University of California Santa Barbara School Psychology Handbook

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University of California Santa Barbara School Psychology Handbook Powered By Docstoc
					University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
   
                      2010‐2011



             University
of
California
Santa
Barbara

                          Gevirtz
Graduate
School
of
Education


           Department
of
Counseling,
Clinical,
and
School
Psychology


      California
Commission
on
Teaching
Credentials
(CCTC)
Accredited


        National
Association
of
School
Psychologists
(NASP)
Approved



               American
Psychological
Association
(APA)
Accredited





          School
Psychology
Handbook
2010‐2011





School
Psychology
Handbook
                
                              1

                                                                        

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
   
           2010‐2011


         Don't
Miss
Your
Professional
Conventions






                                                                    


April
13‐15,
2011;
Costa
Mesa,
CA;
www.casponline.org









                                                   


Feb.
22‐25,
2011;
San
Francisco;
www.nasponline.org




                                               



School
Psychology
Handbook
                
                   2

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
      
                         2010‐2011





School
Psychology
Students


2002   Jenne Simental (PhD, School Psychologist, Texas, Dissertation)
2006   Elena Lilles (PhD, Internship)
2006   Camille Jones (PhD, Internship)
2007   Kristin Ritchey (PhD, Internship)
2007   Tyler Renshaw (PhD, Internship)
2007   James Earhart (PhD, Internship)
2007   Katie Eklund (PhD, Internship)
2007   Shelley Hart (PhD, Internship)
2007   Kaitlyn Stewart (PhD, Internship)
2008   Meagan O'Malley (PhD, Internship)
2008   Amber Bharoocha (SPEDR PhD, Internship)
2008   Zhanna Shekhtmeyster (MEd, Internship)
2007   Sofie Beem (PhD)
2007   Elina Saeki (PhD)
2007   Lindsey O'Brennan (PhD)
2007   Kristen Sullivan (PhD)
2007   Renee Singh (PhD)
2008   Jenna Chin (PhD)
2008   Won-Fong Lau (PhD)
2008   Jennifer Twyford (PhD)
2008   Victoria Gonzalez (MEd)
2009   Amanda Fox (MEd)
2009   Karina Ortega (MEd)
2009   Kymberly Doane (MEd)
2009   Megan Potter (MEd)
2009   Rachel Yu (MEd)
2009   Annmary Shenouda (PhD)
2009   Matthew Ruderman (PhD)
2009   Skye Fraser (PhD)
2010   Jacqueline Brown (PhD)
2010   Erin Prothro (MEd)
2010   Ashley Mayworm (MEd)
2010   Jennica Rebelez (PhD)
2010   Jennifer Schell (MEd)
2010   Lisa Wilcoxen (PhD)
2010   William Rime (PhD)
2010   Nelly Rivera (MEd)




School
Psychology
Handbook
                   
                                 3

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
               
                                          2010‐2011



Graduates
(post
1991
CTC
approval)

1992*   John Laughlin (MEd, Psychologist; San Leandro School District)
1992*   Judy Greycloud (MEd, Psychologist; Gateway Community School, Camarillo)
1993*   Marcy Feldman (MEd, Psychologist; Los Angeles Unified School District)
1993*   Guadalupe Morales (MEd, Psychologist; Oxnard Elementary School District)
1993*   Rebecca Norton (MEd, school psychologist; Santa Barbara School Districts)
1993    Kristie Schrutchfield (Transferred to Ph.D. Program at Texas A&M)
1994    Lisa Hassin (MEd, Psychologist; Marin County Office of Education)
1994    Vicky Lorelli (MEd, Psychologist; Santa Barbara School Districts)
1995    Patricia Andrejack (MEd, Psychologist)
1995    Dory Walker, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor, University of Utah; CCSP Ph.D)
1996    Melanie West (Psychologist; Manhattan Beach Unified School District.)
1996    Sharon Corcoran (Psychologist; San Luis Obispo County Office of Education)
1996    Jessica Muñoz (Psychologist; Paso Robles Unified School District)
1997    Jennifer Rosenblatt, Ph.D. (Development & Disability; VP Dr. Koop's Web Site)
1997    Peter Mortola, PhD (Development & Disability; faculty at Portland State University)
1997    Michael Corritone (M.Ed./Credential; Contra Costa County Office of Education)
1997    Elizabeth Couto (M.Ed./Credential; school psychologist, Merced Union High School District)
1997    Dara Stiebel, PhD (Development & Disability; Los Angeles Unified School District, part-time)
1998    Jennifer Kelly (M.Ed./Credential; school psychologist, Oceanside Unified School District)
1998    Elizabeth Laurie (M.Ed./Credential, LEP, NCSP, school psychologist, SB County Schools, Lecturer, UCSB)
1999    Annette Smith, PhD, CCSP (school psychologist, Torrance School District)
1999    Robert Ngan (MEd/Credential, school psychologist, Los Angeles Unified School District)
1999    Michael Bates, PhD, CCSP (Mosaic)
1999    Laurel Robertson, PhD, CCSP
1999    Barbara D'Incau, PhD, CCSP (Oxnard SD)
2000    Annie Chung, Ph.D., (Children's Mental Health Services, Kauai, Hawaii)
2000    Melvina Chase, Ph.D.
2000    Michael Pobanz, Ph.D. (SPEDR/Credential, school psychologist, Los Angeles Unified School District)
2000    Monette Tijerina (M.Ed./Credential, school psychologist, Santa Barbara School Districts)
2000    Iris Zanglis (PhD SPEDR, school psychologist, Santa Barbara School Districts)
2000    Suzanne Anthony (Ph.D., private practice, Honolulu, HI)
2000    Jeff Klein (PHD, Kansas)
2001    Cheri Barkhau (school psychologist, Bay Area)
2001    Berkeley Bowers (school psychologist, San Diego)
2001    Meredith Karp (school psychologist, Santa Monica/Malibu USD)
2001    Alexis Zavaleta (school psychologist, Los Angeles USD)
2001    Mari Minjarez Baptista (Special Education Coordinator, Santa Barbara County Education Office)
2001    Robin Kracker (PhD, SPEDR/Credential, school psychologist)
2001    Grace Santarelli (PhD, SPEDR/Credential, School Psychologist)
2001    Meri Harding, (Ph.D., Professor, California State University, Sonoma)
2001    Emily Kiedman (Ph.D.)
2001    Katherine Elliott (Ph.D., UC Davis)
2002    Joanna Cheng (MED, school psychologist, Montclaire USD)
2002    Sandra Luhrsen (MED, school psychologist, Escondido)
2002    Iris Zanglis (PhD, school psychologist, Santa Barbara City Schools)
2003    Kim Grant (school psychologist, Goleta Union School District)
2003    Matt Harstock (school psychologist, Bay area)
2003    Fiona Wu (school psychologist, San Jose)
2003    Jill Sharkey (PhD, SPEDR, Academic Coordinator, UCSB)
2003    Geoff Smith
2003    Renee Pavelski (PhD, Stanford University)
2003    Maria Alvarez (school psychologist, Sonoma area)
2004    Stacy O'Farrell (SPEDR PHD; Soquel)




School
Psychology
Handbook
                            
                                                         4

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
              
                          2010‐2011


Graduates
(cont.)

2004   Lisa Jai (MED, LAUSD)
2004   Zarah DeVera (MED, Oakland USD)
2004   Amy Decrescenzo (MED, Maryland
2004   Elana Hamovitch (MED, San Diego)
2004   Jennifer Kang (MED, Orange County)
2004   Amy Spurrier (MED, Ventura County)
2004   Sabrina Rhee (ABD, school psychologist, Portland and dissertation)
2005   Paul Lozano (MED, school psychologist, Santa Barbara School Districts)
2005   Katherine Brown (SRI, San Francisco)
2005   Gabrielle Anderson (PhD., Columbia University Medical Center, New York)
2005   Francisco Rocco (Children's Hospital, Los Angeles)
2005   Emily Fisher (Professor, Loyola-Marymount University)
2005   Amber Kaufman (PhD, Western Psychological Services)
2005   Grace St Jean (MED, Oceanside USD)
2006   Natasha Carter (MED, Denver Public Schools)
2006   Nicole Donovan (MED, School Psychologist, NY)
2006   Denise Perez, (MED, School Psychologist, CA)
2006   Catherine Taylor, (MED, School Psychologist)
2006   Alicia Soliz, MED
2007   Megan (Brown) DeCristoforo (PHD, private practice, NJ)
2007   Kelly Graydon (PHD, Professor, Chapman University)
2007   Blanca Orellana (PHD)
2007   Mabel Gonzalez (PhD)
2007   Lauren Adamek (MED)
2007   Tracy Cortichiato (MED)
2007   Andrew Long (MED)
2007   Lee Meneken (MED)
2007   Sarah Sweeney (MED)
2007   Megan Redding Allen (PhD, Children’s Health Council, Palo Alto, CA)
2008   Chau (Tran) Goel (MED, San Francisco),
2008   Christina Ibarbia (MED, Oxnard)
2008   Sarah Pletcher (PhD)
2009   Allison (Lee) Staton (MED, Fulsom)
2009   Heather Malone (MED, Ojai)
2009   Mary (Skokut) Patterson (PhD, Santa Barbara County)
2009   Sunny Crandell (MED, Santa Barbara City College)
2009   Yasmin Chacko (MED, San Diego)
2010   Diane Tanigawa (PhD, School Psychologist, Los Angeles USD)
2010   Amy Jane Griffiths (PhD, The HELP Group)
2010   Rene Staskal (PhD)
2010   Santiago Cardenas (MED, SB County)
2010   Lizbeth Chavez-Lopez (MEd, SB County)
2010   Elizabeth Norris (MEd, LAUSD)
2010   Laura Sass (MEd, Maryland)




School
Psychology
Handbook
                           
                                  5

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011



Introduction
 
                       
      
       
       




Welcome
to
UCSB!



        

This
document
describes
a
scientist‐practitioner
model
that
seeks
to
train
school
psychologists
to

assume
broad‐based
professional
roles
in
schools
that
address
the
complex
developmental,

emotional,
and
educational
needs
of
children.
It
is
our
belief
that
this
type
of
training
is
needed
to

prepare
school
psychologists
to
be
valuable
resources
as
schools
respond
to
the
challenges
of

educating
California's
increasingly
diverse
student
population.



        

As
in
any
graduate
training
program,
the
school
psychology
specialization
described
in
this
student

handbook
provides
only
the
structure
through
which
knowledge,
skills,
and
professional
development

can
take
place.
A
basic
principle
of
this
specialization
is
the
expectation
that
each
student
will
make
a

commitment
to
develop
skills
both
in
and
out
of
specific
courses.
It
is
imperative
that
you
be

responsible
for
your
own
learning
and
professional
development
by
viewing
the
specialization

requirements
as
the
environment
in
which
learning
occurs.
At
its
best,
this
learning
involves

independent
study,
attendance
at
professional
conferences,
participation
in
clinical
and
research

activities,
in
addition
to
completion
of
the
required
course
work.



        

By
working
together
we
can
develop
a
community
that
encourages
mutual
support
of
self‐initiated

learning.
As
we
enter
the
2010‐2011
school
year,
we
want
to
encourage
each
of
us
to
approach
the

year
with
a
positive
spirit
and
a
commitment
to
proudly
acknowledge
the
many
meaningful
ways
that

school
psychologists,
as
educators,
can
contribute
to
the
broad
educative
mission
of
schools.



        

We
the
faculty
are
continually
working
to
improve
our
own
professional
development
and
the
quality

of
the
program
as
a
whole.
We
value
student
mentorship
and
the
learning
that
working
together

yields
for
everyone
involved.
We
constantly
strive
to
enhance
the
classroom,
fieldwork,
and

mentoring
experiences
for
students
and
we
regularly
reflect
to
update
and
improve
our
practice.
You

are
an
important
part
of
this
process
at
UCSB
that
will
lead
to
benefits
for
all
of
us,
including
the

children,
families,
and
schools
that
we
have
the
honor
to
work
with.
We
look
forward
to
the

challenges
and
fun
that
are
ahead
of
us.



Erin
Dowdy,
Ph.D.

Michael
Furlong,
Ph.D.,
NCSP,
Licensed
Psychologist,
LEP

Beth
Laurie,
M.Ed.,
NCSP,
LEP

Shane
Jimerson,
Ph.D.,
NCSP

Gale
Morrison,
Ph.D.,
Dean
UCSB
Graduate
Division

Matthew
Quirk,
Ph.D.


