement (10% requirement) 2. TOTAL 3. Title I Allotment 4. Projected Carryover 5. Total Title I Funds Available (#3 + $747,108 of #4) 6. Title I Funds To Be Allotted To Schools (#5 - #2) or (#3 - #2) 7. Number of Low-Income Children: (Public & Private) 8. Number of Low-Income Children (125% rule) 9. Cost Per Low-Income Child (#6 ÷ #7) (#5 ÷ #8) x 125% Funds Set-Aside $498,470 $124,618 $337 $2,593,759 $623,088 $1,683 $623,088 N/A N/A $45,904 $116,317 $438,529 $1,246,175 $6,309,948 $12,461,749 $1,247,108 $13,208,857 $6,898,909 20,706 N/A $333.18 N/A 56 $20,720

10. Cost Per Low-Income Child (125% rule)

11. Number of Low-Income in Private Schools (if applicable) 12. Private School Title I Allotment POVERTY BANDS (If applicable) Band Poverty Percent Or Per Pupil Cost Grade Spans Number of From To Students K 5 370.00 12331 6 12 278.36 8319

1 2 3

Totals 4,562,470.00 2,315,676.84 6,878,146.84

Page 3 (a)

LEA ELIGIBLE SCHOOLS SUMMARY

410

*RESIDENT CHILDREN School Grade LOW-INCOME Elig. Served Rank School Code Span Total Numbe Percent Code (Y or 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 364 PK-05 488 486 99.59% 1 Y Fairview Elementary 1 Washington Elementary 586 PK-05 274 263 95.99% 1 Y 2 Gillespie Park Elementary 385 PK-05 293 273 93.17% 1 Y 3 WM Hampton Elementary 403 PK-05 313 291 92.97% 1 Y 4 Kirkman Park Elementary 439 PK-05 282 262 92.91% 1 Y 5 Clara J. Peck Elementary 514 0K-05 333 297 89.19% 1 Y 6 Oak Hill Elementary 499 PK-05 375 332 88.53% 1 Y 7 Jackson Middle 415 06-08 622 547 87.94% 1 Y 8 Ceasar Cone Elementary 349 0K-05 499 431 86.37% 1 Y 9 580 PK-05 384 322 83.85% 1 Y 10 Union Hill Elementary 366 PK-05 547 455 83.18% 1 Y 11 Waldo C. Falkener Sr. Elementary 532 PK-05 705 583 82.70% 1 Y 12 Rankin Elementary 402 06-08 798 655 82.08% 1 Y 13 Otis L. Hairston Sr. Middle 379 SP-ED 133 109 81.95% 1 N 14 Gateway Education Center 469 PK-05 575 465 80.87% 1 Y 15 Montlieu Avenue Elementary 373 PK-05 338 273 80.77% 1 Y 16 Julius I. Foust Elementary 328 0K-05 383 309 80.68% 1 Y 17 Bessemer Elementary 367 06-08 678 533 78.61% 1 Y 18 Ferndale Middle 511 PK-05 418 326 77.99% 1 Y 19 Parkview Village Elementary 376 0K-05 389 295 75.84% 1 Y 20 Cyrus P. Frazier Elementary 538 0K-05 468 345 73.72% 1 Y 21 Sedgefield Elementary 457 SP-ED 97 71 73.20% 1 N 22 C. D. McIver Special Education 598 PK-05 320 234 73.13% 1 Y 23 Wiley Accel/Enrichment 583 0K-05 270 197 72.96% 1 Y 24 Vandalia Elementary 322 0K-05 420 298 70.95% 1 Y 25 Archer Elementary 310 PK-05 498 351 70.48% 1 Y 26 Allen Jay Elementary Alfred J. Griffin Middle 391 06-08 693 487 70.27% 1 Y 27 316 06-08 923 640 69.34% 1 Y 28 Allen Middle 577 PK-05 408 276 67.65% 1 Y 29 Sumner Elementary 307 0K-05 334 225 67.37% 1 Y 30 Edwin A. Alderman Elementary 334 PK-05 608 404 66.45% 1 Y 31 Brightwood Elementary 409 PK-05 421 279 66.27% 1 Y 32 Hunter Elementary 496 PK-05 567 375 66.14% 1 Y 33 Northwood Elementary Laurin Welborn Middle 592 06-08 782 510 65.22% 1 Y 34 478 PK-05 390 253 64.87% 1 Y 35 Murphey Traditional Academy DISTRICT TOTALS 65372 29056 44.45% * Children, ages 5 through 17, living in school attendance areDistrict Average Number of School Served Number of Eligible Schools 57 67 F/RLunch Data Feb. 2004 Source of Low-Income: Date Collected Feb. 2004 Source of Membership: SIMS Data Date Collected Grade-Span Grouping If grade span grouping will be used to identify eligible school attendance areas/schools, indicate the grade span(s) chosen: Page 3 (a)

K-5

6-8; 9-12

LEA ELIGIBLE SCHOOLS SUMMARY

410

*RESIDENT CHILDREN School Grade LOW-INCOME Elig. Served Rank School Code Span Total Numbe Percent Code (Y or 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 36 Johnson Street Elementary 427 0K-05 284 184 64.79% 1 Y 37 Ben L. Smith High 544 09-12 1536 992 64.58% 1 Y 38 John Van Lindley Elementary 451 PK-05 326 206 63.19% 1 Y 39 Eastern Middle 460 06-08 913 565 61.88% 1 Y 40 Triangle Lake Montessori Elem 578 PK-01 485 295 60.82% 1 Y 41 Dudley High 355 09-12 1294 777 60.05% 1 Y 42 Bluford Elementary 331 0K-05 412 244 59.22% 1 Y 43 High Point Central High 406 09-12 1339 773 57.73% 1 Y 44 Oak View Elementary 505 0K-05 422 243 57.58% 1 Y 45 Guilford Primary 400 0K-02 350 198 56.57% 1 Y 46 T. Wingate Andrews High 319 09-12 1162 653 56.20% 1 Y 47 Allen Jay Middle 313 06-08 715 392 54.83% 1 Y 48 Aycock Middle 325 06-08 666 355 53.30% 1 Y 49 Sedalia Elementary 535 0K-05 448 233 52.01% 1 Y 50 David D. Jones Elementary 430 0K-05 642 330 51.40% 1 Y 51 Morehead Elementary 472 0K-05 436 223 51.15% 1 Y 52 Peeler Open Elementary 517 0K-05 321 163 50.78% 1 Y 53 Kiser Middle 442 06-08 889 440 49.49% 1 Y 54 Irving Park Elementary 412 0K-05 575 277 48.17% 1 Y 55 Jamestown Elementary 418 0K-05 481 224 46.57% 1 Y 56 James Y. Joyner Elementary 436 0K-05 373 167 44.77% 1 Y 57 Eastern Guilford High 358 09-12 927 411 44.34% 2 N 58 Guilford Middle 397 06-08 850 368 43.29% 2 N 59 Gibsonville Elementary 382 PK-05 441 187 42.40% 2 Y 60 Erwin Montessori 361 PK-01 195 81 41.54% 2 Y 61 Northeast Guilford Middle 487 06-08 897 369 41.14% 2 N 62 Madison Elementary 454 0K-05 436 176 40.37% 2 Y 63 SCALE School 533 06-12 127 51 40.16% 2 N 64 Jamestown Middle 421 06-08 1121 443 39.52% 2 N 65 Southern Elementary 538 0K-05 299 114 38.13% 2 N 66 Mendenhall Middle 463 06-08 874 318 36.38% 2 N 67 Southern Guilford High 556 09-12 832 298 35.82% 2 N 68 Shadybrook Elementary 541 0K-05 539 186 34.51% 0 N 69 Page High 508 09-12 1597 530 33.19% 0 N 70 Pleasant Garden Elementary 523 0K-05 659 218 33.08% 0 N DISTRICT TOTALS 65372 29056 44.45% * Children, ages 5 through 17, living in school attendance areDistrict Average Number of Eligible Schools 67 Number of School Served 57 F/RLunch Data Feb. 2004 Source of Low-Income: Date Collected Feb. 2004 SIMS Data Source of Membership: Date Collected Grade-Span Grouping If grade span grouping will be used to identify eligible school attendance areas/schools, indicate the grade span(s) chosen: Page 3 (a)

