student handbook 2010-2011

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					COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
         &
  HEALTH SCIENCES




      Bowshar Campus




   2010-2011 Student Handbook
        and Course Catalog
NOTE:
The English language version of this Student Handbook is the legally binding one. An
Arabic translation of some sections of the Student Handbook may be provided as a
service to students and parents, but it is not considered official. When in doubt about
the precise meaning of the Arabic version, please refer to the English language version.



  College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
                 Calendar

                                                             Fall Semester 2010
September 18-22 ................................................................................................ Registration and Orientation
Saturday, September 18 ................................................................................................... First Day of Classes
Saturday- Wednesday, November 6-10 .............................................................. Mid-semester Exam Week
Tuesday, November 16*........................................................................................................... Eid-Al-Adha
Thursday, November 18*............................................................................................................ National Day
Wednesday December 29 ................................................................................................. Last Day of Classes
Saturday-Wednesday, January 1-12……………………………………………………….Final Exams

                                                           Spring Semester 2011
Saturday, January 29 ......................................................................................................... First Day of Classes
Tuesday, March 1………………………………………………………………………...Open Day
Monday, March 9* .............................................................................................................. Prophet‟s Birthday
Saturday-Wednesday, March 19-23.................................................................... Mid-Semester Exam Week
Monday, May 11 ................................................................................................................ Last Day of Classes
Saturday-Wednesday, May 14-25 .................................................................................................Final Exams


                                                         Summer Semester 2011
Saturday, June 4 ................................................................................................................ First Day of Classes
Sunday, June 26-June 29 ............................................................................................... Mid-Semester Exams
Monday, July 20 ................................................................................................................. Last Day of Classes
Thursday-Monday, July 23-27 .....................................................................................................Final Exams


NOTE: The academic calendar for the 2011-2012 academic year has not yet been determined.

*Days off related to official holidays have not yet been determined. Announcements will be made before each
holiday once the government holidays are known.
                                                             BOWSHAR CAMPUS




                                                                          ii
              Ramadhan Schedule

The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences operates on a reduced schedule
during Ramadhan, in accordance with tradition. Classes start at the regular time
each morning (8:00 a.m.), but they finish early. The mechanism for adjusting the
schedule during Ramadhan is that each hour in the regular schedule is reduced to
50 minutes during Ramadhan. The student‟s class schedule during Ramadhan
can be determined from the following table:

Period   Regular Schedule       Ramadhan Schedule
1        8:00 – 8:50 a.m.       8:00 – 8:40 a.m.
2        9:00 – 9:50            8:50 – 9:30
3        10:00 – 10:50          9:40 – 10:20
4        11:00 – 11:50          10:30 – 11:10
5        12:00 – 12:50 p.m.     11:20 – 12:00 noon
6        1:00 – 1:50            12:10 – 12:50
7        2:00 – 2:50            1:00 – 1:40
8        3:00 – 3:50            1:50 – 2:30
9        4:00 – 4:30            2:40 – 3:00




                                      iii
      CPHS Mission Statement


   The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences is
                    committed to
educating pharmacists and allied health professionals
   of the highest quality dedicated to serving the
        health care needs of the international
          community and the people of the
                 Sultanate of Oman




                     GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

   To prepare students for the study and practice of pharmacy and health
    sciences in English.

   To provide students with the basic science and clinical knowledge
    required for their chosen field of study.

   To improve students‟ use of information technology and computers.

   To help students become self-directed learners.

   To foster student curiosity and inquisitiveness.

   To prepare students for a lifelong commitment to other persons, their
    communities, and their country.

   To prepare students to become leaders in their communities.

   To encourage professionalism and ethical behavior




                                    iv
                           Table of Contents
                                              ADVANCED PLACEMENT                 11

GENERAL INFORMATION                1        ACADEMIC ADVISING                    11
  Academic Advancement and Progress 1         Responsibilities of the Advisor:   12
  Calendar                          1         Responsibilities of the Students   12
  Class Dismissal                   2
  Computer Facilities               2       GENERAL FOUNDATION PROGRAM           13
  Dean’s List                       2         CURRICULUM                         14
  E-Mail                            2         GENERAL FOUNDATION PROGRAM         14
  Faculty                           2         Course Descriptions                14
  Fire and Safety Policy            2
  First Aid                         3       Intensive English Program      16
  Health Insurance                  3          COURSE DESCRIPTIONS         18
  Health Services                   3          REQUIREMENTS FOR SUCCESS    18
  Holidays                          3          BENCHMARKS FOR ADVANCEMENT TO
  Hours of Operation                3          PROGRAMS                    19
  Housing                           3
  Identification Card               4       ACADEMIC STRUCTURE               19
  Laboratory Safety                 4         ACADEMIC SYSTEM FOLLOWED BY
  Library                           4         CPHS                           19
  Lost Items                        5         ADVANCEMENT FROM ONE ACADEMIC
  Meals                             5         YEAR TO THE NEXT               19
  Offices                           5         GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR
  Parking                           6         PHARMACY                       19
  Payment of Fees                   6         ATTENDANCE POLICY              20
  Prayer Rooms                      6         WITHDRAWAL POLICY              20
  Prayer Time                       6         WITHDRAWAL FROM CPHS           20
  Printing                          6         POSTPONEMENT                   20
  Ramadan                           7         ADDING OR DROPPING COURSES     21
  Registration                      7         CREDITS PER SEMESTER           21
  Regulations Affecting Degrees     7         ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL
  Smoking                           7         STANDARDS REQUIRED             21
  Student Activities                7         PLAGIARISM                     22
  Student Files                     8         CHEATING                       22
  Student Lockers                   8         FORGERY, MISREPRESENTATION, OR
  Student Lounge                    8         FRAUD                          22
  Syllabus                          8         WHAT IS MISCONDUCT?            23
  Telephones                        8         PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING
  Transcripts                       9         DISHONESTY OR MISCONDUCT       24
  Transportation                    9         PENALTIES                      24
  Visitors To Campus                9         APPEAL OF PROBATION, SUSPENSION,
                                              DISMISSAL, OR EXPULSION        25
ACADEMIC POLICIES: RULES                      MARKING EXAMINATIONS           30
                                              REVIEWING AN EXAMINATION PAPER
AND REGULATIONS          10
                                              OR OTHER GRADED WORK           30
                                              POSTING OF GRADES              30
ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION      10
                                              MAKEUP EXAMS                   31
  PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION TO THE
  FIRST YEAR                    10
                                            COURSE GRADING PROTOCOLS             31
  INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS      10
                                              THE GRADE SCALE                    31
  PLACEMENT TESTS               11

                                        v
  GRADE POINT AVERAGE           32
  CALCULATING A GRADE POINT
  AVERAGE                       32
  KEY FEATURES OF THE GRADING
  SYSTEM                        33
  HOW TO CALCULATE A PARTIAL GRADE
  IN A COURSE                   33
  REPEATING COURSES             34

Textbooks                       34


RULES AND REGULATIONS 35

HOSTEL RULES and REGULATIONS     35
  AIM                            35
  BEHAVIOR AND DISCIPLINE        35
  UPKEEP OF THE HOSTEL           36
  LIFE IN THE HOSTEL: THE DAILY
  SYSTEM                         36
  VISITORS                       36
  LATE NIGHT PASSES              37
  REVISION OF RULES AND
  REGULATIONS                    37
  DRESS CODE                     37
  HAIR                           38
  DRESS                          38
  PROHIBITED ITEMS OF CLOTHING 38
  PROHIBITED ITEMS IN LABORATORIES
                                 38
  HEALTH and SAFETY POLICY       38
  GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES      38
  FIRE REGULATIONS               39
  ACCIDENTS                      39
  FIRST AID                      39


PHARMACY CURRICULUM             40

PHARMACY CURRICULUM (2007, 2008
batches)                        40

Four Year Program in Pharmacy   43

Batch starting in 2009          43

Bachelor of Pharmacy Course
Descriptions                    46

Fees & Other Charges            54
  TUITION FEE                   54
  REFUND POLICY                 54
  FEES STRUCTURE                54
  CHARGES FOR OTHER SERVICES    54
  HOSTEL RENTAL                 54

                                      vi
                                                                                      1
                                                                                       Section
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




GENERAL INFORMATION
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences is a private co-educational college dedicated to the
training of pharmacists and allied health professionals.. The college offers a four-year program of
study leading to the B. Pharm. (Bachelor of Pharmacy) degree and a General Foundation
Program.. The B. Pharm. degree program consists of a three and one- half years of courses and
one semester of training in institutions and community pharmacies. Because the College of
Pharmacy & Health Sciences is in academic partnership with West Virginia University in the
U.S.A., students have the opportunity to obtain a U.S.-style pharmacy education entirely within
Oman. While the school was built primarily to educate Omani secondary school graduates, it also
accepts citizens of the GCC countries and a limited number of expatriates. Enrollment is limited
to approximately 60. students per year. The curriculum is taught entirely in English.
Oman Medical College opened the doors of its pre-medical campus at Bowshar in the fall of
2001. In 2003, Oman Medical College added a new Bachelor of Pharmacy program to its
educational offerings in Bowshar. The initial four-and-a-half-year B. Pharm. program was the
first of its kind in Oman.

Academic Advancement and Progress
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences has an obligation to evaluate students in the
pharmacy and other proposed programs as thoroughly as possible with regard to their academic
and professional knowledge and skills, their integrity, and their suitability for the practice of
pharmacy and health sciences. In addition, students have a right to know how they will be
evaluated, how progression through the program will be judged, and their rights and
responsibilities in the program. See Section 2, Rules and Regulations, for academic advancement
policies and procedures.

It is the responsibility of students to monitor their own academic progress throughout the
semester. Keeping a record of examination and homework grades is a part of this process.
Parents who wish to discuss their son‟s or daughter‟s progress should contact the associate dean
for academic affairs or the appropriate heads of department (HOD) to set up an appointment.
Teachers need time to gather the student‟s work in order to give an accurate estimate of the
student‟s academic progress.
_____________________________________________________________

Calendar
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences operates on a two and one-half semester system.
The normal academic year at CPHS begins in mid-September and ends in late July. The academic
year consists of two semesters, called “terms,” of approximately 17 weeks and an eight-week
summer term. There are short breaks, or holiday periods, between semesters. Important dates
                                                1
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

for the year are indicated in the college calendar on page 2. The language of instruction in all
courses is English.
CPHS will adhere to the same holiday schedule as the government sector. The academic calendar
does not list all the holidays because the dates generally are not determined by the government
until very near the holiday date. The dates of official holidays will be announced once they are
determined.
_____________________________________________________________

Class Dismissal
Classes are dismissed for holidays recognized by The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.
All classes meet during Ramadan on a reduced schedule. Students are expected to do research
for class assignments on their own time unless indicated otherwise in course syllabi.
_____________________________________________________________

Computer Facilities
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences expects all students to become familiar with
computers and their use. The college has three fully networked learning environments for
teaching and learning purposes. Two of them – the IT laboratory and the CALL lab – are located
on the ground floor near the cafeteria. These laboratories are available for student use for doing
homework or accessing their e-mail whenever classes are not meeting in them, according to a
schedule available in the IT department. The third, CASL, is located on the second floor next to
the chemistry laboratories. In addition, computers and printers are available for student use in
the library. Some locations have Internet access.
_____________________________________________________________

Dean’s List
Each year in August the dean reviews the academic performance of all students and places the
very best students in each year‟s class on the Dean‟s List. The Dean‟s List is limited to less than
10 percent of each year‟s class.
_____________________________________________________________

E-Mail
Students at CPHS receive e-mail accounts. They should check their e-mail accounts regularly for
announcements from administration. Guidelines for the use of e-mail are found in the 2005-2006
IT Handbook. A copy of these guidelines is on file in the dean‟s office.
_______________________________________________________________

Faculty
The term “faculty” includes all persons who teach students. The primary job of the faculty is to
help students learn. Faculty keeps office hours which are posted near their offices. Students can
(and should) seek help if they need it. Students should remember not to congregate in groups
outside someone‟s office because, at times, it can be disruptive.
__________________________________________________________________

Fire and Safety Policy
Procedures to follow in an accident or a fire are found in the “Fire and Safety Policy.” in
SECTION 3 - Rules and Regulations.


                                                 2
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

First Aid
First aid kits are kept in all science laboratories and in the nurse‟s station located on the ground
floor.
_____________________________________________________________

Health Insurance
The college does not maintain health insurance coverage for its students. Omanis are covered by
the Omani National Health Service. Expatriates are required to show proof of health insurance
at the time of registration.
_____________________________________________________________

Health Services
A designated female member of the faculty is certified in first aid and CPR and has the skills to
handle minor problems encountered by the students and staff. A female faculty member is an
MD and is available for handling all medical situations. Students who become ill should contact a
relative to transport them to a health facility. Except in emergency situations, CPHS provides
transport only for female students living in the hostel who do not have relatives in the Muscat
area to transport them to hospitals or clinics.
_____________________________________________________________

Holidays
CPHS adheres to the same holiday schedule as the government sector. The academic calendar
does not list exact dates for holidays, such as Eid Al Fitr, because the dates generally are not
determined until very near the holiday. Once CPHS administration has determined the date of a
holiday, students will be informed by e-mail and by an announcement posted on the notice
board in Reception. If you have NOT yet heard the official announcement of a holiday, assume
classes will be held as usual.
_______________________________________________________________

Hours of Operation
Being a pharmacy or health sciences student is like having a full-time job. Classes may be
scheduled any time between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. On some days, students can expect to be busy
nearly all of the time with the exception of a lunch period. Portions of the building, including the
student lounge and the library, are open in the evening during the week.
_____________________________________________________________

Housing
A limited number of supervised off-campus accommodations (hostels) are available for female
students on a first-come basis. Students seeking accommodation in the hostel will be required to
pay a refundable deposit of RO 100 at the time of admission. Hostel fees are charged at cost to
the college (about RO 60/month). Transportation is provided to and from the campus. Food is
purchased and prepared by the students. Transportation is provided once a week to a grocery
store. A cafeteria is available on campus for the purchase of food during college hours. Hostel
regulations are in Appendix C.
Living away from home with a roommate is a new experience for most first-year students. The
guidelines below may help to make the transition from living at home to living with a roommate
go more smoothly.


                                                  3
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Identification Card
 An CPHS identification (I.D.) card is more than identification. It may be used to access the
CPHS library and networked learning laboratories. It contains a student‟s pin number used when
exam results are posted. Students should guard their I.D. cards as they would a credit card or an
ATM card. The card should not be folded or stapled. Damaged or lost cards must be replaced
and are subject to a RO 1 replacement fee. Students should go the Office of the Registrar
immediately to report a lost or stolen card.
_____________________________________________________________

Laboratory Safety
See Fire and Safety Policy in SECTION 3 - Rules and Regulations.
_____________________________________________________________

Library
Borrowing policy: CPHS students may borrow books and other specified resources from the library.
Students may check out a maximum of three books for three weeks. Books should be returned to the
circulation desk on or before the due date stamped in the book. Books may be renewed for a further
period of three weeks provided that they are not reserved by other students, faculty, or staff.