Jill
Sharkey,
Ph.D.,
NCSP





School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                            6

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
                      
                                              2010‐2011







Table
of
Contents

Program
of
Study
and
Preparation

Program
Description........................................................................................................8

Program
Philosophy
and
Goals ........................................................................................9

School
Psychology
Credential
Program
Objectives.........................................................12

People
I
should
get
to
know
&
Websites........................................................................14

Credential
Course
Requirements ...................................................................................15

Practicum
and
Internship
Training .................................................................................18

Advising:
Getting
your
Credential ..................................................................................22

UCSB
Student
Resources................................................................................................24

Evaluation
of
Student
Progress
&
Assessments..............................................................27

School
Psychology
Faculty .............................................................................................32




Appendices

A.
Counseling
Skills
Evaluation...................................................................................... A1

B.
Field
Supervisor
Evaluation
–
Year
1 ......................................................................... A7

C.
Field
Supervisor
Evaluation
–
Practica
and
Internship ............................................... A9

D.
Portfolio
Guidelines
&
End
of
Year
Review
for
M.Ed.
and
Credential .......................A16

E.
Fieldwork/Internship
Plan........................................................................................A25

F.
Signature
Assignments
............................................................................................A43

G.
NASP,
CCTC,
and
APA
Standards
Cross‐Referenced .................................................A54









School
Psychology
Handbook
                                   
                                                           7

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                 2010‐2011


                    SCHOOL
PSYCHOLOGY
AT
UCSB

                                                   

                   Graduate
Study
in
School
Psychology

           Department
of
Counseling,
Clinical,
and
School
Psychology

                   University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara

                            Program
Philosophy

Program
Description


The
Department
of
Counseling,
Clinical,
and
School
Psychology
in
the
Gevirtz
Graduate
School
of

Education
at
the
University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
offers
a
post‐master
degree
specialization
in

School
Psychology.
Students
successfully
completing
this
specialization
receive
the
California
Pupil

Personnel
Services
Credential
with
advanced
specialization
in
School
Psychology.
Students
complete
a

Masters
Degree
as
part
of
the
credential
specialization.



Most
students
are
accepted
into
the
program
without
a
master’s
degree
and
apply
for
admission
to

graduate
student
standing.
If
accepted
to
graduate
standing,
these
students
begin
taking
courses

toward
an
M.Ed.
Degree
in
Education.
The
M.Ed.
Degree
is
awarded
after
the
first
48
quarter
units

are
successfully
completed.




Students
entering
the
specialization
with
no
master’s
degree
will
complete
three
years
of
graduate

study,
which
includes
450
hours
of
fieldwork
during
the
first
two
years
(see
fieldwork
description
in

the
appendices).
During
the
first
year,
students
complete
a
broadbased
practicum
that
includes

assignments
carried
out
in
both
the
program’s
community
counseling
training
clinic
and
public

schools.
The
first
year
of
practicum
includes
activities
involving
joint
training
with
other
programs

within
the
Graduate
School
of
Education.
The
practicum
experiences
during
the
second
year
are

primarily
in
a
public
school
setting.
A
full‐time
internship
is
completed
as
a
culminating
experience:

during
year
3
in
the
M.Ed.
track
(1,200
clock
hours)
and
in
year
5
or
6
in
the
APA
Ph.D.
track
(1,500

clock
hours).
The
minimum
number
of
units
required
to
complete
the
specialization
is
100
units
plus

internship
units.
Students
typically
opt
to
take
additional
courses
to
improve
their
knowledge
and

skills
or
may
be
required,
on
an
individual
basis,
to
take
additional
courses
to
strengthen
areas
of

deficiency.



The
UCSB
School
Psychology
Specialization
is
intensive
and
requires
a
full‐time
commitment.

Many
of
the
courses
are
offered
during
the
day.
A
basic
principle
of
the
program
is
that
learning
does

not
take
place
only
in
the
context
of
formal
course
work.
The
program
seeks
to
develop
a
true

community
of
learners
who
participate
in
the
learning
process
and
make
a
firm
commitment
to
be

involved
in
the
continued
improvement
of
the
program.



Advanced
(doctoral)
study
in
the
CCSP
Department
goes
beyond
the
specialization
level
and
includes

in‐depth
study
in
research,
professional
issues
in
psychology,
advanced
practicum
experiences,
and

advanced
study
in
other
areas
(e.g.,
methodology,
human
development,
system‐level
interventions).

The
specialist
program
(Masters
Degree
+
Credential)
is
a
central
part
of
the
doctoral
training
in
the

Department
of
Counseling,
Clinical,
and
School
Psychology.
We
require
all
students
to
meet
state


School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                          8

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                 2010‐2011

(California
Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing)
and
national
(National
Association
of
School

Psychologists)
standard
requirements
as
a
fundamental
core
of
their
training.
The
doctoral
program
is

accredited
by
the
American
Psychological
Association
and
approved
by
NASP
through
2013.
The
MEd

credential
specialist
program
of
study
has
been
approved
by
CCTC
since
1991
and
NASP
since
1998.


Program
Fieldwork
Sequence


Year
 
        
      MEd
Program

         
       PhD
Program

1
        
    
      100
Hours
      
     
       100
Hours

2
        
    
      350
Hours
      
     
       350
Hours

3
        
    
      1,200
Hours
    
     
       Advanced
Fieldwork:
BCT

4
        
    
      N/A
 
          
     
       Internship
Applications;
BCT
optional

5
or
6
   
    
      N/A
 
          
     
       1,500
Hours
 
        
       
      
      


Program
Philosophy
and
Goals


The
School
Psychology
Specialization
at
UCSB
is
committed
to
a
scientist‐practitioner
model
of

training
in
school
psychology
with
emphasis
on
the
role
of
school
psychologists
as
highly
qualified

practitioners
as
defined
by
state
(CCTC)
and
national
(NASP)
standards
and
also
as
leaders/innovators

in
comprehensive
support
services
to
schools.
The
core
training
is
designed
to
not
only
meet
but
also

exceed
state
and
national
standards,
which
are
detailed
and
cross‐referenced
in
Appendix
G.
We
are

proud
to
be
accredited
by
CCTC
and
APA
and
approved
by
NASP,
and
work
diligently
to
ensure
each

student
receives
in‐depth
training
that
reflects
current
scholarship
in
the
field.
We
expect
our

students
to
be
curious,
dedicated,
and
take
initiative
to
exceed
basic
requirements.
We
expect

students
to
energize
our
community
with
respectful
relationships
and
work
hard
to
maintain
our

program’s
excellence.
Through
our
joint
efforts
we
promote
each
student
to
become
leaders
and

innovators
in
the
field
of
school
psychology.
Additional
areas
of
program
focus
are
detailed
below.



Scientist‐Practitioner
Philosophy.
We
are
committed
to
emphasizing
the
implications
of
research

findings
in
psychology
and
education
for
psychological
services
in
school
settings.
In
turn,
we

emphasize
the
analysis
of
problems
encountered
in
school
settings
from
a

scientific/evaluative/research
point
of
view.
We
recognize
the
need
for
school
psychologists
to
apply

research‐based
skills
and
evidence‐based
strategies
to
assist
all
students
to
learn
and
maximize
their

human
potential.
This
means
that
school
psychologists
work
with
regular
education
students
and

with
students
who
have
special
learning
needs.
In
addition
to
core
content
courses,
this
analytical

perspective
may
be
complemented
by
ongoing
practicum
experiences
in
the
Dr.
Ray
Hosford
CCSP

Training
Clinic,
the
UCSB
Autism
Clinic,
as
well
as
in
local
schools
and
agencies.
These
practicum

experiences
are
closely
supervised
by
both
university
and
field
supervisors.




The
UCSB
training
model
is
based
on
the
integration
of
theory,
research
methodology,
professional

role
development,
and
practice/skills.
The
theoretical
areas
of
study
include
strands
in
human

development,
prevention/interventions,
assessment,
consultation,
programs
and
services,

legal/ethical,
as
well
as
evaluation/research.
Research
methodology
includes
courses
in
research,

evaluation,
and
quantitative
analysis.
All
students
take
a
research
practicum
and
most
participate
in

formal
professional
research
presentations.
Professional
role
development
involves
the
engagement

of
students
in
reading
and
active
discussion
about
the
changing
role
of
the
school
psychologist
in
the


School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                           9

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011

schools.
Field‐based
practice
and
skill
development
is
accompanied
by
university‐based
supervision

designed
to
integrate
the
areas
of
theory,
research,
and
role
development
with
what
the
trainees
are

experiencing
in
the
field.




A
primary
training
emphasis
of
students
in
doctoral
programs
associated
with
school
psychology
at

UCSB
is
research.
Doctoral
students
engage
in
research
activities
throughout
their
studies
at
UCSB.
It

is
typical
for
doctoral
students
to
participate
in
several
professional
publications
and
presentations
at

professional
conferences
while
at
UCSB.
Although
the
focus
of
the
Master's
degree‐school
psychology

credential
specialization
is
on
the
application
of
psychological
and
education
knowledge
in
school

settings,
these
students
also
have
a
number
of
opportunities
to
engage
in
research
activities.

Master's
degree
students
also
participate
in
research
and
program
evaluation
projects
and
assist
in

preparing
information
for
publications
and
professional
conferences.
All
students
are
encouraged
to

seek
out
opportunities
to
engage
in
research
activities
that
augment
their
classroom
instruction.



Goal—
Comprehensive
Support
Services.
We
view
the
school
psychologist
as
pivotal
in
the
provision

of
comprehensive
support
services
to
teachers,
students,
and
parents.
Comprehensive
support

services
include
prevention,
assessment,
and
intervention
programs
for
all
children.
A
primary
goal
of

the
specialization
is
to
train
school
psychologists
who
work
to
enhance
the
learning
and
development

of
all
students
and
to
assist
those
who
are
at‐risk
or
in
need
of
special
education
services.
These

services
include,
but
are
not
limited
to,
implementing
and
supporting
primary
prevention
programs,

student
study
team
efforts
of
pre‐referral
interventions
(both
academic
and
behavioral),

multidisciplinary
assessments
(including
continuous
progress
monitoring),
crisis
intervention
efforts

(including
suicide
prevention
and
intervention),
psychoeducational
interventions,
involvement
in

school
safety
and
school
improvement
planning
efforts,
and
services
in
special
education
programs.




In
our
view,
school
psychologists
are
leaders
in
the
development
and
provision
of
support
services
in

the
schools.
Therefore,
particular
emphasis
is
given
to
training
the
development
of
consultation
and

collaboration
skills
that
are
needed
to
work
with
other
school
and
community
professionals
and
to

facilitate
group
efforts
in
program
development.
Another
goal
is
to
train
school
psychologists
who

recognize
the
critical
role
teachers
play
in
the
learning
process
and
who
are
determined
to
support

teachers’
efforts
to
provide
a
broad‐based
educational
program.
Our
specialization
offers
a
strong

emphasis
on
counseling
and
interpersonal
communication
skills,
which
provides
the
necessary

foundation
to
build
skills
of
consultation,
program
development,
and
planning.
This
is
strongly

supported
by
the
training
offered
to
the
students
through
the
resources
of
the
CCSP
Program:
i.e.,

extensive
course
offerings,
diverse
faculty
perspectives,
and
modern
community
counseling
clinic.




Effective
leadership
in
comprehensive
support
services
requires
a
solid
knowledge
base
about
how

schools
function
as
an
organization.
Therefore,
students
in
our
specialization
are
required
to
have
a

thorough
background
in
areas
such
as
school
effectiveness,
early
academic
interventions,
safe
school

planning,
schools
as
a
social
system,
and
the
administration
of
guidance
services.
We
feel
that
these

are
crucial
skills
for
future
school
psychologists.
As
schools
undergo
increasing
decentralization
of

decision
making,
school
psychologists’
interpersonal
relationships
and
negotiation
skills
will
be

valuable
assets
to
school
improvement
efforts.







