Erwin Middle School Staff

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Erwin Middle School Staff Powered By Docstoc
					                                 2010-2011
        ERWIN MIDDLE SCHOOL
                       http://fc.thompson.k12.co.us/~ems/
                   613-7600 (main) and 613-7690 (attendance)




                          WILDCATS
                                   What’s in a name?
Erwin Middle School is named for Lucile Erwin who was a physical education teacher and
counselor in Thompson R2J for thirty-eight years before retiring in 1983. Lucile was born in
Longmont on April 2, 1913 and was raised on a farm southeast of Loveland. While in grade
school, Lucile decided that she wanted to teach. She majored in physical education at the
University of Colorado. She taught in Brush, Colorado for two years before beginning a teaching
assignment in Loveland. Although Lucile taught physical education at all levels, her work was
primarily at the junior high level. Her memories of the kids remain positive. She says, “I enjoyed
that age. Those kids just intrigued me.”
June, 2010

Dear Erwin Middle School Parents/Guardians and Students,

Welcome to Erwin Middle School! We look forward to visiting and working with the Erwin Middle
School learning community to help each student grow and reach his or her potential. By
combining our efforts, we have a much greater chance of positively impacting each and every
student.

In keeping with our tradition of excellence, Erwin Middle School will continue to focus on PRIDE
(Positive, Respect, Integrity, Discipline, Excellence) as our vision for our learning community.
Furthermore, our mission is the ABC’s (Accountability, Best practices, and Culture). Working
together to hold one another accountable, utilizing the best research based practices for
instruction, and promoting a positive culture and climate for all will help us form a cohesive
learning community demonstrating PRIDE on a consistent basis.

We are continuing our journey to becoming an IB World School. We submitted Application B and
completed the authorization visit this past spring. We received a glowing review from the
committee and are awaiting their final recommendation, which should be communicated any day.

We know our parents/guardians are the first teachers, and they have great influence on their
student’s development and success at school. Parents/guardians, we need your help in all facets
of learning to help your student achieve their lofty goals.

In this packet you will find important strategies related to various content areas that have been
customized for Erwin Middle School. The teachers have worked hard to provide these and will be
working with your child to incorporate this into their lessons. Please refer to these throughout the
school year to help your student maximize learning.

We encourage parents and students to read, share, and discuss the rules and information
contained here. The information in this packet is a road map for success at LEMS! If you have
questions or concerns at any time, please call the school at 613-7600.

We look forward to a great year!




Di Worner                          Tom Altepeter                   Carmen Williams
Principal                          Assistant Principal             Assistant Principal
613-7603                           613-7604                        613-7638
wornerd@thompson.k12.co.us         altepetert@thompson.k12.co.us    williamsc@thompson.k12.co.us
                              Bell Schedule
                       Lucile Erwin Middle School
                                  2010-2011


            PERIOD   MON-TUE-THUR-FRI       PERIOD    WEDNESDAY
6TH GRADE                  TIME                          TIME
 ELECTIVE     1        7:23   - 8:13          1       7:23    - 7:59
 ELECTIVE     2        8:17   - 9:04          2       8:03   - 8:37
 ELECTIVE     3        9:08   - 9:55          3       8:41    - 9:15
  CORE        4        9:59   - 10:59         4       9:19    - 10:03
  CORE        5       11:03   - 12:03         5      10:07    - 10:51
 LUNCH                12:03   - 12:33       LUNCH    10:51   - 11:21
  CORE        6       12:37   - 1:39          6      11:25   - 12:13
  CORE        7        1:43   - 2:45          7      12:17   - 1:05



            PERIOD   MON-TUE-THUR-FRI       PERIOD    WEDNESDAY
7th GRADE                  TIME                          TIME
  CORE        1       7:23    - 8:27          1        7:23 - 8:11
  CORE        2       8:31    - 9:32          2        8:15 - 9:00
 ELECTIVE     3       9:36    - 10:23         3        9:04 - 9:39
 ELECTIVE     4      10:27    - 11:14         4       9:43 - 10:18
  LUNCH              11:14    - 11:44       LUNCH     10:18 - 10:48
 ELECTIVE     5      11:48    - 12:35         5      10:52 - 11:27
  CORE        6      12:39    - 1:40          6      11:31 - 12:16
  CORE        7       1:44    - 2:45          7      12:20 - 1:05



            PERIOD   MON-TUE-THUR-FRI       PERIOD    WEDNESDAY
8TH GRADE                  TIME                          TIME
  CORE        1        7:23   - 8:27          1       7:23   - 8:11
  CORE        2        8:31   - 9:33          2       8:15   - 9:02
  CORE        3        9:37   - 10:39         3       9:06   - 9:53
  CORE        4       10:43   - 11:44         4       9:57   - 10:43
 ELECTIVE     5       11:48   - 12:35         5      10:47   - 11:23
 LUNCH                12:35   - 1:05        LUNCH    11:23   - 11:53
 ELECTIVE     6        1:09   - 1:55          6      11:57   - 12:29
 ELECTIVE     7        1:59   - 2:45          7      12:33   - 1:05


                                        2
                                   Important Calendar Dates

First Day: August 16, 2010 (6th Grade only) and August 17, 2010 (all grades)
Conferences: October 13-14, 2010 and February 16-17, 2011
Last Day: May 20, 2011

                Sport                             Season                       First Practice
  Cross Country (Girls and Boys)       August – October                August 9, 2010
  Swimming (Girls and Boys)            August – October                August 9, 2010
  Volleyball (Girls)                   August – October                August 9, 2010
  Basketball (Boys)                    October – December              October 11, 2010
  Basketball (Girls)                   January – March                 January 4, 2011
  Wrestling (Boys)                     January – March                 January 4, 2011
  Track (Boys and Girls)               March – May                     March 7, 2011