Hours of Operation.: The library is generally open from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m., Saturday through
Wednesday, and 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. on Thursday when the college is in session. A current library
schedule will be posted near the library entrance.

Interlibrary Loan;: CPHS can arrange interlibrary loan for books from Royal Hospital Medical
Library and Sultan Qaboos University Medical Library. It is also possible to obtain journal
articles from the medical libraries of GCC countries, Sultan Qaboos University and Royal
Hospital Medical Hospital. Students interested in these services may contact the circulation desk.

Journals: Journals are for reference only and cannot be borrowed.

Literature Search: Selective dissemination of information and current awareness services are
provided in the library. Students are encouraged to utilize these services. Help sessions are
provided in the library regarding:
      Choosing the best databases and formulating effective search strategies.
      Electronic journals available on the Net
      Utilizing Web search engines and subject gateways to find quality information on the
       Web.

Online Catalog: An online catalog is available so that students can browse at their convenience,
check the availability status of books, and reserve books online.

Overdue notice and Fines:: Students should check their e-mail accounts regularly for overdue
return notices. Students will be charged an overdue fine of 100 baisas per working day per item
for the first week and 200 baisas per working day per item beyond this period, in case of late
return of books. If the books are not returned within 15 days from the due date, the borrowing
privileges of the member are suspended till the dues are cleared.

Photocopying:: Photocopying is available in the library expressly for students. Prepaid cards for
the photocopier can be purchased from the circulation desk for RO 1 to make 50 copies.

                                                4
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Reserve Books: Books placed on reserve are for use in the library; however, students may
borrow reserve books overnight but the books must be returned before 9:00 a.m. the following
the morning.

Reference Access: Reference materials are for use within the library area only. They cannot be
borrowed or taken out of the library.

SOLE: SOLE (Secure On-Line Environment) is a portal for online education and information.
It is a web-based tool for students to access courses at West Virginia University and at The
College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, and for instructors to build and maintain those courses.
SOLE harnesses the communication power of the Internet within a single-login, user-friendly
environment.

WVU Health Sciences Library:: The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences students may use
the online WVU Health Sciences Library to access online journals and databases. Access is
through the CPHS library homepage.
_____________________________________________________________

Lost Items
Students who have lost books or other personal items can check in the Finance Office to see if
the missing items have been turned in.
_______________________________________________________________

Meals
The college cafeteria is located on the ground floor on the east side of the building. It is open for
breakfast and lunch from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. on school days. All purchases are made in cash.
_______________________________________________________________

Offices

DEAN: The dean of CPHS is the head of the academic and administrative structure of CPHS..
Appointments to see the dean are made through his/her secretary.

ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS: The associate dean for academic affairs
is responsible for the educational programs, curriculum, and teaching activities of the faculty as
well as matters pertaining to students. He/she oversees Academic Counseling and Student
Affairs.

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION: Finance and Administration is responsible for
budget matters, purchasing, non-academic staff affairs, hostels, transportation, and building
maintenance.

OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND THE REGISTRAR: The Office of the Registrar
maintains the integrity of the academic record, is charged with the enforcement of CPHS policies
and procedures, and maintains the values of higher education while supporting students in
achieving their academic and career goals. The Office of the Registrar is here to assist students in
the process of registering for classes, withdrawing, verifying enrollment and transcript
requests/distribution. Faculty and staff rely on the office for classroom scheduling, course
                                                 5
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

scheduling, and coordination of course registers, grade submission, various enrollment reports
and assistance with the registration process. It is the goal of the Office of the Registrar to
provide timely and secure student record information.

OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS: The Office of Student Affairs coordinates and
supervises the Student Council as well as cultural, social, religious, and sport activities organized
by the students. The Student Affairs advisor serves as a counselor for students in academic
difficulty or with personal problems.

_____________________________________________________________

Parking
Free uncovered parking is available at the Bowshar campus. Parking permits for students are required
and can be obtained in the Finance Department. All students and staff are expected to park in marked
spaces only. ALL bricked walkways and other bricked areas around the building are considered no-
parking zones. The fine for parking in a no-parking zone is RO 5.
________________________________________________________________

Payment of Fees
All fees are due and payable on or before registration. No student will be admitted to class until all
tuition and other fees are paid in full. Any student failing to complete registration during the normal
registration period must pay a late registration fee of R.O.24/-. Students who have not paid fees will
be allowed to take mid-term examinations but will not be allowed to see their grades. Students who
have not paid fees by the week after the examinations will not be allowed to attend classes.
___________________________________________________________

Prayer Rooms
Prayers rooms are available for students. The women‟s prayer room is located near the Student
Lounge, and the men‟s prayer room is near the English Department. Classes continue during
prayer times without a break.

_____________________________________________________________

Prayer Time
Students should make arrangements to pray at times that do not conflict with scheduled classes. A
desire to pray is NOT a legitimate reason for missing class, being late for class, or leaving a class while
it is in session.
_____________________________________________________________

Printing
Printing of downloaded pages from the Internet is available in the library. After registering with
the library staff and paying RO 1, the student may print 50 copies. A network laser printer is
currently available for student use in the IT department. Please observe IT department rules for
its use. When in doubt, ask the instructors.




                                                    6
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Ramadan
Classes meet on a modified schedule during Ramadan. The Ramadan class schedule is found at
the front of the handbook.
_____________________________________________________________

Registration
During registration, students sign in with the registrar, pay their fees, pick up their books, and
pay for the college-provided accommodations. As part of registration, all tuition and prior
financial obligations owed to the college must be fully paid before a student is allowed to
attend classes. This includes the current semester‟s tuition as well as all past due financial
obligations owed to the college.

_____________________________________________________________

Regulations Affecting Degrees
Students become eligible to graduate when they complete the requirements of CPHS and of the
program that was in effect at the time they first registered at CPHS. However, if they withdraw
for a semester, they may have to meet the requirements of a later catalog.
CPHS will not confer a degree or issue a transcript to any student until payment of all tuition,
fees, and other indebtedness is made.
_______________________________________________________________

Smoking
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences maintains a smoke-free environment. Students and staff
may not smoke anywhere inside the air-conditioned space of the building.
_____________________________________________________________

Student Activities
Students are encouraged to participate in extra-curricular activities to broaden their horizons
during their years in higher education. Through cultural and social programs, as well as academic
support, students are provided an opportunity to develop life-long leadership, interpersonal and
community skills during their years at The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.
Recreational trips and academic/cultural/recreational activities are organized through the Office of
Student Affairs. Planned trips may include such activities as trips to museums, festivals, cultural events,
and to the beach for example. Students must have signed permission of their parents or guardians to
participate. The form is available from the secretary in the Admission and Registration area. The
signed permission form is kept in their student file in the Office of the Registrar.

STUDENT COUNCIL: The Student Council is responsible for conducting tours of the CPHS
Bowshar campus for official visitors. The Student Council is also responsible for helping
students organize special student activities and events such as the annual Open Day, the Global
Iftar during Ramadan, guest speakers, blood drives, and clubs. Students who are interested in a
specific activity are encouraged to propose and help develop additional student clubs and events.

ORIENTATION DAYS: Orientation Days are full of facts and fun for entering first-year
students. They are designed to help make the transition from high school to college smoother.
                                                    7
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

New students learn about CPHS policies and school “etiquette.” Sessions are conducted by the
CPHS academic counselor and returning students as well as other CPHS staff.

SPORTS AND RECREATION: Limited recreational facilities (table tennis, baby‟s foot) are
available in the student lounge. A basketball court is available on the north side of the building.
Male students participate in a football club. Students are encouraged to develop their own
recreational interests through the formation of student clubs and activity groups. There is space
to the east of the building for a recreation facility outside. Development of the space may depend
on what students want and on how much money is available to support it. The college may
sponsor occasional recreational activities off-campus if students are interested.

____________________________________________________________

Student Files
Student files, which are kept in the Office of the Registrar, are the property of The College of
Pharmacy & Health Sciences. Students or their parents may review a student‟s files with the
registrar. Under no circumstances may they remove any of the contents. Attempting to remove
or removing contents from the files is subject to disciplinary action. However, if they feel their
file includes inaccurate information, they may write a statement and have it included in their files.
_______________________________________________________________

Student Lockers
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences provides lockers in which students can store their
books, purses, etc. CPHS strongly encourages students to use these lockers in order to prevent
theft of personal belongings.
_____________________________________________________________

Student Lounge
The two student lounges (one for boys and one for girls) are for student use between classes. It
has space for study, limited recreational (table tennis, baby‟s foot, etc.), and eating.
_____________________________________________________________

Syllabus
A syllabus is a document describing a course of study and the policies that apply to it. A syllabus
contains the instructor‟s name, office number, office telephone extension number, CPHS e-mail
address, a list of required textbooks, the times and locations of the teaching schedule, learning
outcomes, a list of the topics to be covered, approximate examination dates, and the grading
policy that applies to that course. Every course instructor should give students a course syllabus
at the beginning of scheduled classes. When in doubt about anything relating to a course,
students should first look at the course syllabus and then ask the instructor.

Telephones
A public phone is located outside the Bowshar campus building on the southwest corner.
Students are, also, free to bring GSMs to campus and to use them on their own time. However,
the use of GSMs during class is disruptive to the teacher and classmates. Therefore, GSMs must
be turned off (or turned to “silent” and not used) during class. Students who receive or
place calls during class will receive a warning on the first offense. Repeat offenders will have
their GSMs confiscated for the remainder of the day. They may lose the privilege of having their

                                                 8
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

GSM on campus entirely. Students who don‟t know how to turn off their GSMs should learn
how before bringing their phones to class, or they should not bring their phones to class at all.

Transcripts
Students‟ complete academic records at CPHS are called their transcript. Their transcript is a part
of their permanent student file. After they graduate, CPHS will issue them with an official copy
of their transcript, which they will probably need to obtain employment or to be approved for
work as a physician or pharmacist. If students leave CPHS before graduation, a copy of their
transcript may be made available to them upon request.

To request an official transcript, students can come in person or write to the Office of the
Registrar and fill out the appropriate form. The first transcript will be free. Subsequent
transcripts will require payment of a small fee:

        Official Transcript via mail                          RO 3
        Priority Official Transcript (pick-up only)           RO 2
        Faxed Transcript (unofficial)                         RO 1

For additional information, contact the Office of the Registrar (968) 504608 at extension 108 or
e-mail: transcripts@CPHS.edu.om.

                         IMPORTANT INFORMATION
        Transcripts will not be mailed or faxed on behalf of students who have any kind of
         financial obligation or "hold" (locker key, unreturned library books, etc.) at CPHS.
        Transcripts may not be requested by telephone, the Web, or e-mail. The College of
         Pharmacy & Health Sciences policy requires that the signature of the student or
         guardian appear on the request.
                  Once a request is received, please allow 3 to 5 working days for processing.

_____________________________________________________________

Transportation
Students who live in college-sponsored off-campus housing will be provided transportation to
and from the college. Students who live off-campus on their own must arrange their own
transportation. Students may drive to campus if they wish. Parking is free with no permit
required.
_____________________________________________________________

Visitors To Campus
Visitors to the college must obtain a visitor‟s pass from the guard at the gate and inform him
who he/she plans to visit.




                                                      9
                                                                                      2
                                                                                       Section
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Academic Policies: Rules And
Regulations
ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences provides excellent educational programs for well
prepared students. The goal of the college‟s admission policy is to select applicants who will
succeed academically and socially. Because seats are limited, only the best-prepared students are
likely to be admitted.

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION TO THE FIRST YEAR
All applicants must possess a diploma of general education (12th standard) or its equivalent in
the Science stream with courses in biology and chemistry. For admission into CPHS minimum
marks of 75% in biology and chemistry are required with a pass of the General Education
certificate (diploma) or passing 12th grade.

Students who are seeking full scholarship support from the Ministry of Higher Education
(MOHE) should apply directly to the MOHE. The MOHE will rank the applicants and provide
CPHS with the list of successful candidates.

Private payers and those seeking only partial scholarship support should apply directly to the
college‟s Office of Admissions and Records. Applicants must fill out an application form and pay
a non-refundable application fee. The selection of private payer applicants will be based primarily
on the students combined secondary school leaving scores (or grades) in biology, chemistry, and
English.

Classes generally begin in mid-September. However, preliminary processing of applications starts
in early summer. Therefore, students are encouraged to apply as soon as their secondary school
scores are known. Applications received after August 31 will be considered for admission on a
space-available basis.
Admission is considered final only after students sign a letter of acceptance, pay the required
first-semester tuition and fees, and provide the school with an original or certified copy of past
academic transcripts (General Education Certificate or equivalent) of all schools attended and
four passport-sized photos.



INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS
Students who have completed the equivalent of 12th grade from another country and who passed
the Secondary School Examination within an educational system approved by the Ministry of
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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Education are also qualified for acceptance with grades of 75% in chemistry and biology.
International students must provide the following: a completed application form, a bank draft
for RO 50 (non-refundable application fee), results of the TOEFL or IELTS (except for
applicants to the first year from the GCC), attested original or attested copies of an official
academic record in the original language of issue, original or certified copies of all certificates or
diplomas in the original language of issue, and Official attested English translations of academic
records, certificates or diplomas. The above items should be sent to Office of Admissions, The
College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, PO Box 620, P.C. 130, Azaiba, Muscat, Sultanate of
Oman, and must be received by the application deadline. If possible, all application material
should be submitted at one time. Incomplete applications cannot be guaranteed consideration
for the desired semester.

PLACEMENT TESTS
Students who have been accepted at CPHS will take a standardized test of English (TOEFL) to
determine their placement in the English classes in the Foundation Year as well as placement
tests in Basic and Pure Mathematics plus Information Technology. Students who score 550 or
above on the TOEFL will be exempted from first year English courses. Students who also pass
the placement tests in basic and pure mathematics and information Technology will enter the
first year of the program.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Students with an excellent background in English may be eligible for direct admission to the first
year of the Pharmacy and other programs. Direct admission requires a high score on an
internationally-recognized English language examination such as TOEFL or IELTS, evidence of
post-secondary school coursework in science courses with grades of “B” or better, and the ability
to pass a placement exam in Basic and Pure Mathematics plus Information Technology. Students
who have completed 1-2 years of college may apply to CPHS to continue their education. All
courses are “mapped” by a CPHS faculty member with the necessary expertise to determine if
the course content is equivalent to a course taught at CPHS. A student will be given transfer
credit for a course that is equivalent to an CPHS course provided that the student has received a
grade of B- or better. Under special circumstances, credit may be given for a C+ if the course is
in the social sciences, math, physics or general chemistry; however, a grade of C+ will not be
accepted in any biology, chemistry or pharmacy course.