School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                           10

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011

Emphasis
on
Diversity.
Effective
provision
of
support
services
also
requires
awareness,
knowledge,

and
skill
development
in
dealing
with
diverse
populations.
Therefore,
throughout
course
work,

references
and
applications
will
be
made
to
demonstrate
how
existing
knowledge
and
skills
can
be

applied
and
adapted
to
serve
every
child.
Particular
attention
is
given
to
the
skills
needed
to
work

with
children
and
families
of
ethnic
and
linguistic
minorities.
In
addition
to
broad‐based
integration
of

diversity
issues
in
all
courses,
students
are
required
to
take
a
diversity
course.






School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                           11

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                 2010‐2011



                                Program
Objectives

Our
program
uses
as
its
guide
the
Standards
of
the
California
Commission
on
Teacher

Credentialing
and
the
National
Association
of
School
Psychologists.
These
standards

represent
the
core
knowledge
and
skills
you
will
be
acquiring
during
your
studies
at

UCSB.
These
Standards
are
detailed
in
Appendix
G.


School
Psychology
Degree
and
Credential
Requirements


California
State
Credential
Pre‐Requisites

Students
must
see
the
UCSB,
GGSE
credential
analyst
(Suzanne
Raphael)
to
complete
all
forms
neces‐
sary
to
begin
work
on
the
school
psychologist
credential.
These
forms
must
be
completed
before
any

fieldwork
experiences
can
occur.
All
students
seeking
the
PPS
school
psychology
credential
must

follow
these
procedures.
There
are
fees
associated
with
this
process.


Specifically,
students
in
the
School
Psychology
Credential
program
must
(a)
take
the

CBEST
(and
pass
for
the
credential),
(b)
have
a
Certificate
of
Clearance
or
a
California
Teaching
or

Services
Credential,
(c)
obtain
a
TB
Clearance
administered
by
the
UCSB
Student
Health
Services,
and

(d)
verify
a
Bachelor's
Degree
from
a
regionally
accredited
institution.



Master
in
Education
Degree
Program
(For
both
MEd
and
PhD
students)

The
Department
of
Counseling,
Clinical,
and
School
Psychology
offers
an
MEd
degree
in
Counseling,

Clinical,
and
School
Psychology
with
an
emphasis
in
School
Psychology.
The
Master
of
Education

Degree
Program
consists
of
a
minimum
of
48
quarter
units.
These
units
essentially
consist
of
the
first

year
in
the
School
Psychology
Specialization.
Students
are
required
to
submit
a
portfolio
as
part
of
the

M.Ed.
comprehensive
oral
examination.
Most
students
formally
receive
their
MEd
degree
at
the
end

of
year
2,
just
prior
to
beginning
their
internship
placement.
An
MEd
oral
examination
is
part
of
the

year
2
credential
portfolio
meeting.
Successful
completion
of
the
oral
examination
is
required
to

obtain
the
MEd
degree.
Students
admitted
to
the
specialization
are
required
to
complete
approved

credit
hours
beyond
the
M.Ed.
Degree
and
1,200
hours
of
internship
as
a
culminating
fieldwork

experience.




The
goal
of
our
course
sequence
is
to
ensure
that
the
student
is
provided
with
critical
"bottom‐line"

knowledge
and
experiences.
These
experiences
are
delivered
through
required
coursework
that

remains
stable
from
year‐to‐year
and
is
provided
by
core
faculty.
Additionally,
there
are
strands
of

knowledge
that
can
be
acquired
from
a
variety
of
courses
within
the
School
of
Education;
therefore,

students
are
afforded
more
flexibility
in
course
taken
within
these
areas.
We
have
found
that

maintaining
flexibility
within
select
areas
affords
the
students
and
faculty
opportunities
to

individualize
student
programs
to
better
meet
their
background
experiences
and
future
aspirations.




Internship
Experience.
After
successful
completion
of
the
second
year
of
training,
students
will
be

qualified
to
apply
for
an
internship
credential,
which
will
allow
them
to
be
paid
for
their
internship



School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                          12

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011

training.
Although
the
UCSB
School
Psychology
specialization
has
arrangements
with
several
local

school
districts
for
potential
paid
internships,
the
program
does
not
guarantee
that
students
will
be

accepted
for
one
of
these
internship
positions;
the
districts
maintain
hiring
discretion.
Students
are

responsible
to
seek
paid
internships
with
support
from
the
UCSB
faculty.
However,
students
are

guaranteed
a
non‐paid
internship
placement
if
they
are
determined
by
the
faculty
to
be
ready
for
this

experience.



        

The
Internship
Credential
is
required
when
the
student
will
be
reimbursed
for
their
internship

service.
The
internship
credential
is
issued
by
the
credential
office
at
UCSB
based
on
approval
from

the
California
Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing.
This
credential
allows
a
school
district
to
hire
a

school
psychology
intern
(all
employees
of
school
districts
in
California
must
have
a
valid
credential).

The
internship
credential
is
limited
to
cover
the
time
period
during
which
the
student
will
received

supervised
internship
experience
within
the
district,
but
not
longer
than
two
years.
The
internship

credential
is
valid
only
for
the
school
district
that
will
hire
the
student
for
an
internship
position.

Should
a
student
complete
more
than
one
internship
(e.g.,
part‐time
positions
in
two
districts
or
half

time
positions
during
different
school
years)
then
a
separate
internship
credential
agreement
is

required
for
each
district.
Please
consult
your
advisor
prior
to
seeking
any
internship
position.



Students
complete
the
forms
needed
to
formally
obtain
the
internship
credential—see
the
Credential

Analyst
(Suzanne
Raphael).
This
should
occur
no
later
than
the
end
of
the
Spring
Quarter
of
the

second
year
of
study.




While
all
students
in
the
M.Ed.
Degree
program
must
enroll
in
CNCSP
275:
Internship
in
School

Psychology
for
1,200
hours
in
the
third
year
of
training,
students
in
the
Ph.D.
program
have
a
variety

of
choices
depending
on
their
background,
training,
and
individual
goals.
Any
student
in
the
Ph.D.

Degree
program
who
wishes
to
gain
fieldwork
experience
in
the
year
prior
to
the
1,500
hour
doctoral

internship
(CNCSP
279
ABC)
must
enroll
in
CNCSP
275
to
develop
a
fieldwork
plan
and
receive

University
supervision.
In
addition,
any
student
who
is
paid
for
internship‐level
experience
must

obtain
an
internship
credential.



Professional
Behavior.
Participation
in
fieldwork
requires
adherence
to
standards
of
professional

behavior
as
well
as
stable
mental
and
physical
health,
which
includes
your
appearance.
All
students

are
expected
to
adhere
to
NASP
Principles
for
Professional
Ethics
and
California
laws
of
practice.
You

must
wear
professional
clothing
and
shoes.
Smoking
is
prohibited.
You
will
be
rated
on
the
following

skills
quarterly:
respect
for
human
diversity,
communication
skills,
effective
interpersonal
relations,

ethical
responsibility,
adaptability,
and
initiative
and
dependability.

If
at
any
time
a
concern

regarding
professional
behavior
comes
up
through
evaluation
or
is
brought
up
by
your
field

supervisor,
a
written
remediation
plan
will
be
put
into
place.
If
the
concern
persists
and/or
you

cannot
be
placed
with
a
field
supervisor
due
to
professional
behavior
or
health
concerns,
you
will
be

unable
to
complete
the
course.





School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                          13

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                2010‐2011



People
I
Should
Get
to
Know


Your
advisor:
 ____________________________________________________________ 


e‐mail:
 _________________________________________________________________ 


Credential
Services
Director:

1175

Phelps,
Suzanne
Raphael
(Ph:
x2084)



e‐mail:
suzanne@education.ucsb.edu



School
Psychology
Coordinator:
Dr.
Jill
D.
Sharkey


e‐mail:
jsharkey@education.ucsb.edu


CCSP
Department
Graduate
Advisor:

Dr.
Shane
R.
Jimerson



e‐mail:
jimerson@education.ucsb.edu


Your
Student
Mentor:

 ____________________________________________________ 


(Ph:
____________)
e‐mail:
 ________________________________________________ 


Your
GSA
President:

 ______________________________________________________ 


(Ph:
____________)
e‐mail:
 ________________________________________________ 




Web
sites

www.education.ucsb.edu/school‐psychology



www.education.ucsb.edu/csbyd



www.education.ucsb.edu/spec



www.education.ucsb.edu/cdspp





School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                       14

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
        
                                    2010‐2011




Required
Courses
for
ALL
Credential
Students
(Ph.D.
and
M.Ed.)
*
taken
during
year
1,
**taken
year
2,
***
taken
year
3
(as
a
general
guideline‐you
need
to
check)


I.
RESEARCH
CORE
(16
units)

*ED
214A
or
ED201D
 
Statistics
(4)
(Fall‐1
or
2)

*CNCSP
209A
(ED
298A)
Research
Practica
(6
quarters)
(24)
(FWS
1
+
2)



II.
PROFESSIONAL
PRACTICE:
ASSESSMENT,
PREVENTION,
&
INTERVENTION
THEORIES‐SKILLS
(36

units)

*CNCSP
250
Cognitive
Assessment
n
Professional
Psych
(4)
(Fall‐1)

*CNCSP
256
Behavioral
Assessment
and
Intervention
for
Children
and
Adolescents
(4)
(Spring)

*CNCSP
257B
Psychoeducational
Assessment
and
Intervention
(4)
(Winter‐1)

*CNCSP
260B

Basic
Practicum
(4)
(Winter‐1)

**CNCSP
262A
Consultation
in
the
Schools
and
Community
(4)
(Fall‐2)

**CNCSP
262B
School‐Based
Mental
Health
Services
(4)
(Spring)

*CNCSP
262C
Counseling
Children
and
Families
(4)
(Spring)

**CNCSP
262D
School
Safety,
Violence,
and
Crisis
Response
(4)
(Winter)

**CNCSP
292
Resiliency,
Strengths
and
Youth
Development
(4)
(Spring)





    

III.
PROFESSIONAL
KNOWLEDGE
AND
FOUNDATIONS
(36
units)

**CNCSP
212
Cognitive
Development
in
Autism
and
Other
Severe
Disabilities
(4)
(Winter)



                     

**CNCSP
220Human
Development
(4)
(Fall)

*CNCSP
223B

Developmental
Psychopathology
(4)
(Winter)

*CNCSP
274A

Contemporary
Issues
in
Student
Services:
School
Psych
First
Year
Induction
(4)
(Fall‐1)

*CNCSP
274B

Contemporary
Issues
in
Special
Education:
School
Psych
First
Year
Induction
(4)
(Winter‐1)

*CNCSP
274C

 School
Discipline
and
Alternative
Schooling:
School
Psych
First
Year
Induction
(4)
(Spring‐1)



**CNCSP
274D
Assessment
and
Data‐Based
Decision‐Making
in
the
Schools:
School
Psych
Practicum
(4)
(F‐2)

**CNCSP
274E
Ethics,
Diversity,
and
Specialized
Assessment
and
Intervention:
School
Psych
Practicum
(4)
(W‐2)

**CNCSP
274F
The
School
Psychologist
as
the
Intervention
Consultant:
School
Psych
Practicum
(4)
(S‐2)



IV.
INTERNSHIP
(12
units)

***
CNCSP
275
Internship
in
School
Psych
(1200
hours
minimum)+
(typically
3
quarters)
(or
279ABC
if

completing
a
school‐based
APA
internship;
for
PHD
students
only)





School
Psychology
Handbook
                     
                                             15

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
           
                                     2010‐2011



          GGSE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY CREDENTIAL COURSE WORK
 M.Ed. End of Year 1 (May 2011)           M.Ed. End of Year 2 (May 2012)              M.Ed. End of Year 3 (May 2013)
  Portfolio/Oral                       Portfolio/Oral                             Final Portfolio/Oral
                                        Application for internship credential      Apply for School Psych. Credential

Fall – Year I and Grades                                                                           Approved Equivalency
ED 214A or ED 201D Statistics (4) (Fall-1 or 2) _____
CNCSP 250 Cognitive Assessment n Professional Psychology (4) _____
CNCSP 274A Contemporary Issues in Student Services: School Psych First Year Induction (4) _____
CNCSP 209A (ED 298A) Research Practicum (6 quarters) (24) (FWS 1 + 2) _____

Winter – Year I and Grades
CNCSP 257B Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention (4) _____
CNCSP 260B Basic Practicum (4) _____
CNCSP 223B Developmental Psychopathology (4) _____
CNCSP 274B Contemporary Issues in Special Ed: School Psych First Year Induction (4) _____
CNCSP 209A (ED 298A) Research Practicum (6 quarters) (24) (FWS 1 + 2) _____