K-5

6-8; 9-12

LEA ELIGIBLE SCHOOLS SUMMARY

410

*RESIDENT CHILDREN School Grade LOW-INCOME Elig. Served Rank School Code Span Total Numbe Percent Code (Y or 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 71 Jefferson Elementary 423 0K-05 732 235 32.10% 0 N 72 Jesse Wharton Elem 424 PK-05 896 283 31.58% 0 N 73 Alamance Elementary 304 PK-05 839 258 30.75% 0 N 74 Monticello-Brown Summit Elem 340 0K-05 720 209 29.03% 0 N 75 Lucy Ragsdale High 529 09-12 1186 336 28.33% 0 N 76 Nathanael Greene Elementary 481 0K-05 376 106 28.19% 0 N 77 Northeast Guilford High 484 09-12 1062 298 28.06% 0 N 78 Sternberger Elementary 568 0K-05 343 93 27.11% 0 N 79 Brooks Global 337 0K-05 421 112 26.60% 0 N 80 Pilot Elementary 522 0K-05 909 239 26.29% 0 N 81 Southeast Guilford Middle 550 06-08 1066 268 25.14% 0 N 82 Millis Road Elementary 466 0K-05 445 104 23.37% 0 N 83 Grimsley High 394 09-12 1785 416 23.31% 0 N 84 Southwest Guilford Middle 565 06-08 1098 253 23.04% 0 N 85 General Greene Elementary 388 0K-05 483 110 22.77% 0 N 86 Florence Elementary 370 0K-05 693 146 21.07% 0 N 87 Stokesdale Elementary 571 0K-05 442 87 19.68% 0 N 88 Philip J. Weaver Ed Center 589 09-12 126 23 18.25% 0 N 89 Western Guilford High 595 09-12 1317 238 18.07% 0 N 90 Claxton Elementary 343 0K-05 470 84 17.87% 0 N 91 Southeast Guilford High 547 09-12 1234 217 17.59% 0 N 92 Southwest Guilford High 562 09-12 1233 194 15.73% 0 N 93 Colfax Elementary 346 0K-05 871 93 10.68% 0 N 94 Southwest Elementary 559 0K-05 732 72 0 N 9.84% 95 Northwest Guilford Middle 487 06-08 1122 110 0 N 9.80% 96 Kernodle Middle 437 06-08 908 85 0 N 9.36% 97 Summerfield Elementary 574 02-05 724 66 0 N 9.12% 98 Oak Ridge Elementary 502 0K-05 505 41 0 N 8.12% 99 GTCC Middle College High 401 09-12 126 10 0 N 7.94% 100 Laughlin Primary 445 0K-01 337 25 0 N 7.42% 101 Northwest Guilford High 484 09-12 1879 104 0 N 5.53% 102 GC Middle College High 390 09-12 107 3 0 N 2.80% 103 Guilford Early College High 395 09-12 158 2 0 N 1.27% 104 Middle College High at Bennett 326 09-12 65 0 0 N 0.00% 105 Middle College High at NC A&T 483 09-12 73 0 0 N 0.00% DISTRICT TOTALS 65372 29056 44.45% * Children, ages 5 through 17, living in school attendance areDistrict Average Number of Eligible Schools 67 Number of School Served 57 F/RLunch Data Feb. 2004 Source of Low-Income: Date Collected Feb. 2004 SIMS Data Source of Membership: Date Collected Grade-Span Grouping If grade span grouping will be used to identify eligible school attendance areas/schools, indicate the grade span(s) chosen: Page 3 (a)

K-5

6-8; 9-12

LEA SCHOOLWIDE PROJECT SCHOOLS. List schools in rank order according to percent low-income. Schoo l Code 1 School Name RESIDENT CHILDREN LOW-INCOME Membershi Numbe 3 4 488 486 274 263 293 273 313 291 282 262 333 297 375 332 622 547 499 431 384 322 547 455 705 583 798 655 575 465 338 273 383 309 678 533 418 326 389 295 468 345 320 234 270 197 420 298 498 351 693 487 11363 9310 Percent 5 99.59% 95.99% 93.17% 92.97% 92.91% 89.19% 88.53% 87.94% 86.37% 83.85% 83.18% 82.70% 82.08% 80.87% 80.77% 80.68% 78.61% 77.99% 75.84% 73.72% 73.13% 72.96% 70.95% 70.48% 70.27% Per Pupil Cost 6 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 278.36 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 278.36 370.00 370.00 370.00 278.36 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 278.36 Allocation 7 $179,820.00 $97,310.00 $101,010.00 $107,670.00 $96,940.00 $109,890.00 $122,840.00 $152,262.92 $159,470.00 $119,140.00 $168,350.00 $215,710.00 $182,325.80 $172,050.00 $101,010.00 $114,330.00 $148,365.88 $120,620.00 $109,150.00 $127,650.00 $86,580.00 $72,890.00 $110,260.00 $129,870.00 $135,561.32 $3,241,075.92

410

Tchrs 8 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 4 4 5 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 0 2 2 1 57

2 364 1. Fairview Elementary 586 2. Washington Elementary 385 3. Gillespie Park Elementary 403 4. WM Hampton Elementary 439 5. Kirkman Park Elementary 514 6. Clara J. Peck Elementary 499 7. Oak Hill Elementary 415 8. Jackson Middle 349 9. Ceasar Cone Elementary 580 10. Union Hill Elementary 366 11. Waldo C. Falkener Sr. Elementary 532 12. Rankin Elementary 402 13. Otis L. Hairston Sr. Middle 469 14. Montlieu Avenue Elementary 373 15. Julius I. Foust Elementary 328 16. Bessemer Elementary 367 17. Ferndale Middle 511 18. Parkview Village Elementary 376 19. Cyrus P. Frazier Elementary 538 20. Sedgefield Elementary 598 21. Wiley Accel/Enrichment 583 22. Vandalia Elementary 322 23. Archer Elementary 310 24. Allen Jay Elementary 391 25. Alfred J. Griffin Middle TOTALS

STAFF (In FTEs) Paras *Other *Other Tutors YC/CIS Tech.Asst. 9 10 11 1.7 0.5 0 0 0 0 0.91 0 0 0.4 0.5 0 1.28 0.25 0 0 0 0 1.09 0 0 3 0 0 0.8 0.5 0 2.4 0 0 1.28 0 0 2 0.5 0 1.44 0 0 0 0.5 0 0.8 0 0 2.8 0 0 1.92 0 0 1.71 0.25 1 1.68 0 0 0 0 0 0.67 0 0 1.6 0.5 0 0.8 0 0 1.71 0.25 0 0 0.5 0 29.99 4.25 1

*Explain Note: Schools in Title I school improvement are required to spend not less than 10 percent of their Title I allocation on providing quality professional development. [Section 1116(b)]

Page 3 (a)

LEA SCHOOLWIDE PROJECT SCHOOLS. List schools in rank order according to percent low-income. Schoo l Code 1 School Name RESIDENT CHILDREN LOW-INCOME Membershi Numbe 3 4 923 640 408 276 334 225 608 404 421 279 567 375 390 253 284 184 1536 992 326 206 485 295 1294 777 412 244 1339 773 422 243 350 198 1162 653 448 233 642 330 436 223 321 163 575 277 481 224 373 167 441 187 14978 8821 Percent 5 69.34% 67.65% 67.37% 66.45% 66.27% 66.14% 64.87% 64.79% 64.58% 63.19% 60.82% 60.05% 59.22% 57.73% 57.58% 56.57% 56.20% 52.01% 51.40% 51.15% 50.78% 48.17% 46.57% 44.77% 42.40% Per Pupil Cost 6 278.36 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 278.36 370.00 370.00 278.36 370.00 278.36 370.00 370.00 278.36 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 370.00 Allocation 7 $178,150.40 $102,120.00 $83,250.00 $149,480.00 $103,230.00 $138,750.00 $93,610.00 $68,080.00 $276,133.12 $76,220.00 $109,150.00 $216,285.72 $90,280.00 $215,172.28 $89,910.00 $73,260.00 $181,769.08 $86,210.00 $122,100.00 $82,510.00 $60,310.00 $102,490.00 $82,880.00 $61,790.00 $69,190.00 $2,912,330.60