ACADEMIC ADVISING
Consistent with the overall mission of the College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, a major
objective is to nurture and challenge students to grow to their fullest potential. Academic
policies and procedures support a philosophy that is both student-centered and supportive of
holistic-development. The goal of academic advising is to assist students in planning meaningful
academic programs to obtain the desired degree. Academic Advisor provides a highly personal
and supportive environment in which students can pursue their educational goals. The
Guidelines for Academic Advising serve as a framework to enhance and improve the advising
process and interactions between students, faculty and administrators.
The advisor and advisee should develop an educational plan to ensure that the following
regulations are met:
     courses are taken in the proper sequence
     pre-requisites for each course have been completed prior to registering for the course
     courses are taken in accordance with the curriculum for the desired degree

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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

     all procedures are within the rules and regulations set by CPHS
The vision of CPHS for academic advisement goes beyond the course selection outlined above
and involves the overall welfare of the student. We understand that students need to be advised
in the areas of personal and intellectual growth, time management, and career choices. Students
are ultimately responsible for the successful completion of curricular requirements and should
frequently check their transcripts to ensure that they are making progress towards fulfilling
degree requirements. Pursuing a degree places an awesome responsibility upon students and
consequently faculty, staff and the administration should assist in every way possible to ensure
the successful completion of graduation requirements for all students.

Responsibilities of the Advisor:
      Be available to students on a regular basis and be conscientious about posting and
       adhering to a schedule of office hours for advising advisees
      Maintain a record of advisee information. This information may include curriculum
       sheets, failure to appear for appointments, any academic difficulties, or decision to
       change program Establish personal relations and rapport with advisees and help resolve
       academic difficulties
      Discuss long-range educational and vocational goals and assist in planning appropriate
       academic programs
      Be familiar with resource materials (such as the Student Handbook) that may answer
       questions about academic and non-academic policies and procedures.
      Be knowledgeable of resource persons and refer students to the appropriate person for
       information and advice (Deans' offices, Registrar's office, tutorial services, career
       resources, etc.)
      Be informed about personal counseling programs
      Be aware of resources and opportunities available to facilitate in-class and extracurricular
       learning
      Send occasional invitations to advisees encouraging them to come in for discussion and
       performance reviews

Responsibilities of the Students
      Schedule and attend regular appointments with your advisor each semester
      Be prepared for each appointment with questions or material for discussion
      Be an active participant in the advising experience
      Ask questions of your advisor, if you do not understand an issue or if you require any
       clarification in rules and regulations from Student Handbook.
      Keep a personal record of your progress in meeting your academic goal
      Organize all official documents so that you may be able to access them when needed
      Complete all assignments or recommendations from your advisor
      Share and clarify your personal values and goals with your advisor
      Be knowledgeable about programs, policies and procedures at CPHS
      Accept responsibility for your decisions




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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011


GENERAL FOUNDATION PROGRAM


Aim The aim of the General Foundation Program is to prepare our students for the rigorous
programs in Pharmacy and allied health fields. The General Foundation Program prepares
students with the necessary skills in English, Mathematics, Information Technology, and Study
Skills to handle the rigorous study programs offered in the College of Pharmacy & Health
Sciences.

Placement tests All students who are admitted into the programs are given placement tests in
English and Math. Students who score 550 on the TOEFL test are allowed to enter the desired
program provided that the student passes the placement tests in Basic and Pure Mathematics as
well as Information Technology. Students who score above 450 on the English placement test ,
will be allowed to take the Advanced Placement IT test. Students are placed in English courses at
the appropriate level depending on the results of the TOEFL test. All students must achieve a
TOEFL score of approximately 500 to proceed to the academic programs.

English The ability to read English with ease is critical for students entering the Health
Sciences as the major texts used in their college training plus the scientific and medical literature
are in English. Our students must also have facility in speaking and writing English as their
future professional careers will involve communication skills both spoken and written. In
addition to basic English courses to provide a foundation in reading, listening, speaking and
grammar, two courses; English 020, English for Specific Purpose and English 030, Concepts
in Biology & Medicine prepare students for programs offered by CPHS, over and above the
general English requirements. These courses focus on the specific language needs of health
sciences programs and encourage students to develop their proficiency in reading scientific texts
and to increase their scientific vocabulary.

Length of program        The Foundation Program lasts for a period of one academic year
consisting of two 16 week semesters and one 8 week semester. During the course of the
program, students take zero credit courses in English, IT and Math by the end of which all the
learning outcomes mandated by the OAC are fulfilled. Students who score more than 360 on the
TOEFL test will complete the required subjects in the Foundation Program in one year;
however, students who score less than 360 on the TOEFL test will be placed in the Intensive
English program described in the next section. In general, one and a half years are required for a
student to complete the Intensive English program.

Mathematics The Foundation Program in „Mathematics‟ has been developed to ensure that
students are equipped with the mathematical understanding and skills necessary to meet the
cognitive and practical requirements of higher education. In particular students pursuing courses
in Pharamcy and Health Sciences need to undergo this course in order to develop number and
symbol sense, demonstrate the proper procedures of algebraic manipulations and acquire the
skills necessary to construct and analyze various graphs of given data sets. Basic Mathematics is
compulsory for all students and provides the students with the ability to apply knowledge of
basic algebra and arithmetic to real life problems. Developing the student‟s ability to perform
mental mathematical manipulations is an important component of this course. To reinforce this
ability, all assessments in this course will be performed without calculators. Pure mathematics
presents core mathematical concepts and techniques essential for the construction, analysis and
interpretation of functions and their graphs. These skills are critical to health care professionals.

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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011


Study Skills It is critical that our students develop good study skills in order to master the
material required to obtain a degree in Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Skills including time
management, effective note taking, revising one‟s work and preparing for exams are embedded
in English, math and IT courses as summarized in the chart on page 42.



                                      CURRICULUM
                      GENERAL FOUNDATION PROGRAM
Course ID             Course Title                                            Hours
Fall Semester         (16 Weeks)                                              26
ENGL 010              English - Grammar I                                     3
ENGL 012              English – Reading, Writing and Vocabulary I             10
ENGL 014              English – Listening and Speaking I                      5
INFT 001              Information Technology I                                4
MATH 010              Basic Mathematics                                       4

Spring Semester       (16 Weeks)                                              26
ENGL 011              English - Grammar II                                    2
ENGL 013              English – Reading, Writing and Vocabulary II            7
ENGL 015              English – Listening and Speaking II                     3
ENGL 020              English for Specific Purpose                            6
INFT 002              Information Technology II                               4
MATH 011              Pure Mathematics                                        4

Summer Semester (8 Weeks)                                                     5
ENGL 030              Concepts in Biology and Medicine                        5



                               COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Fall Semester
ENGL 010. English - Grammar I. This course focuses on the form, function and meaning of
high frequency grammatical structures such as parts of speech, tenses and passive voice.
Extensive practice through a variety of exercises and interactive student-centered tasks will be
provided to promote accuracy in the overall use of the English language. Error recognitions and
editing discourse level texts will be an integral part of the course.

 ENGL 012. English – Reading, Writing and Vocabulary I. This course develops reading
and writing skills through a comprehensive, systematic and engaging process designed to
integrate the two skills effectively. Students are encouraged to develop proficiency in reading
strategies, to augment academic vocabulary and to advance their ability to derive meaning from
these readings. This course provides students with extensive experience in essay writing. Students
learn to write more effectively by practicing the elements of good writing mechanics of

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

composition. In addition, a range of academic word study helps students to develop word-
building skills, giving them greater flexibility to use these words while writing essays. Students are
also introduced to the basic research skills.
 ENGL 014. English – Listening and Speaking I This course focuses on reinforcing
students‟ listening and speaking skills by providing them with a variety of authentic situations
and practical activities. This course aims at enhancing learners‟ active listening abilities by
exposing them to authentic language input in the form of real life conversations, and then by
assessing their understanding of it through practical listening activities. It also aims at promoting
students‟ fluency by simulating situations that encourage them to use language productively
through tasks such as role play, impromptu speaking and presentation.
INFT 001. Information Technology I. This course is designed with the aim of developing
students into independent users of the computer. In addition to familiarizing students to
essential hardware and software issues, the exercises and assignments also enable them to use
word processing and presentation features of the Office suite. A brief introduction to the
Internet and effective search techniques adds to their IT skills.
MATH 010. Basic Mathematics. This course provides an opportunity for the student to
develop critical thinking, number & and symbol sense and to demonstrate an ability to
understand and apply the knowledge of basic algebra in real life problems. Topics include real
numbers, exponents, measurements & unit conversions, ratios & proportions, basic algebraic
concepts, algebra of polynomials, equations & inequalities, elementary coordinate geometry,
variation and modeling.

Spring Semester
ENGL 011. English-Grammar II. This course focuses on the form, function and meaning of
complex grammatical structures and adjective/noun clause structures in English. Students will
extensively practice the application of grammar rules in context through a variety of exercises.
Error recognition and editing texts will be an integral part of the course.

ENGL 013. English – Reading, Writing and Vocabulary II. This course is designed to
develop reading and writing skills through an integrated approach. Students are encouraged to
develop proficiency in reading strategies, to augment academic vocabulary and to advance their
ability to construct meaning. It also develops the students‟ reading sub-skills and writing
proficiency. Students are introduced to the basic research skills. This course provides students
with extensive experience in essay writing. Students learn to write more effectively by practicing
the elements of good writing mechanics of composition.

ENGL 015. English- Listening and Speaking II. This course focuses on reinforcing students‟
listening and speaking skills by providing them with a variety of authentic situations and practical
activities. This course aims at enhancing learners‟ active listening abilities by exposing them to
authentic language input in the form of real life conversations, and then by assessing their
understanding of it through practical listening activities. It also aims at promoting students‟
fluency by simulating situations that encourage them to use language productively through tasks
such as role-play and discussions. It also develops students‟ note taking skills necessary for
academic purposes.

ENGL 020. English for Specific Purpose. This course introduces students of medicine and
pharmacy to intermediate level scientific language. The course develops the skills of listening,
speaking, reading and writing in the context of scientific content. Listening skills are developed

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

by employing texts of scientific nature while oral proficiency is reinforced through class
discussions and presentations on science related topics. Reading to extract information from
scientific and health sciences printed materials is an integral part of the course. The cognitive
skill of making inferences and judgments about information is incorporated into the program.
Composition of an extended essay not only develops writing and grammar skills, but also
introduces basic research and referencing skills. By combining the input for and assessment of
the presentations, and by utilizing a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for facilitating delivery,
the course aims at integrating students‟ language and IT skills.

INFT 002. Information Technology II. The cross-curriculum design of the course teaches
students to research databases and other internet resources for scientific information culminating
in the presentation of their findings using appropriate Office Suite applications. Topics include
the use of spreadsheets to compile statistical reports, the essential features of database systems,
and a brief introduction to Web designing packages.

MATH 011. Pure Mathematics Prerequisite: Math 010. This course presents the core
mathematical concepts and techniques essential for the construction, analysis and interpretation
of functions and their graphs with particular emphasis on linear and non linear graphing. Topics
include functions, graphs, quadratic functions, polynomial & rational functions, exponential &
logarithmic functions, basic statistics and elementary probability. The use of appropriate software
to interpret equations and graphs will be an important feature of this course.

Summer Semester

ENGL 030. Concepts in Biology and Medicine. This course introduces students to the
language of anatomy and physiology. Students are encouraged to develop their proficiency in
reading scientific texts and to increase their scientific vocabulary. They define, describe, identify
and locate body parts and discuss their functions orally and in writing. They also comprehend
and reproduce verbs that are used frequently in scientific writing. This course not only reinforces
students‟ listening and speaking skills by providing them with a variety of authentic lectures and
case study discussions, but also encourages them to use language productively in presentations
and writing tasks.


Intensive English Program

Rationale The medium of instruction for the health sciences programs being English, it is but
predictable that a sound foundation in English is the first step towards becoming a successful
student in these programs. The correlation between these two factors becomes increasingly
evident when one compares the performance of students in the later years to their English
proficiency. Excepting a few stray cases, it has been observed that the students who fail out or
have to repeat the main courses were invariably weak in English to start with. This was the
primary reason why while revising the curriculum the number of English hours during the first
two semesters was drastically increased and the nature of the program changed. From an average
of 9-13 hours from the previous years, the students now take English for 20 hours during first
year. Moreover, instead of an exclusive first year ESP program which did not holistically address
the language needs of the students, the program was modified to combine general English with
ESP. This method has been found effective with the overall average English proficiency scores
moving up from a 389 on the placement test to a 460 on the progress test given at the end of
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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

two semesters in 2007-08 .Furthermore, students‟ exposure to ESP not only familiarized them
with the language of science but it also provided them with ample opportunities for research and
independent learning.

Though the program works for the majority of students, it was noticed that it did not effectively
address the needs of students who came in with very low levels of English proficiency and
scored below a 360 on the placement test. Though every single student‟s language skills
improved considerably (a fact confirmed by the test scores and ongoing assessments) it was
observed that these students were unable to cope with the regular program. Despite several
hours of extra help sessions and dedicated teaching, many of them were unsuccessful and failed
their English courses. This served to de-motivate them and they were not able to perceive the
progress they had made and the ground they had covered. On the contrary, they tended to focus
on their failure. As a result, some of them were not able to keep pace with the rest and had to be
given modified curricula.

Starting 2009 -10 In order to give the students an equal opportunity to finish the Foundation
program in one academic year, it is proposed that the Intensive English program follow a
different time schedule (Figure 2). The students in this program will take shorter breaks between
semesters. They will also have a twelve week summer semester where a combined ESP course
will be offered in lieu of the two separate ESP courses taken by students of the regular program.

Students who have to take this program will be identified based on three aspects: the English
Placement Test scores, a writing sample and an interview. Based on consistently good class
performance, and results of the ongoing assessments, the instructors can recommend the
promotion of a student into the regular stream till the end of week four of the semester.

Previous experience has often shown that language skills have no direct bearing on a student‟s
performance in IT and Math courses, which are not language intensive. Therefore, the students
from this program will take the regular IT and Math courses.



Course ID             Course Title                                            Hours


Fall Semester         (16 Weeks)                                              26


ENGL 009              Introductory English                                    18
INFT 001              Information Technology I                                4
MATH 010              Basic Mathematics                                       4


Spring Semester       (16 Weeks)                                              26
ENGL 010              English - Grammar I                                     3
ENGL 012              English – Reading, Writing and Vocabulary I             10
ENGL 014              English – Listening and Speaking I                      5
INFT 002              Information Technology II                               4
MATH 011              Pure Mathematics                                        4

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Summer Semester ( 12 Weeks)                                                    20
ENGL 011              English - Grammar II                                     2
ENGL 013              English – Reading, Writing and Vocabulary II             7
ENGL 015              English – Listening and Speaking II                      3
ENGL 023              English for Specific Purpose-Integrated                  8

                               COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ENGL 009. Introductory English. This course integrates the four language skills - listening,
speaking, reading and writing- to bridge the gap between the beginning and intermediate levels of
English proficiency. Students explore real world issues, discuss academic topics and study
content-based material as part of the listening and speaking activities. The course combines
reading and writing skills by integrating the two effectively. Grammar structures are reinforced
through a variety of controlled and communicative exercises which encourage the students to
internalize and use the formal rules of the language. The course also encourages students to
interact with one another as they tackle tasks in pairs and in groups. Students learn tools that
promote critical thinking skills crucial to success in the academic world.
ENGL 023. English for Specific Purpose-Integrated. This course introduces students to
intermediate level scientific language with the language of anatomy and physiology forming a
main component of the course. It develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing
in the context of science. Acquisition of scientific vocabulary and reading to extract information
from scientific and health science related material are integral to this course. Listening skill is
developed by employing texts with science content while oral proficiency is reinforced through
class discussions and presentations on science related topics, and case studies . Case studies also
enhance students‟ critical thinking and analytical skills. Composition of an extended essay not
only develops writing skill and grammatical accuracy, but also introduces research and
referencing skills. Students practice the language of anatomy and physiology by identifying,
defining and describing organs and functions of various body systems. Use of Virtual Learning
Environment (VLE) by students facilitates course delivery.