Spring– Year I and Grades
CNCSP 256 Behavioral Assessment Intervention for Children and Adolescents (4) _____
CNCSP 262C Counseling Children and Families (4) _____
CNCSP 274C School Discipline and Alternative School: School Psych First Year Induction (4) _____
CNCSP 209A (ED 298A) Research Practicum (6 quarters) (24) (FWS 1 + 2) _____
Fall – Year 2 and Grades
CNCSP 264A Supervision and Consultation in Applied Psychology (4) _____
CNCSP 220 Human Development (4) _____
CNCSP 274D Assessment and Data-Based Decision-Making in the Schools: School Psych Practicum
(4) _____
CNCSP 209A (ED 298A) Research Practicum (6 quarters) (24) (FWS 1 + 2) _____

Winter – Year 2 and Grades
CNCSP 212 Cognitive Development in Autism and Other Severe Disabilities (4) _____
CNCSP 262D School Safety, Violence, and Crisis Response (4) _____
CNCSP 274E Ethics, Diversity, and Specialized Assessment and Intervention: School Psych
Practicum (4) _____
CNCSP 209A (ED 298A) Research Practicum (6 quarters) (24) (FWS 1 + 2) _____


Spring Year 2 and Grades
CNCSP 262B School-Based Mental Health Services (4) _____
CNCSP 292 Resiliency, Strengths and Youth Development (4) _____
CNCSP 274F The School Psychologist as the Intervention Consultant: School Psych Practicum (4)
_____
CNCSP 209A (ED 298A) Research Practicum (6 quarters) (24) _____
Year 3 Internship
CNCSP 275 Internship in School Psychology (1,200 hours minimum)
or 279ABC if completing a school-based APA internship; for PHD students only)





School
Psychology
Handbook
                        
                                               16

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
                             
                                       2010‐2011



                       School
Ph.D.
Planning
Guide
2010‐2015

                                (Regularly
check
course
availability
and
adjust)

          FALL QUARTER
                                       WINTER QUARTER
                       SPRING QUARTER

YEAR 1: 2010                                         YEAR 1: 2011                         YEAR 1: 2011
17 units
                                            20 units
                            20 units

4274A Yr. 1 Practicum                               4274B Yr. 1 Practicum               4274C Yr. 1 Practicum
4250 Cognitive Assessment                           4260B Basic Practicum               4271B Basic Practicum
4260A Counseling Theories                           4257B Psycho-Educational            4292 Resilience & Strengths
1224A Professional Organizations                    Assessment                           4Ed 214C Statistics
4209A Research Practicum                            4Ed 214B Statistics                 4209A Research Practicum
 _____________________
                             4209A Research Practicum             _______________________
                                                      _______________________            Credential Folio Review
                                                     
                                    Annual Progress Report

YEAR 2: 2011                                         YEAR 2: 2012                         YEAR 2: 2012
20 units
                                            20 units
                            24 units

4274D Yr. 2 Practicum                               4274E Yr. 2 Practicum               4274F Yr. 2 Practicum
4201C Research Design                               4223B Developmental                 4256 Behavior Management
4Advanced Data Analysis*                            Psychopathology                      4225 Ethics
4220 Human Development                              4262D School Violence & Safety      4262B School-Based Mental Health
4209A Research Practicum                            4209A Research Practicum            4209A Research Practicum
 ______________________                             4597 Comprehensive Exam Prep        4597 Comprehensive Exam Prep
*Discuss with advisor. Common options:                _______________________             _______________________
multivariate (prereq for SEM), N = 1 design,         
                                    Ethics Paper June
qualitative methods, psychometrics)                                                       Year-2 Research Paper Summary
                                                     Theories Paper March


                                                                                         Credential Folio Review
                                                                                          Annual Progress Report
YEAR 3: 2012                                         YEAR 3: 2013                         YEAR 3: 2013
24 units
                                            24 units
                            20 units

4227 Diversity                                      4216 History & Systems              4209A Research Practicum
4209A Research Practicum                            4209A Research Practicum            4262C Child-Family
4262A Consultation & Supervision                    4270 Advanced Fieldwork             4270 Advanced Fieldwork
4210 NueroAnatomy or 210A Cog                       4212 Autism                         2291A Human Sexuality
Bases                                                4291C Family Violence               2291B Substance Abuse
4270 Advanced Fieldwork                             4598 Dissertation Exam Prep         4598 Dissertation Prep
4597 Comprehensive Exam Prep                         _______________________             _______________________
 _______________________                            
                                    Annual Progress Report
Year-2 Paper Presentation Research                                                        Dissertation Proposal
                                                                                          Internship Orientation
Festival
                                                                                          Complete Research Practicum Survey

Specialty Paper November
Qualifying Exam December

YEAR 4: 2013                                         YEAR 4: 2014                         YEAR 4: 2014
16 units
                                            16 units
                            12 units

4210 NueroAnatomy or 210A Cog                       4214 Social Bases of Behavior       12599 Dissertation
Bases                                                12599 Dissertation                  Annual Progress Report
12599 Dissertation                                  Select Internship
                   Dissertation Defense
                                                                                          Annual Progress Report
Apply for Internship
YEAR 5 : 2014                                        YEAR 5: 2015                         YEAR 5: 2015
12 units
                                            12 units
                            12 units

12279A PhD Internship                               12279B PhD Internship
              4279C PhD Internship
1500 hour minimum                                                                         Complete Exit Survey
(800 hours school-based needed for credential)   
                                        Final Credential Review



Consult your advisor each quarter regarding course selection before registering. Students must consult with faculty advisor before
registering for classes; some courses are offered at various times, not always the quarter indicated, due to sabbaticals, etc.




School
Psychology
Handbook
                                          
                                                 17

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                 2010‐2011



              Practicum
and
Internship
Training

Year
2:
Practicum
CNCSP
274(D,
E,
F)

CNCSP
274
is
a
three‐quarter
long
course
open
only
to
second‐year
school
psychology
students.

The
course
requires
each
student
to
spend
a
minimum
of
10‐15
hours
per
week
in
an
approved

school
practicum
site
under
the
supervision
of
a
credentialed
school
psychologist.
A
UCSB

faculty
member
provides
weekly
supervision.
Course
content
is
designed
to
develop
various

school
psychologist
competencies
necessary
to
meet
standards
as
required
by
California

Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing
and
the
National
Association
of
School
Psychologists.

Students
are
expected
to
compile
a
comprehensive
portfolio
of
academic
and
field
experiences

by
the
end
of
the
second
year
practicum.



This
weekly
seminar
provides
the
context
in
which
to:

   1. discuss
fieldwork
experiences
related
to
assessment,
counseling,
consultation,
and

      prevention
programming;

   2. assign
fieldwork
activities
to
enhance
the
integrity
of
practice;

   3. review
real‐time
educational,
professional,
and
ethical
issues;

   4. discuss
challenges
of
providing
psychoeducational
services
to
diverse
populations;

   5. discuss
the
role
of
supervision
in
the
preparation
of
school
psychologists;

   6. introduce
assessment
and
psychoeducational
resources;


   7. enhance
comprehensive
psychoeducational
assessment
reporting;
and

   8. review
related
readings.


Requirements:

   1.   Attendance
at
the
weekly
supervision
seminar.

   2.   Completion
of
a
weekly
fieldwork
log

   3.   Completion
of
fieldwork
plan
and
supervisor
evaluations
quarterly

   4.   Successful
completion
of
a
minimum
of
350
hours
of
supervised
fieldwork

   5.   Completion
of
assigned
field‐based
activities

   6.   Completion
of
required
readings
and
being
prepared
for
a
critical
discussion

        questions/comments
regarding
implications
for
school
psychology
practice.

Weekly
Logs

Students
must
keep
track
of
their
hours
and
activities.
Students
must
maintain
their
own

record
of
the
hours
they
work
and
what
types
of
activities
they
engage
in
during
their
hours.


Include
where,
of
the
four
possible
settings
(preschool,
elementary,
middle/junior
high,
high

school),
the
activities
were
conducted.
The
information
included
in
the
online
fieldwork
logs
is

not
a
comprehensive
recording
of
activities
but
rather
a
summary
of
activities
and
reflections

on
those
activities.
A
final,
comprehensive
log
maintained
by
the
student
must
be
included
in

the
portfolio.
Zoomerang
fieldwork
logs
guide
both
fieldwork
and
University
supervision.






School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                          18

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                  2010‐2011



Fieldwork
Plans

The
University
supervisor
works
with
each
student
to
refine
individualized
fieldwork
plans.
Each

quarter,
the
student
must
gain
feedback
from
the
fieldwork
supervisor
and
turn
in
the

evaluation
along
with
an
updated
plan
(due
the
last
day
of
class
each
quarter).
The

development
of
the
fieldwork
plan
is
a
series
of
outcomes
based
on
the
National
Association
of

School
Psychologist’s
(NASP)
Domains
of
Professional
Practice,
which
are
linked
with
the

California
Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing
(CCTC)
standards.
The
student
could

demonstrate
knowledge
of
each
of
these
domains
in
a
wide
variety
of
ways.
These
domains

should
be
addressed
in
the
plan
by
writing
expected
activities
outcomes.
The
fieldwork
plan

should
relate
to
the
standards
for
training
school
psychologists
as
established
by
NASP
and

CCTC,
and
thus,
are
excellent
products
to
include
in
the
portfolio.
See
Appendix
E.


2010
NASP
Standards

You
are
responsible
for
the
2010
NASP
Professional
Standards,
which
can
be
accessed
at:

http://www.nasponline.org/standards/2010standards.aspx
Please
read
all
four
documents

and
integrate
the
new
models
into
your
log
entries,
fieldwork
plan,
and
practice.

Class
Format


Each
weekly
class
session
is
2
hours,
50
minutes
with
one
15‐minute
break.
Classes
are

designed
primarily
to
share
and
reflect
upon
fieldwork
experiences.
Classes
will
also
be
used
to

discuss
supplementary
readings
and
assigned
field‐based
activities.
Supplemental
University‐
directed
activities
are
assigned
to
structure
experiences
that
would
not
otherwise
be
available.

All
activities
are
required
to
fulfill
training
standards
and
promote
best
practices.
By
working

together,
students
can
bring
experiences
from
the
field
into
the
seminar
and
disseminate
them

to
classmates,
thus
rapidly
expanding
knowledge.
In
this
way,
students
will
not
have
to
work

individually
each
time
an
issue
arises,
but
can
work
together
to
gather
knowledge
and
an

understanding
of
practice.



Classroom
Technology

Our
building
has
wireless
internet
and
advanced
technology
capabilities
to
explore
and
develop

for
use
in
class.
My
goal
is
to
go
entirely
paperless
so
that
all
course
materials
including
the

syllabus
and
student
presentations/handouts
are
turned
in
electronically
via
email
and

presented
in
class
via
projector.



School
Psychology
Credential
Resources

University
resources
available
to
students
include
assessment
materials,
relevant
texts,
and

intervention
manuals
and
will
be
organized
in
the
School
Psychology
Resource
room
in
the

Hosford
Clinic
(room
1156).
A
key
card
is
required
to
access
this
room.
To
have
check
out

privileges
you
must
sign
the
agreement
regarding
the
use
and
prompt
return
of
all
materials.

Please
treat
the
materials
with
respect
and
return
them
after
one
use
so
your
peers
may
also

have
access
Use
assessment
protocols
sparingly
to
avoid
implementing
lab
fees
for
assessment

courses.




School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                          19

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
       
                                   2010‐2011



Portfolio

Students
must
complete
a
comprehensive
portfolio
of
experiences
to
meet
CCTC
and
NASP

standards
(details
follow).
It
is
expected
that
fieldwork
plans
will
plot
a
course
of
activities
that

will
be
showcased
in
the
portfolio.
An
electronic
version
is
mandatory.
Portfolio
meetings
are

scheduled
for
June
4,
2011.

See
Appendix
D
for
full
description
and
requirements.