Erwin Middle School Maroon/Gold Days: 2010-2011




                                                    3
August
16 ........................................ Gold
17 .................................... Maroon      25 .........................................Gold    10 ................................... Maroon      21………….. ........ Maroon
18 ........................................ Gold    26 .................................... Maroon      11 .........................................Gold   22.............................. Gold
19 .................................... Maroon      27 .........................................Gold    12 .................................... Maroon     23.......................... Maroon
20 ........................................ Gold    28 .................................... Maroon      13 .........................................Gold   24.............................. Gold
                                                    29 .........................................Gold    14 .................................... Maroon     25.......................... Maroon
23 .................................... Maroon
24 ........................................ Gold  November                                              18 .........................................Gold  April
25 .................................... Maroon    1 ...................................... Maroon       19 ................................... Maroon     4 ............................... Gold
26 ........................................ Gold  2 ...........................................Gold     20 ........................................ Gold  5 ........................... Maroon
27 .................................... Maroon    3 ...................................... Maroon       21 ................................... Maroon     6 ............................... Gold
                                                  4 ...........................................Gold                                                       7 ........................... Maroon
30 ........................................ Gold 5 ...................................... Maroon        24 ........................................ Gold 8 ............................... Gold
31 .................................... Maroon                                                          25 ................................... Maroon
September                                         8 ...........................................Gold     26 ........................................ Gold 11.......................... Maroon
1 .......................................... Gold 9 ...................................... Maroon       27 ................................... Maroon 12.............................. Gold
2 ...................................... Maroon 10 .........................................Gold        28 ........................................ Gold 13.......................... Maroon
3 .......................................... Gold 11 .................................... Maroon                                                          14.............................. Gold
                                                  12 .........................................Gold      31 ................................... Maroon 15.......................... Maroon
7 ...................................... Maroon                                                         February
8 .......................................... Gold 15 .................................... Maroon        1 .......................................... Gold 18.............................. Gold
9 ...................................... Maroon 16 .........................................Gold        2 ..................................... Maroon 19.......................... Maroon
10 ........................................ Gold 17 .................................... Maroon         3 .......................................... Gold 20.............................. Gold
                                                  18 .........................................Gold      4 ..................................... Maroon 21.......................... Maroon
13 .................................... Maroon 19 .................................... Maroon                                                             22.............................. Gold
14 ........................................ Gold                                                        7 .......................................... Gold
15 .................................... Maroon 22 .........................................Gold         8 ..................................... Maroon 25.......................... Maroon
16 ........................................ Gold 23 .................................... Maroon         9 .......................................... Gold 26.............................. Gold
17 .................................... Maroon                                                          10 ................................... Maroon 27.......................... Maroon
                                                  29 .........................................Gold      11 ........................................ Gold 28.............................. Gold
20 ........................................ Gold 30 .................................... Maroon                                                           29.......................... Maroon
21 .................................... Maroon December                                                 14 ................................... Maroon
22 ........................................ Gold 1 ...........................................Gold      15 ........................................ Gold May
23 .................................... Maroon 2 ...................................... Maroon          16 ................................... Maroon 2 ............................... Gold
24 ........................................ Gold 3 ...........................................Gold                                                        3 ........................... Maroon
                                                                                                        22 ........................................ Gold 4 ............................... Gold
27 .................................... Maroon      6 ...................................... Maroon     23 ................................... Maroon 5 ........................... Maroon
28 ........................................ Gold    7 ...........................................Gold   24 ........................................ Gold 6 ............................... Gold
29 .................................... Maroon      8 ...................................... Maroon     25 ................................... Maroon
30 ........................................ Gold    9 ...........................................Gold                                                     9 ........................... Maroon
October                                             10 .................................... Maroon      28 ........................................ Gold 10.............................. Gold
1 ...................................... Maroon                                                         March                                             11.......................... Maroon
                                                    13 .........................................Gold    1 ..................................... Maroon 12.............................. Gold
4 .......................................... Gold   14 .................................... Maroon      2 .......................................... Gold 13.......................... Maroon
5 ...................................... Maroon     15 .........................................Gold    3 ..................................... Maroon
6 .......................................... Gold   16 .................................... Maroon      4 .......................................... Gold 16.............................. Gold
7 ...................................... Maroon     17 .........................................Gold                                                      17.......................... Maroon
8 .......................................... Gold                                                       7 ..................................... Maroon 18.............................. Gold
                                                 January                                                8 .......................................... Gold 19.......................... Maroon
11 .................................... Maroon 4 ...................................... Maroon          9 ..................................... Maroon 20.............................. Gold
12 ........................................ Gold 5 ...........................................Gold      10 ........................................ Gold
                                                 6 ...................................... Maroon        11 ................................... Maroon
18 .................................... Maroon 7 ...........................................Gold
19 ........................................ Gold                                                        14 ........................................ Gold
20 .................................... Maroon                                                          15 ................................... Maroon
21 ........................................ Gold                                                        16 ........................................ Gold
22 .................................... Maroon                                                          17 ................................... Maroon
                                                                                                        18 ........................................ Gold




                                                                                                  4
ERWIN MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF
ADMINISTRATION:                                   Becky Fuchs / Art
Diane Worner / Principal                          Daniel Joiner / Computer Literacy
Tom Altepeter / Assistant Principal               Leonard Kellogg / Band
Carmen Williams / Assistant Principal             Michelle Logan / Computer Literacy
                                                  Jake Marshall / Ind. Tech and Comp. Lit.
OFFICE:
                                                  Russ Massey / Band
Larry Bridges / Campus Monitor
                                                  Hope Morales / World Languages
Andres Burgueno / Head Custodian
                                                  Chris Norrdin / World Languages
Leslie Dermody / Nurse
                                                  Kelby Siegfried / Choir
Cindy Glanzer / School Secretary
                                                  Teri Weaver / CFS
Traci Wilkre / Faculty Assistant
                                                  TBD / Art
Jana Lewis / Attendance Clerk
Kim Miranda / Food Services
Mary Ellen Wild / Nurse’s Aide                    SIXTH GRADE:
Rosanna Houlton / Receptionist                    Tim Bren
Santos Encinias / In-House Monitor                Mary Beth Bridges
                                                  James Garcia
COUNSELORS:
                                                  Deramie Kaup
Gary Brunner
                                                  Theresa McCarthy
Jobi Duke
                                                  Stacey Premer
Heather Dwelle
                                                  Denise Schump
Hope Morales / ELA
                                                  Paul Shimek
Chris Kliegl / Psychologist
                                                  Holly Stewart
Val Depew / Literacy Intervention Program
                                                  Curt Van Tress
                                                  SEVENTH GRADE:
LIBRARY/TECHNOLOGY:
                                                  Jim Backstrom
Tane’ Leach / Librarian
                                                  Karen East
Susy Cleaveland / Media Aide
                                                  Cinnamon Garner
Michelle Logan / Instructional Technologist
                                                  Kyle Hemje
Peggy Sue Klein / Technologist
                                                  Christine Herrington
ISS TEAM:                                         Linda Hewett
Judy Brunk                                        Meridith Russell
Brian Heskin                                      Karen Sinclair
LeAnn Illingworth                                 Jan Smith
Suzanne Mueller                                   Tom Southard
Sigrid Petersen                                   Kris West
Amy Rosier
                                                  EIGHTH GRADE:
Sue Teumer / GT
                                                  Tera Denning
 Matt Vannice
                                                  Janet Elwood
                                                  Sara Heskin
ELECTIVES TEAM:                                   Beth Kauffman
Kelly Anderson / PE and Health                    Tammy Lawhead
Sarah Avery/ Orchestra                            Jill Prindiville
Nick Bakovich / PE and Health                     Chastity Stringer
Jo Dixon / PE and Health                          Jennifer Varrella
Sonia Daggett / World Languages                   Matt West

(Electives Team Con’t)
                          Lucile Erwin Middle School
                                              5
                                      Attendance Policy
 Please be sure to call the attendance line each day your student is absent or
                                     tardy
                                          (970) 613-7690
Students with a chronic health condition need documentation by a physician.
   Please bring a doctor’s note each time your student sees a physician or
             dentist so all absences can be marked accordingly!

Tardies
5 unexcused tardies                         Team consequence
6 unexcused tardies and beyond              Referral (administrator gives
                                            consequence)
10 excused or unexcused tardies             Tardy letter sent home (If tardies
                                            continue to increase, a meeting with
                                            parents will need to be scheduled)
       *Tardies start over at semester.

Absences
10 absences                                 Excessive absence letter sent home.
15 absences                                 Medical letter must now be
                                            provided for every new absence to
                                            be excused (requires conference
                                            with administrator, counselor,
                                            parents, student, and team
                                            representative)
                                            Referrals will be written for every
                                            unexcused absence.
20 absences                                 Notification to district truancy office.
                                            Compulsory letter sent home.
                                            (requires conference with
                                            administrator, counselor, parents,
                                            student, truancy officer and possibly
                                            team representative)
*Medically excused absences do not count towards the total number of absences.




Excused Absences

                                                   6
Exceptions to compulsory attendance are excused absences, including the following (asterisked
items refer to Colorado Law):

      A student who is temporarily ill or injured or whose absence is approved by the
       administrator of the school of attendance.*
      A student who is absent for an extended period due to physical, mental, or emotional
       disability.*
      A student who is pursuing a work-study program under the supervision of a public school.*
      A student who is participating in any school-sponsored activity or a student who has
       advance approval by the administration to attend an activity of an educational nature.
      A student whose presence in school, on a doctor’s written advice, may constitute a danger
       to his or her health or will seriously expose other students to a health hazard.
      A student who has a death in his or her immediate family.
      A student who must schedule a remedial health appointment with a doctor, dentist, or other
       medical advisor.
      A student who is under quarantine.
      A student whose presence is required in court.
      A student who, with advance approval, attends for a minimum of one hundred seventy-two
       days in an independent or parochial school which provides a basic academic education as
       defined in state law.*
      A student who is in the custody of a court or law enforcement authorities.*
      A student who is being instructed at home by a certified teach or under a system of home
       study pursuant to state law and State Board of Education rules.*
      A student who has the written approval of the building principal based on special family
       circumstances.
      A student to whom a current age and school certificate or work permit has been issued
       pursuant to state law.*
      A student who is participating in an observance of his or her religion.