410

Tchrs 8 2 1 1.533 2 1 2 1 6 1 3 2 2 3 2.3 1 3 0.95 2 1.533 1 2 1 1 43.32

2 316 26. Allen Middle 577 27. Sumner Elementary 307 28. Edwin A. Alderman Elementary 334 29. Brightwood Elementary 409 30. Hunter Elementary 496 31. Northwood Elementary 478 32. Murphey Traditional Academy 427 33. Johnson Street Elementary 544 34. Ben L. Smith High 451 35. John Van Lindley Elementary 578 36. Triangle Lake Montessori Elem 355 37. Dudley High 331 38. Bluford Elementary 406 39. High Point Central High 505 40. Oak View Elementary 400 41. Guilford Primary 319 42. T. Wingate Andrews High 535 43. Sedalia Elementary 430 44. David D. Jones Elementary 472 45. Morehead Elementary 517 46. Peeler Open Elementary 412 47. Irving Park Elementary 418 48. Jamestown Elementary 436 49. James Y. Joyner Elementary 382 50. Gibsonville Elementary TOTALS

STAFF (In FTEs) Paras *Other *Other Tutors YC/CIS Tech.Asst. 9 10 11 1.07 0 0 3.33 0 0 0.32 0 0 1.6 0 0 2.42 0 0 1.27 0.25 0 2.13 0 0 3.2 0 0 1.07 0 0 0.64 0 0 0 0 0 3.2 0 0 0.64 0 0 2.96 0 0 0.27 0 0 0.67 0 0 1.6 0 0 1.71 0 0 1.01 0 0 0.96 0 0 0.91 0 0 0 0 0 2.03 0 0 0.72 0 0 1.2 0 0 34.93 0.25 0

*Explain Note: Schools in Title I school improvement are required to spend not less than 10 percent of their Title I allocation on providing quality professional development. [Section 1116(b)]

Page 3 (a)

LEA SCHOOLWIDE PROJECT SCHOOLS. List schools in rank order according to percent low-income. Schoo l Code 1 School Name RESIDENT CHILDREN LOW-INCOME Per Pupil Cost

410

2 361 51. Erwin Montessori 454 52. Madison Elementary

Membershi Numbe Percent 3 4 5 6 195 81 41.54% 370.00 436 176 40.37% 370.00

STAFF (In FTEs) Allocation Tchrs Paras *Other *Other Tutors YC/CIS Tech.Asst. 7 8 9 10 11 $29,970.00 0.5 0.32 0 0 $65,120.00 1 0.64 0 0

TOTALS *Explain

631

257

$95,090.00

1.5

0.96

0

0

Note: Schools in Title I school improvement are required to spend not less than 10 percent of their Title I allocation on providing quality professional development. [Section 1116(b)]

Page 3 (a)

LEA TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS. List schools in rank order according to percent low-income. No. Per ELIGIBLE PARTICIPATIN STAFF Grade(s) LowPupil STUDENTS STUDENTS (In FTEs) Served Income Cost Allocation Rdg Mat Othe Rdg Mat Othe Tchr Tutor 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 06-08 510 278.36 $141,963.60 107 55 0 107 55 0 1 0.53 06-08 565 278.36 $157,273.40 199 86 0 150 86 0 2 1.2 06-08 392 278.36 $109,117.12 174 103 0 120 103 0 2 0 06-08 355 278.36 $98,817.80 90 61 0 90 61 0 2 0.5 06-08 440 278.36 $122,478.40 122 110 0 100 91 0 2 0.53

410

Sch. 1 592 460 313 325 442 School Name 2 1. Laurin Welborn Middle 2. Eastern Middle 3. Allen Jay Middle 4. Aycock Middle 5. Kiser Middle 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 TOTALS

Projec 15 SEC,AO SEC,PO SEC,AO SEC,PO SEC,PO

2262

$629,650.32

692

415

0

567

396

0

9

2.76

Note: Schools in Title I school improvement are required to spend not less than 10 percent of their Title I allocation on providing quality professional development. [Section 1116(b)]

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code PREKINDERGARTEN CLASSES Title I Funded Classes Funded No. Per through SetClass Aside(1) or Allocation (4 ) 3 18 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 16 1 32 1 18 1 16 1 16 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 18 1 16 1 36 1 16 1 16 1 36 1 18 1 18 1 16 1 18 1 18 1 36 1 18 1 18 1 34 1 Staff (In FTEs) Tchrs 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 36 Paras 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 36

410

Site 1 Alamance Elementary Alderman Elementary Allen Jay Elementary Archer Elementary Bessemer Elementary Brightwood Elementary Colfax Elementary Falkener Elementary Foust Elementary Gillespie Elementary Guilford Primary Hunter Elementary Irving Park Elementary Jamestown Elementary Jefferson Elementary Johnson Street Elementary Jones Elementary Kirkman Park Elementary Lindley Elementary Madison Elementary Millis Road Elementary Monticello-Brown Summit E Montlieu Elementary Northwood Elementary Oak View Elementary Rankin Elementary Sedalia Elementary Sedgefield Elementary Sumner Elementary Union Hill Elementary Vandalia Elementary TOTAL *Specify Estimated Cost

No. of Classes 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 36

*Other 7

0

The estimated cost of operating the classes listed above is $2,593,759.00 (Including teacher salaries and benefits, materials and supplies, equipment, snacks, professional development costs, parental involvement costs, field trips, etc.) Page 3 (a)

LEA Code PROJECT NARRATIVE Participant Identification

410

Title I Preschool classes (36) are offered by the Guilford County School System to children turning 4 years old, on or before October 16th. This high quality prekindergarten experience is targeted for four-year olds, or rising four-year olds, at risk of developmental delay, including a high percentage of low-income children and their families. The program recruits children with special needs and those who have emotional or behavioral changes. Priority is given to children with the greatest educational need as measured by the Developmental Indicator for the Assessment of Learing; 3rd. Edition (DIAL-3) Preschool classrooms serve 16-18 children and are led by a Birth-Kindergarten licensed teacher and an assistant, meeting the NCLB standards. Instructional approach(es) and curriculum A developmentally appropriate curriculum as defined by national and local standards for serving preschool children is implemented. The Creative Curriculum which is a nationally recognized, researched-based curriculum, addresses the needs of the whole child through developmental goals and integrated exploratory activities. Teachers organize their classrooms into interest areas, while providing individual, large and small group instruction. Observations are utilized to plan instruction. A variety of approaches that allow for an active role in children’s learning, while responding to new requirements for addressing academic content is utilized. The teacher’s role serves to connect content, teaching and learning for preschool children. An additional component focusing on literacy, “Literacy First”, enhances the emergent literacy process for young children. The North Carolina Guide for the Early Years is the framework for the early childhood programs implemented in the school district. Children diagnosed with special needs are provided with additional instruction based on their diagnosis. Types of materials and equipment used Print rich environments are chocked with various genres of literature, printed materials, puzzles, toys, games, multiple sized and shaped blocks, areas for dramatic play, items for exploration, music, artistic expression, computers, and electronic games. Selected materials are culturally diverse and meet the needs of typically, as well as atypically developing children. Monitoring of progress/other assessments used Progress is monitored using the Creative Curriculum ongoing assessment. This assessment tracks children’s progress using a systematic approach that supports learning and is consistent with the goals and objectives of the curriculum. The three step process includes the following: collecting facts, analyzing and evaluating the collected facts, and using what you have learned to plan for each child and the group. Professional Development