Internship
(full‐time)
CNCSP
275

CNCSP
275
is
a
variable
credit
course
required
of
students
in
the
school
psychology
emphasis

who
are
obtaining
internship‐level
fieldwork
experience
in
the
school
setting.
The
course

requires
each
student
to
obtain
direct
supervision
of
a
credentialed
school
psychologist
in
the

fieldwork
setting.
The
UCSB
Supervisor
provides
additional
supervision
and
oversight.
For

students
yet
to
earn
their
Credential,
an
individualized
fieldwork
plan
is
developed
by
the

student
with
input
from
field
and
University
supervisors
to
meet
standards
as
required
by

California
Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing
and
the
National
Association
of
School

Psychologists.
These
students
are
expected
to
compile
a
comprehensive
portfolio
of
academic

and
field
experiences
upon
completion
of
internship
hours.



Requirements

   1.   Student
is
responsible
to
find
an
eligible
internship
experience

   2.   Secure
a
site‐specific
internship
credential
for
all
paid
fieldwork
experience

   3.   Meet
all
site‐specific
requirements
for
fingerprinting
and
TB
testing

   4.   Complete
hourly
logs
detailing
experiences
on
a
weekly
basis

   5.   Develop
and
revise
fieldwork
plan
each
quarter
with
fieldwork
supervisor
feedback

   6.   Facilitate
meetings
with
fieldwork
and
University
supervisors
as
needed

   7.   Successful
completion
of
a
minimum
of
1,200
hours
of
supervised
fieldwork

   8.   Successful
completion
of
a
portfolio
and
portfolio
review

   9.   Read
and
integrate
2010
NASP
Standards
into
current
practice


District
Agreements


University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
enters
into
a
contract
with
your
district,
regardless
of

whether
the
internship
experience
is
paid
or
unpaid.
The
contract
stipulates
that
districts

provide
the
following:

   1. A
minimum
of
2
hours
per
week
of
supervision
by
a
credentialed
school
psychologist

       with
at
least
3
years
experience.

   2. Time
and
supervision
to
complete
fieldwork
plan
requirements
and
signature

       assignments

   3. Workers
Compensation
Insurance
and
General
Liability
Insurance.

   4. A
caseload
neither
to
exceed
the
case
load
of
any
school
psychologist
employed
by
the

       district
nor
to
exceed
the
ratio
of
1
school
psychologist
to
the
school
population
of
1,000

       students
as
recommended
by
the
National
Association
of
School
Psychologists.


   5. Written
feedback
to
the
University
Supervisor
no
later
than
the
end
of
each
academic

       quarter.



School
Psychology
Handbook
                    
                                            20

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011



University
Supervision

University
supervision
will
be
tailored
to
each
student’s
individual
needs.
The
University
School

Psychology
Coordinator
is
available
through
email,
conference
call,
and
office
hours
to
discuss

issues
that
come
up
through
practicum
and
internship
experiences.


Specific
activities
include:


    1. Guiding
students
in
the
process
of
finding
an
internship
setting

    2. Working
with
students
to
develop
and
update
their
fieldwork
plan
quarterly

    3. An
initial
meeting
with
student
and
supervisor
to
review
course
expectations

    4. Additional
meetings
with
students
and/or
supervisors
as
needed

    5. Regular
review
of
hours
logged
and
questions
generated

    6. Portfolio
review

Weekly
Logs

Students
must
keep
track
of
their
hours
and
activities.
Students
must
maintain
their
own

record
of
the
hours
they
work
and
what
types
of
activities
they
engage
in
during
their
hours.


Include
where,
of
the
four
possible
settings
(preschool,
elementary,
middle/junior
high,
high

school),
the
activities
were
conducted.
The
information
included
in
the
online
fieldwork
logs
is

not
a
comprehensive
recording
of
activities
but
rather
a
summary
of
activities
and
reflections

on
those
activities.
A
final,
comprehensive
log
maintained
by
the
student
must
be
included
in

the
portfolio.



Fieldwork
Plans

The
University
supervisor
works
with
each
student
to
refine
individualized
fieldwork
plans.
Each

quarter,
the
student
must
gain
feedback
from
the
fieldwork
supervisor
and
turn
in
the

evaluation
along
with
an
updated
plan
(due
the
last
day
of
class
each
quarter).
The

development
of
the
fieldwork
plan
is
a
series
of
outcomes
based
on
the
National
Association
of

School
Psychologist’s
(NASP)
Domains
of
Professional
Practice,
which
are
linked
with
the

California
Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing
(CCTC)
standards.
The
student
could

demonstrate
knowledge
of
each
of
these
domains
in
a
wide
variety
of
ways.
These
domains

should
be
addressed
in
the
plan
by
writing
expected
activities
outcomes.
The
fieldwork
plan

should
relate
to
the
standards
for
training
school
psychologists
as
established
by
NASP
and

CCTC,
and
thus,
are
excellent
products
to
include
in
the
comprehensive
portfolio.
See
Appendix

E.


2010
NASP
Standards

You
are
responsible
for
the
2010
NASP
Professional
Standards,
which
can
be
accessed
at:

http://www.nasponline.org/standards/2010standards.aspx
Please
read
all
four
documents

and
integrate
the
new
models
into
your
log
entries,
fieldwork
plan,
and
practice.


PRAXIS

You
must
take
and
pass
the
PRAXIS
examination
enough
prior
to
your
final
portfolio
review
so

the
score
can
be
included
in
the
final
portfolio.
A
score
of
165
is
required
to
pass.
See
the
NASP

website
for
additional
information.




School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                           21

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                 2010‐2011



Portfolio

Students
must
complete
a
comprehensive
portfolio
of
experiences
to
meet
CCTC
and
NASP

standards.
It
is
expected
that
fieldwork
plans
will
plot
a
course
of
activities
that
will
be

showcased
in
the
portfolio.
An
electronic
version
is
mandatory.
The
portfolio
reviews
are

tentatively
scheduled
for
June
3,
2011.
However,
if
a
student
anticipates
applying
for
the
state

credential
prior
to
June,
the
student
is
responsible
to
set
up
a
portfolio
review
meeting
at
an

earlier
date.
See
Appendix
D.


School
Psychology
Credential

Upon
completion
of
the
school
psychology
specialization,
given
faculty
approval
and

completion
of
the
portfolio
AND
a
passing
rate
(165)
on
the
School
Psychology
Praxis

examination,
the
student
applies
for
the
state
credential
through
Suzanne
Raphaelʼs
office

(805‐893‐2306).
Internship
students
should
make
an
appointment
to
see
Suzanne
by
the
end
of

the
quarter
immediately
preceding
the
quarter
they
anticipate
completing
the
credential

requirements.
For
example,
if
you
are
finished
in
June
(Spring
Quarter)
then
you
should
see

Suzanne
no
later
than
March
(end
of
Winter
Quarter)
to
begin
the
credential
application
and

review
procedure.




ADVISING:
GETTING
YOUR
CREDENTIAL
&
DEGREE

Faculty
Advisor


Each
student
in
the
school
psychology
specialization
is
assigned
a
faculty
member,
who
is

closely
aligned
to
the
School
Psychology
specialization,
as
a
program
advisor.
The
faculty

advisor
is
available
for
general
academic
advising
and
should
be
consulted
for
decisions

regarding
taking
additional
courses,
engaging
in
research
with
another
faculty
member,
or

taking
on
additional
outside
responsibilities.
The
faculty
advisor
is
not
an
expert
on
course

requirements,
however,
Thus,
you
must
be
responsible
to
plan
your
courses
according
to
the

credential
and
degree
requirements.
There
are
several
other
supports
within
the
Department

for
successfully
negotiating
your
graduate
studies.


School
Psychology
Coordinator
(Dr.
Jill
D.
Sharkey)

The
School
Psychology
Coordinator
provides
administrative
oversight
for
the
credential

program.
She
is
responsible
to
manage
the
program
to
meet
CCTC
and
NASP
requirements.
The

Coordinator
also
teaches
the
second‐year
and
internship
fieldwork
courses.
As
the
University‐
based
fieldwork
supervisor,
the
Coordinator
oversees
the
practitioner
training
of
all
credential

students
and
is
available
as
a
mentor
regarding
credential
requirements,
fieldwork
sequence

and
opportunities,
and
job
prospects.
She
complements
but
does
not
duplicate
the
efforts
of

the
Credential
Services
Director.
Office:
ED
2133;
Phone:
x3441





School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                          22

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
        
                                    2010‐2011




Credential
Services
Director
(Suzanne
Raphael)


The
Credential
Services
Director
coordinates
the
procedures
necessary
to
qualify
for
a
California

state
credential
across
disciplines
in
the
Gevirtz
Graduate
School
of
Education.
This
office
also

maintains
student
records
pertinent
to
applications
for
the
credential.
Each
student
is

responsible
to
contact
this
office
for
assistance
with
taking
the
CBEST,
getting
a
Certificate
of

Clearance,
a
Certificate
of
Health,
and
submitting
Credential
Applications.
The
Credential

Services
Director
meets
with
students
as
needed
to
facilitate
the
advising
process.
All
students

must
work
with
the
Credential
Services
Director
to
formally
enroll
in
the
credential
program

and
to
obtain
the
credentials
needed
for
a
paid
internship
and
to
practice
as
a
school

psychologist.
Office:
ED

4102;
Phone:
x2036


Student
Affairs
Graduate
Advisor
(Dr.
Shane
Jimerson)


The
Graduate
Advisor
is
responsible
primarily
for
matters
of
student
affairs.
The
CCSP
Graduate

Advisor,
along
with
the
GGSE
Academic
Advisor,
processes
all
records
pertinent
to
students'

admissions,
enrollment,
and
eventual
graduation.
All
matters
pertinent
to
financial
aid,

petitions
for
leave
of
absence,
and
any
“special
circumstances”
must
be
approved
by
the

Graduate
Advisor.


In
addition
to
the
above‐mentioned
responsibilities,
the
CCSP
Graduate
Advisor
attempts
to

serve
as
a
liaison
between
the
student
body
and
the
faculty
as
a
whole.
In
this
role,
the
CCSP

Graduate
Advisor
serves
as
an
advisor
to
the
Graduate
Student
Association
and
advises

students
on
matters
of
academic
policy.
Students
are
encouraged
to
use
the
services
of
CCSP

Graduate
Advisor
for
matters
that
are
appropriate,
either
of
a
professional
or
personal
nature,

when
the
above
mentor
relationships
are
not
sufficient.
Office:
2113;
Phone:
x3366


Student
Affairs
Committee


The
CCSP
Student
Affairs
Committee
is
overseen
by
the
CCSP
Executive
Committee,
which

consists
of
the
CCSP
Department
Chair
and
faculty
from
each
emphasis
(Counseling,
Clinical,

and
School
Psychology).
The
Student
Affairs
Committee
is
responsible
for
all
matters
of
policy

pertaining
to
student
welfare.
Students
may
consult
this
committee
for
any
relevant
academic

concerns,
and
may
consider
the
committee
as
a
committee
of
appeal.

If
you
need
any
"official"

form,
see
the
CCSP
Graduate
Advisor.


Student
Affairs
Office

The
 Academic
 Advisor
 serves
 as
 a
 liaison
 between
 the
 Graduate
 Division
 and
 the
 students
 of

the
 Graduate
 School
 of
 Education.
 Policies
 and
 procedures
 regarding
 admission,
 registration,

leaves
of
absence,
change
of
status,
and
completion
of
degrees
are
interpreted
and
shared
with

the
 students
 by
 the
 Academic
 Advisor.
 This
 office
 maintains
 all
 student
 records
 pertinent
 to

applications,
enrollment
and
eventual
graduation.
The
Academic
Advisor
serves
as
a
resource

person
to
both
faculty
and
students.
Students
and
faculty
are
welcome
to
contact
the
Academic

Advisor
regarding
matters
pertinent
to
degree
progress.
Office:
4100;
Phone:
x2137





School
Psychology
Handbook
                     
                                             23

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011




                          UCSB
Student
Services

Center
for
Academic
Skills
Enrichment
(CASE)


The
University
offers
group
workshops
and
individual
support
to
students
who
need
help
with

their
reading,
exam‐taking,
problem‐solving,
time
management,
note‐taking,
writing,
and
study

skills.



Counseling
Services
and
Career
Services


The
University
maintains
an
up‐to‐date
counseling
services
center
and
a
career
services
center.

These
centers
can
be
used
to
obtain
individual
personal
counseling
as
well
as
career
guidance

and
support.