                          REQUIREMENTS FOR SUCCESS
Grading of students
 A student must pass all of the course with a minimum grade of 70% (a C-). Our experience
suggests that assigning numerical grades in the General Foundation Program prepares students
for the rigors of the subsequent curriculum. Moreover, giving letter grades identifies the weak
and strong students to the faculty who can then provide extra help to the weak and challenges to
the strong students.

Remediation of courses
Regular English A student who fails all three English courses in the fall semester will be
transferred to the Intensive English stream where they will repeat these courses in the spring
semester. Students who fail one or two of the English courses in the fall semester will be allowed
to progress into the courses of the spring semester. A student who clears the failed course(s) at
the next level will not have to repeat the failed course(s). However, a student who fails a course
for the second time will have to remediate the course in the summer session. A student who fails
only one English course at the end of the program will be given a retest in that subject.


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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Intensive English Students who fail English 009 will be allowed to progress to the courses in the
second semester. A student who fails two or three English courses at the next level will be asked
to repeat the entire Foundation Year and perhaps study English elsewhere during the summer
semester. A student who fails only one English course at the end of the spring semester will be
given a retest in that subject.

Math A student who fails the Basic Mathematics course (MATH 010) must repeat it in the spring
semester before taking Pure Mathematics (MATH 011).

Information Technology A student who fails INFT 001 may take INFT 002 in the spring semester
and remediate INFT 001 subsequently.


           BENCHMARKS FOR ADVANCEMENT TO PROGRAMS
Students must pass all English courses including ENGL 023 and achieve a TOEFL score
approaching 500. Students must also pass Basic Mathematics, Pure Mathematics and
Information Technology I and II for promotion to the Program Year with the following
exceptions.

A student who fails two courses of the following: Pure Mathematics (MATH 011), Concepts in
Biology and Medicine (ENGL 030), Information Technology I or II (INFT 001 or INFT 002) –
may proceed to Year 1 of the program but must remediate the courses before the end of the
academic year for promotion to Year 2 of the program.




ACADEMIC STRUCTURE

ACADEMIC SYSTEM FOLLOWED BY CPHS
College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences will follow the American system of higher education in
affiliation with our partner West Virginia University. Course grades are assigned by the
instructor. It is the responsibility of the instructor to judge students fairly against academic and
professional standards, without prejudice in terms of race, color, national origin, religion, or sex.
The passing grade in all courses will be 70%. Students who fail a course must repeat the course
at a later date.


ADVANCEMENT FROM ONE ACADEMIC YEAR TO THE NEXT
Students who pass all of their courses in an academic year including the summer session with a
cumulative GPA equal to or greater than 2.0 will advance to the next year. A student with a GPA
of less than 2.0 in two semesters will be placed on academic probation. Students may take six
years to complete the four years of the program.
.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR PHARMACY
Students in the Pharmacy program must complete all course requirements including the
Research Project with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or greater before starting and passing their
practical training. In addition, students must pass a comprehensive examination covering all
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                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

pharmacy subjects, which will be scheduled 3-4 times each year during their practical training as
needed. Passing this exam will prepare the students for the licensing exam given by the Ministry
of Health.


ATTENDANCE POLICY
Students are expected to attend all scheduled course activities including lectures, laboratories,
scheduled group study sessions, and exams. Attendance is taken in every class. Signing the
attendance sheet for another student who is absent is a form of Academic Dishonesty. Students
studying pharmacy and health sciences are expected to demonstrate the highest ethical standards
of their chosen professions. Attendance reports are available from the secretary in the Registrar‟s
office. Students are responsible for checking their attendance record at regular intervals. The
following points are important policies regarding attendance:
     If a student misses more than 15% of the scheduled classes for any reason, the student
         will receive a warning letter.
     If a student misses more than 20% of the scheduled activities in a course for unexcused
         absences, the student will receive an F in the course.
Makeup assessments (exams, quizzes, in-class assignments etc) will not be given for unexcused
absences. The student will receive a “zero” on the Lateness CPHS has zero tolerance for lateness.
Students who arrive late to class will not be allowed into the classroom and will be marked absent.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY
Students may withdraw from individual courses only with the permission of the Associate Dean
for Academic Affairs. Students may withdraw only up until the end of the tenth week in a regular
semester or the fifth week of a summer session. For scholarship students, permission must be
given by the Ministry of Higher Education. The process involves collecting the withdrawal form
from the Registrar‟s office and obtaining the necessary signatures.

WITHDRAWAL FROM CPHS
Students who no longer wish to attend CPHS may withdraw from the college at any time up to
the last day of scheduled classes. Students who withdraw before the end of the tenth week of
class in a regular term or the fifth week of class of a summer term will receive a grade of “W” in
all classes. After these deadlines students will receive grades of “W” in all classes in which they
were passing at the time of withdrawal and grades of “WF” in classes in which their progress was
unsatisfactory. Students who wish to leave CPHS must inform the Registrar, who will explain the
withdrawal procedure to them. Students are responsible for clearing all financial obligations and
turning in their ID card and locker key before their withdrawal is considered to be final. Students
who fail to fulfill these obligations will not be eligible to receive a transcript from the college. If
students are receiving a scholarship, the college will inform the Ministry of Higher Education
that the students have withdrawn.

POSTPONEMENT
A student who has been accepted into the CPHS may postpone matriculation for one year with a
valid excuse. Students may withdraw from the college for a semester or a year provided that their
grades are in good standing and that they have received permission from the Dean or the
Associate Dean.




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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

ADDING OR DROPPING COURSES
 A course may be added to or dropped from a student‟s schedule during the first two weeks of
the fall and spring semester and during the first week of the summer semester.

CREDITS PER SEMESTER
In general, students will take 15or 16 credit hours. A student with a GPA of 2.50 may take a
maximum of 18 credit hours during the fall and spring semesters and a maximum of 9 credit hours
during the summer semester. Students with a cumulative GPA of 2.7 (B-) or better may petition the
Dean or Associate Dean to take additional hours in the summer session.


ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS REQUIRED

The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences expects all enrolled students to:
   fulfill the requirements for satisfactory academic progress as required by the syllabus in
      each course,
   be considerate toward faculty, staff, and each other,
   comply with the rules of procedure, conduct, and appearance required by the
      administration of the premedical campus and by the faculty for any course or laboratory,
   Comply with all local and national ordinances, rules, and decrees and the rules and
      regulations of The College of Pharmacy & health Sciences

By enrolling in The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences the student accepts these academic
requirements, standards, and criteria for successful completion of the curriculum. It is the
student‟s responsibility to know and meet these requirements, standards, and criteria, and to
inform the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of any serious impediment (such
as illness, disability, etc.) that would hinder satisfactory progress. Failure to meet the
requirements of the program may lead to a delay in a student‟s academic advancement, being
placed on academic probation (with specific conditions for removal of probation), suspension,
or even dismissal.

ACADEMIC PROBATION
      Students who fail two courses in the fall semester or two or more courses in the fall and
       spring semesters will be placed on academic probation.
      Students who have a GPA of less than 2.0 in both the fall and spring semesters will be
       placed on academic probation.
      Students on academic probation will have the following course schedule:
           o In the fall and spring semester, these students must take no more than 12 credits
               but must take a minimum of 8 credits.
           o In the summer session they may take 4 credits or a maximum of 2 courses..
           o Students will remain on academic probation until they achieve a semester GPA
               of 2.0 or greater.
      Students who do not achieve a GPA of 2.0 in any semester during the subsequent
       academic year will be subject to dismissal.




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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

DISMISSAL

      Only two of the four years of the programs may be repeated. Consequently a student
       who has already repeated a year and fails 2 or more courses in a subsequent year will be
       subject to dismissal.
      The Academic and |Professional standards Committee will review the scores of all
       students whose performance may result in dismissal and make recommendations to the
       dean. The dean‟s decision will be final.


                 ACADEMIC DISHONESTY AND MISCONDUCT

The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences expects all students, faculty, and staff to share its
commitment to honesty, integrity, and the search for truth. A commitment to honesty is
particularly important in the health care professions, where lives can be at stake. CPHS will not
tolerate dishonest practices in its students, faculty, or staff. Academic dishonesty is grounds for
immediate dismissal or expulsion.
WHAT IS ACADEMIC DISHONESTY? Academic dishonesty includes but is not
limited to plagiarism, cheating, forgery, misrepresentation, and fraud:
   PLAGIARISM is defined as “using the ideas or writings of another person as one‟s own.”
   Plagiarism is a form of cheating because it is the stealing of ideas and words. Whenever
   students write something as if it were their own, they must always write it entirely in their
   own words. It is plagiarism to copy material from someone else without clearly giving credit
   to the original author (if the author is known) or the original source (if the author is not
   known). Plagiarism also includes omitting to give credit to every individual who is involved
   in a joint project. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Students who hand in plagiarized work for
   a grade may receive a grade of “zero” after review by the Academic and Professional
   Standards Committee.

  CHEATING includes but is not limited to the following:
              obtaining help from another student during examinations;
              knowingly giving help to another student during examinations;
              taking an examination for another student;
              the unauthorized use of notes, books, or other sources of information during
               examinations;
              Obtaining without authorization an examination or any part thereof.
              Having mobile phones or other electronic devices during exams
              Hacking into college computers

    FORGERY, MISREPRESENTATION, OR FRAUD includes but is not limited
    to the following:
             forging or altering, or causing to be altered, the record of any grade in a grade
                book or other educational record;
             altering an examination paper, homework assignment, laboratory notebook or
                other document with intent to defraud;
             use of college documents or instruments of identification with intent to defraud;


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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

              presenting false data or intentionally misrepresenting one‟s records for admission,
               registration, or withdrawal from the college or from a college course;
              knowingly presenting false data or intentionally misrepresenting one‟s records for
               personal gain;
              knowingly furnishing false statements in any college academic proceeding;
              pretending to be ill or fraudulently obtaining a medical excuse;
              doing academic work such as homework assignments or laboratory reports for
               another student;
              providing one‟s own work for another student to copy and submit as his or her
               own;
              Hacking into or the unauthorized use of any college computer or software
               program.

WHAT IS MISCONDUCT? The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences expects all
students to treat fellow students and CPHS faculty/staff with respect. Students are encouraged
to demonstrate this respect for others and for Islamic culture in their conduct. The following
misconduct is prohibited:
      Fighting or other conduct that unreasonably endangers or inflicts physical injury upon
       another.
      Sexual misconduct that involves:
            o Deliberate touching of another without consent;
            o Unwelcome sexual advances or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual
                nature that expressly or implicitly threatens, interferes with, or creates an
                intimidating, hostile, or demeaning environment for an individual‟s academic
                pursuits, participation in activities sponsored by CPHS or organizations or
                groups related to CPHS, or opportunities to benefit from other aspects of CPHS
                life.
      Threats that involve violation of restraining orders or no-contact orders imposed by
       government or campus authorities, stalking, or other activities that create a reasonable
       apprehension of physical or emotional harm to an individual following a request or order
       to desist.
      Discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, creed, gender, or
       age.
      Possessing or carrying any weapon or dangerous substance.
      Operating a motor vehicle in a reckless manner while on campus.
      Engaging in recklessly dangerous, disorderly or obscene conduct affecting CPHS
       interests, students or other personnel.
      Illegally possessing, manufacturing, selling, or delivering a controlled substance as
       defined by the Sultanate of Oman
      Engaging in violent, forceful, threatening, intimidating, or disruptive conduct, or inciting
       others to engage in such individual or collective conduct, that willfully disrupts any
       normal operation, function, or activity of CPHS or any of its organizations, personnel, or
       guests.
      Engaging in conduct or inciting others to engage in conduct that improperly restrains
       freedom of movement, speech, assembly, or access to premises or activities by any
       individual who is a member of the CPHS community or guest of CPHS or of any of its
       organizations in connection with that individual‟s performance of legitimate activities or
       duties within or at CPHS.

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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

      Engaging in conduct within an CPHS classroom that substantially disrupts the academic
       environment.
      Misrepresenting oneself as another or otherwise adversely interfering with their academic
       standing, privacy or personal information.

PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING DISHONESTY OR MISCONDUCT
   1. An instructor who suspects academic dishonesty or misconduct by a student has an
      ethical responsibility to investigate. The instructor may wish to meet with the student to
      discuss the evidence. The matter may be dropped if, after talking with the student, the
      instructor becomes convinced that academic dishonesty did not occur.
   2. An instructor who is convinced that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should
      report the incident on the prescribed form available in the office of the Head of the
      Department of from the Chief Proctor in case of an examination. A copy must be sent to
      the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within 3 calendar days of the incident..
   3. Upon reviewing the evidence and after meeting with the student, the Associate Dean for
      Student Affairs may formally charge the student with academic dishonesty if he/she feels
      it is warranted. Written notice of the charges must be submitted to the chair of the
      Academic and Professional Standards Committee within 15 calendar days of the incident.
   4. If the student is formally charged with academic dishonesty, the Chair of the Academic
      and Professional Standards Committee will call a committee meeting about the incident
      within 15 calendar days of receipt of the written charge. The Committee will review the
      evidence and will request that the student appear before it with one other person either a
      parent or friend. The committee will review the evidence presented to it and make
      recommendations to the dean. The dean will review the evidence and the committee‟s
      recommendation and make a final decision.

PENALTIES
Depending on the nature and the seriousness of the offense, the instructor can impose the
following penalties:
         Dismissal from the classroom due to misconduct that disrupts the class.

If a proctor during an exam observes that a student has notes written on paper, body-parts,
clothes or other objects, the proctor will report the incident to the Chief Proctor. If the Chief
Proctor confirms the observation, the student will be immediately dismissed from the exam
room and will receive a zero on the exam. The Chief Proctor will report the incident to the
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Upon receiving a recommendation from the Academic and Professional Standards Committee
that a student has committed academic dishonesty as defined on page of the 2010-2011 Student
Handbook, the Dean may:
          For the first offense, assign a grade of zero on the exam or assignment
          For the second offense, suspend the student for one semester at which time the
            student can apply for readmission to the college
          For repeated offenses, dismiss the student from the college

Upon receiving a recommendation from the Academic and Professional Standards Committee
that a student has committed misconduct as defined on page xx of the 2010-2011 Student
Handbook, the Dean may depending on the severity of the offense:
     Place a formal letter in the student‟s file

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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

      Suspend the student for one semester at which time the student can apply for
       readmission to the college
      Dismiss the student from the college


                                   APPEALS PROCESS

Any student who feels that he/she has been unfairly or incorrectly graded, evaluated, or
penalized has the right to appeal. The appeals process is a series of formal steps designed to
ensure fairness and justice. Appeals are expected to be in writing and to be completed in a
timely manner.