Unexcused Absences
An unexcused absence is an absence that is not covered by one of the foregoing exceptions,
including:
     Suspension
     Expulsion
     Leaving school or a class without permission of the teacher or administrator in charge.
     Not reporting to school or a class unless the absence is excused in accordance with the
       schools’ policy.




IB Mission Statement

                                                7
The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young
people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural
understanding and respect.
To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations
to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.
These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and
lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

IB learners strive to be:
Inquirers: Students develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct
inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this
love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable: Students explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global
significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a
broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers: Students exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to
recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators: Students understand and express ideas and information confidently and
creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work
effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Principled: Students act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and
respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for
their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded: Students understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories,
and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities.
They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow
from the experience.

Caring: Students show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of
others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the
lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers: Students approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and
forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They
are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Balanced: Students understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to
achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Reflective Students give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They
are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their
learning and personal development.

                                                  8
The Areas of Interaction
The Areas of Interaction (A of I) are the organizing themes on which the International
Baccalaureate MYP instruction is based. The Areas of Interaction are the lens through which the
lessons and/or units are taught. The Areas of Interaction are:

Health and Social Education - The area concerned with the total development of the person and
of society. It involves:
     Making responsible decisions regarding self, family, community, and environment

Environments – The area concerned with the interdependence of humans and nature. It involves:
    Developing insight into local and global environmental concerns
    Developing awareness of the connections of the environment to all subjects and aspects of
      life: science, social, political, economic, and cultural

Human Ingenuity – The area concerned with appreciation of the creative and inventive genius of
people. It involves:
    Learning about the influences of human inventions and discoveries on past and present life
    Constructing innovative and creative products related to course topics

Approaches to Learning – The area concerned with learning how to learn. It involves the
development and practice of:
    Study, research and test taking skills
    Critical and higher level thinking
    Problem solving skills
    Taking charge of your own learning
    Teamwork and team spirit

Community and Service – The area that focuses on responsible citizenship in the world outside
the classroom. It involves:
    Participating in service to others in our community
    Participating in activities within our school
    Reflecting on the needs of others and benefits provided to our community

For a wealth of information please log on to the International Baccalaureate website at:

                                    http://www.ibo.org




                                                 9
                   LUCILE ERWIN MIDDLE SCHOOL
                               IS A
                POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT SCHOOL


In 2004, Erwin became the first Middle School in Thompson R2J School District to
become a PBS School.


PBS is a school-wide systems approach to enhancing the education of all students
through strategies that support positive outcomes academically and behaviorally.


A big part of being a PBS school is having consistent expectations in the classrooms, as
well as, in the non-classroom areas. Our expectations follow PRIDE, which are stated
on the following page.


We have a PBS Team in our school that looks at data, assesses our building’s needs and
implements new incentives and programs for Erwin. Please check out www.pbis.org or
www.cde.state.co.us/pbs for more information.




                                          10
 POSITIVE
 RESPECT
 INTEGRITY
 DISCIPLINE
 EXCELLENCE



         11
                                                                                              IDENTIFIED          AREAS
                                                                                                                   Library
                                                                                                 Outside
                     Cafeteria         Hallway           Bathroom         Gym/Events                               Comp.           Counseling             Office            Bus           Community
                                                                                                  Areas
                                                                                                                    Labs
                   *Use              *Use               *Use good         *Use good           *Play safely with   *Speak quietly   *Be                *Use good        *Use               *Appreciate

               P   appropriate
                   language and
                   behavior
                                     appropriate
                                     language and
                                     behavior
                                                        bathroom
                                                        etiquette
                                                                          sportsmanship
                                                                          and represent
                                                                          LEMS in a
                                                                                              others
                                                                                              * Include others
                                                                                              in games
                                                                                                                  * Be patient
                                                                                                                  * Be polite
                                                                                                                                   responsible
                                                                                                                                   *Speak quietly
                                                                                                                                   * Be Polite
                                                                                                                                                      manners
                                                                                                                                                      *Be patient
                                                                                                                                                                       appropriate
                                                                                                                                                                       language and
                                                                                                                                                                       behavior
                                                                                                                                                                                          other cultures
                                                                                                                                                                                          and beliefs

                   * Speak quietly                                        positive manner




                   *Wait your turn   *Respect           *Respect other    *Respect others     *Respect others     *Respect all     *Respect the        *Use a quiet    *Use                *Respect

               R   in      line
                   * Respect the
                   cafeteria
                                     students, staff,
                                     and school
                                     property
                                                        peoples
                                                        privacy
                                                        Respect
                                                                  *
                                                                          and all property
                                                                          and equipment
                                                                          *Respect
                                                                                              and their
                                                                                              property
                                                                                              * Respect the
                                                                                                                  students and
                                                                                                                  staff
                                                                                                                                   counseling and
                                                                                                                                   nursing staff
                                                                                                                                                      voice and
                                                                                                                                                      respect others
                                                                                                                                                      in the office
                                                                                                                                                                       appropriate
                                                                                                                                                                       volume
                                                                                                                                                                       * Be polite to
                                                                                                                                                                                          others, self and
                                                                                                                                                                                          environment

                   workers                              property          authority           environment                                                              the drivers
EXPECTATIONS




                   *Clean up after   *Pick up trash     *Clean up after   *Be tolerant of     *Keep the           *Use             *Confidentiality   *Have a          *Keep the bus      * Leave a

               I   yourself and
                   pick up your
                   trash
                                     and use
                                     recycle bins
                                                        yourself          skill and ability
                                                                          differences
                                                                          * Give others
                                                                                              grounds clean       equipment
                                                                                                                  appropriately
                                                                                                                                                      purpose for
                                                                                                                                                      entering the
                                                                                                                                                      office
                                                                                                                                                                       clean              positive
                                                                                                                                                                                          impression

                   *Recycle                                               credit for doing
                                                                          their best




                   *Keep your food   *Keep your         *Use during       *Be a quiet         *Obey safety        *Come with       *Check-in with     *Enter the       *Keep objects      *Participate in

               D   on your plate
                   *Use good
                   manners
                                     hands, feet,
                                     and objects to
                                     yourself
                                                        passing
                                                        periods
                                                                          audience and
                                                                          listen to the
                                                                          performers
                                                                                              rules and traffic
                                                                                              procedures
                                                                                                                  an purpose
                                                                                                                  * Be
                                                                                                                  productive *
                                                                                                                                   a hall pass and
                                                                                                                                   have a
                                                                                                                                   purpose for
                                                                                                                                                      office with a
                                                                                                                                                      hall pass
                                                                                                                                                                       and hands
                                                                                                                                                                       inside the bus
                                                                                                                                                                                          community
                                                                                                                                                                                          activities

                                                                                                                  Read often       your visit.




                   * Make            *Walk and          *Use good         *Cheer              *Keep the           *Take care of    *Return to         * Return to      * Communicate      * Be law

               E   everyone feel
                   welcome
                                     keep traffic
                                     flowing
                                                        hygiene           respectfully and
                                                                          enthusiastically
                                                                          for the LEMS
                                                                                              grounds clean
                                                                                              * Pick up jackets
                                                                                              and sweatshirts
                                                                                                                  the materials
                                                                                                                  and
                                                                                                                  equipment
                                                                                                                                   class promptly     class promptly   appropriately
                                                                                                                                                                       with the drivers
                                                                                                                                                                                          abiding


                                                                          athletes and
                                                                          performers




                                                                                                     12
SUCCESS IN LEARNING FOR SUCCESS IN LIFE
                 ERWIN HOMEWORK STUDY PLAN
Dear Parents / Guardians:

Homework is important because it benefits students by creating self-disciplined
independent learners that are better prepared to be successful in life. Students learn a
variety of skills while completing homework assignments routinely, thoroughly, accurately,
and on time. Success in school often depends on successful homework completion,
supported by good study habits. The end result is that students will be better prepared to
address challenges in life and learning.