Students
can
establish
a
placement
file,
which
can
be
used
to
facilitate
search
for

employment
upon
completion
of
their
credential.
Students
can
also
use
the
placement
facility

to
identify
districts
with
current
and
future
vacancies.
The
faculty
also
are
active
in
the

California
Association
of
School
Psychologists
through
which
many
career
opportunities
are

located.



Disabled
Students
Program

Providing
academic
accommodations
to
students
with
disabilities
is
a
shared
responsibility
of

the
campus.
Students
with
disabilities
are
responsible
for
ensuring
that
the
Disabled
Students

Program
(DSP)
is
aware
of
their
disabilities
and
for
providing
DSP
with
appropriate

documentation.
DSP
is
located
in
2120
Student
Resource
Building
and
serves
as
the
campus

liaison
regarding
issues
and
regulations
related
to
students
with
disabilities.
The
DSP
staff
works

in
an
advisory
capacity
with
a
variety
of
campus
departments
to
ensure
that
equal
access
is

provided
to
all
disabled
students.


Student
Grievances


Students
who
have
grievances
may
air
them
with
the
faculty
person
involved,
the
CCSP

Graduate
Advisor,
the
Student
Affairs
Committee,
and/or
the
Campus
Ombudsman’s
office.

Formal
grievance
procedures
are
also
described
in
the
UCSB
General
Catalog.
In
addition,
CCSP

faculty
meet
regularly
to
discuss
issues,
policies,
and
procedures.
The
school
psychology
faculty

do
the
same
and
invite
student
input
at
these
meetings.
There
is
a
commitment
to
providing

students
with
the
opportunity
to
openly
discuss
their
educational
process
and
to
work
with
the

faculty
to
improve
it.



Financial
Aid


Financial
Aid
Office.
Scholarships,
loans,
grants,
and
work
study
opportunities
are
available

through
the
Financial
Aid
Office,
Student
Affairs
and
Administrative
Services
Building
2103
(893‐
2432).



       

Campus
and
Graduate
Opportunity
Fellowships.
These
fellowships
are
restricted
to
under‐
represented
populations.
The
fellowships
are
awarded
on
the
basis
of
merit.
The
number



School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                           24

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                  2010‐2011


available
to
CCSP
students
varies
from
year
to
year
and
is
dependent
on
the
number
of

qualified
students
in
the
Program.
Both
Masters
and
Ph.D.
Degree
students
may
receive
these

Fellowships,
but
they
are
almost
always
given
to
doctoral
students.
Applications
can
be

obtained
from
Graduate
Division
in
Cheadle
Hall.

The
CCSP
program
does
receive
block
funding

money
from
the
University
to
allocate
to
students.




Regents
and
University
Fellowships.
Regents
and
University
Fellowships
are
unrestricted
and

are
awarded
on
the
basis
of
merit
only.
Typically,
the
program’s
share
of
Regents
and
University

Fellowships
each
year
amounts
to
two
Fellowships.
Only
doctoral
degree
students
are

considered
for
these
fellowships.
Applications
may
be
obtained
from
the
Graduate
Division
in

Cheadle
Hall.



        

Non‐Resident
Fee
Waivers.
A
limited
number
of
nonresident
fee
waivers
are
available
to
CCSP

students.
Nonresident
fee
waivers
are
awarded
on
the
basis
of
need
and
merit.
Both
Masters

and
Doctoral
degree
students
have
received
these
awards
in
the
past.



        

Teaching
Assistantships.
All
teaching
assistantships
within
the
GGSE
are
quarter‐time
positions

(i.e.,
10
hours
per
week).
Teaching
Assistantships
are
typically
awarded
to
doctoral
students.

Eligible
students
are
notified
of
TAship
availability
during
Spring
Quarter.
CCSP
students
have

also
applied
for
and
received
teaching
assistantships
in
other
departments
(e.g.,
Asian‐
American
Studies,
Black
Studies,
Chicano
Studies,
and
Religious
Studies).



        

Supervisory
Positions.
There
are
five
25%‐time
supervisory
positions
that
are
administered
by

the
Hosford
Clinic.
Eligible
students
are
notified
of
the
availability
of
supervisory
positions

during
Spring
Quarter.
Salary
Range:
Approximately
$6,000
per
year,
depending
on
the
number

of
course
units
completed
above
the
Masters
degree.



        

Research
Assistantships.
The
availability
of
research
assistantships
is
primarily
a
function
of

extramural
funding.
Faculty
members
who
have
research
assistantships
available
will
advertise

these
to
students.
Please
inquire
with
your
advisor
about
these
positions.



        

Work
Study.
The
Hosford
Counseling
and
Psychological
Services
Training
Clinic
normally
hires

one
or
two
work
study
students
each
year.
Candidates
must
be
eligible
for
work
study
through

Financial
Aid.
Both
masters
and
doctoral
degree
students
are
eligible
for
these
positions.



Graduate
Student
Humanities/Social
Sciences
Research
Grant
Program.
This
program
is

administered
by
Graduate
Division
and
provides
up
to
$2,000
in
support
of
graduate
student

research.
Typically,
the
funds
are
used
to
support
doctoral
research
and
usually
are
granted

only
once
per
student.



       

Graduate
Research
Mentorship
Program
(GRMP).
This
program
is
administered
by
Graduate

Division
and
provides
a
small
grant
(usually
less
than
$10,000)
to
support
the
research
activities

of
a
team
composed
of
a
faculty
mentor,
one
or
more
graduate
students
from
under‐

represented
populations,
and
one
or
more
undergraduate
students
from
under
represented



School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                          25

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                 2010‐2011


populations.
Students
in
the
program
have
competed
very
successfully
for
these
grants
in
the

past.



       

Graduate
Student
Research
Travel
Funds.
Graduate
students
who
are
invited
to
present
a

paper
at
a
scholarly
meeting
(e.g.,
NASP,
CASP,
and
APA
conventions)
are
eligible
to
apply
for

research
travel
monies.
You
must
be
advanced
to
candidacy
and
must
be
either
registered
or

on
an
approved
leave
of
absence.
Normally,
you
may
not
receive
support
for
more
than
one

trip
per
fiscal
year
or
two
during
the
graduate
career.
For
more
information
contact
the
Student

Affairs
Office.



       

Professional
Associations.
APA
provides
Fellowship
in
support
of
ethnic
minority
graduate

students.
APA
also
provides
some
travel
support
to
graduate
students
who
are
presenting

papers
at
the
annual
convention.
The
California
Association
of
School
Psychologists
gives
an

annual
Minority
student
scholarship.
NASP
also
has
a
minority
scholarship
program.






School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                         26

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                 2010‐2011






                 Student
Evaluation
Procedures

Evaluation
of
Student
Progress


The
School
Psychology
specialization
uses
the
core
evaluation
procedure
established
for
all

students
in
the
CCSP
Department.
In
addition
to
the
annual
evaluation
by
the
UCSB
faculty,

students
are
evaluated
on
a
regular
basis
by
field
supervisors.
The
student
evaluation
time
line

over
the
three
years
of
the
specialization
training
is
as
follows:


Year
of
Program
     Evaluation
Activity
                            Month

Year
1
              Course
Grades
                                  December

                                                                     March

                                                                     June

                     Field
Supervisor
Evaluation
                    January

                                                                     June

                     Counseling
Skills
Evaluation
                   March

                     University‐Supervisor
                          May

                     Based
End
of
Year
Review

Year
2
              Fieldwork
Plan
                                 September

                                                                     December

                                                                     March

                     Course
Grades
                                  December

                                                                     March

                                                                     June

                     Field
Supervisor
Evaluation
                    December

                                                                     March

                                                                     June

                     Fieldwork
Logs
                                 Weekly

                     University‐Supervisor
                          May

                     Based
End
of
Year
Review

                     Apply
for
M.Ed.
degree
                         May

                     Apply
for
internship
credential
                June

Internship
Year
     Internship
Plan
                                August

                     School
Psychology
Praxis
Exam
                  Sept,
Nov,
or
Jan

                     Field
Supervisor
Evaluation
                    December

                                                                     March

                                                                     June

                     Fieldwork
Logs
                                 Weekly

                     University‐Supervisor
                          May

                     Based
End
of
Year
Review

                     Final
GPA
                                      June

                     Determination
of
candidate
competence
          June



School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                         27

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                 2010‐2011




EVALUATION
                  DESCRIPTION
OF
THE
EVALUATION/DATA
COLLECTED
AND


INSTRUMENT                                    USE
OF
THE
EVALUATION
Course
Grades      Students
must
make
timely
progress
toward
completion
and
satisfactorily

                   meet
the
following
standards
of
scholarship
established
by
University
and

                   campus:
Maintain
a
cumulative
GPA
of
at
least
3.0.
Take
sufficient
courses

                   for
a
letter
grade
to
achieve
the
minimum
cumulative
GPA
of
3.0.

Keep
the

                   student
transcript
free
of
unfinished
coursework.
Meet
all
departmental

                   degree
requirements,
including
satisfactory
performance
in
core
courses

                   (grade
of
B
or
better
required).
Fieldwork
         Evaluations
are
shared
with
the
student
by
the
field
supervisor.

Supervisor
        Coordinators
review
ratings
at
each
period.
If
problems
appear
at
this
level

Evaluation
        of
training,
they
are
discussed
with
the
candidate,
field
supervisor,
and
the

Procedures

       University
supervisor
present.
A
contract
for
improvement
is
negotiated

                   with
the
candidate
that
includes
(a)
a
statement
of
the
problem,
(b)
a

                   statement
of
what
the
student
will
do
to
remedy
this
problem,
(c)
a

                   statement
of
what
the
faculty
or
supervisor
will
do
to
support
this

                   remediation,
and
(d)
a
date
for
re‐evaluation
of
the
problem.
Year
1

           In
the
first
year,
students
are
rated
twice
with
six
questions
on
a
5‐point

Appendix
B         Likert
scale:

                   Knowledge
Base

                   Professional
Behavior

                   Self‐Presentation

                   Relationship
Skills

                   Oral
Communication
Skills

                   Ethical
Knowledge
and
Practice

                   Open‐ended
comments
Year
2
and
3
      During
Practicum
and
Internship,
students
are
evaluated
quarterly
with

Appendix
C         questions
on
a
5‐point
Likert
scale
regarding
competencies
aligned
with
the

                   ten
2010
NASP
Standards.
Counseling
Skills
 Through
coursework
and
clinical
supervision,
students
receive
feedback
on

Evaluation
        their
counseling
skills.
Supervisors
rate
each
student
with
a
5‐point
Likert

Appendix
A         scale
on16
questions
in
4
categories:


                   Clinical
and
relationship
skills

                   Professional
presentation
and
behavior

                   Supervision
behavior
and
knowledge
demonstration

                   Agency
behavior

                   Supervisors
also
provide
open‐ended
feedback.
The
Clinic
Coordinator
and

                   supervisors
meet
with
each
student
to
review
the
feedback.





School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                          28

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
     
                                 2010‐2011



University‐         The
University
advisor
meets
students
on
a
regular
basis
to
review
progress

Supervisor
         based
on
course
grades
and
fieldwork
ratings.
During
Spring
Quarter,
the

Based
End
of
       student
prepares
a
written
statement
regarding
progress
toward
achieving

Year
Review
        the
competencies
of
the
School
Psychology
Specialization.
This
is
part
of
the

Appendices

        portfolio
development
process.
The
advisor
notes
student
progress,

D
&
F
              strengths
and
potential
need
areas
in
terms
of
professional
development
as


                   well
as
ratings
(1=High
Pass,
2=Pass,
3=Needs
Improvement)
on
each
of
the


                   10
standards.
In
addition,
faculty
complete
rating
rubrics
for
five
signature


                   assignments
over
the
two
years
of
fieldwork
and
passing
ratings
are

                    required.
This
summary
is
reviewed
by
the
students,
their
advisors,
and

                    their
University‐based
fieldwork
supervisor
at
the
annual
portfolio
review

                    meeting.
If
the
evaluation
indicates
problem
areas
for
the
student,
the

                    faculty
advisor,
on
advice
and
recommendation
from
the
faculty,
will

                    negotiate
a
contract
for
improvement
with
the
candidate
that
includes
the

                    following
information:

(a)
statement
of
the
problem,
(b)
a
statement
of

                    what
the
student
will
do
to
remedy
this
problem,
(c)
a
statement
of
what

                    the
faculty
will
do
to
support
this
remediation,
and
(d)
a
date
for
re‐
                    evaluation
of
the
problem.
At
this
time,
the
faculty
discusses
the
overall

                    performance
of
the
student
and
considers
whether
or
not
the
candidate
will

                    be
allowed
to
begin
the
year‐2
practicum
the
following
Fall
Quarter.
If
not,

                    the
faculty
will
recommend
remedial
steps
to
be
taken
and
advise
the

                    faculty
advisor
in
creating
a
written
contract
with
the
student
to
address

                    the
training
deficiencies.