An appeal must be based on convincing evidence that a grade or a penalty was imposed on the
basis of incorrect, inaccurate, or incomplete information or in violation of CPHS policy. Simply
not liking a particular grade or penalty is not grounds for appeal..

APPEAL OF PROBATION, SUSPENSION, DISMISSAL, OR EXPULSION
      Appeals of probation, suspension, dismissal, or expulsion must be made in writing to
       the dean. The student‟s parents may also request a meeting with the dean if they wish,
       but only after the letter of appeal has been delivered to the dean.
      The appeal must be based on convincing evidence that the decision or penalty was
       imposed on the basis of incorrect, inaccurate, or incomplete information or in violation
       of CPHS policy.
      Before making a decision, the dean may request that the student appear before the
       Academic and Professional Standards Committee to present their case. The Academic
       and Professional Standards Committee will make a report o the dean containing their
       recommendations for action.
      The dean will respond in writing. All decisions of the dean are final.

Appeals must be made in a timely manner. Appeals made more than a month after any grade,
penalty, or appeals previous appeals decision may not be considered.

                                    EXAMINATIONS
A policy of continuous assessment of learning outcomes is performed by in-class assignments
including quizzes, mid-term and final examinations and out-of-class assignments such as
presentations, case study presentations, group discussions, role playing and seminar
presentations. The delivery of courses and the formal assessment of individual student‟s
progress and attainments are the most critical activity in which the College is engaged. The
college also ensures the involvement of the faculty in the Examination and Grading procedures.

Examination policies
Various activities of examination preparation and grading are streamlined and coordinated for an
effective outcome. These policies describe the responsibility of different members of staff for
the quality of information about students‟ attainments – their course grades – that is eventually
published.




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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Scheduling examinations
The academic calendar and planned class schedule in each subject shall give the tentative dates
of the mid-term and final examinations. The schedule of examinations (time table) shall be
prepared and disseminated to staff and students at least 3 week prior to the examination.

Proctoring schedule
Detailed proctoring schedule shall be prepared with date and time of examination, place of
examination Lecture Halls), number of students appearing in each case with names of chief
proctor and proctors. The instructor shall be not given proctoring duty of his /her subject. The
name of faculty /staff deployed for the proctoring duties shall be disseminated to the concerned
at least one week before the examination week.

Preparation of examinations
The faculty shall take utmost care in preparing questions and ascertain that the learning
outcomes stated in the syllabi are met in the exam. The questions shall be prepared as per syllabi
and shall be comprised of both multiple choice and short answer questions as described in the
respective syllabi. During the writing of the exams, faculty should ensure that all exam questions
are stored on a flash-drive. Faculty shall prepare the answer key for the questions (MCQ and
short answer- questions). The hard copy (not softcopy) of the exam shall be reviewed by a
colleague who is an expert in the field or has sufficient knowledge of the subject to review the
questions. The reviewer shall check the spelling and grammar, repetition of questions, clarity of
questions, distribution of marks etc. After making necessary corrections, the hard copy used for
reviewing shall be destroyed.

Review of examinations
A committee of 7 faculty members (not HODs) with expertise in the topics taught at CPHS will
conduct a second review of all examinations. Unacceptable formats of multiple choice questions
are highlighted, revisions in „lead in‟ statements of MCQs, which are not clear or are too long are
suggested. In addition, grammatical and spelling errors are corrected.

Photocopying of examinations
After the revised and completed examination has been photocopied under the supervision of the
instructor, the examinations are placed under lock and key in a secure cabinet in the office of the
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Preparation of Grade sheet
 The grade sheet should be prepared one week prior to a final exam to ensure that all other
components of students‟ grades are complete, accurate, and in conformity with the course
grading policies as published in their course syllabus, in preparation for submitting final course
grades. During this time the faculty should make every effort to be available to answer student
questions during their study days.

Duties of Chief Proctor
Fifteen minutes before the scheduled start of an examination, the Chief Proctor obtains the
examinations from the Associate Dean and signs that he/she has received them. The Chief
Proctor is responsible for maintaining security of the exams prior to distribution to the students.




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                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Protocols for exams
The protocol for conducting and proctoring examinations is as follows
    For examinations, students may be divided into groups and assigned to specific rooms. They
       may also be given a specific number that will determine their seat assignment in the
       examination room where they must sit.
    No personal belongings may be brought into the examination room; including but not limited
       to reference materials, personal pagers, books, bags, calculators (when not permitted), mobile
       phones, PDA‟s, tissues or food. Prohibited items will be confiscated and handed over to the Dean.
    Students must not talk or communicate in any way with other students while in the examination
       room.
    Students must not start writing in an examination until signaled to do so by the instructor or
       proctor.
    No student may start an examination more than 15 minute late. Late comers will not be given
       extra time. Students who arrive more than 15 minutes late will be barred from the
       examination room and will receive a zero for the exam.
    Students are not permitted to leave the examination room during the first 15 minutes of the
       exam.
    Students who leave the examination room during an examination will not be allowed to
       reenter it.
    Examination papers are not to be removed from an examination room.
    Students are required to complete their examination in ink, felt tip or ballpoint pens. The use
       of pencils, except for completion of computer answer sheets and drawings, is not permitted.
    Students are not allowed to ask questions during the examination. However, if an error is
       spotted in the examination paper, this can be brought to the attention to the proctor.
    Students must cease writing once it has been announced that an examination is finished.

Illness before an examination
 If a student becomes severely ill before a scheduled examination, he/she must notify the instructor
and the Associate Dean's office in advance. The student must have his/her illness verified and
excused in an approved clinic or hospital. Except when the student is completely incapable of
notification, the notification should be made by the student, and not by a relative or friend. Minor
conditions such as a headache are not acceptable excuses for missing an examination. Students
without permission to miss the examination in advance or without a verified medical excuse will
receive a zero on the exam and will not be permitted to make it up. Pretending to be ill in order to
miss a scheduled examination is a form of academic dishonesty.

Students who are not allowed to take the final exam
 All students in the course are allowed to take the final exam even if their overall grades in that course
suggest that he/she will fail the exam. The only students not allowed to take the final exam are those
who have missed more than 20% of the lectures as described under Attendance Policy.


                            ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMS
Role of Proctors
This proctoring protocol has been developed to ensure the integrity of the examination process
for students enrolled in CPHS. This protocol provides guidelines to meet a minimal standard for
CPHS; it does not restrict individual departments or courses from implementing stricter
guidelines.
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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Staffing Recommendations
 One Chief Proctor, one Proctor for every 30 examinees
The Chief proctor is a faculty member other than the course instructor, not related to any
examinee, a responsible, organized, detail-oriented individual who is respectfully assertive in
directing the attention and cooperation of the examinees, familiar with the CPHS proctor
protocol, knowledgeable of testing procedures. The Chief proctor brings an exam kit containing
tissues, a stapler, pens, and pencils.

Proctors are faculty or staff with qualifications listed above for Chief Proctor.
    Not related to any examinee
    “A responsible, mature, confident and respectfully assertive” individual.
    Familiar with the CPHS proctor protocol, knowledgeable of testing procedures.


Registration – identifying and admitting examinees
   Examinees sign-in on a roster containing their printed name provided by the course.
    Students must show their CPHS identification card.
   Chief Proctor observes the signing of the roster.
   No personal belongings may be brought into the examination room; including but not
    limited to textbooks, reference materials, personal or pagers, mobile phones, PDAs, tissues
    or food.
   The Chief Proctor will read the instructions for the exam and ask students to bring
    prohibited items such as mobile phones to the front of the room for safe keeping during the
    exam.
   If prohibited items are observed during the examination, these items will be confiscated and
    brought to the Dean‟s office.

Admission of late arrivals
 It is the expectation that all examinees arrive on time for the examination. No student may start
an examination 15 minutes after the start of the exam. Late comers will not be given extra time
to complete the exam. Students who arrive more than 15 minutes late will be barred from the
examination room and will receive a zero for the exam.

Administration of exams- Seating
At a minimum, examinees must sit in every other seat and directly behind the student in the row
in front. A course instructor may make a seating plan, which should be followed by the Chief
Proctor. In some cases, students are given assigned seats to prevent cheating. A few chairs at the
front of the room should be left empty for suspected cheaters.

Timing of Examination
 A visible countdown timer or clock should be used. The proctor should provide a 30 minute
and a 10 minute “end of exam” warning.

Early Dismissal
If an examinee wishes to leave before the end of the exam, he/she must turn in all examination
papers to the proctor and will not be allowed re-enter to the examination room. No student shall
be allowed to leave the examination room within the first 15 minutes of an exam.

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Proctoring the exam
The Chief proctor must collect the exams from the course instructor 15 minutes prior to the
examination time. All proctors should arrive at the examination room 15 minutes before the start
of the exam to distribute the exams, to direct students to their assigned seats and to help in
taking attendance. Proctors should be present and attentive at all times, observing the examinees
from different angles of the room. Proctors should frequently walk through the room without
disturbing the examinees to observe the security of the room and the examinee seating areas
noting that:
     Examinees have nothing on their desks or laps except the appropriate test administration
        material specific to the exam.
     No one is making written notes of the exam.
     No one is using written materials.
     Examinees are not communicating with one another in any way.
     Examinees are not using inappropriate electronic devices, e.g. watches with computer or
        memory capability, PDAs, etc.
     Examinees stop answering questions at the call for “Stop”.
After the exam is completed, the Chief Proctor will collect the exams and verify that the number
of exams is equivalent to the attendance list. The Chief Proctor will give the collected exams and
the attendance sheet to the course instructor.

Managing Irregular Incidents
Irregular incidents by examinees include, but are not limited to:
     The copying, giving or receiving of unauthorized information or making unauthorized
       notes
     Continuing to write after the exam has been concluded
     Disruptive behavior
     Possession of a mobile phone or other electronic device
     A student who has writing on body parts, clothing, paper or any other object will
       be immediately dismissed from the exam.

If irregular incidents occur, the proctor should confirm the observation with at least one other
proctor, notify the chief proctor of the incident and allow the examinee to complete the exam.
If the irregular incidents continue, the proctor should move the examinee to a secure location
that will ensure no disruption to other examinees, and report the incident to the Associate Dean
for Academic Affairs.

Handling suspected cheating
 Upon completion of the exam, the Chief Proctor must notify the course instructor and the
student suspected of cheating prior to submission of a report of the incident to the Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs beginning the process outlined above in the topic entitled
“Procedures for Handling Dishonesty or Misconduct”.

                                    MEDICAL EXCUSES
Students are allowed to make up examinations or assignments missed because of serious illness or
injury provided that proper documentation is presented to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
within three days of the student‟s return to college. The following are considered valid medical
excuses according to MOHE policy:
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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Omanis: Excused absences signed by a physician (NOT a secretary or other clinic worker) at a
government health center or hospital. Medical excuses given by private medical clinics and hospitals
will not be accepted .

 Expatriates: Excused absences signed by a physician at CPHS‟s approved health care provider
(Bashayer Clinic, Al Khuwair) or the student‟s sponsor‟s official health care provider.

All students.: The leave report must show a diagnosis and indicate how many hours or days of leave
are being given, and must be stamped by the clinic/hospital. Emergency hospitalization or clinic
treatment will be excused provided that a report from the hospital or clinic signed by a physician is
presented to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within three days of the student‟s return to the
college.

Prior scheduled appointments with a medical specialist at a government health center or hospital
(Omanis) or a private clinic or hospital (Expatriates) will be excused provided that the Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs is notified at the time the appointment is made so that arrangements for
the makeup examination can be made.

Sick leave requests for headaches, tiredness, anxiety, or (in the case of female students) menstrual
cramps will not be excused. Appointments for routine dental work will not be excused.

SPECIAL EXCUSES
Students are allowed to make up examinations or assignments missed due to deaths in the family.
Three days are allowed for the death of a father, mother, grandmother, grandfather, sister, brother,
son or daughter. Two days are allowed for the death of an uncle, aunt or cousin. Presentation of proof
of death from the relevant authority is required.

MARKING EXAMINATIONS
 Credit can only be given for answers recorded on answer sheets or on exams in the appropriate
places. No credit will be given for answers scribbled in the margins or on the backs of exams.
On writing sections of examinations and in-class assessments, no additional time will be allowed
for students to recopy work once the proctor (invigilator) has announced the end of the
examination or assessment period. Credit will be given only for the writing designated as the final
copy and written in the answer booklet.

REVIEWING AN EXAMINATION PAPER OR OTHER GRADED WORK
Students have the right to review their examination papers and other graded work with the
instructor. Students are only allowed to review graded work for up to two weeks after it is first
made available; after that, all grades are considered final. Students are not permitted to
“negotiate” their grades! The purpose of grade review is to see that the grades were calculated
properly and to give the student an opportunity to learn from his/her mistakes.


POSTING OF GRADES
Examination results are posted on the notice board located outside each department
approximately one week after an examination after approval by the Exam committee. Final
course grades are posted on the notice board located outside Admissions and Registration
approximately two weeks after the end of each semester. Only course grades posted by the
Office of the Registrar are considered as official course grades. In order to maintain


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                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

confidentiality, results are posted by students‟ pin numbers rather than by their names. To access
grades on the college website, the pin number is required to sign in.


MAKEUP EXAMS
Makeup exams will be of equal difficulty but may be of a different type (i.e. written essay or oral
examination instead of MCQ or short-answer). Make-up final exams will be scheduled by the
instructor during the first week of the following semester. Other make-up exams will be scheduled by
the instructor during the week following the scheduled exam. Makeup exams will be of equal difficulty
but may be of a different type (i.e. written essay or oral examination instead of MCQ or short-answer).



COURSE GRADING PROTOCOLS
Course grades are assigned by the instructor. It is the responsibility of the instructor to judge
students fairly against academic and professional standards, without prejudice in terms of race,
color, national origin, religion, or sex. Instructors are also responsible for reporting all violations
of the standards of academic and professional integrity that they witness to the Associate Dean
for Academic Affairs.
When a student fails to meet the academic and professional requirements of a course, the
instructor will assign the student an unsatisfactory course grade. At the very least, students
who receive an unsatisfactory grades in a course will have to repeat the course at a later time.