There are many purposes for doing homework. Homework reinforces learning that has
taken place in class. Students are better prepared in order that they may be successful
when taking tests and when they encounter future learning opportunities. Students will
have better mastery of concepts and skills essential for their current and future success.
Homework helps build strong character traits such as self-reliance, self-discipline,
perseverance, indomitable spirit, responsibility, reliability, and independence.

SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF HOMEWORK PROMOTES THE FOLLOWING:
       Supports the building of independence and self-reliance to improve lifelong study
         habits;
       reinforces lessons taught – concepts and skills learned;
       introduces new information;
       provides for mastery of learning through practice and repetition;
       properly assigned and properly completed, homework is one of the cornerstones of
         academic success;
       homework is one of the best ways in which students can take responsibility for their
         own learning;
       completing all homework assignments routinely, thoroughly, and accurately is one of
         the best ways that a student can assure his/her success in school;
       successful completion of homework engages the entire family, thereby promoting
         parent involvement in school and their child’s academic success.

                             ERWIN HOMEWORK GUIDELINES

Erwin teachers will assign homework four days a week (with some exceptions) according to the
following time allocations:
                            6th grade: 60 minutes / daily
                            7th grade: 70 minutes / daily
                            8th grade: 80 minutes / daily

   Time recommendations are averages. Some students may require more time, others may
             actually prefer more time, and some students may need less time.




                                              13
                           LEARNING COMMUNITY EXPECTATIONS

 TEACHER EXPECTATIONS
         Homework is directly connected to the skill and conceptual development of the
          learner.
         Homework is purposeful and meaningful.
         Homework will support student progress toward achieving learning standards.
         Homework will be monitored to assure optimal benefit to the student.

 STUDENT EXPECTATIONS
     Homework is an essential component of the educational process, therefore we recommend
     the following:
                 Students will be responsible for completing all homework assignments
                    routinely, thoroughly, accurately, and timely.
                 Students will dedicate the prescribed homework time to successfully
                    complete assignments.
                 Students will complete their agenda daily in each class by entering all
                    homework and assignments.
                 Students will take their agenda home each night for parental signature.

 PARENT EXPECTATIONS
     Homework is an essential component of the educational process; therefore we recommend
     the following in order to help the parent stay abreast of the child’s performance in school:
         Encourage growth in academic independence and responsibility by openly valuing
             high performance on homework.
         Provide an appropriate environment for studying.
         Check your child’s agenda and sign the signature page.
         Routinely talk with your child about their progress in school.
         Follow student progress by accessing Parent Connect.

 Homework is essential for academic achievement. It’s important for the learning
 community of students, parents, and teachers to work together with common goals and
 expectations for high performance. Our goal is for students to have a successful and
 rewarding experience at Erwin Middle School. We believe this can be achieved through
 partnership with the learning community.
 Thank you for your support in helping your student to achieve academic excellence.




Attendance
                                                14
Every day is an important day at Erwin Middle            It is the student’s responsibility to make up any
School. Good school attendance is                        work missed because of an absence or tardy.
important to the student’s success at                    Students will be allowed one day to complete
middle school. Colorado State Law requires               missing work for each day missed. In the
students to attend school every day that it is in        event of an extended illness, arrangements to
session except on those occasions when the               pick up schoolwork can be made with the front
school has been notified that the student is ill,        desk by calling 613-7600. Twenty-four hour
has a family emergency, or has a pre-arranged            notice is necessary for work requests. Make-up
absence.                                                 work will be left in the main office for parents to
Perfect Attendance is no classes missed!                 pick up.
Dismissal during the School Day                          Unexcused or excessive absences will result in
All students are expected to remain at school            the following:
for the entire day. If a student must leave for              1. Notification of parents.
an appointment, they must:                                   2. Communication with administration.
    1. Present a note to the attendance office               3. Loss of credit for assignments missed
        before school that day.                                  (team discretion).
    2. Have a parent/guardian sign the student               4. Possible in-school or out-of-school
        out when they leave.                                     suspension and/or district notification.
    3. Check in with the office when they                Tardies
        return.                                          School starts promptly at 7:23 am. Generally,
In an effort to maximize our student body                students should plan to arrive at 7:15 am.
safety, if someone other than the                        Students who arrive prior to 7:15 will be asked
parent/guardian is picking up a student,                 to wait outside until the morning bell rings.
a written note signed by the parent/                     Please note: All students that arrive late
guardian is necessary. Anyone signing a                  must report to the office for an admittance
student out from school before the end of the            slip. Students need to present an excused
school day may be asked to present an ID                 note from a parent at this time.
before the student will be released to him/her.
                                                         Unexcused or excessive tardies will result in
Illness and Emergency Absences                           the following:
Whenever a student is absent from school, a                 1. Notification of parents.
parent/guardian is asked to call 613-7690                   2. Meeting with administration.
before 9:00 am on the day of the absence.                   3. Detention over lunch or after school.
Notes are only required when it has been                    4. Possible loss of credit.
impossible to call the school. Students will not            5. Individual consequences according to
receive credit for work that is missed during an                 team policies.
unexcused absence unless the assignment is
waived by the teacher.                                   Visitors
                                                         Student visitors will be handled on an individual
Prearranged Absences                                     basis through an administrator. High school
The attendance office should be given written            students may not visit during the school day
notice from a parent/guardian as far in advance          unless an appointment has been arranged with
as possible. Students will receive a form to             an Erwin staff member in advance. All visitors
notify teachers of the absence. This may                 must report to the Main Office to obtain a
provide the student an opportunity to receive            visitor’s badge.
some make-up work prior to the absence.
Students will need to make up missing
assignments (see policy below)
Make-up Work

                                                    15
Student Behavior To and From School                     school at their own risk. It is suggested that
Our school is part of a community in which our          personal items, such as school supplies be
neighbors value their homes and yards. To               labeled with the student’s name. Students are
earn and keep the goodwill of property owners           not to bring backpacks and coats into the
around our school, students should observe              classroom.
the following rules:
    Respect private property.                          Care of School Property
    Walk on sidewalks and use appropriate              We are fortunate to have a clean and pleasant
        crosswalks.                                     atmosphere in our building. We have
    Use bicycles, skateboards, skates, or              audiovisual aids, computers, textbooks, sports
        scooters in accordance to traffic rules         equipment, lockers, and other materials to help
        and with caution around parked cars.            us learn. The building and the equipment are
    Always be courteous to pedestrians.                here for all of us to use and care for.
    No loitering (stopping or standing) on             Therefore, students who intentionally destroy
        the way to and from school.                     or disfigure any school property/equipment
                                                        must pay for the repair or replacement of these
Bus Behavior                                            items. This intentional act will result in
Riding the bus is a privilege based on a need           disciplinary action. Chewing gum is a privilege.
and good behavior. Inappropriate behavior               If gum is found in locations other than the
could result in the denial of this privilege.           trash, gum will not be allowed at Erwin.
Students may not ride on a bus other than the
one assigned unless a bus pass is issued by             Lockers
the front office. Rules of safety and conduct           Lockers are issued for the student’s
set by the driver are to be obeyed by all               convenience by the school district for the entire
students.                                               school year. They remain the property of the
                                                        school while occupied by the student. Only
Bicycles, Skateboards, Rollerblades,                    materials that pertain to school should be kept
Skates, and Scooters                                    in the locker. If necessary, it can be opened
Students riding should observe all traffic and          for inspection by any staff member. Periodic
safety rules. Students may not ride these               locker checks will be made to encourage the
items on school grounds. Walking a bike or              removal of accumulated debris. Students are to
carrying skates and skateboards onto school             remain in the assigned locker unless
property will be required. Bikes are to be              reassigned by a staff member to a new locker
securely locked at the bike racks and other             location. Every locker has a combination lock.
items are to be kept in the student’s locker.           It is intended to keep everyone out except the
Erwin will not take responsibility for stolen           student and to protect the student’s property.
items.                                                  The lock will do this only when the combination
                                                        is dept a secret. Students are advised to follow
Student Valuables                                       these locker rules:
Students are responsible for the safety of their              Be neat and organized.
own personal property. The school can not                     Don’t share your locker combination
guarantee the personal property of students.                     with others.
Therefore, students are cautioned not to                      Leave your locker as you found it to
bring large sums of money or other                               avoid being charged for locker damage.
valuable items to school. Audiovisual
equipment, such as radios, music players,
electronic games, cellular phones, pagers,
trendy toys, etc. should not be brought to
school. Students bring valuable items to