All Staff have the following training: First aid, CPR, Playground Safety: Technology for Literacy First data collection, and the Creative Curriculum. Page 3 (a)

LEA PREKINDERGARTEN CLASSES Blended Classes No. of No. Staff (In FTEs) Programs Classe Per s Class Tchrs Paras *Other % Title % EC *Other 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

410

Site 1

Title I Funding 10

TOTALS *Specify

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

$0.00

ESTIMATED COST The estimated cost of operating the number of classes listed above is (Including teacher salaries and benefits, materials and supplies, equipment, snacks, professional development costs, parental involvement costs, field trips, etc.) PROGRAM NARRATIVE. Provide a program description that includes the following components: 1) participant identification; 2) instructional approach(es) and curriculum; 3) types of materials and equipment used; 4) monitoring of progress/other assessments used; and 5) professional development. OTHER CLASSES Any other PreK classes operating in your LEA? If so, what is the funding source? FUNDING SOURCE(S) More at Four Smart Start Local (LEA)

X

Yes

No

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

PRIVATE SCHOOLS. Please use the table below to list the private schools located in the LEA. Number of Title I Students Private Schools 1 American Hebrew Academy B’Nai Shalom Day School Baldwin Chapel SDA School Caldwell Academy *Calvary Nazarene Christian Academy Canterbury School Christ Academy Covenant Christian Day School Fisher Park Academy GLC Kiddie College School Greensboro Day School Greensboro Montessori School Guilford Day School Hayworth Christian School High Point Christian Academy High Point Friends School Immaculate Heart of Mary School Matrix Christian Academy Mell Burton School N.B. Smith SDA Academy New Garden Friends School Oak Ridge Military Academy Our Lady of Grace Paramount Christian Academy Pendle Hill Friends School Piedmont School Ridgefield Academy Shining Light Academy St. Pius School Tri-City Junior Academy Triad Christian Academy Vandalia Christian School Wesleyan Education Center Home Schools TOTALS
*Closed July 2003

Grade Span 2 9-12 K-8 K-8 K-12 ---K-8 K-12 K-8 K-2 K K-12 K-8 1-12 K-12 K-10 K-3 K-8 5-11 6-11 K-8 K-8 7-12 K-8 6-11 K-8 1-8 9-12 K-12 K-8 K-10 1-5 K-12 K-12 1,027

Eligible 3

7

4

17

10

7

Estimated Served Participants (Y or N) 4 5 N N 7 Y N N N N N N 4 Y N N N N N N N N N 17 Y N N 10 Y N N N N N 7 Y N N N N

45

45

Have all private schools been given the opportunity to participate?

X

Yes

No

Page 3 (a)

Baldwin Chapel SDA Church School

LEA Code

410

PRIVATE SCHOOL PARTICIPATION (complete for each participating nonpublic school) 1. SITE FOR SERVICE X private school mobile unit public school student's home rental/leased site computer-assisted lab portable unit community-based (library; community center) other (explain)

2. PRIVATE SCHOOL ALLOCATION. Specify this school’s Title I allocation for eligible nonpublic children: $5,550.00 $90.30 $450.60 $6,090.90 Allocation Parent Involvement Professional Development Total

3. INSTRUCTIONAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION. Provide a program narrative that includes the following components: 1) participant identification; 2) instructional approach(es) and curriculum; 3) types of materials and equipment used; 4) monitoring of progress/other assessments used; 5) professional development. Students are assessed for academic need based on a combination of multiple criteria including teacher recommendation, standardized tests scores, and levels of need for services using the Title I educational needs assessments. Supplemental services are provided for eligible students in grades K-8. A highlyqualified tutor will meet with them on a weekly basis for approximately 30-45 minutes one to one or in very small groups. The tutor will coordinate with the regular classroom teachers in providing instructional assistance to participating students. The main focus will be on using reading strategies along with incorporating them with current classroom assignments. A variety of leveled reading materials along with grade level books, and resources will be used. Feedback on student progress will be ongoing throughout the school year between the tutor, teachers, and parents. Students will be assessed in the fall and spring. Teachers of participating Title I students have expressed an interest in professional development activities/opportunities in the areas of reading strategies and writing.

Page 3 (a)

Greensboro Life Skills Center Kiddie College

LEA Code

410

PRIVATE SCHOOL PARTICIPATION (complete for each participating nonpublic school) 1. SITE FOR SERVICE X private school mobile unit public school student's home rental/leased site computer-assisted lab portable unit community-based (library; community other (explain)

2. PRIVATE SCHOOL ALLOCATION. Specify this school’s Title I allocation for eligible nonpublic children: $2,590.00 $42.14 $210.28 $2,842.42 Allocation Parent Involvement Professional Development Total

3. INSTRUCTIONAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION. Provide a program narrative that includes the following components: 1) participant identification; 2) instructional approach(es) and curriculum; 3) types of materials and equipment used; 4) monitoring of progress/other assessments used; 5) professional development. Students are assessed for academic need based on a combination of multiple criteria including teacher recommendation, standardized tests scores, and levels of need for services using the Title I educational needs assessment. Supplemental services are provided for eligible students in first grade. A highlyqualified tutor will meet with them on a weekly basis for approximately 35 minutes one to one or in very small groups. The tutor will coordinate with the regular classroom teachers in providing instructional assistance to participating students. The main focus will be on using reading strategies along with incorporating them with current classroom assignments. A variety of leveled reading materials along with grade level books, and resources will be used. Feedback on student progress will be ongoing throughout the school year between the tutor, teachers, and parents. Students will be assessed in the fall and spring. Teachers of participating Title I students have expressed an interest in professional development activities/opportunities in the areas of reading strategies for early childhood years.

Page 3 (a)

Napolean B. Smith Academy

LEA Code

410

PRIVATE SCHOOL PARTICIPATION (complete for each participating nonpublic school) 1. SITE FOR SERVICE X private school mobile unit public school student's home rental/leased site computer-assisted lab portable unit community-based (library; community other (explain)

2. PRIVATE SCHOOL ALLOCATION. Specify this school’s Title I allocation for eligible nonpublic children: $4,070.00 $66.22 $330.44 $4,466.66 Allocation Parent Involvement Professional Development Total

3. INSTRUCTIONAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION. Provide a program narrative that includes the following components: 1) participant identification; 2) instructional approach(es) and curriculum; 3) types of materials and equipment used; 4) monitoring of progress/other assessments used; 5) professional development. Students are assessed for academic need based on a combination of multiple criteria including teacher recommendation, standardized tests scores, and levels of need for services using the Title I educational needs assessment. Supplemental services are provided for eligible students in grades K-8. A highly-qualified tutor will meet with them on a weekly basis for approximately 30-45 minutes one to one or in very small groups. The tutor will coordinate with the regular classroom teachers in providing instructional assistance to participating students. The main focus will be on using reading strategies along with incorporating them with current classroom assignments. A variety of leveled reading materials along with grade level books, and resources will be used. Feedback on student progress will be ongoing throughout the school year between the tutor, teachers, and parents. Students will be assessed in the fall and spring. Teachers of participating Title I students have expressed an interest in professional development activities/opportunities in the areas of reading comprehension and writing.