THE GRADE SCALE
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences uses the traditional A, B, C, D, F grading scale,
according to the following descriptions:
    A – Exceptional performance. Student has achieved nearly all of the course requirements
       and course objectives in a consistently outstanding manner. Generally, an “A”
       corresponds to achievement of 90% or above.
    B – Very good performance. Student has met most of the course objectives and
       requirements in a consistent manner. A “B” grade generally corresponds to an
       achievement of 80 – 89%.
    C – Satisfactory performance. Student has satisfied a sufficient number of the course
       objectives and requirements to warrant a passing grade. Achievement in the 70-79%
       range generally corresponds to a “C.”
    D – A grade of “D” is considered unsatisfactory in all courses and must be repeated.
       F – Unacceptable performance in any course. No course credit earned. Percentage marks
        below 60% generally correspond to an “F.”
Other grade designations that may appear on a grade report or an official transcript are:
    I – Incomplete. An incomplete may be given when an instructor determines that the
       work is unavoidably incomplete or that an additional examination is justified. An “I”
       becomes an “F” if the work is not completed within one year.
    W – Withdrawn. A grade of “W” is assigned when a student withdraws from a course
       before the end of the tenth week of class (or the fifth week of a summer term). After the
       tenth week a grade of “F” will be assigned even if the student no longer attends the class.
       A grade of “W” does not affect a student‟s Grade Point Average.


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                     STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

      WF – Withdrawn Failing. A student who withdraws completely from the college and
       all classes after the tenth week (or the fifth week in the summer term) will receive grades
       of “WF” in all classes. Marks of “WF” do not affect a student‟s Grade Point Average.
      AP – Advanced placement. Students may receive advanced placement credit for
       equivalent coursework taken elsewhere or by passing a subject test administered by the
       college. AP credit is included in student‟s cumulative credit hours but not in their GPA.
      (R) – Repeated. The designation (R) after a course grade indicates that it is a repeated
       course. Both the original course grade and the repeated course grade appear on the
       official transcript. However, only the repeated course grade count toward the student‟s
       cumulative Grade Point Average.

      X – Audit. By special permission of the Dean, certain students may be allowed to audit
       one or more courses. The student registers for the audited course and pays full fees but
       is not permitted to take exams or turn in assignments for grading. No course grade is
       assigned and no credit can be earned for auditing a course. Attendance is required
       according to college policy. When a student audits a course, at least one semester pass
       before he/she can enroll in the course for credit.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE
 Within the A, B, and C letter grade categories, the top three percentage points may be
designated with a “+”, and the bottom three percentage points with a “-“. All course letter
grades carry a numeric value that is used in computing the student‟s semester and cumulative
Grade Point Averages (GPAs), according to the following scale:
   A    A-       B+ B        B- C+ C              C- D+ D              F
   4.0 3.7      3.3 3.0 2.7         2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3           1.0      0

CALCULATING A GRADE POINT AVERAGE
A student‟s grade point average (GPA) is a numerical measure of how well the student is doing
overall in his/her academic program. Using the numerical values listed above, you can calculate
your grade point average (GPA) as follows (see table below):
       The number of credit hours for each course (Column B) is multiplied by the numerical
        grade point that is equivalent to each letter grade (Column C). The result is placed in
        Column D. This procedure is followed separately for each course.
      The results are added together (total of column D).
      The total sum (column D) is divided by the total number of credit hours attempted (sum
       of column B) to obtain the grade point average (column F). (15.3 divided by 9 equals
       1.7).
      Column E shows the credit hours earned in this student‟s semester. Note that it is less
       than credit hours attempted because no credit is earned from a grade of “F”.
Example:
             A             B             C          D             E             F
                      Credit Hours     Grade                 Credit Hours   Grade Point
          Course       Attempted       Point       BxC         Earned        Average
        ENGL 105            2          C=2           4             2
        CHEM 101            3          B=3           9             3
        CHEM 111            1         C+ = 2.3      2.3            1
        INFT 101            3          F=0           0             0
                            9                      15.3            6            1.7

                                              32
                        STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011


Students at CPHS are expected to maintain a minimum Grade Point Average of 2.5 in order to
remain in good standing in the college. Students whose GPA falls below 2.5 are placed on
probation. Failure to bring the GPA back to above 2.5 in two more semesters is grounds for
automatic dismissal.

KEY FEATURES OF THE GRADING SYSTEM
        Grades of “A”, “B”, and even “C+ ” are considered acceptable in all courses.
        Grades of “C” or “C-“ are passing but marginal as they lower the GPA below 2.5
        A grade of “D” is considered an unsatisfactory grade and the course must be repeated.
        A grade of “F” is considered an unsatisfactory grade. Courses in which a student has
         earned an “F” do not earn course credit and must be repeated.



HOW TO CALCULATE A PARTIAL GRADE IN A COURSE
 Students can calculate their grades in classes at any time during the semester as follows:
1. Read the syllabus to determine the weight for each category, for example, tests and homework.
2. Divide the total number of points earned in each assignment or exam to date (column B) by the
    total points possible for each assignment or exam (column C) and multiply by 100 to get a
    percentage (column D).
3. Multiply the percentage grade in each category (column D) by the fractional value of each category
    in the final grade (column E), and add them together.
4. Divide by the total fraction of your grade already determined at that time (total of column E) to
    determine your current grade percentage.
Example
Your syllabus lists the following:
Homework                        10%
Two tests                       20% (10% each)
Midterm examination             30%
Final examination               40%

Calculating your grade after mid-term:



           A             B               C           D                  E
        Category       Earned         Possible    Percent       Wt. of Category
                                                  (B ÷ C)   (fraction of total grade)
      Homework 1      8 points       10 points
      Homework 2      7 points       10 points
   Homework total    17 points       20 points      85            .10
   Test 1            37.5 points     50 points      75            .10
   Midterm test      80 points       100 points     80            .30
   Test 2
   Final exam
                                                            Total: .50

Your mid-term grade: [(85 x .10) + (75 x .10) + (80 x .30)] ÷ .50 = 80%


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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




REPEATING COURSES
When a student receives an unsatisfactory grade (D or F) in a credit-carrying course, he/she
must repeat it before advancing to the next academic year. Once the course is successfully
repeated, the repeated course grade appears on the official transcript followed by the designation
“(R)”. The original D or F grade remains on the official transcript but is not included in the
calculation of cumulative GPA.



Students may repeat failed courses as follows:
    Students who fail just one course may make up the failed course in addition to the
       scheduled course in the summer session.
    Students who fail two or more courses will be put on academic probation and must
       repeat the entire academic year. They make take one scheduled course in the summer
       session but must repeat the failed courses during the fall or spring semester.


Textbooks
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences will provide textbooks to the students in the pre-
professional courses on a „Loan” basis for their use in most courses. Textbooks will be
distributed from and returned to the library. Selected textbooks will be given to the students

The textbook policies are listed below.
    Textbooks must be returned to the library within two working days of the final
       examination in a course and signed by the librarian. A student who fails to return a
       textbook within this timeframe will not receive results of the exam until the book is
       returned. If a book is not returned before the beginning of the following semester, the
       student will be charged for the book.
    Upon completion of a course, students may purchase the textbook if desired.
    Students, who highlight portions of the text, write notes in the margins or damage the
       textbook in any way must pay for the book.
    Students who withdraw from a course before the end of a semester must return the
       assigned textbooks to the library (verified by the librarian) before having their withdrawal
       form approved by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
    Students who do not return textbooks will not receive textbooks the following semester.




                                               34
                                                                                     3
                                                                                     Section
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Rules And Regulations
HOSTEL RULES and REGULATIONS

AIM
1. To facilitate parents to educate their children properly and without anxiety
2. To educate students and to enable them to adapt themselves to a disciplined mode of life
   which will prepare them to be useful citizens in their future life
3. To inculcate in the students a feeling of mutual help, self discipline and adjustments in the
   society in which they live and to train them to live together peacefully in society

_____________________________________________________________

BEHAVIOR AND DISCIPLINE

1. Students are expected to display acceptable forms of behavior anywhere within the hostel
   complex.
2. Parties or other social gatherings in the hostel complex are not permitted without prior
   consent of the Finance and Administration Manager or the hostel supervisor.
3. Noise levels must be kept low to allow others the opportunity to study or sleep in comfort.
4. No overnight guests are allowed in the room.
5. Students who find their roommate(s) missing for more than 48 hours must report them to
   the hostel supervisor.
6. Keeping perishable food or cooking in rooms is prohibited.
7. Public phones in hostels are meant for all students. Therefore, students should remember to
   use them with consideration for other students.
8. Before leaving the room, students should always turn off lights and air-conditioning as well
   as any other electrical appliances.
9. Visitors of the opposite sex are not allowed in student rooms.
10. Posting or writing on doors is prohibited.
11. Students should sleep in the dedicated place, and there is to be no change without prior
    approval by the hostel supervisor.
12. College identity cards should be produced when requested by authorized people.


                                                 35
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

13. Students are advised to lock all doors at all times for security reasons.
14. Face cover is not allowed in the hostel.
15. Students should observe a dress code which is respectful to Omani rules and tradition.
16. Alcoholic drinks, prohibited issues and prohibited magazines are not allowed.
17. Coming late after 10:00 p.m. is not permitted.
18. Vandalism is a very serious offense. Students found guilty of committing such an offense can
    or may be expelled from the hostel as well as barred from continuing as a student at The
    College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

_____________________________________________________________

UPKEEP OF THE HOSTEL

1. Students are responsible for keeping their rooms and the common areas in the hostel, such
   as lounge areas, kitchens and bathrooms, clean and tidy at all times.
2. No clothes or laundry should be visible from outside the hostel.
3. Common hostel furniture must not be moved into other rooms without the consent of the
   Finance and Administration Manager. or the hostel supervisor.
4. Any damage to hostel property must be reported immediately the hostel supervisor.
5. The Finance and Administration Manager reserves the right send an appropriate person to
   make spot checks on the hostel units without giving prior notice to students, after notifying
   the hostel supervisor. However, every effort will be made to respect the privacy and dignity
   of students.

_____________________________________________________________

LIFE IN THE HOSTEL: THE DAILY SYSTEM

1. Students will leave the hostel to the CPHS campus daily at 7:30 and return back at 4:30 p.m.
   except on Thursdays and Fridays.
2. Daily house cleaning will be done by appropriate persons.
3. Students should sign in daily at 9:00 p.m.
4. The main gate/door will be closed daily at 9:30 p.m., after which no visitor will be permitted.
   On Fridays, the door will be closed at 10:30 p.m.
5. Monday is a weekly marketing day and sometimes refreshment in any public garden under
   the guidance of the hostel supervisor.

_____________________________________________________________

VISITORS

Visitors of the opposite sex are allowed only in the lounge area of the hostel during visiting
hours as follows:
Weekdays                                4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
                                                 36
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Weekends and Public Holidays             8:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
1. All visitors must register at the security gate and provide all details and documents as
   requested by security before entering the hostel complex. All visitors must leave the hostel
   complex by 9:30 p.m.
2. Visitors are not allowed to stay overnight in the hostel units.
3. Students are not permitted to allow visitors of the opposite sex into their bedrooms at any
   time for whatever reason. ANY STUDENT FOUND IN THE COMPANY OF A
   MEMBER OF THE OPPOSITE SEX IN ANY ROOM OTHER THAN THE
   LOUNGES IN THE HOSTEL UNIT WILL BE EXPELLED FROM THE HOSTEL
   AND FACE POSSIBLE EXPULSION FROM THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY &
   HEALTH SCIENCES.
_____________________________________________________________

LATE NIGHT PASSES

1. Students who have late night passes must leave the hostel before 10:00 p.m. Security
   personnel may not allow any student to leave the complex after 10:00 p.m.
2. Students returning in the early hours of the morning are to follow all rules and regulations of
   the hostel such as not making too much noise.

_____________________________________________________________

REVISION OF RULES AND REGULATIONS

The Finance and Administration Manager reserves the right to revise hostel rules and regulations
from time to time and will keep students informed of any changes in the form of memoranda
and notices on CPHS notice boards.
Students found breaking any hostel rules are liable to be evicted from the hostel within
24 hours.
_______________________________________________________________


DRESS CODE
The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences places a high value on personal appearance including
attire for students, faculty and staff . The reasons are rooted in concerns for infection control,
communication, and cultural sensitivity. The guidelines below set forth standards for dress and
appearance necessary to meet the service and safety objectives of placing patient welfare first and the
educational objectives of preparing the student to assume the role of a professional health care worker.
As a general rule, attire should be comfortable and not detract from the educational atmosphere. The
following guidelines help prepare the student to establish a successful caregiver-patient relationship.

GENERAL STANDARDS
    1. Good personal hygiene is to be maintained at all times. This includes regular bathing, use of
       deodorants/antiperspirants, and regular dental hygiene.
    2. Avoid distracting perfumes or colognes (may precipitate allergies or sensitivities).


                                                  37
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

    3. Faces must be visible at all times on all college facilities, including in the hostels.
       Veils (nikhab) are not permitted. Failure to adhere to this rule may result in dismissal from the
       college.

HAIR
    1.   Hair should be neat and clean.
    2.   Hair should be styled off the face and out of the eyes.
    3.   Beards/mustaches must be neatly trimmed.
    4.   Fingernails should be clean and of short to medium length.


DRESS
    1. Clothing should be clean and in good repair.
    2. Shirts, blouses, and other tops should cover the shoulders and the midriff.
    3. Women: skirts that cover the knees, jeans, or tailored slacks.


PROHIBITED ITEMS OF CLOTHING
    1. Shorts.
    2. Bare midriff tops; tee shirts; halters; translucent or transparent tops; sleeveless shirts or
       tops, shirts or tops with plunging necklines, or tank tops.
    3. Burqas.


PROHIBITED ITEMS IN LABORATORIES
   1. Sandals or open toed shoes or canvas shoes (chemicals or glass shards may penetrate the
      fabric).
   2. Large buttons or large pins (could interfere with function)
_____________________________________________________________

HEALTH and SAFETY POLICY
 The College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences seeks to provide and maintain a learning
environment which is safe for students and faculty. Thus, this handbook is designed to highlight
potential safety hazards which may be encountered at CPHS. It contains only guidelines. Your
teacher will provide you with detailed instruction which must be adhered to at all times in the
laboratory. If you do not understand any policy or safety issue, do not hesitate to ask a teacher
for clarification.
_____________________________________________________________

GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES

1. Observe all health and safety guidelines at all times.
2. Report all accidents and hazards – whether a person is injured or not – to the administration
   AND faculty.
3. Safety and/or protective equipment/clothing must be worn in laboratories at all times.
4. Fill out the relevant risk assessment form before any laboratory experiment.
5. Conform to all instructions set out by the lecturer/technical staff responsible for health and
   safety.

                                                  38
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

6. Familiarize yourself with first aid and fire emergency procedures.
7. Make suggestions to improve health and safety.
8. Highlight any potential dangers to official visitors and/or other students.
9. Set a good example by following the appropriate guidelines precisely and ensuring that the
   guidelines are strictly observed.
_____________________________________________________________

FIRE REGULATIONS

Fire evacuation drills are carried out on a regular basis. They should not be taken lightly as a
“REAL FIRE” could occur at any time. Be sure you know what to do and where to go.
                         IF YOU DISCOVER A FIRE OR SUSPECT
                               THE PRESENCE OF FIRE
1.   Sound the alarm by breaking the glass in the nearest fire alarm.
2.   Send another student to alert a teacher/an administrator.
3.   Summon the fire department by dialing 9999.
4.   Put out the fire with the nearest suitable fire extinguisher. Remember to do this only if it is
     safe.