                                                   16
Behavior Toward Others                                   Tobacco, Drugs, Alcohol, Fireworks,
Mutual respect and good communication                    Matches, Lighters, Weapons
among students, staff, and parents                       Use, possession, or distribution of the above
characterize the Erwin Middle School                     items (including knives of any kind) in, on, or in
community. Mutual respect fosters social and             sight of school property, including buses or by
academic growth, self-discipline, responsibility,        students on the way to or from school, is
and problem-solving skills. By setting clear             unlawful and prohibited. Violation of this
behavior expectations, a safe environment can            policy will initiate disciplinary action which may
be established that encourages positive                  include suspension, expulsion, and/or
behavior, raises self-esteem, and fosters                notification of law enforcement officials.
responsibility, self-discipline, and cooperation.
Our school teaches and models caring and                 Hallways
respect. Appropriate and consistent                      Students are to walk in the hallways and are
consequence will be carried out for those who            not to participate in rough-housing behaviors.
choose to overstep the boundaries. The                   These behaviors cause safety hazards and
following behaviors are unacceptable, will not           may result in an injury. Shouting and
be tolerated, and will result in disciplinary            disruptive behaviors are unacceptable and
action:                                                  interfere with the educational setting. Please
      Rude and disrespectful toward any                 discard all trash in the containers provided. Do
        individual.                                      not bring open food or drink containers into the
      Insubordination including talking-back,           hallways or classrooms. Let’s take pride in our
        arguing, or refusing to follow directions        school by keeping the building free of trash and
        to do class work, or obeying the rules.          graffiti. Remember: a student is permitted in
      Disrespectful and inappropriate                   the hall during class time only if the teacher
        language. Students are expected to               issues a pass. No student may leave a
        learn and to model a language that is            classroom without the teacher’s consent.
        appropriate in a school setting.
      Intimidation and sexual harassment                Deliveries
        include threatening someone (verbally            In order to reduce interruptions and keep our
        or in writing), using inappropriate              school running well for all, requests from
        physical contact, or using derogatory            parents/guardians for deliveries to students
        statements (written, verbal, or hand             must be limited to medications, money, or
        gestures).                                       messages regarding changes in after school
      Dishonesty (written or verbal)                    student pick-up or emergencies.
      Lying or cheating.
      Roughhousing including tripping,                  Cafeteria Manners
        pushing, kicking, hitting, picking up            Students can create a lunchtime that is a
        other students, etc.                             relaxing and restful time to eat and visit with
                                                         friends if they follow these six basic rules:
      Stealing.
                                                             1. Use quiet voices.
      Fighting. Students who are having
                                                             2. Clean up after yourself.
        conflicts should seek help from a staff
                                                             3. Walk and stay calm.
        member before a fight begins. All
                                                             4. Use what you know about good
        parties involved in a fight will be
                                                                behavior and expect that of yourself and
        disciplined.
                                                                others.
Let’s make Erwin a safe and comfortable place
                                                             5. Keep all food, drink, and personal items
for students, parents, and staff.
                                                                on your tray.
                                                             6. Go outside when finished eating.


                                                    17
        Cafeteria Procedure                            Emergency Drills
Each student will have his/her own account. If         Emergency drills are to ensure the safety of all
you send money (a check is recommended),               individuals. When an alarm is sounded,
the amount will be entered into the student’s          proceed outside quickly and quietly in an
account. It can be designated for breakfast,           orderly meaner. This is very important so that
lunch, or both. Students can pay cash each             everyone will be able to hear the emergency
day if you choose. The cafeteria can not               instructions. To turn in a false alarm is a
accept charges. Please do not make such                violation of city and state law. A student who
requests.                                              activates a false alarm will be apprehended
Prices:                                                and will receive appropriate disciplinary
Breakfast (a la carte items) $0.50 – $1.50             measures, which may include expulsion,
Lunch - $2.30                                          suspension, and/or notification of law
Reduced lunch - $0.40                                  enforcement officials.
A la carte items are priced separately as are
items sold by vendors.                                 Health Services
                                                       A RN or health aide will be available in the
School Athletic Events, Assemblies, and                health office for minor illnesses, health
Performances                                           concerns, and emergency situations. Except in
Students are encouraged to attend school               the case of an emergency students must have
activities and contests. Whenever attending an         a pass from a teacher before being allowed in
athletic event, whether as a participant or a          the health office. An early dismissal slip must
spectator, the student is asked to observe             be obtained from the health office before a
these rules of good sportsmanship at all times:        student with an illness of injury is allowed to
     Consider all opponents as guests.                leave the building.
                                                       MEDICATIONS: The health office can not
     Accept all decisions of officials without
                                                       dispense medication of any kind without written
        complaint.
                                                       physician and parent permission. In the case
     Never hiss, boo, or use offensive
                                                       of prescription medications, the labeled
        language toward players, coaches,
                                                       prescription bottle indicates written physician
        officials, or visitors.
                                                       permission. The medication must be in the
     Play fairly according to the rules of the        prescription bottle and be accompanied by the
        game.                                          district “Permission for Medication” form with
                                                       the required physician and parent signatures.
Erwin wants to be known for its good                   IMMUNIZATIONS: Colorado law requires all
sportsmanship.                                         7th and 8th grade students to have a second
When attending assemblies, performances,               measles, mumps, and rubella (mmr) as well as
etc., please behave in an appropriate manner.          the hepatitis b series. Please be sure
Acceptable Behavior:                                   immunizations are up-to-date before the start
     Sit still and quietly.                           of school. If you have questions, please
     Give the presenter your attention.               contact the health office.
     Participate in an appropriate manner.            PHYSICALS: The district strongly encourages
     Keep hands and feet to yourself.                 physical examinations for all students in grades
     Applaud and give positive feedback to            kindergarten, 4, 7, 9. All students
        participants.                                  participating in athletics are required to
                                                       have a physical before they participate. It is
                                                       also required that all students in athletics have
                                                       proof of insurance.