Page 3 (a)

Our Lady of Grace School

LEA Code

410

PRIVATE SCHOOL PARTICIPATION (complete for each participating nonpublic school) 1. SITE FOR SERVICE X private school mobile unit public school student's home rental/leased site computer-assisted lab portable unit community-based (library; community other (explain)

2. PRIVATE SCHOOL ALLOCATION. Specify this school’s Title I allocation for eligible nonpublic children: $6,290.00 $102.34 $510.68 $6,903.02 Allocation Parent Involvement Professional Development Total

3. INSTRUCTIONAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION. Provide a program narrative that includes the following components: 1) participant identification; 2) instructional approach(es) and curriculum; 3) types of materials and equipment used; 4) monitoring of progress/other assessments used; 5) professional development. Students are assessed for academic need based on a combination of multiple criteria including teacher recommendation, standardized tests scores, and levels of need for services using the Title I educational needs assessment. Supplemental services are provided for eligible students in grades K-8. A highly-qualified tutor will meet with them on a weekly basis for approximately 30-45 minutes one to one or in very small groups. The tutor will coordinate with the regular classroom teachers in providing instructional assistance to participating students. The main focus will be on using reading strategies along with incorporating them with current classroom assignments. A variety of leveled reading materials along with grade level books, and resources will be used. Feedback on student progress will be ongoing throughout the school year between the tutor, teachers, and parents. Students will be assessed in the fall and spring. Teachers of participating Title I students have expressed an interest in professional development activities/opportunities in the areas of reading strategies, reading comprehension, and math.

Page 3 (a)

St. Pius X Catholic School

LEA Code

410

PRIVATE SCHOOL PARTICIPATION (complete for each participating nonpublic school) 1. SITE FOR SERVICE X private school mobile unit public school student's home rental/leased site computer-assisted lab portable unit community-based (library; community other (explain)

2. PRIVATE SCHOOL ALLOCATION. Specify this school’s Title I allocation for eligible nonpublic children: $2,220.00 $36.12 $180.24 $2,436.36 Allocation Parent Involvement Professional Development Total

3. INSTRUCTIONAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION. Provide a program narrative that includes the following components: 1) participant identification; 2) instructional approach(es) and curriculum; 3) types of materials and equipment used; 4) monitoring of progress/other assessments used; 5) professional development. Students are assessed for academic need based on a combination of multiple criteria including teacher recommendation, standardized tests scores, and levels of need for services using the Title I educational needs assessment. Supplemental services are provided for eligible students in grades K-8. A highly-qualified tutor will meet with them on a weekly basis for approximately 30-45 minutes one to one or in very small groups. The tutor will coordinate with the regular classroom teachers in providing instructional assistance to participating students. The main focus will be on using reading strategies along with incorporating them with current classroom assignments. A variety of leveled reading materials along with grade level books, and resources will be used. Feedback on student progress will be ongoing throughout the school year between the tutor, teachers, and parents. Students will be assessed in the fall and spring. Teachers of participating Title I students have expressed an interest in professional development activities/opportunities in the areas of reading strategies, reading comprehension, and incorporating study skills with these strategies.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

AFFIRMATION OF CONSULTATION WITH PRIVATE SCHOOL Section 1120(b) of the No Child Left Behind and § 200.63 of the Title I regulations require that timely and meaningful consultation occur between the local educational agency (LEA) and private school officials prior to any decision that affects the opportunities of eligible private school children, teachers, and other educational personnel to participate in programs under this Act, and shall continue throughout the implementation and assessment of activities under this section. The following topics must be discussed during the ongoing consultation process • How the LEA will identify the needs of eligible private school children; • What services the LEA will offer to eligible private school children; • How and when the LEA will make decisions about the delivery of services; • How, where, and by whom the LEA will provide services to eligible private school children, including a thorough consideration and analysis of the views of the private school officials on the provision of services through a contract with a third-party provider; • How the LEA will assess academically the services of eligible private school children in accordance with § 200.10 and how the LEA will use the results of that assessment to improve Title I services; • The size and scope of the equitable services that the LEA will provide to eligible private school children and, consistent with § 200.64, the proportion of funds that will be allocated to provide these services; • The method or sources of data that the LEA will use under § 200.78 to determine the number of private school children from low-income families residing in participating public school attendance areas, including whether the LEA will extrapolate data, if a survey is used; • The equitable services the LEA will provide to teachers and families of participating private school children; • If the LEA disagrees with the views of the private school officials on the provision of services through a contract, the LEA must provide the private schools the reasons in We agree that timely and meaningful consultation occurred before the LEA made any decisions that affected the participation of eligible private school children in the Title I, Part A program. STATEMENT OF ASSURANCES Assurances are given that – • Nonpublic school officials have provided accurate and reliable low-income data to the district for children residing in eligible school attendance areas for purposes of allocating Title I funds. • The LEA has determined a per pupil allocation for each eligible school attendance area and reserved that amount for each nonpublic low-income child residing in the participating school attendance area. • The educational services and other benefits offered to eligible nonpublic children are equitable in comparison to services and benefits for public school children. • Each nonpublic school child receiving Title I assistance resides in a Title I-served school attendance area and has educational need based on multiple, objective, academicallyrelated criteria. • The educational services and other benefits provided to eligible nonpublic school children are secular, neutral, nonideological, and under the district’s administrative direction and control.

Public School Official

Date

Public School Official

Date

School District

Name of Private School

THE LEA MUST MAINTAIN A COPY OF THIS FORM IN ITS RECORDS AND PROVIDE A COPY TO SEA. Page 3 (a)

LEA Code PARTICIPATION OF CHILDREN IN SPECIAL POPULATIONS

410

Homeless Children Attending Non-Title I Schools 1. Does the district have homeless children attending non-Title I schools? X YES NO *If yes, the LEA is required to reserve Title I funds to provide comparable services to eligible homeless children attending non-Title I schools. 2. Describe the nature of the Title I services to be offered to homeless children in nonparticipating schools.
Our Special Programs Divisions receives funds through the McKinney-Vento Act that serves students identified as homeless. The system has implemented a new enrollment provision for families in order to be in compliance with the Act. The process includes completing the Affidavit of Homelessness and addressing the needs of this group. Also, the LEA now has a full-time staff person to coordinate the program. Title I funds will be set aside to provide supplemental educational services for homeless students who are failing to meet state academic standards or who are at risk of meeting state academic standards.

Migrant Children Attending Title I Schools 3. Does the LEA have children of migrant workers, or children of formerly migrant workers, attending Title I schools? YES X NO

4. Describe the nature of the Title I services to be offered to eligible migratory children.
Our LEA will coordinate with Rockingham and Randolph counties to serve students who are identified as migrant.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code LEA Name: Type of (check one) Guilford County Schools Neglected Institution Name:

410
Juvenile Detention Juvenile Structured Day Program

X

Delinquent

NEGLECTED AND DELINQUENT INSTITUTIONS PROJECT NARRATIVE
Project Narrative. Provide a project description of the Title I program being conducted/offered. Use additional sheets, if necessary. Include the following:

Instructional approach(es). Describe the instructional program including strategies, pupil services and procedures that will be used to meet the identified needs of the participants. State certified teachers are used for this program. Counselor Technicians assist students in the classroom as well as with outside activities. Plato instructional software is utilized. A contract is entered with parents (Juvenile Structured Day Program) to ensure parent involvement. We conduct monthly mandatore meetings with all parents.

Types of materials and equipment used . Describe the instructional materials and equipment to be used in the program/project. The following instructional materials and equipment are used: State adopted textbooks, reference materials, calculators, computers, overhead projectors, Plato instructional software and other related materials. Title I funds will be used to provide materials and supplies for students.

Monitoring of progress/assessments used. Discuss how the progress of the participants will be monitored and the assessments to be used to determine program effectiveness. The same criteria is used as Guilford County Schools such as end-of-grade testing. Computer competency tests are administered in 8th grade. Assessments are used to prepare juveniles for re-integration into the public school system. Life skills courses are taught.

Professional development. Describe the appropriate training to be offered to teachers and other instructional and administrative personnel to enable such teachers and personnel to carry Basic training for juvenile workers is a requirement for our Guilford County employees. Workshops through the Guilford County School system and on-site training.