It
is
the
intention
of
the
program
to
support

                    student
learning
efforts
and
to
see
them
through
to
the
successful

                    completion
of
the
credential
program.

Students
may
not
continue
in
the

                    credential
portion
of
the
program
if
they
do
not
develop
the
basic
skills

                    competencies
needed
to
be
a
school
psychologist.
In
such
instances,
a

                    student
can
complete
the
M.Ed.
without
the
credential.
Fieldwork/
         Students
must
present
the
University
supervisor
with
a
draft
fieldwork
plan

Internship
Plan
    at
the
start
of
any
new
fieldwork/internship
experience.
The
development

Appendix
E          of
the
fieldwork
plan
is
a
series
of
outcomes
the
student
should
meet
at
the

                    completion
of
the
internship.
The
fieldwork
plan
is
developed
with
National

                    Association
of
School
Psychologist’s
Domains
of
Professional
Practice,
which

                    are
linked
with
the
California
Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing

                    standards.
The
student
can
demonstrate
knowledge
of
each
of
these

                    domains
in
a
wide
variety
of
ways.
These
domains
are
addressed
in
the
plan

                    by
writing
expected
activities
outcomes.
The
University
supervisor
will
work

                    with
each
student
to
refine
the
individualized
plan.
A
copy
of
the
plan
is

                    filed
with
the
university
field
placement
coordinator.




School
Psychology
Handbook
                  
                                         29

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                                 2010‐2011




Fieldwork
Logs     Students
must
keep
track
of
their
hours
and
activities
and
report
them
via

                   web‐based
survey,
which
organizes
activities
by
APPIC
and
NASP

                   standards.
Students
must
keep
a
backup
of
all
files
and
forms
submitted

                   and
present
similar
information
to
their
fieldwork
supervisors
as
needed.
A

                   final,
comprehensive
log
maintained
by
the
student
will
be
included
in
the

                   portfolio.
Logs
guide
both
fieldwork
and
University
supervision
and

                   document
hour
requirements
for
the
credential.
M.Ed.
degree       The
Masters
of
Education
Degree
with
a
specialization
in
School

                   Psychology
consists
of
a
minimum
of
48‐quarter
units.
These
are

                   completed
over
the
first
two
years
of
the
School
Psychology
Credential

                   Program.
Students
submit
a
portfolio
as
part
of
the
M.Ed.
oral

                   comprehensive
exam
process
(typically
during
the
spring
quarter
of
the

                   second
year
of
study).
The
portfolio
includes
student
products
produced
as

                   part
of
coursework,
fieldwork
experiences,
and
other
creative
products

                   (e.g.,
publications
and
conference
presentations).
The
M.Ed.
oral

                   examination
is
part
of
the
Year‐2
portfolio
examination
and
involves

                   faculty
affiliated
with
the
School
Psychology
specialization.
Students
in
the

                   School
Psychology
Credential
Program
are
required
to
complete
approved

                   credit
hours
beyond
the
M.Ed.
Degree
and
at
least
1200
hours
of
school‐
                   based
(P‐12)
internship
as
a
culminating
fieldwork
experience).
Apply
for
         The
second
major
screening
process
occurs
at
the
end
of
Year
2.
Students

internship
        apply
for
entrance
to
internship
during
the
Spring
Quarter
of
their
second

credential
        program
year

(coinciding
with
the
year
2
portfolio
review
meeting).

The


                  students
had
been
working
primarily
on
the
School
Psychology


                  specialization
curriculum.
If
the
candidate
is
not
considered
ready,
school

                   psychology
faculty
will
recommend
remedial
steps
to
be
taken
and
advise

                   the
faculty
advisor
in
creating
a
written
contract
with
the
student.
The

                   program
seeks
to
support
the
learning
efforts
of
all
students,
but
they
are

                   not
recommended
for
the
internship
credential
until
the
student

                   demonstrates
successful
completion
of
a
school
psychology
practicum.

School
            NASP‐approved
graduate
programs
in
school
psychology
require
graduate

Psychology
Praxis
 students
to
take
the
PRAXIS
II
National
School
Psychology
Test
(test
code

Exam               10401),
administered
by
the
Educational
Testing
Service
(ETS).

A
passing

                   score
of
165
is
required.

Determination
of
 The
Spring
Quarter
evaluation
for
students
completing
their
internship

Candidate
         includes
the
recommendation
for
the
credential.
This
determination

Competence


      includes
a
final
recommendation
from
the
internship
field
supervisor.
A

                   credential/degree
check
is
completed.
The
student's
portfolio
is
submitted

                   prior
to
final
credential
review.
If
evaluations
are
positive,
the

                   coordinator(s)
approve
the
recommendation
for
the
credential.





School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                                         30

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
             
                                       2010‐2011



     Your
Credential:
Important
Tasks
to
Remember


YEAR
1

Begin
File
in
Credential
Advising
Office
(Phelps
1175)
See
Suzanne
Raphael
NOW


Your
CBEST,
Certificate
of
Clearance,
TB
Clearance,
and
award
of
Bachelor's
Degree
from
a
regionally

accredited
institution
must
be
on
file.
Verification
must
be


provided
to
the
school
psychology
faculty
when
seeking
signatures
for
approval
of

the
petition.
(Check
with
Suzanne
for
the
latest
requirements.)


Date
Completed:________________________________________________




Complete
Year‐1
Course
Work
and
Portfolio
Meeting
(approval
for
practicum)


Date
Completed:________________________________________________



YEAR
2

Complete
Year‐2
Course
Work
and
Portfolio
Meeting
(approval
for
internship)


Date
Completed:________________________________________________



YEAR
3

Submit
Application
for
Internship
Credential
usually
during
March‐April
of
Year
2.


(See
Credential
Services
Director.
Required
for
a
paid
internship.
Apply
when
districts
make
an
employment
offer
for
an

internship
position.)


Date
Completed:________________________________________________





Register
for
and
take
the
NCSP
Praxis
National
Examination
(Report
scores
to
UCSB)



File
petition
for
the
Masters
of
Education
degree
(See
Vivian
in
the
Graduate
Advisors
Office)




Apply
for
your
School
Psychology
Credential.
Contact
the
Credential
Analyst
by
the
beginning

of
the
last
quarter
of
the
Internship.




Submit
Credential
Application
Fee
to
the
Credential
Advising
Office
(Money
Order
payable
to
the

Commission
on
Teacher
Credentialing;
usually
March
of
year
3;
or
at
the


beginning
of
the
last
quarter
of
internship.)




Send
Official
UCSB
Transcript
to
Credential
Advising
Office:

Submit
transcript
with
award
of
the
Masters
Degree


Date
Completed
(7a,
7b,
7c):_________________________________________




Final
Portfolio
and
Credential
Review
with
School
Psychology
core
faculty

(Portfolio
dates
and
times
are
set
for
late
May
or
early
June).






School
Psychology
Handbook
                          
                                                 31

University
of
California,
Santa
Barbara
    
                        2010‐2011


                                                  



                           Enjoy
Your
Studies!

                     Your
School
Psychology
Faculty

                                                  

                                     ERIN
DOWDY,
PH.D.


                                 EDOWDY@EDUCATION.UCSB.EDU



                                        COLIN
ELLIOTT,
PH.D.


                                        VISITING
PROFESSOR


                                       BASDASMAN@AOL.COM



               MICHAEL
J.
FURLONG,
PH.D.,
NCSP,
LEP,
LICENSED
PSYCHOLOGIST

                            MFURLONG@EDUCATION.UCSB.EDU



                                   BETH
LAURIE,
ME.D.,
NCSP,
LEP


                                            LECTURER


                                      BETHLAURIE@COX.NET



                                   SHANE
JIMERSON,
PH.D.,
NCSP


                                 JIMERSON@EDUCATION.UCSB.EDU



                                     GALE
M.
MORRISON,
PH.D.



                                    GALE@EDUCATION.UCSB.EDU



                                     MATTHEW
QUIRK,
PH.D.


                                  MQUIRK@EDUCATION.UCSB.EDU



                                     JILL
SHARKEY,
PH.D.,
NCSP

                                 JSHARKEY@EDUCATION.UCSB.EDU









School
Psychology
Handbook
                 
                               32

University of California, Santa Barbara       2010-2011




                                 APPENDIX A




School Psychology Handbook                          A1
University of California, Santa Barbara                                                                            2010-2011
                     UCSB Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology Program
                                                   Trainee Quarterly Evaluation


Name of Trainee:                                                                            Date:
Practicum Site: Hosford Counseling & Psychological Services Clinic
Supervisors:
Faculty Supervisor's Name & California Psychologist License: Heidi A. Zetzer, Ph.D., PSY 14216

Directions: The ratings of trainees should be based on actual observation and/or reports of trainee performance received from
faculty supervisors, field site supervisors, university instructors, staff, and appropriate others. Please evaluate the trainee only after
s/he has completed all of the practicum/internship requirements for the quarter under review. Evaluations should be based on
his/her current level of progress and competence in the current practicum/internship site. Circle the number of the scale that best
describes the trainee's competence as given in the descriptions below. Rate each category independently. A description of the
scale points is given below.

         -1-    Competence considered to be in need of further training and/or to require additional growth,
maturation, and change on the part of the trainee in order for him/her to be effective in the various skill areas; trainee
should not be allowed to function independently.

          -2-   Competence currently considered to be below average but which, with further supervision and
experience, is expected to develop satisfactorily; independent functioning is not recommended and close supervision
is required.

            -3-   Competence at least at the minimal level necessary for functioning with moderate supervision
required.

         -4-      Competence assessed to be above average; trainee can function independently with periodic need for
supervision.

            -5-   Competence very developed and trainee can function independently with little or no supervision
required.

            -N-   Insufficient data to rate at this time.

Signatures. A copy of this evaluation will be filed in the trainee's permanent Program file. The signatures below attest only to
the fact that the signees have seen the evaluation and reviewed its contents. A trainee's signature on this document does not in any
way indicate that he or she either agrees or disagrees with the contents; only that the evaluation's contents were seen and reviewed.
Trainees have the right at any time to file a response with the Director of Training for placement into the trainee's permanent
Program file. The signature of the Practicum Supervisor below attests to the fact that the trainee has completed all of the casework
and associated responsibilities of the practicum according to the stated requirements.