                                                  18
Insurance                                                School and community educators work
Student insurance is available for all students          cooperatively with the staff, the Director of
at a nominal cost. The school is only a                  Student Activities, and Student Health
medium in supplying the insurance materials              Services to enhance the educational process
and assumes no liability for subsequent                  for students, parents, and staff. They work
negotiations with the company.                           directly with students in the classroom, in
                                                         facilitating small group sessions, and in doing a
Physical Education                                       limited amount of counseling. They also serve
Physical education is a part of the total middle         as a resource for parents when the service is
school experience. Physical activity and                 requested. The school/community educators
exercise are vital in order for adolescents to           support students in all aspects of their personal
learn. If a student is well enough to attend             and educational lives, in successful and
school, he/she will participate in PE. The only          positive transitions to middle school, and in
exceptions are:                                          conjunction with staff members should
   1. Following an illness, the teacher will             extraordinary or difficult situations for students
       honor a written request from the parent           arise.
       to excuse the student for one day.
   2. A written statement from a doctor                  Student Activities
       excusing the student from PE for                  In keeping with the middle school philosophy, a
       medical reasons.                                  variety of activities is offered to our students.
   3. Special exceptions for attendance to PE            Watch for announcements for dates and times!
       can be made by the Administration.
                                                         Communication
Special Services                                         Communication is the key to a successful year.
There are many services available to students            Information can be obtained in a variety of
with special needs. The Resource Program                 ways.
serves 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students who                   Report cards
have been identified through staffing                         Newsletters
procedures. Students may receive support in                   Parent-teacher conferences
the regular classroom as well as individual and               Contacting the teacher directly through
small group instruction in the resource room.                  the voice mail or email system
Students with significant delays in learning are              Infinite Campus Parent Portal
serviced through the pre-vocational program                   Notes to and from school via the student
where students are mainstreamed into the                       agenda book
regular classroom with support and                            Daily announcements.
modifications. This program may also provide
                                                              Bulletin boards/displays
instruction in living skills and work experience.
                                                              Attending meetings of school
The Speech/Language Program serves
                                                               organizations
students with special needs in articulation,
fluency, voice and/or language. ELA services
                                                         School Closures or Early Dismissals
students who speak English as a second
                                                         Please listen or watch:
language. Talented and Gifted activities
                                                         KLOV 1570 AM
provide opportunities for those students to
                                                         KCOL 1410 AM
expand their talents.
                                                         KOA 85 AM
                                                         KUSA Channel 9
                                                         KCNC Channel 4
                                                         KMGH Channel 7
Guidance and Counseling

                                                    19
                                    Erwin Middle School
                         Code of Conduct and Possible Consequences

                                          MINOR OFFENSES

Minor offenses are behaviors that do not necessarily compromise the learning or safety of
anyone. These offenses initially will be worked out between the student, teacher, and parents if
necessary. It is expected that the behavior will be corrected after minor interventions by the staff.
If minor offenses continue to occur, the behavior gets worse, or the safety of the student or others
is compromised, the student’s behavior may be considered a major offense.

Example of Minor Offenses
* Offenses that can be either minor or major offenses

      Any behavior that is disruptive to the
       education process*
      Dishonesty                                     Possible Consequences for Minor
      Late to Class – unexcused                      Offenses

      Late to School – unexcused                     Detention

      Inappropriate display of affection             Parent Contact

      Forgery*                                       Warnings

      Having out music players, cellular             Peer mediation

       phones, etc, during school                     Teacher/parent/team meetings
                                                      Behavior contracts
      Loitering in the building during
                                                      Counseling contact
       unauthorized times or in unauthorized
                                                      Meeting with administration
       locations
                                                      Loss of credit
      Improper dress/attire
                                                      Verbal warning
      Improper lunchroom behavior
                                                      In-school suspension
      Swearing*
      Failure to follow school rules – see
       student handbook




                                                 20
                                      MAJOR OFFENSES
Major offenses are behaviors that are considered disruptive or dangerous to the student or others.
These offenses will be dealt with by the school administration. The severity of any incident or
repeated violations will dictate the consequences. These major offenses may result in a
Discipline Remediation Plan meeting.

Examples of Major Offenses                                  forbidden in the buildings, school
*Offenses that can be either minor or major                 grounds, school vehicles or at any
offenses                                                    school sponsored activity by school
     Any behavior that is disruptive to the                policy, local, and state law. Weapons
      education process*                                    include but are not limited to: pistol,
     Willful disrespect, defiance, or                      revolver, rifle, shotgun, air gun or
      disobedience                                          spring gun, slingshot, bludgeon, brass
     Swearing */derogatory remarks                         knuckles, artificial knuckles of any
     Forgery*                                              kind, knife having a blade of greater
     Extortion                                             than three inches, any knife which
     Intimidation                                          blades can be opened by a flick of a
     Rough-housing: pushing, snowballs,                    button or pressure on the handle, or
      etc. – see student handbook                           any pocket knife where the blade is
                                                            carried in a partially open position with
     Truancy/Ditching
                                                            a blade 3.5 inches or long
     Gang related activity
                                                           Failure to follow school rules – see
     Physical confrontation
                                                            student handbook*
     Stealing
     Intentional destruction of school              Possible Consequences for Major
      property/vandalism                             Offenses
     Sexual harassment or intimidation              Detention
     Possession/distribution of potentially         Parent contact
      harmful or hazardous material such as          Warnings
      but not limited to: fireworks,                 Peer mediation
      ammunition, combustible materials              Teacher/parent/team meetings
     Possession and/or use of alcohol,              Behavior contracts
      drugs, drug paraphernalia or                   Counselor contact
      controlled substances                          Meeting with an administrator
     Distribution of alcohol, drugs, drug           Loss of credit
      paraphernalia or controlled                    Verbal warnings
      substances                                     Meeting with administrator and possibly
     Pulling fire alarm                             parents
     Incidents of assault upon, disorderly          In-school suspension
      conduct toward, harassment of, the             Out-of-school suspension
      making of a knowingly false allegation         Discipline Remediation Plan with student,
      of child abuse against or any criminal         parents, and school staff
      act directed toward a school teacher           Police contact
      or school employee                             Expulsion
     Weapons: the possession of,
      carrying, displaying, use or attempted
      use of any kind of weapon is strictly



                                                21
                               ERWIN MIDDLE SCHOOL DRESS CODE

Erwin Middle School is very proud of its student population. Students shall be well-groomed, and clothing
should be neat and clean at all times. The responsibility for dress and grooming rests primarily with the
student and his/her parents. However, staff members will encourage appropriate dress and grooming and
help students learn what is appropriate to wear, when, and where.

Traditionally hats are removed when someone enters a building. This was a sign of respect and
considered good manners. Here at Erwin we remove our hats from the time we enter the building in the
morning to the time classes are over for the day to show our respect for the learning that takes place within
these walls. Thank you for not wearing your hats.
Prohibited Dress
Any form of dress or hairstyle which is considered:
    Contrary to good hygiene
    Distractive or disruptive
    Derogatory to either gender
    Detrimental to the purpose of school
Any type of dress or action which includes:
    Gang membership or affiliation by written communication, whistling, hand signs, language,
       recruitment, posturing, tattoos, hair or eyebrow cuts, drawing, painting or design upon any school or
       personal property
    Any clothing or actions which lead staff to reasonably believe that such apparel or action is gang
       related and would disrupt or interfere with the school environment and/or educational objectives
       (This can include paraphernalia, displaying colors, directional – north, south, east, west – clothing,
       displaying numbers – especially 13, 14, 18 or combinations of those, rolled pant legs or sleeves,
       and anything related to ICP or other individuals/groups with known/pervasive gang
       symbolism/actions)
Any style of dress and unreasonable body exposure such as:
    Tube tops, spaghetti straps, T-backs, halter tops
    Short shorts and short skirts
    Low cut blouses, see-through blouses
    Half shirts/cropped tops, net shirts
    Shirts, pants, sweats, shorts or jeans with holes that create an inappropriate appearance or that are
       distracting
    No stomachs, backs, breasts, buttocks, or underwear may be visible at any time.
Any items of clothing including:
    Hats, jewelry, and apparel that advocate, advertise, or promote the use of controlled substances
       such as alcohol, drugs, or tobacco
    Anything sexually suggestive in nature
    Clothing that exhibits vulgar, obscene or crude language
    Clothing that is offensive or supports violence (These guidelines apply to stickers on notebooks and
       lockers as well.)
    Shoes and footwear are required at all times. No slippers!
    Undergarments will not show, including tank tops or undershirts
    Pants must fit at the waist without the aid of a belt/NO SAGGING!
Students should dress for extracurricular activities with similar guidelines as in school.




                                                      22
Consequences for Dress Code Violations
The administration reserves the right to determine whether clothing is distracting, indecent, or
inappropriate to wear in the school environment. Violations of the dress code are subject to
disciplinary action. The discipline measures taken will be based upon the degree and frequency
of violations.
All staff members will enforce the dress code. This dress code will be enforced beginning first
period and for the entire school day.
Students wearing unacceptable apparel will be asked to change, cover their clothing, or be sent
home to change. Erwin spirit wear will be available in the office for students in violation of the
dress code to wear and borrow for one day.