Transition activities. If applicable, describe the strategies that will be implemented to assist children and youth in making successful transitions from the institution to public schools. We keep in contact with the teachers, counselors, etc. After students have been integrated back into their home school, we continue to follow up on their progress for one year and offer any help needed.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code N or D Institutions

410

Prepare a budget showing how the Title I, Part D funds will be spent to improve the academic achievement of children served. Use the budget worksheet below to show how the funds will be expended. There should be a correlation between the budget line items and the activities described in the project narrative. Budget Worksheet Description of Expenditure Parent Involvement Guilford County School Counselor/Social Worker to work at the Juvenile Detention Center Instructional Supplies Amount To Be Budgeted $1,163.00 $60,000.00

$55,154.00

Total Budget Amount

$116,317.00

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code COMPARABLE SERVICES

410

Complete the following table for eligible attendance areas/schools, in a selected grade-span or in the district as a whole, that will be skipped and will not receive Title I funds. LEA Per Pupil Cost: N/A Comparable Funding Source Local State Supplementa Supplemental l Dollars Dollars 5 6 $771,986.62 $1,788,094.20 $75,605.92 $958,102.64

School Name

Number of LowGrade Income Span Students 2 K-12 K-12 3

Anticipate d Title I Funding

1 Gateway Ed. Center C.D. McIver (SP-ED)

4 109 $40,330.00 71 $26,270.00

180 $66,600.00

$847,592.54 $2,746,196.84

Is/are the school(s) in compliance with the comparability requirements of section 1120A(c )?

X yes

no

Give a brief description of the comparable services to be offered. Gateway is a public separate setting for EC children who are in the most restrictive environment, many of whom are medically fragile, and with cognitive delays. McIver is a public separate setting for EC children with serious cognitive delays and often, behavior difficulities. Comparable Title I services may include the following: one on one instruction, supplemental educational materials and supplies, tutoring, and smaller class size.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

SCHOOLWIDE PROJECT SCHOOLS
LEA Summary Components. Provide an LEA summary of the ten (10) schoolwide components being implemented in participating schools, as described in section 1114
• Comprehensive needs assessment • School reform strategies • Instruction by highly qualified teachers • High quality and ongoing professional development • Strategies to attract highly qualified teachers to high need schools • Including teachers in decisions regarding the use of assessments • Strategies to increase parental involvement • Preschool transition strategies • Activities for children experiencing difficulty • Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services

Resources used in programs. Briefly summarize the Title I and other resources used in participating schools. Because of Title I funding, we are able to offer a variety of resources that support student achievement. Guided Reading teachers, math teachers and curriculum facilitators are available to assist students and teachers. Flexible skill groups are instituted and children are taught on their instructional level. These resources allow classroom teachers to see model lessons, ask questions, implement new strategies, receive non-evaluative feedback, and analyze data and plan instruction accordingly. Extended learning opportunities are provided to students through the use of highly qualified tutors. In addition, some schools partner with the United Way to use Youth Coordinators to help students make enriching learning connections outside of the school day. Many students read more and on their reading level because of programs like Accelerated Reader. There is an increase in classroom libraries and nonfiction reading materials. Opportunities for front loading are made readily available. If students lack prior knowledge, teachers plan experiences that will give them first-hand knowledge. Math Manipulatives and Hands on Minds on Materials are invaluable resources and provide students the opportunity to internalize abstract concepts. Technology is widespread because of the increase of hardware and software at the school level. Communities in Schools volunteers and parent liaisons provide a bridge between the home and school. Title I, Title II, Title III, Title V, Federal Magnet Assistance Grant, 21st Century Grant, United Way, Technology Grants, local equity allotments, grants from local foundations, state accountability funds and local business partners have supplemented educational programs in schools.

Other federal, state and local programs Included. Briefly summarize other federal, state, and local programs to be included in the schoolwide programs. Other programs include Reading Together, Learning Together, Paideia, Comer, Responsible Discipline, Character Education, Extended Learning, Carnegie Math Project, Success for All, Literacy First, Advanced Learner Program, Special Education Services, pre-kindergarten classes and magnet schools. These are supported with state, local and federal funds. How assessment results are reported to parents. Explain how assessment results will be reported to parents. Assessment results are reported in a variety of ways to parents. Schools send daily and weekly progress reports home to parents. Sample work is often included. Quarterly report cards go to parents and parent-teacher conferences are regularly scheduled to discuss student progress. Individual standardized test results are sent home to parents. Parents receive school assessment results during parent meetings throughout the year. The results are printed in local newspapers, on the local cable station and on the district’s and each school's web page. Home visits are often made to communicate individual student achievement and progress. Page 3 (a)

LEA Code 410 TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS Allen Jay Middle, Aycock Middle, Eastern Middle, Kiser Middle, Welborn Middle PROGRAM ORGANIZATION Type of Project: Reading Project Setting: Scheduled Elective (Example: Reading, Math, Language Arts ) (Example: pull-out, inclass, scheduled elective, etc .) A typical Title I participant receives instruction 5 40-45 days per week for minutes per day.

The regular instructional time, for the subject area addressed, is 40-45 minutes in duration. Instructional approach(es) The Title I teacher will teach small classes during the students' elective time. Students will not be taken from their core academic classes. A variety of strategies will be used including self-selected reading, where the students will read at their appropriate level and have weekly conferences with the teacher. Vocabulary and spelling development will also be incorporated. Flexible guided reading groups with center activities will be used to allow students to have small group instruction as well as independent practice on skills taught during the small group lesson. Systematic phonic instruction will be used to increase fluency. Research based Reading in the Content Area strategies, cooperatiave learning, and graphic organizers will also be used. Interactive software such as SuccessMaker and Accelerated Reader will be used to encourage and develop independent reading. Some classes will add tutors to assist the Title I teacher in small group activites. Types of materials and equipment used Leveled books will be used in the guided reading groups. Trade books and textbooks will also be utilized. Center activities will include tape recorders and CD players with books on tape, SRA kits for reading and phonics, as well as comprehension games, vocabulary manipulatives, graphic organizers and word walls. Software such as SuccessMaker and Accelerated Reader will also be used.

Monitoring of progress/Other assessments used Benchmark tests will be administered to assess student progress. Data from these tests, along with classroom teacher assessments and informal assessments (observations, grades, interviews, etc.) will be used to revise Personal Education Plans (PEP) based on identified student needs. Title I and regular education teachers will share results to ensure their best use in supporting student progress.

Professional development Title I Teachers will be given training in Reading in the Content Area, Balanced Literacy, and other district level workshops. They may also visit other schools that have model programs for reading. There will be opportunities to attend conferences such as the North Carolina Reading Conference, the North Carolina Middle School Conference, Closing the Gap Conference, etc. and to take college courses if needed. Participant identification The Guilford County School rating and ranking scale is used to identify students based on academics, standardized test scores, teacher recommendation, and a Level I or Level II on the end of grade test. These students are generally not served through Exceptional Children services and the English Speaker of Other Language program. Using this criteria, students in sixth, seventh, or eighth grade with the highest priority of need in reading will be served. Page 3 (a)

LEA Code TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS Allen Jay Middle, Aycock Middle, Kiser Middle PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

410

Type of Project: Math Project Setting: Scheduled Elective (Example: Reading, Math, Language Arts ) (Example: pull-out, inclass, scheduled elective, etc .) A typical Title I participant receives instruction 5 40-45 days per week for minutes per day.

The regular instructional time, for the subject area addressed, is 40-45 minutes in duration. Instructional approach(es) The Title I teacher will diagnose specific skill deficits through various assessments in math for each student. A variety of instructional approaches will be utilized to address the deficits including cooperative groups, graphic organizers, center activities with manipulatives, SOLVE for problem solving skills, and interactive math computer software such as Successmaker. Some classes will add tutors to assist students in small group activites in the class. Types of materials and equipment used Math manipulatives, calculators, trade books such as NC Coach, and software such as SuccessMaker and Yearly Progress Pro will be used in the math guided studies class.

Monitoring of progress/Other assessments used Benchmark tests will be administered to assess student progress. Data from these tests, along with classroom teacher assessments and informal assessments (observations, grades, interviews, etc.) will be used to revise Personal Education Plans (PEP) based on identified student needs. Title I and regular education teachers will share results to ensure their best use in supporting student progress.

Professional development Title I Teachers will be given training in Reading in the Content Area and other district level workshops. They may also visit other schools that have model programs for math. There will be opportunities to attend conferences such as the North Carolina Teachers of Mathematics Conference and to take college courses if needed.