                                IF YOU HEAR A FIRE ALARM
1.   Leave the building by the nearest available exit.
2.   Do not run.
3.   Do not use the lifts.
4.   Proceed to the assembly point situated to the front of the building outside the main gates.
5.   Inform a faculty/staff member or fire marshal if there seems to be a missing person.
6.   If possible, faculty should check the register to verify that all students are accounted for.
7.   Do not reenter the building until officially informed that it is safe to do so.
8.   Teaching/technical staff should switch off the gas supply at the main isolation valve as they
     leave if it is safe to do so.


ACCIDENTS

The Dean or Associate ddean must be alerted if there is a serious accident which may require
hospital treatment. A standard accident report form must be completed with details of any
incidents that occur.
_____________________________________________________________

FIRST AID
First aid kits are kept in all science laboratories and in the nurse‟s station located on the ground
floor. Laboratory technicians, the Social Sciences coordinator, and the academic counselor are
trained in first aid. They can assist students who require minor first aid.



                                                39
                                                                            4
                                                                            Section
                  STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Pharmacy Curriculum

PHARMACY CURRICULUM (2007, 2008 batches)

B.Pharm. degree program – Year 1          Total Credits 19 hours

Course ID          Course Title                                    Credit
                                                                   Hours
Fall Semester                                                      2
ENGL 010           English - Grammar I (4 hrs)                     0
ENGL 012           English – Reading/Writing/Vocabulary I (11 hrs) 0
ENGL 014           English – Listening/Speaking I (7hrs)           0
INFT 111           Information Technology I                        2

Spring Semester                                                      11
ENGL 011           English - Grammar II (2 hrs)                      0
ENGL 013           English - Reading/Writing/Vocabulary II (7 hrs)   0
ENGL 015           English - Listening/Speaking/Writing II (3 hrs)   0
ENGL 101           English for Special Purposes (5 hrs)              5
INFT 112           Introductory Information Technology II            2
CHEM 103           General Chemistry with Lab I                      4

Summer Session                                                       6
CHEM 104           General Chemistry with Lab II                     4
PHAR 101           Orientation to Pharmacy                           2

B.Pharm. Degree Program – Year 2           Total Credits 35

Fall Semester                                                        15
BIOL 104           General Biology with Lab                          4
CHEM 203           Organic Chemistry with Lab I                      4
ENGL 145           Special Topics in English for Pharmacy            3
MATH 102           Introduction to Calculus                          4

Spring Semester                                                      15
BIOL 209           Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab             4

                                          40
                  STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

BIOL 210          Biochemistry                                       4
CHEM 204          Organic Chemistry with Lab II                      4
PHAR 204          Physical Pharmacy                                  3

Summer Semester                                                      5
CHEM 205          Pharmacognosy with Lab                             3
SOCS 201          Communication Skills for Pharmacists               2




B.Pharm. Degree Program – Year 3      Total Credits 36

Fall Semester                                                        16
CHEM 301          Medicinal Chemistry I                              3
PCOL 303          Pharmacology I                                     4
PHAR 304          Pharmacy Rules/Ethics                              2
PHAR 307          Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Immunology         3
PHAR 310          Pharmaceutics with Lab I                           4


Spring semester                                                      15
CHEM 302          Medicinal Chemistry II                             3
PCOL 305          Pharmacology II                                    4
PHAR 303          Pathophysiology and Therapeutics I                 4
PHAR 315          Pharmaceutics with Lab II                          4


Summer Semester                                                      5
PHAR 308          Pharmacy Literature Evaluation                     2
MATH 301          Epidemiology and Biostatistics (2011)              3


B. Pharm. Degree Program                   Year 4 Total Credits 37

Fall Semester                                                        16
CHEM 410          Pharmaceutical Chemistry with Lab                  4
PCOL 401          Pharmacology III and Toxicology                    3
PHAR 401          Pathophysiology and Therapeutics II                3
PHAR 403          Pharmaceutical Biotechnology                       3
PHAR 404          Pharmacokinetics                                   3

Spring Semester                                                      16
PHAR 405          Pathophysiology and Therapeutics III               3
PHAR 406          Clinical Pharmacokinetics                          3
PHAR 407          Over-the-Counter Products                          3
PHAR 411          Quality Control of Pharmaceutical Products         3
                                         41
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

PHAR 412              Pharmacy Practice                         3
PHAR 418              Integrated Lab Experience                 1

Summer Semester                                                 5
PHAR 419              Pharmaceutical Management                 2
SOCS 401              Community Health                          3

PHAR 425              Research Project                          2




B. Pharm. Degree Program - Year 5        Total Credits 15

Fall Semester                                                   15
PHAR 501              Community Experience            7 weeks   7
PHAR 502              Institutional Experience        7 weeks   7
PHAR 503              Industrial Experience           2 weeks   1

Total Course Credits = 128 Credits
Research Project = 2 Credits
Total Practical Training Credits = 15 Credits

Total = 145 Credits




                                                 42
                  STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011


                    Four Year Program in Pharmacy

           Bachelor of Pharmacy Curriculum (2009, 2010 Batches)


B. Pharm. Degree Program – Year 1                        37 Credits
Fall Semester                                                     16
BIOL 104          General Biology with Lab                        4
CHEM 103          General Chemistry with Lab I                    4
ENGL 145          Special Topics in English for Pharmacy I        3
MATH 102          Introduction to Calculus                        3
PHAR 101          Orientation to Pharmacy                         2

Spring Semester                                                   16
BIOL 209          Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab           4
ENGL 146          Special Topics in English for Pharmacy II       3
CHEM 104          General Chemistry with Lab II                   4
PHAR 204          Physical Pharmacy                               3
SOCS 103          Oman and Islamic Civilization and Modern        2
                  Society

Summer Semester                                                   5
CHEM 205          Pharmacognosy with Lab                          3
SOCS 201          Communication Skills for Pharmacists            2


B. Pharm. Degree Program – Year 2                        36 Credits

PHAR 201              Practical Training (2 weeks)                    1

Fall Semester                                                     15
CHEM 203             Organic Chemistry with Lab I                 4
PCOL 303             Pharmacology I                               4
MATH 301             Epidemiology and Biostatistics               3
PHAR 305             Pharmaceutics with Lab I                     4

Spring semester                                                   16
CHEM 204             Organic Chemistry with Lab II                4
PCOL 305             Pharmacology II                              4
BIOL 210             Biochemistry                                 4
PHAR 315             Pharmaceutics with Lab II                    4




                                          43
                  STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Summer Semester                                                   4
PHAR 308            Pharmacy Literature Evaluation                2
PHAR 304            Pharmacy Rules & Ethics                       2

B. Pharm. Degree Program – Year 3                    41 Credits


PHAR 301          Practical training (2 weeks)                    1

Years 3 and 4
PHAR 425            Research project                 2 Credits

Fall Semester                                                     17
CHEM 301            Medicinal Chemistry I                         3
PCOL 401            Pharmacology III & Toxicology                 4
PHAR 401            Pathophysiology and Therapeutics I            4
PHAR 307            Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Immunology    3
PHAR 404            Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics           3



Spring Semester                                                   17

PHAR 412            Pharmacy Practice                             3
CHEM 302            Medicinal Chemistry II                        3
PHAR 303            Pathophysiology and Therapeutics II           4
PHAR 406            Clinical Pharmacokinetics                     3
CHEM 410            Pharmaceutical Analysis with Lab              4


Summer Semester
                                                                  4
PHAR 409            Disease Prevention/Health Promotion           2
PHAR 419            Pharmaceutical Management                     2


B. Pharm. Degree Degree Program - Year 4 29 Credits

Fall Semester                                                     14

PHAR 403            Pharmaceutical Biotechnology                  3
PHAR 405            Pathophysiology & Therapeutics III            4
PHAR 411            Quality Control of Pharmaceutical Products    3
PHAR 407            Over the Counter Products                     3
PHAR 417            Integrated Lab                                1

                                                                  15

                                          44
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

Spring Semester         Community Experience       7
PHAR 501                Institutional Experience   7
PHAR 502                Industrial Experience      1
PHAR 503


Total Course Credits    124
Research Project        2
Training Credits =      17
Total = 143 Credits




                                             45
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011



               Bachelor of Pharmacy Course Descriptions


                                       Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 104. General Biology with Lab. A one-semester course that introduces pharmacy
students to the fundamental concepts of organization and maintenance of cellular structure and
function. The course topics comprise biomolecules, cell organelles, membrane structure and
function, signal transduction, cell cycle and its regulation, cell reproduction, molecular biology of
DNA, regulation of gene expression, and applications of DNA technology. 3 hrs. of lectures.
Lectures will be supplemented by relevant lab exercises and group discussions based on case
studies. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)
BIOL 209. Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab. This course provides fundamentals
of the organization and functions of the human body and lays down a solid foundation for the
learning of the pathophysiological concepts of diseases and their pharmacological interventions.
Topics include anatomical terminology, structure and elaborated functions of cell, tissues,
organs, and organ system levels. 3 hrs. of lectures. Laboratory includes study of structure and
function of systems with models and tissue slides; and physiology experiments. 3 hrs. of
laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)

BIOL 210. Biochemistry. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I. This course provides a general
introduction to biochemical concepts, which prepare the students for subsequent courses in
pharmacology and pathophysiology including enzyme mechanisms, therapeutic use of enzyme
inhibitors, intermediary metabolism, effects of drugs on various metabolic pathways, signal
transduction, and biotransformation. (4 Credit Hrs.)
                                     Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 103. General Chemistry with Lab I. This course establishes a foundation in the
fundamental concepts of states of matter. Atoms, molecules and ions are discussed as are
chemical, aqueous and thermal reactions. The periodic properties of elements, stoichiometry and
chemical bonding are also discussed. 3 hrs. of lectures. Laboratory learning includes the
preparation of standard solutions, separation of the components of a mixture, reactions in
aqueous solutions, acid base titration, heat of reactions and the determination of melting and
boiling points. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)

CHEM 104. General Chemistry with Lab II. Prerequisite CHEM 103. This course investigates
the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, solubility, chemical equilibrium, acid base equilibrium,
titrations, coordination compounds, precipitation and electrochemistry. 3 hrs. of lectures.
Laboratory experiences explore colligative properties, freezing points, molar masses, and pH of
buffer solutions. Students learn to determine the pKa of an unknown acid, hydrolyze salts, work
with calorimetry, determine the rates of chemical reactions and prepare coordination complexes.
3 hrs. of laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)
CHEM 203. Organic Chemistry with Lab I. Prerequisites: CHEM 103&104. This course
explores the important mechanisms of structure and bonding, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic
compounds, stereochemistry, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and
derivatives. 3 hrs. of lectures. Laboratory includes the following reactions- esterification,

                                                46
                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

hydrolysis, oxidation, reduction, and condensation reactions. Stereochemistry and molecular
modeling using ChemDraw and Chemsketch software are also covered. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (4
Credit Hrs.)
CHEM 204. Organic Chemistry with Lab II. Prerequisites CHEM 103 &104. This course
provides further study of the concepts covered in CHEM 203 and includes oxidation and
reduction, enols and enolates, the study of carbonyl I, II and III compounds, heterocyclic
compounds, carbohydrates, amino acids and polymers, catalysis, lipids, and nucleic acids. 3hrs.
of lectures. Laboratory includes identification of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and polymers,
synthesis of heterocyclic compounds, spectral studies of selected molecules, and stereo-
modeling. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)
CHEM 205. Pharmacognosy with Lab. This course introduces phyto-chemistry and the
medicinal uses of active constituents present in plants and other natural sources employed in
medicine. Students will learn the classification of phytochemical constituents of medicinal
importance, the chemistry and uses of lipids, terpenoids, alkaloids, glycosides, flavanoids,
steroids, and proteins. 2 hrs. of lectures. Laboratory includes exercises in identification of crude
drugs by macroscopic and microscopic methods, and isolation/ identification of selected active
constituents from natural products. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (3 Credit Hrs.)

CHEM 301. Medicinal Chemistry I.                Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I, II. This course
introduces students to the chemical properties of drugs and their relationship to biological
action. Topics covered include the study of functional groups in drug action, physicochemical
activity, molecular modeling, computer-aided drug design, drug metabolism and the pro-drug
concept. A detailed study of the chemistry, structure/function relationship and medicinal
properties of drugs used as anti-infective agents is included. (3 Credit Hrs.)

CHEM 302. Medicinal Chemistry II. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I, II. This course is a
continuation of Medicinal Chemistry I and covers the chemistry, SAR and medicinal properties
of drugs affecting the central nervous system such as anti-depressants, general anesthetics,
narcotic analgesics, sedatives, hypnotics, antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. The discussion of
local anesthetic agents includes their mechanism of action, classification and clinical uses. Other
drugs covered include those affecting the adrenergic and cholinergic systems, cardiovascular
system, hormonal systems, immune systems, respiratory system and gastrointestinal system. (3
Credit Hrs.)

CHEM 410. Pharmaceutical Analysis with Lab. Prerequisites: Medicinal Chemistry I and II. This
course deals with the various techniques used in the assay of pharmaceutical preparations. The
principles and methodology of drug analysis is discussed including titrimetry, chromatography,
spectrofluorimetry, spectrophotometry, flame photometry and radioimmunoassay. 3 hrs. of
lectures. Laboratory exercises include the synthesis of simple organic drugs and analytical
experiments based on titrimetry, chromatography and spectrophotometry. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (4
Credit Hrs.)
                                       English (ENGL)
ENGL 145. Special Topics in English for Pharmacists I. ENGL 145 aims to provide
English language support to the second year pharmacy students in their biology course. The
objective of this course is to further develop the skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening
by using material that is closely related to the biological concepts dealt with in BIOL 103. The
course also aims to familiarize students with the relevant scientific vocabulary. (3 Credit Hrs.)


                                                47
                       STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

ENGL 146. Special Topics in English for Pharmacists II. This course is a continuation of
English 145 using material that is closely associated with BIOL 209.
                                    Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 102. Introduction to Calculus. Prerequisite Math 011. This course provides a
comprehensive introduction to calculus as applied to the study and practice of pharmacy. The
concepts of differential and integral calculus are emphasized and utilized for practical examples
such as pharmacokinetics. The course is delivered in the form of lectures supplemented with
problem-solving assignments, pre-quiz revisions and post-quiz analysis. (3 Credit Hrs.)


MATH 301. Epidemiology and Biostatistics. This course provides an introduction to
epidemiology, and introduces students to biostatistics as related to pharmacy. It uses
epidemiological study designs as the background for discussion of statistical applications. Topics
include study designs in health sciences, descriptive and inferential statistics, probability
distributions, interval estimates and hypothesis testing. Students will also be exposed to statistical
software such as NCSS. (3 Credit Hrs.)