Continual violations of the dress code will result in parent conferences and the possibility of the
student’s removal from school.

The following articles will not be allowed:
Hats, bandanas, or sunglasses
Chains hanging from pockets
Spiked belts or neck collars
Pajamas and slippers
Coats and backpacks in classrooms
Pagers, electronic games, laser pointers

Students are discouraged from bringing music players and cell phones to school. If these
items are brought to school, they may not be in use at any time from 7:23 am to 2:45 pm
(1:05 on Wednesdays). If cell phones and/or music players are out during school hours,
they will be confiscated and placed in the office with students possibly assigned detention
and parents/guardians potentially needing to pick up the item. Students are responsible for
the safety of their own personal property. The school can not guarantee the personal property of
students. Students bring valuable items to school at their own risk.

Thompson School District is an equal opportunity educational institution and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender,
and disability in its activities, programs, or employment practices as required by Title VI, Title IX, and Section 504. For information regarding civil
rights or grievance procedures, contact the Executive Director of Human Resources, 800 S. Taft Avenue, Loveland, CO 80537, (970) 613-5000 or
the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Region VIII, Federal Office Building, 1244 North Speer Boulevard, Site 310, Denver,
Colorado 80204, (303) 844-5695.




                                                                          23
                                                                        ERWIN MIDDLE SCHOOL
                                                                            Writing Rubric


Instructions:
   (1) Read the paper all the way through.
   (2) Read each criteria item and enter "Y" for "yes"; "N" for "no"; "S" for "sort of".
   (3) Mark your total score in the space provided.
                       IDEAS                                                          ORGANIZATION                                                        VOICE
             Interesting Things to Say                                            The Way It Goes Together                                        Sounds Like You Talking

___ It all makes sense.                                  ___ It starts out with a bang!                                              ___ It sounds like a real person wrote it.
___ The writer knows this topic well.                    ___ Everything ties together well.                                          ___ You can tell the writer cares about this topic.
___ The writer has included interesting details not      ___ It builds to the good parts.                                            ___ This is what the writer really thinks.
    everyone would think of.                             ___ You can follow it easily.                                               ___ The writer wants you to read this and feel
___ The paper has a purpose.                             ___ At the end it feels finished and makes you think.                          something.
___ Once you start reading, you won't want to                                                                                        ___ You can tell that the writer was thinking about
stop.                                                                                                                                    the audience.

                                                         Total for the trait of ORGANIZATION_____                                    Total for the trait of VOICE_____
Total for the trait of IDEAS_____                        (Give 1 point for each "Y", 1/2 point for each "S", and 0 points for each   (Give 1 point for each "Y", 1/2 point for each "S",
(Give 1 point for each "Y", 1/2 point for each "S",      "N"                                                                         and 0 points for each "N"
and 0 points for each "N"




                WORD CHOICE                                                        SENTENCE FLUENCY                                                   CONVENTIONS
          The Best Words For Your Ideas                                The Way it Sounds When You Read It Out Loud                     Spelling, Punctuation, Grammar, Capitals, Etc.

___ This is the best way to say this.                    ___ The writer's sentences begin in different ways.                         ___ The writer uses capitals correctly.
___ The writer's words make pictures in your mind.       ___ Some sentences are long; some are short.                                ___ Periods, commas, exclamation marks,
___ The writer uses words that are new ways to           ___ It sounds good as you read it.                                             and quotation marks are in the right places.
         sayeveryday things.                             ___ The writer's sentences have power and punch.                            ___ Almost every word is spelled correctly.
___ The writer's verbs are powerful; the writer's        ___ The writing flows easily from sentence to                               ___ The writer indented each paragraph.
         nouns and adjectives are specific and              sentence.                                                                ___ The writer's spelling, punctuation, grammar,
         precise.                                                                                                                            and capitalization make the paper easy to
___ Some of the words linger in your mind after                                                                                              read and understand.
         you read them.
                                                         Total for the trait of SENTENCE FLUENCY _____                               Total for the trait of CONVENTIONS _____
Total for the trait of WORD CHOICE _____                 (Give 1 point for each "Y", 1/2 point for each "S", and 0 points for each   (Give 1 point for each "Y", 1/2 point for each "S",
(Give 1 point for each "Y", 1/2 point for each "S",      "N"                                                                         and 0 points for each "N"
and 0 points for each "N"




                                                                                           24
                                       Basic Paragraph Checklist
      Great Short Answer                  and Scoring Guide                     Helpful Scoring Questions

A Great Short Answer (GSA) can be Organization                           Organization
one sentence, or as long as a short   topic sentence                           Does the topic sentence clearly state
paragraph.                            follows a logical order                   the topic?
                                      concluding sentence                      Does the paragraph flow in an order
                                                                                 that makes sense? Can you follow
A Great Short Answer:                                                            along without feeling lost or confused?
   1. Restates the question or                                                  Does it come to a satisfying ending?
                                    Content / Ideas
      prompt.                          addresses all parts of the       Content / Ideas
                                         prompt                                 Does the paragraph discuss all parts
                                       include relevant reasons,                of the prompt?
   2. Is Correct:                        details, and facts to support          Does it contain enough information or
           Is supported with            topic                                   description to show the intended
             evidence                                                            learning?

            Uses required                                               Word Choice / Vocabulary
                                    Word Choice / Vocabulary                    Does the student use the required
             vocabulary                required vocabulary used                 unit/subject vocabulary works
                                         correctly                               correctly?

   3. Uses complete Sentences.                                           Conventions
          Uses correct             Conventions                                 Do errors in capitalization, usage,
            capitalization             paragraph indented                       punctuation, and spelling interfere
                                                                                 with the meaning?
                                       few errors in CUPS
            Uses correct                                                Other Assigned requirements
             punctuation            Other Assigned Requirements          * Teacher requirements for the assignment
                                        included in paragraph           relevant to content learning.
                            2 Minute Editing
      Check you paper for CUPS
           C = capitalization
           U = usage of words
           P = punctuation
                                                   CUPS
           S = spelling

                                                        25
MLA Sample Bibliography
                                             (Revised November 2004)

Books and Pamphlets:
Example: Brown, Michael. Facts about Cold-Blooded Animals. New York: Facts on File, 1998.

*If there is more than one author (co-author), use the following:
First author’s last name, First author’s first name, and Second author’s first name and last name. Example: Brown,
Michael and James Fisk.

Encyclopedia Signed Article:
Example: Wilson, Harold. “Lizards of the World.” World Book. 27 ed.1997.

Encyclopedia Unsigned Article:
Example: “Tiger.” Compton’s. 27 ed. 1997.

Encyclopedia (CD-ROM):
Example: Wilson, Harold. “Lizards of the World.” World book. CD-ROM. 8 ed. 2000.

Magazines and Newspapers:
Example: Chadwick, Douglas H. “Dead or alive.” National Geographic March 1997: 2-41.

Video:
Example: States of Matter. Dir. Frank Mills. Perf. Bill Nye. 2001. video cassette. Disney, 2002.

World Wide Web (www) Sites:
To cite files available for viewing/downloading on the World Wide Web by means of Netscape, or other Web
browsers, provide the following information:

     The author’s name (if known)
     The title of the page in quotes
     The name of the website underlined
     The date of publication or the last revision
     Organization
     The date you read this article
     The full address (URL) enclosed with angle brackets< >

Example: "Australia." The World Factbook. 15 April 2008. Central Intelligence Agency. 16 Apr 2008
        <https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/as.html>.

Interview:
Example: Williamson, Thomas. Personal Interview. 02 Nov. 2004.