Participant identification The Guilford County School rating and ranking scale is used to identify students based on academics, standardized test scores, teacher recommendation, and a Level I or Level II on the end of grade test. These students are generally not served through Exceptional Children services and the English Speaker of Other Language program. Using this criteria, students in sixth, seventh, or eighth grade with the highest priority of need in math will be served. Page 3 (a)

LEA Code TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS Allen Jay Middle, Eastern Middle, Kiser Middle PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

410

Type of Project: Reading Project Setting: Pull-out (from elective) (Example: Reading, Math, Language Arts ) (Example: pull-out, inclass, scheduled elective, etc .) A typical Title I participant receives instruction 1-2 40-45 days per week for minutes per day.

The regular instructional time, for the subject area addressed, is 40-45 minutes in duration. Instructional approach(es) Students will be scheduled into an elective class and then will be pulled out of that elective for 1-2 days a week for guided studies reading. RCA strategies, cooperative learning, and expanded use of graphic organizers will be implemented with small groups of students. Accelerated Reader will also be used to encourage and develop independent reading.

Types of materials and equipment used Various software and trade books will be utilized to assist children in increasing reading achievement Software will include Success Maker. Trade books such as 9 Good Habits and NC Coach will be used.

Monitoring of progress/Other assessments used Benchmark tests will be administered to assess student progress. Data from these tests, along with classroom teacher assessments and informal assessments (observations, grades, interviews, etc.) will be used to revise Personal Education Plans (PEP) based on identified student needs. Title I teachers and regular education teachers will share results to ensure the best support for student progress.

Professional development Title I Teachers will be given training in Reading in the Content Area, Cooperative Learning, Graphic Organizers, and other district level workshops.

Participant identification The Guilford County School rating and ranking scale is used to identify students based on academics, standardized test scores, teacher recommendation, and a Level I or Level II on the end of grade test. These students are generally not served through Exceptional Children services and the English Speaker of Other Language program. Using this criteria, students in sixth, seventh, or eighth grade with the highest priority of need in reading will be served.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS Allen Jay Middle, Kiser Middle PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

410

Type of Project: Math Project Setting: Pull-out (from elective) (Example: Reading, Math, Language Arts ) (Example: pull-out, inclass, scheduled elective, etc .) A typical Title I participant receives instruction 1-2 40-45 days per week for minutes per day.

The regular instructional time, for the subject area addressed, is 40-45 minutes in duration. Instructional approach(es) Students will be scheduled into an elective class and then will be pulled out of that elective for 1-2 days a week for guided studies math. Problem solving strategies, use of manipulatiaves to encourage student participation, cooperative learning, and expanded use of graphic organizers will be implemented with small groups.

Types of materials and equipment used Various software and trade books will be utilized to assist children in increasing math achievement Software will include Success Maker. Trade books such as NC Coach will be used.

Monitoring of progress/Other assessments used Benchmark tests will be administered to assess student progress. Data from these tests, along with classroom teacher assessments and informal assessments (observations, grades, interviews, etc.) will be used to revise Personal Education Plans (PEP) based on identified student need

Professional development Title I Teachers will be given training in problem solving and proper use of manipulatives, Cooperative Learning, Graphic Organizers, and other district level workshops.

Participant identification The Guilford County School rating and ranking scale is used to identify students based on academics, standardized test scores, teacher recommendation, and a Level I or Level II on the end of grade test. These students are generally not served through Exceptional Children services and the English Speaker of Other Language program. Using this criteria, students in sixth, seventh, or eighth grade with the highest priority of need in math will be served.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS Allen Jay Middle, Welborn Middle PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

410

Type of Project: Reading and Math Project Setting: Add-on (before & after or Saturday) (Example: Reading, Math, Language Arts ) (Example: pull-out, inclass, scheduled elective, etc .) A typical Title I participant receives instruction 1-2 25-45 days per week for minutes per day.

The regular instructional time, for the subject area addressed, is 45-80 minutes in duration. Instructional approach(es) For Add-on services, certified teachers will work with students either before or after school for 1 hour or during a 4-hour Saturday Academy. Instructional strategies will emphasize remediation and acceleration to help students succeed in their regular education classes. Individualized instruction will be in small groups. When appropriate, concepts and skills will be introduced before they are taught during the regular school day so that students will have prior knowledge and more time to master objectives. Interactive computer software such as Success Maker and Internet activity sites will also be used. Types of materials and equipment used Manipulatives, calculators, computer software programs such as Success Maker, and Internet activity sites such as brainchild.com, and Test Ready materials with focus on reading and math will be used.

Monitoring of progress/Other assessments used Assessments will be related to the materials being used. Since regular daytime teachers will be providing the add-on services, assessment data will be shared. Success Maker reports as well as teacher formal and informal assessments will be used to determine student progress and to plan subsequent instruction.

Professional development Regular daytime teachers will be providing the add-on services, and they will be provided opportunities for training in math and reading as needed.

Participant identification The Guilford County School rating and ranking scale is used to identify students based on academics, standardized test scores, teacher recommendation, and a Level I or Level II on the end of grade test. These students are generally not served through Exceptional Children services and the English Speaker of Other Language program. Using this criteria, students in sixth, seventh, or eighth grade with the highest priority of need in reading and/or math will be served. Page 3 (a)

LEA Code PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT

410

PROGRAM NARRATIVE. Provide an LEA summary of how participating schools will address the following: Convening an annual public meeting Through several means of communication, Guilford County Schools' (GCS) parents will be informed of annual parent meetings that will be held in the fall. The annual meetings will focus on Title I, student achievement and parents right to know and be involved, (i.e., Back to School Night, Open House, or PTA meeting). Agenda topics may include an overview of the NCLB Act, Compacts, Parent Policy, Achievement or Proficiency Status, Ways of Becoming Involved, How To Form a True Partnership and other Title I information. In many instances, the meetings will be supplemented by grade level and parent outreach meetings that focus on local and state promotion standards, curriculum strands and objectives, and strategies for helping reinforce instruction. Parents who do not attend the meetings may be informed through flyers, home visits, newsletters and special outreach meetings at designated community sites. Offering a flexible number of meetings The parent outreach meetings will be scheduled at flexible times, some during the day and some in the late evening. Arrangements will be made for transportation and childcare, if needed. The following are examples of the types of meetings that will be held to accommodate the schedules of our GCS parents: Grade level meetings for parents; Conferences held on workdays; Before- and after-school meetings; Comer Parent Team Meetings (monthly); PTA Board Meetings (monthly); School Improvement Meetings; Home visits; Meetings held at public libraries, Housing Communities, or other sites specified by the families. Involving parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of Title I programs, including the planning, review and improvement of the school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan. Multiple opportunities will be extended to parents to participate in numerous school events including the planning, review and improvement of Title I programs, parent policy and the development of the School Improvement Plan. Parents have opportunities to serve as members on the Title I Planning Team and on the School Improvement Team. In Comer schools, parents participate on the Comer Parent Team, and serve on Parent Advisory Councils at the school level. Regularly scheduled meetings will be held with the School Improvement Teams as the school level. Parents will have an opportunity to review assessment results and work towards continuous school improvement. Providing timely Information, such as information about Title I programs, descriptions and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the reforms of academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet. Parents will be afforded timely information regarding the Standard Course of Study, the Guilford County Prioritized Curriculum, grade level curriculum objectives, assessment strategies, and proficiency levels through the following means: Open House; Grade Level Nights; Parent Information Curriculum Related Workshops (Gateways, Proficiency levels, Benchmarks, NC Standard Course of Study, Homework, Reading and Math Strategies, Selection of Reading Materials, etc.); Partners in Learning (a GCS grade level publication for parents); District and indivdual school websites; Quarterly student progress reports; Weekly parent packets sent home containing student's work, school newsletters, homework assignments, etc.; Newsletters; and, Grade-level calendars. Providing opportunities for regular meetings (if requested) to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children. Parents will be given multiple opportunities throughout the year to attend regular meetings regarding the educational development to their child. Parent conferences are held after each grading period (one first and second semester are manditory), and ongoing at the parent or teacher's request. Open House and PTA meetings provide time for formal and informal communication regarding a child's progress and parental ideas for improvement. Grade level Parent Information Nights and workshops provide parents with additional information related to students' achievement and overall academic development.