                                    Pharmacology (PCOL)
PCOL 303 Pharmacology I. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course introduces
students to the scientific study of drugs and emphasizes the integration of pharmacological
actions with physiological responses of the body. Students will learn general pharmacology,
routes of drug administration, fundamentals of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics,
pharmacogenetics, synergism and antagonistic effects, and adverse drug reactions. Knowledge of
drug history, sources, physicochemical properties, clinical uses, adverse effects, drug interactions,
patient/drug-related specific precautions and warnings will be presented for drugs that affect the
autonomic nervous system, central nervous system and sympathetic nervous system. (4 Credit
Hrs.)
PCOL 305. Pharmacology II. Prerequisite:Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course, a
continuation of Pharmacology I, embraces the knowledge of drug history, sources,
physicochemical properties, basic parameters of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical
uses, adverse effects, drug interactions, patient/drug-related specific precautions and warnings,
of the drugs used on the cardiovascular system, hematopoietic system, renal system, the
respiratory system, and gastrointestinal system. Autacoids and drugs used in special conditions
such as pediatrics, geriatrics and pregnancy are covered. (4 Credit Hrs.)
PCOL 401. Pharmacology III. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology. This course, a
continuation of Pharmacology I and II embraces the knowledge of drug history, sources,
physicochemical properties, basic parameters of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical
uses, adverse effects, drug interactions, patient/drug-related specific precautions and warnings,
used in the endocrine system as well as antibiotic, antifungal, anti-malarial, antiviral, and
anticancer drugs. Topics also include immuno-modulators, bioassays of some important drugs,
and vitamins. A brief introduction to toxicology including the evaluation of new drugs, their
safety profile, teratogenicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and clinical trials is included. (3 Credit
Hrs.)
                                       Pharmacy (PHAR)

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

PHAR 101. Orientation to Pharmacy. This course introduces students to the profession of
pharmacy with an emphasis on the contribution of pharmacy to healthcare in various settings
(e.g., community, hospital). Specific topics include an introduction to professionalism and the
importance of conveying a professional image in pharmacy practice. Pharmaceutical care,
professional ethics and health promotion extend these ideas. (2 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 201. Practical Training. Introduces students to the concept of professionalism.
Students will gain hands-on experience in a community pharmacy setting. (1 Credit Hr.)

PHAR 204. Physical Pharmacy. Prerequisites: CHEM 103. This course integrates knowledge of
mathematics, physics and chemistry to explain the basic principles of physical and chemical
phenomena related to drug formulation and drug delivery. Topics include application of
colligative properties in preparation of pharmaceutical solutions, micromeritics, interfacial
phenomenon, rheology, dispersions, diffusion, dissolution, complexation, buffers, solubility and
related phenomena. (3 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 301. Practical Training The course exposes students to a variety of pharmacy practice
settings and patient care experiences. Students will receive training in first aid and
cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
(1 Credit Hr.)

PHAR 303. Pathophysiology and Therapeutics I. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology.
This course is the first of three courses that are sequenced to run consecutively for three
semesters. The students will be expected to use, etiology, risk factor, epidemiology and
pathophysiologic information and drug therapy characteristics to develop and support a
pharmacotherapeutic plan to treat neuropsychiatric, neurobehavioural, neurodegenerational,
haematological, neutritional, dermatological and ophthalmological diseases and disorders. Case
studies will be used to emphasize on interpretation of clinical data pertinent to each disease state,
identifying drug-related problems, identifying appropriate therapeutic goals, drug indications and
regimens and monitoring parameters for efficacy and toxicity. (4 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 304. Pharmacy Rules and Ethics. Prerequisite: Orientation to Pharmacy. This course
provides an insight into Oman National Drug Policy and the regulations that are followed for
import and licensing of drugs in Oman. Topics include objectives of the policy, legislation and
regulation, registration and drug control, licensing procedures for pharmacies, pharmaceutical
establishments, medical stores, scientific offices, registration of pharmaceutical companies
(products and pricing), penalties, controlled drugs including narcotics and psychotropics, trading
and dealing of controlled drugs. Pharmaceutical ethics and professional code of conduct will also
be taught during the course. Topics related to confidentiality and personal behavior will also be
dealt with.(2 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 307. Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Immunology. Prerequisite: Biology 103,
Biochemistry. This course deals with the morphological, cultural, and physiological characteristics
of disease-causing microorganisms; control of microbial growth comprising disinfection and
sterilization. Review of major infectious diseases. The topics in immunology include immune-
regulatory role of granulocytes and lymphocytes; basic functions of the immune system and
innate as well as adaptive immune responses, vaccination, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity,
immunodeficiency and graft rejection.(3 Credit Hrs.)



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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

PHAR 308. Pharmacy Literature Evaluation. This course helps the student learn to critically
evaluate drug literature and to apply the findings to actual pharmacy practice situations. Students
learn to identify various resources for drug and herbal information for health professionals and
patients, including medical web sites that contain specific types of information. Students learn to
locate relevant drug and medically related information from secondary information resources
such as Micromedex. (2 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 305. Pharmaceutics with Lab I. Prerequisite: Physical Pharmacy. This course provides an
introduction to the principles applied in the preparation of pharmaceutical dosage forms and
drug delivery systems. Topics include equilibrium phenomena, parenterals, solid, liquid and semi-
solid dosage forms, and transdermal systems. 3 hrs. of lectures. Laboratory experiences are
designed to supplement lecture material and develop basic skills in pharmaceutical calculations,
physico-chemical theories in pharmaceutical formulations, and compounding of dosage forms. 3
hrs. of laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 315. Pharmaceutics with Lab II. Prerequisite: Pharmaceutics with Lab I. This course
provides an introduction to the technologies applied in the preparation and evaluation of
pharmaceutical dosage forms and drug delivery systems. Topics include pharmaceutical
necessities, polyphasic systems, polymers, coating, solids, sustained release, drug delivery,
NDDS, and regulatory processes. 3 hrs. of lectures. Laboratory includes sterile techniques, liquid
and semi-solid dosage forms, and microencapsulation. 3 hrs. of laboratory. (4 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 401. Pathophysiology and Therapeutics II. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology.
This course is the second of three courses that are sequenced to run consecutively for three
semesters. The students will be expected to use, etiology, risk factor, epidemiology and
pathophysiologic information and drug therapy characteristics to develop and support a
pharmacotherapeutic plan to treat pulmonary, endocrinal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and
cerebrovascular diseases and disorders. Case studies will be used to emphasize on interpretation
of clinical data pertinent to each disease state, identifying drug-related problems, identifying
appropriate therapeutic goals, drug indications and regimens and monitoring parameters for
efficacy and toxicity. (4 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 403. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology. Prerequisites:Pharmaceutical Microbiology and
Immunology. Students will learn the basic functions of the elements of molecular biotechnology
and pharmaceutical applications, including how components of the immune system can be used
for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes and applications of molecular biotechnology in the
treatment and diagnosis of diseases. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, recombinant
proteins, nucleic acid technology, therapeutic use of biotechnological products, gene therapy,
macromolecular drug delivery, and anti-sense technology. (3 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 404. Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics. Prerequisite: Introduction to Calculus. This
course covers the physicochemical and biological properties that affect drug transit into the
systemic circulation. The kinetic and biological process that a drug undergoes upon entering the
body are discussed including one and two compartment open models, basic drug metabolism,
linear and non-linear pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic interactions, drug-receptor interactions,
biopharmaceutics, bioavailability, and drug disposition. (3 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 405. Pathophysiology and Therapeutics III. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology.
This course is a third of three courses that are sequenced to run consecutively for three
semesters. The students will be expected to use, etiology, risk factor, epidemiology and
pathophysiologic information and drug therapy characteristics to develop and support a
pharmacotherapeutic plan to treat infectious, neoplastic, skeletomuscular and renal disease and
disorders. Case studies will be used to emphasize on interpretation of clinical data pertinent to

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

each disease state, supportive therapy, identifying drug-related problems, identifying appropriate
therapeutic goals, drug indications and regimens and monitoring parameters for efficacy and
toxicity. (4 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 406. Clinical Pharmacokinetics. Prerequisite: Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics. This
course focuses on the application of pharmacokinetic principles to patient care. Topics include
one compartment intravenous bolus dosing, one-compartment infusion, multiple dosing, protein
binding of drugs, non-oral medications, prolonged medications, pharmacokinetic variability, drug
concentration and clinical response, individualization and optimization of drug dosing regimens
and therapeutic drug monitoring. Appropriate dosing and monitoring of drug levels of
aminoglycosides, digoxin and anti-arrhythmic drugs will be discussed in detail. (3 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 407. Over-the-Counter Products. Prerequsites: Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Pharmaceutics I
and II. This course introduces students to non prescription medications and their appropriate
use. Students will gain skills in assessing the patient‟s physical complaints and signs/symptoms,
determining conditions that require medical attention versus self-treatment, aiding in the proper
selection of product, advising about appropriate use of products, and monitoring
nonprescription drug therapy. (3 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 409. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. This course exposes pharmacy
students to pharmacoepidemiology and public health. Instruction focuses on pharmacists as
integral to preventing and detecting disease and promoting community health. Emphasis is given
to village health care and Omani culture. (2 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 411. Quality control of Pharmaceutical Products. Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Analysis,
Pharmaceutics I & II. The course deals with the principles and methodology of quality control
tests for formulations, disinfectants, antiseptics, herbal products, and microbiological products.
Students will learn the methods used in the pharmaceutical evaluation of topical, oral-liquid,
ophthalmic, and dental products; principle and techniques of pyrogen testing, sterility testing,
and tests for microbial contamination, efficacy of disinfectants; and herbal drug standardization
as per WHO guidelines. (3 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 412. Pharmacy Practice. Prerequisites: Pharmaceutics I and II. This course introduces
students to the objectives and functions of a hospital pharmacy including the personnel and
facilities required such as equipment, drug distribution systems, medical stores, surgical
instruments and health accessories used in hospitals. The Clinical Pharmacy section includes an
introduction to clinical pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical care concepts, patient counseling and
compliance, drug utilization reviews, drug interactions, clinical toxicity, treatment of poisoning
and pharmaco-economics. Role playing will be emphasized. (3 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 417. Integrated Lab Experience. Prerequisites: Pharmacology I & II, Pharmaceutics I & II,
Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Immunology. This laboratory course includes a number of laboratory
exercises that reinforce the integration and application of theoretical course work taken in
various courses. Laboratory exercises include microbiological techniques such as sterility testing,
antibiotic susceptibility tests, MIC, simulated pharmacological experiments and evaluation of
various dosage forms including capsules, tablets, packaging material and emulsions. 3 hrs. of
laboratory. (1 Credit Hr.)
PHAR 419. Pharmaceutical Management. Prerequisites: Pharmaceutics I and II. The objective of
this course is to familiarize students with the basic principles, terms, and functions of pharmacy
marketing and management that must be undertaken in every pharmacy practice setting. Students
will survey a full spectrum of business practices required of pharmacists who own or lease a

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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

pharmacy, practice in a hospital or community pharmacy, or who wish to establish
pharmaceutical care services. Topics include evaluating the financial performance of a pharmacy,
strategic planning and marketing management, material management, developing a marketing
plan to provide innovative pharmaceutical care services, drug supply, and accounting. (2 Credit
Hrs.)

PHAR 425. Research Project. Students will undertake a graduation project during their third
and forth years of study on a topic in an emerging area of pharmaceutical sciences under the
direct supervision of a faculty member from the Department of Pharmacy. Its objective is to
develop aptitude and a particular interest in pharmaceutical sciences and develop the students‟
awareness and understanding of the pivotal role of pharmacists in various facets of the pharmacy
profession. It involves formulating a problem, collecting data, summarizing and analyzing data,
and presentation in the form of a scientific publication. Evaluation will be based on assessment
of submitted work, seminar and viva voce test. (2 Credit Hrs.)

PHAR 501. Community Experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of prior coursework. In this
capstone course the pharmacy student spends seven weeks in one or more community
pharmacies practicing the profession of pharmacy under the close supervision of a practitioner.
Activities include filling and dispensing prescriptions counseling patients about side effects and
drug interactions and describing non-prescription medications. Students also learn the business
and management aspects of retail pharmacy. Upon completion of the practical training in
community pharmacies, the student submits an Internship Report to the Pharmacy Department
for evaluation by the faculty. (7 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 502. Institutional Experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of prior coursework. In this
capstone course the students spend seven weeks in one or more institutional or hospital
pharmacies practicing the profession of pharmacy under the close supervision of a clinical
pharmacist. Activities include dispensing prescriptions, counseling patients regarding
pharmaceutical care, and providing information to patients upon discharge from the hospital.
Students also learn about inventory control, drug information services, pharmacy committees
and patient-centered pharmacy practice in wards. Upon completion of the practical training in
institutions or hospitals the student submits an Internship Report to the Pharmacy Department
for evaluation by the faculty. (7 Credit Hrs.)
PHAR 503. Industrial Experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of prior coursework. This
training includes orientation to different departments in the pharmaceutical industry, which helps
students relate the theoretical concepts of their courses with the practical side of the profession.
The students will undertake a 1-week training program in pharmaceutical houses to obtain
exposure to pharmaceutical manufacturing of tablets and capsules, oral liquid preparations,
materials handling, and quality control. (1 Credit Hr.)

                                  Social Sciences (SOCS)
SOCS 103. Oman and Islamic Civilization/Modern Society. The historical framework of
Islamic civilization and its essential characteristics in comparison to Western civilization. (2
Credit Hrs.)

SOCS 201. Communication Skills for Pharmacists. The importance of communication skills
in the field of pharmacy will be introduced including the principles of interpersonal

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                    STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011

communication and the role of perception and nonverbal communication in effective
communication. Students will learn and practice good listening and empathic responding. (2
Credit Hrs.)




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                      STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011




Fees & Other Charges

TUITION FEE
The tuition fees, as of now, will cover the cost of academic services and internet access. Fees are
subject to change every year.

All fees are due and payable on or before semester registration. No student will be admitted to
class until all tuition and other fees are paid in full. Any student failing to complete registration
during normal registration period will have to pay a late registration fee of R.O. 25/-. No student
will be permitted to register after two weeks of beginning the classes.


REFUND POLICY
Students who withdraw after registration but before the first day of classes are entitled for a
refund of 90 percent of the semester‟s tuition. Students who withdraw from the college before
the 8th week of the semester are entitled to a refund of half of the tuition fee for that semester.
For students who withdraw from a course by the 10th week of the semester, the tuition will be
retained and applied to the repeat of the course. No refunds will be made if a dropped course is
not repeated.

FEES STRUCTURE
From the academic year 2010-2011, the tuition fee for all newly admitted pharmacy and health
science students is R.O. 100/- per credit hour.


CHARGES FOR OTHER SERVICES
In order to inculcate the sense of responsibility and accountability among the students, the
college will charge the following services;

Registration Fee                                        RO. 50/-
Special Registration Fees for Advanced Placement        RO 200/-
Replacing a lost locker key:                            RO.5/-
Replacing of lost Goggles:                              RO.10/-
Replacing of lost lab coat:                             RO.10/-
Replacing lost & misplaced item:                        RO.5/- per item


HOSTEL RENTAL
Students seeking accommodation in the hostel will be required to pay a refundable deposit of
RO.100/- at the time of admission. The rental charge for each seat in the hostel is RO. 80/-.
This includes the cost of transportation to the college and return.


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