                                  Online Databases: Home Access
        World Book                                               CultureGrams
        http://www.worldbookonline.com                           http://online.culturegrams.com
        Log-in ID: thompson                                      Username: lerwin
        Password: research                                       Password: cgrams

        EBSCO                                                    Opposing Viewpoints
        http://search.epnet.com                                  http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/love34338rpa
        User ID: s9895712                                        Password: lucerne
        Password: password
                                                          26
                                          NOTES: SCIENTIFIC METHOD

PIGS               STEP 1 - PROBLEM - THIS IS THE QUESTION YOU WANT TO ANSWER.
                   EXAMPLE: What fertilizer will grow a poinsettia plant to the tallest height?

IN                 STEP 2 - INFORMATION - GATHERING RESEARCH TO LEARN BACKGROUND
                   INFORMATION.
                   Read and record information on such topics as plant growth, fertilizers, poinsettia plants.

HAWAII             STEP 3 - HYPOTHESIS - “EDUCATED GUESS” Can be an “if…, then statement.”
                   Be specific (state your best “guess” as to the answer to Step 1 question).

EAT                STEP 4 - EXPERIMENT - TEST YOUR HYPOTHESIS BY USING A STEP-BY-
                   STEP PROCESS.
                   1) In your write up, explain the steps so clearly that someone could repeat your experiment from your
                   directions.
                   2) To design your experimental plan set up two test groups. (Note: Some types of experiments do not
                   have a control group).

                                                         TEST
                                                        GROUPS

     Experimental                                                                               Control Group
     Group(s)
                                                                                                Your standard for
     This is where you introduce                  Controlled Variables                          comparison (example:
     the one variable you are                                                                   no fertilizer added in
     testing (Example: types of                   Remember, all other possible                  pot).
     fertilizer put in the different              Variables are kept the same.
     pots you are testing).                       (Ex. Water amount, sun,
                                                  fertilizer amount and soil are
                                                  the same for each group.)
                                                                                                    height




RAW                STEP 5 - RESULTS - RECORD THE FACTS WE LEARNED
                   FROM EXPERIMENTING (data tables and graphs are useful.)
                                                                                                             Types of fertilizer
CORN               STEP 6 - A CONCLUSION

         A conclusion is a summary of an experiment. Someone who reads only the conclusion section of your report
         should be able to completely understand your experiment. The summary should give your results, describe
         what those findings mean, and suggest new questions that should be investigated. You should avoid using
         “I” statements in your writing. Use phrases like “the data indicates …” (A good conclusion can be written by
         answering six questions).
         1. What was the purpose of the experiment? (Restate the Step 1 “problem” question).
         2. What were the major findings? (make a statement that tells what the answer to the problem question is,
         and give data examples).
         3. Was your hypothesis supported by the data?
         4. How did your findings compare with other research or with information in the textbook? (Optional Step)
         5. What possible explanations can you give for the findings?
         6. What recommendations do you have for further study and for improving the experiment?

                                                             27
What is VARIABLE?
There are actually three types: dependent, independent and controlled variables. It is important to test only ONE
variable at a time, and to keep all other things the same (in other words, they are controlled). (Read Step #1 question
to figure out the variables).

    A. What is the INDEPENDENT VARIABLE?
         This is the variable you change on purpose: it is also called the manipulated variable.
         Example: We changed the kind of fertilizer on purpose (graph on the x-axis).

    B. What is the DEPENDENT VARIABLE?
         This is the variable that you measure or observe a change in as a result of changing the independent
         variable: it is also called the responding variable.
         Example: We measure a change in height of our poinsettia plants (graph on the y-axis).

    C.   What is a CONTROLLED VARIABLE? (Controlled variables and constants refer to the same thing.)
         Characteristics in an experiment that are kept unchanged in all trials are controlled variables.
         Example: Amount of water, sunlight, soil types, amount of fertilizer (sometimes this is called controlling your
         variables).

What is a CONTROL?
The control in an experiment is the standard for comparison, in which no variable is introduced.
Example: No fertilizer is added to one poinsettia planting so you can compare the fertilized pots to this unfertilized
one. Note: Not every experiment has a control, many will.

What is the HYPOTHESIS?
This is an educated guess about how changing the independent variable will affect the dependent variable.
Example: If fertilizer is added to poinsettia plants, then Pat’s Essentials Fertilizer will grow the poinsettia plant the
highest, followed by Bill’s and Jack’s.

What are TRIALS?
Trials are the number of times an experiment is repeated for each level or value, of the independent variable. More
trials conducted will produce more reliable the results. To be considered dependable you should do a minimum of 5
trials. Example: This is one trial, do at least 4 more for valid results.




                                                             Control       Jack’s         Bill’s        Pat’s




                                                             28
                   Data Table Self Check                                                       Graphing Self Check

    Does your table include columns and rows for all of the data             Did you choose the correct type of graph? (Line graph for showing
     you need to record?                                                       changes over time, temp, etc.) (Bar graph is for comparing data that is
                                                                               “not connected”.
    Did you put the independent variable in the first column and             Did you choose a correct scale? (This means that you made the range
     label it? Does it need to be labeled with a “unit” of some type           of the data a size that will fill up most of your graph and not just a small
     (cm, seconds, etc.) to make it more understandable.                       part of it) Did you use increments (the spacing of numbers or categories
    Did you put the dependent variable in the second column and               on the “x” or “y” axis) that are accurate and evenly spaced?
     label it (cm, seconds, etc.)? (It could be the third, fourth, etc.       Is your graph neat and accurate? Are all points plotted correctly? Did
                                                                               you use color or symbols in some way if it would help your graph to be
     column, depending on how much data needs to be recorded).                 more understandable? If the data on the “x” axis would be more
     NOTE: When recording your data, do not put the unit labels                understandable by using a color-coded key or a key that explains
     (cm, sec, etc.) all the way down the column. Put it in the top            symbols used, did you include the key (also called a legend)?
     box of the column, then that indicates that unit is what all of          Does your graph have a title that relates to the problem that is graphed?
     the numbers represent.                                                    Is it across the top of the graph? (You can always create a title by
                                                                               stating the “x” axis vs. the “y” axis)
    Did you give your data table a title?                                    Does the “x” axis have a clear, neat label that describes units and
                                                                               states the independent variable? (The independent variable is the one
                                                                               you decide on, you change it “on purpose”)
    Independent                                           Dependent
                                                                              Is the “y” axis clearly labeled and does it describe the dependent
    variable -                                            variable             variable? Are the units included on it, also? (The dependent variable is
                                                                               the one in which you “measure or observe” some change)

                                                                                       HINT: Put your left
                                                                                       hand up, thumb out.
    Decide                                                                             Your fingers represent
    on the                                                                             the “dependent”                           Height vs. Type of Fertilizer
    number                                                                             variable (y-axis) and
                                                                                       the thumb is by itself –
    of rows                                                                                                        Dependent Goes
                                                                                       “independent (x-axis).
    needed                                                                             Remember that you           Here
                                                                                       put your thumb out “on      y-axis
                                                                                       purpose” which is a
                                                                                       hint for the
                                                                                       independent variable.                    Independent goes here
                                                                                                                                               x-axis



                                                                      29
                  12× Multiplication Table


×   1   2    3    4    5    6         7   8     9    10    11    12

1   1   2    3    4    5    6         7   8    9     10    11    12

2   2   4    6    8    10   12    14      16   18    20    22    24

3   3   6    9    12   15   18    21      24   27    30    33    36

4   4   8    12   16   20   24    28      32   36    40    44    48

5   5   10   15   20   25   30    35      40   45    50    55    60

6   6   12   18   24   30   36    42      48   54    60    66    72

7   7   14   21   28   35   42    49      56   63    70    77    84

8   8   16   24   32   40   48    56      64   72    80    88    96

9   9   18   27   36   45   54    63      72   81    90    99    108

10 10   20   30   40   50   60    70      80   90    100   110   120

11 11   22   33   44   55   66    77      88   99    110   121   132

12 12   24   36   48   60   72    84      96   108   120   132 144


                                 30

				
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