Providing for parent comments on content of schoolwide program plans Parent surveys, informal letters/calls, workshop evaluations, and input through the Leadership Team, PTAs, parent focus groups, teacher/parent conferences, and Parent Suggestion Box are some methods for parents to provide input towards continued school improvement. Some schools offer Quarterly Principal Chats and Friday with Friends in an effort to hear from parents.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

Developing School-Parent Compacts that indicate shared responsibilities for high student ademic achievement. Schools will develop compacts which denotes shared responsibilities of high student achievement. Schools have the option of using the sample Title I Compact, modifying it for their particular school, or developing their own. The sample Title I Compact is available in English and Spanish. Also, the LEA has developed a Home and School Partners for Student Success document which has been translated into many languages such as English, Spanish, Arabic, and Vietnamese. Providing parent assistance on understanding State academic content standards and student academic achaievement standards; how to monitor a child’s progress and work with educators to improve the achievement of their children. Parents will be afforded multiple opportunties for acquiring greater understanding of State and local standards, how to monitor progress, and strategies for partnering with teachers. Through Open Houses, grade level meetings, newsletters, parent/teacher conferences, luncheon meetings, and parent workshops, parents will have opportunities to acquire understanding of the following: Standard Course of Study, and grade level competencies, End of Grade Assessments, NC Gateways, Title I Regulations, Progress Reports, Strategies for Supporting and Improving Progress and Character Development. In addition, some school counselors disseminate information to parents regarding the State Testing Program, timelines, and implications for their children. Providing materials and training to help parents to work with their children to improve achievement. such as literacy training and using technology, as appropriate, to foster parental involvement. Through Title I funds parents will be provided materials and training focusing on but not limited to the following: Helping Your Child Read; Helping with Homework; Stages of Literacy Development; Home Link Component of Chicago Mathematics (Everyday Math); Building Responsibility and Character; Workshops in reading/math/writing for parents; Multicultural Activities; Provide parents with materials to help students prepare for Science Fairs; Adult GED classes through GTCC at various school sites; Effective Conferencing; Websites to Build Fluency; Building Self-discipline. In addition, instructional materials for home use by parents will be made available by teachers and from commercial and/or US government publications/videos (i.e., Home/School Connections (publication); Discover Science (publication); Reading Connections (publication). Educating school personnel in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners implement and coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school. School personnel will continue to be educated in the value of and skills in reaching out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, implement and coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school. Among the topics that will be addressed are as follows: Effective Communication with Parents; Conducting an Effective Parent Conference; Cultural Diversity, Learning and Achievement; Closing the Achievement Gap Conference, and Comer Training. Coordinating and integrating parent involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, the Home Instruction Programs for PreSchool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, and public preschool and other programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children. Several initiatives will be constructed around activities designed to provide greater coordination and intergration of efforts in parent involvement. Among these are the following: A master mailing list developed by the GCS Volunteer Coordinator. Community agencies, such as Head Start, churches, and daycare center will recieve regular mailings including newsletters, calendars, and announcements.; GCS Pre-K teachers and other area teachers will schedule at least two meetings to share best practices and progress being made. Parents visit and meeti with Head Start and school personnell to learn more about the elligility requirements and accessing available services. GCS collaborates with Head Start to offer an annual Pre-School Fair for prospective parents. Parent visit and meet Head Start and school personnell to learn more about the eligibility requirements and accessing available services; some schools partner with United Way to use Youth Coordinators to help students make enriching learning connections outside of the school day; some schools work with Communities in Schools to use a coordinator to act as a laison between the home, school and community, and recruit volunteers to work as tutors for at-risk students; the Safe and Drug Free Schools staff offer topics for parents and students, such as Bully Proofing Your School and the Tobacco Education Alternate (TEA) Program. Parents Resource/Litercy Centers are located in several schools for parents to access information regarding students' achievement, child development, communitiy resources, etc; the school nurse, social worker, and counselor work closely to coordinate services to families. Many schools obtain the S trengthening P arent I nvolvement in C hildren's E ducation (S.P.I.C.E.) grant from the Guilford Conty Council of PTA's to improve student academic success through parent involvement. Ensuring that information related to school and parent programs, meetings and other activities is sent to parents in a format and in a language the parents can understand. Through the efforts of ESL teachers, special education teachers, office personnel, district office administators and voluneer coordinators, parents receive information in a format and language that is understandable. Academic resources are printed in Spanish to increase understanding. Ongoing communications including letters, flyers, memos, and handbooks are visual and printed in language that is easy to understand. Portfolios are often used to visually chart a child's growth. School personnel often access Project HERE (providing translators for Hispanic parents) to assist in communication efforts. School personnel also access the services or assistance of Lutheran Family Services and Project Pueblo (Hispanic Outreach) to help the district engage the Hispanic community. Interpreters are provided for hearing impaired and visually impaired parents as well. Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

Providing opportunities for parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children In planning, schools ensure that accommondations are available for parents with disabilities to participate in school activities and conferences. Also, efforts are made to remove barriers for parents with limited English proficiency by using interpreters and sending home information in a native language (especially Spanish). Adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parental involvement (optional)
Some schools have adopted parts of the Comer Model which has a parent component. Parents receive training on becoming effective advocates for their children and parent leaders.

Developing appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses in parent involvement activities (optional).
Family Life Council (United Way Agency) and Family Services of the Piedmont provide parenting workshops which include life skills training.

Involving parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and other educators to improve the effectiveness of such training (optional).
Parents are included in selected school-based training (i.e., Literacy First, Success for All, Responsible Discipline).

Providing literacy training if LEA has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for such training (optional)

Paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with local parental involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to participate in school-related meetings and training sessions. (optional).
Schools have the option of using Parent Involvement funds to provide transporation and cover child care costs for parent training sessions.

Training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents (optional)

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code

410

Arranging school meetings at a variety of times, or conducting in-home conferences between teachers or other educators(optional)
Schools offer a vareity of meeting times such as during school time (especially at lunch), after school and early evening. Also, many teachers, along with school social workers and/or counselors make home visits. Pre-K teachers also make home visits.

Establishing districtwide parental advisory councils (optional)
An Advisory Council exists to allow parents to share how parent involvement activities are taking place in their schools, and to gain ideas on how to involve more parents. The council is also given opportunities to provide input for LEA Title I Plan, and the district parent involvement board policy. At the first yearly meeting of the District Advisory Council, the members will establish the meeting times and locations to accommodate parents' schedules. Minutes of these meetings are sent to each school. Title I schools are given the opportunity to have a parent representative serve on this council.

Page 3 (a)

LEA Code TITLE I DISTRICT-LEVEL STAFF POSITIONS

410

List all Title I district-level staff positions. (NOTE: A job description must be on file in the LEA for each position listed.) All parttime positions funded through Title I must maintain time and effort logs. Name 1 Dr. Bill Stewart Judy Dunlap Landy Gilkerson Ronda Robb Betsy Ramey Jenny Johnson Vacant Shelia Robinson Shannon Bowden Position 2 Executive Director Director Office Support III Office Support III Program Specialist Program Specialist Program Specialist Curriculum specialist Office Support III FTE 3 0.4 1 0.4 1 1 1 1 0.5 0.5 Title I Duties 4 Title I, Title II and Title V Director of Title I Program Office Support for Title I Office Support for Title I Program Private Schools: Evaluation/Accountablility; parent Private Schools: Evaluation/Accountablility; parent Private Schools: Evaluation/Accountablility; parent Preschool Administrator Office Support for Preschool Program

6.8

Page 3 (a)