Trainee:                                                                                    Date:
Student Supervisors:                                                                        Date:                       __________
Faculty Supervisor:                                                                         Date:




School Psychology Handbook                                                                                                    A2
University of California, Santa Barbara                                  2010-2011
Trainee:                                                                     Page 2

A.    Clinical and relationship skills

1.    Relationship Skills - established rapport, was aware       N   1   2   3   4    5
      of own impact on others, and showed respect for clients,
      colleagues, and staff in professional contexts.
      Comments:


2.    Assessment Skills - demonstrated appropriate               N   1   2   3   4    5
      knowledge and use of assessment instruments;
      was able to appropriately interpret and discuss
      test results with clients and colleagues as well as
      integrate in intake reports.
      Comments:


3.    Diagnostic Skills - incorporated multiple sources          N   1   2   3   4    5
      of data; showed sensitivity to client concerns;
      demonstrated good knowledge of DSM-IV;
      used diagnosis to establish client goals and make
      appropriate referrals.
      Comments:


4.    Intervention Skills - showed flexibility in using          N   1   2   3   4    5
      a variety of appropriate strategies to help clients
      work toward identified goals.
      Comments:


5.    Crises Management - recognized and handled                 N   1   2   3   4    5
      clinical crises and emergencies in a professional
      manner.
      Comments:



6.    Consultation Skills - worked effectively with              N   1   2   3   4    5
      significant others (family members, teachers,
      relevant professionals) to help meet client needs.
      Comments:



Average score for clinical skills: __________________




School Psychology Handbook                                                       A3
University of California, Santa Barbara                                                          2010-2011
      Trainee:                                                                                       Page 3


B.    Professional presentation and behavior

7.    Professional Behavior - showed readiness and                                      N    1   2   3   4    5
      ability to assume and discharge assigned duties;
      initiated opportunities to gain and share skills.
      Comments:


8.    Self Presentation - presented self in a professional                              N    1   2   3   4    5
      manner through physical appearance/dress, composure, organization,
      confidence, and desire to help.
      Comments:


9.    Management of Personal Issues in a Professional                                    N   1   2   3   4    5
      Manner – Controls personal stress, psychological dysfunction, or emotional
      reactions so that they do not affect case conceptualization, professional
      interactions with clients and their families, or relationships with colleagues and
      other professionals.
      Comments:


10.   Ethical Knowledge & Practice - demonstrated                                       N    1   2   3   4    5
      understanding of ethical principles; showed awareness of ethical
      dilemmas as they occurred; conformed to ethical principles in professional
      work and practice.
      Comments:


11.   Knowledge and practice of Diversity Issues -                                    N    1     2   3   4    5
      demonstrated understanding of diversity issues related to concerns of
      clients and colleagues; showed awareness of ethnic, cultural, sexual
      preference, and religious concerns as they arose; sought consultation
      and additional knowledge from a variety of appropriate non-client sources to enhance
      relationship and practice.
      Comments:


12.   Intake reports and Progress Notes - completed                                     N    1   2   3   4    5
      intake reports and case notes in a timely manner, and
      included relevant professional information in a manner
      which could be used and interpreted by other professionals.
      Comments:


Average score for professional presentation:




School Psychology Handbook                                                                               A4
University of California, Santa Barbara                                 2010-2011


Trainee:                                                                    Page 4


C.    Supervision behavior and knowledge demonstration
13.   Knowledge Base - demonstrated good understanding of       N   1   2   3   4    5
      theories and research in psychology, human
      development, counseling/psychotherapy, assessment,
      and psychopathology.
      Comments:


14.   Written Communication Skills - showed ability             N   1   2   3   4    5
      to write clearly in a professional style that is clear,
      succinct, and devoid of unnecessary jargon.
      Comments:


15.   Oral Communication Skills - showed ability to             N   1   2   3   4    5
      use oral language to communicate effectively
      with clients, supervisors, and colleagues.
      Comments:


16.   Supervisory Involvement - sought supervision              N   1   2   3   4    5
      when needed, openly shared concerns and ideas
      with supervisor, demonstrated openness to feedback,
      used supervisory suggestions to make improvements.
      Comments:


Average score for supervision behavior and knowledge:




School Psychology Handbook                                                      A5
University of California, Santa Barbara                                   2010-2011
Trainee:                                                                      Page 5


D.    Agency behavior

17.   Program Development Skills - developed                      N   1   2   3   4    5
      alternative prevention or intervention programs
      to meet client or community needs.
      Comments

18.   Agency Involvement - attended and actively                  N   1   2   3   4    5
      participated in staff meetings and conferences;
      fulfilled administrative responsibilities.
      Comments:


19.   Agency Relationship Skills – Establishes good               N   1   2   3   4    5
      relationships with colleagues, faculty, and staff, treats
      them with respect, and functions as a good team member.
      Comments:


Average score for agency behavior:



20.   Other Feedback & Comments -




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A6
University of California, Santa Barbara       2010-2011




                                 APPENDIX B




School Psychology Handbook                          A7
University of California, Santa Barbara                                            2010-2011
                       UCSB School Psychology Program Trainee
                              Semi-Annual Evaluation

To assist us in designing a complete and meaningful school experience for our students, we would
appreciate your completion of this brief evaluation form. We welcome any comments.

The evaluation should be based on his/her current level of progress and competence in the current
placement site. Circle the number of the scale that best describes the trainee’s competence, with 1
being low and 5 being high.

Trainee:

1.   Knowledge Base- demonstrated good understanding             1    2     3    4     5
     of students and the classroom environment.

2.   Professional Behavior- showed readiness and ability         1    2     3    4     5
     to assume and discharge assigned duties’ initiated
     opportunities to gain and share skills.

3.   Self Presentation- student presented self in a              1    2     3    4     5
     professional manner through physical appearance,
     composure, organization, confidence, and a desire to
     help.

4.   Relationship Skills- established rapport and showed         1    2     3    4     5
     respect for students and teachers.

5.   Oral Communication Skills- showed ability to use            1    2     3    4     5
     oral language to communicate effectively with
     students and teachers.

6.   Ethical Knowledge and Practice- demonstrated                1    2     3    4     5
     understanding of ethical principles, conformed to
     ethical principles in professional work and practice.


Comments:




Thank you for your assistance. Should you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact the
instructor, Beth Laurie Garcia at egarcia@education.ucsb.edu or (805) 965-8355.




School Psychology Handbook                                                                 A8
University of California, Santa Barbara       2010-2011




                                 APPENDIX C




School Psychology Handbook                          A9
University of California, Santa Barbara                                            2010-2011

                     2010-2011
                     University of California Santa Barbara
                     Gevirtz Graduate School of Education
                     Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

                              Second-Year Fieldwork and Internship

Supervisor Name: __________________________ Student Name: ________________________

School/District: ____________________________ Date of Evaluation: ____________________

Students - Please rate your competence level based on actual performance and/or information
received from other school staff, families, students, etc. Each item should be rated independently
by writing the number that best exemplifies your competencies.

Supervisors - Please rate the intern’s competence level based on actual performance and/or
evaluation of reports written by the intern and on information received from other school staff,
families, students, etc. Each item should be rated independently by writing the number that best
exemplifies the intern’s competencies. If a student is given a rating of 1, please provide
comments supporting this rating.
Please share the form with your trainee and then return the completed form to me (electronically).
If you have any questions or concerns, please contact:
Jill D. Sharkey, Ph.D., School Psychology Coordinator
Phone: (805) 893-3441 email: jsharkey@education.ucsb.edu

                          Final Evaluation Signature and Summary
All Quarters:
This student is making adequate progress (circle one)?:    Yes             No
Comments:

Second Year Students - Spring Quarter only
This student is now ready for an internship (circle one)?:       Yes        No
Internship Students – Spring Quarter only
This student is now ready to practice as a credentialed school psychologist (circle one)?: Yes No

Signatures
Student ___________________________________________________ Date ____/_____/_____

Field Site Supervisor ________________________________________ Date ____/_____/_____

University Supervisor/Coordinator _____________________________ Date ____/_____/_____
Note: In lieu of a signature, the Field Site Supervisor may email the University Supervisor the
form and CC the Student.




School Psychology Handbook                                                                A10
University of California, Santa Barbara                                      2010-2011

                                   1 – Improvement Needed
                             2 – Competent (Supervision Needed)
                 3 – Professionally Competent (Minimal Supervision Needed)
                        N/A – No Opportunity to Observe/Participate

Data Based Decision Making and Accountability: NASP Standard 2.1
                                                Intern Rating        Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of various assessment models
and methods
Appropriately used data gathered to identify
strengths and needs of students
Understands students’ presenting problems
Demonstrated ability to measure student
progress and accomplishments

Systematically collected data
Empirically-based decisions were made about
the delivery of services
Outcome of services were evaluated based on
data gathered
Comments:




Consultation and Collaboration: NASP Standard 2.2
                                                    Intern Rating    Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of various consultation and
collaboration models and methods
Appropriately applied various models and
methods of consultation and collaboration
Collaborated effectively with school personnel
Collaborated effectively with families
Collaborated effectively with students
Collaborated effectively with the community
Collaborated effectively with the school board
and policy makers
Comments:




School Psychology Handbook                                                         A11
University of California, Santa Barbara                                    2010-2011
                                    1 – Improvement Needed
                              2 – Competent (Supervision Needed)
                 3 – Professionally Competent (Minimal Supervision Needed)
                          N/A – No Opportunity to Observe/Participate

 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills: NASP Standard 2.3
                                                   Intern Rating      Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of human learning processes
and the techniques to assess them
Gained knowledge of services available to assist
in developing cognitive and academic skills
Appropriately developed cognitive and academic
goals for students
Implemented appropriate interventions to
achieve student goals
Evaluated the effectiveness of the interventions
implemented
Utilized both instructional interventions and
consultation
Comments:




Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills: NASP Standard
2.4
                                                  Intern Rating       Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of human developmental
processes and the techniques to assess them
Gained knowledge of services available to assist
in development of behavioral, affective,
adaptive, and social skills
Appropriately developed behavioral, affective,
adaptive, and social skills goals for students
Implemented appropriate interventions to
achieve student goals
Evaluated the effectiveness of the interventions
implemented
Utilized consultation, behavioral assessment, and
counseling interventions
Comments:




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A12
University of California, Santa Barbara                                    2010-2011
                                    1 – Improvement Needed
                              2 – Competent (Supervision Needed)
                 3 – Professionally Competent (Minimal Supervision Needed)
                          N/A – No Opportunity to Observe/Participate


School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning: NASP Standard 2.5
                                               Intern Rating        Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of general education, special
education, and other educational and related
services.
Understands the school setting as a system.
Participated in the facilitation of policies and
practices that promote safe and supportive
learning environments for the students.
Comments:


Preventive and Responsive Services: NASP Standard 2.6
                                                  Intern Rating     Supervisor Rating
Has knowledge of psychological and educational
principles and research related to resilience and
risk factors in learning and mental health.
Has knowledge of universal, selected, and
indicated prevention strategies.
Knows evidence-based strategies for effective
prevention, preparation, and response.
Used data to evaluate outcomes of prevention
and response activities.
Comments:


Family-School Collaboration Services: NASP Standard 2.7
                                                Intern Rating       Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of family systems
Gained knowledge of family influences on
student’s development, learning, and behavior
Gained knowledge of methods that promote
family involvement in education and service
delivery
Worked effectively with families
Promoted and provided comprehensive services
to students and families
Comments:



School Psychology Handbook                                                      A13
University of California, Santa Barbara                                      2010-2011


                                   1 – Improvement Needed
                             2 – Competent (Supervision Needed)
                 3 – Professionally Competent (Minimal Supervision Needed)
                        N/A – No Opportunity to Observe/Participate

Diversity in Development and Learning: NASP Standard 2.8
                                                 Intern Rating       Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of individual differences,
abilities, and disabilities
Gained knowledge of various influences on
development and learning
Became more sensitive to students of diversity
Demonstrated skills needed to work with
students of diversity
Implemented strategies based on the student’s
individual characteristics, strengths, and needs
Comments:




Research and Program Evaluation: NASP Standard 2.9
                                                 Intern Rating       Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of research, statistics, and
evaluation methods
Effectively evaluated research and translates it
into practice
Effectively conducted program investigations
and evaluations
Used research gathered for improvement of
services
Comments:




School Psychology Handbook                                                         A14
University of California, Santa Barbara                                          2010-2011


                                   1 – Improvement Needed
                             2 – Competent (Supervision Needed)
                 3 – Professionally Competent (Minimal Supervision Needed)
                        N/A – No Opportunity to Observe/Participate


Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice: NASP Standard 2.10
                                                   Intern Rating           Supervisor Rating
Gained knowledge of various services methods
and models
Gained knowledge of public policies related to
students and families
Gained knowledge of ethical and legal Standards
Practiced school psychology according to
standards and ethical guidelines
Gained knowledge of skills needed to acquire
career-long professional development
Comments:




School Psychology Practice and Development: Professionalism
                                                 Intern Rating             Supervisor Rating
Respect for human diversity
Communication skills
Effective interpersonal relations
Ethical responsibility

Adaptability
Initiative and dependability

Comments:




Thank you for taking the time to complete this thorough evaluation! Please complete the front
page, review with the student, and return to me by email: jsharkey@education.ucsb.edu.



School Psychology Handbook                                                              A15
University of California, Santa Barbara       2010-2011




                                 APPENDIX D




School Psychology Handbook                          A16
University of California, Santa Barbara                                       2010-2011
                                          UCSB
                                School Psychology Portfolio
                                General Overview 2010-2011

A portfolio is a presentation of products that provide evidence of your acquisition of
knowledge and competencies in the major training domains of school psychology. We
have designed the portfolio process so that it represents a developmental sequence of
reflections and products designed to showcase your growing competency as you
advance through the program. Thus, there are different requirements and expectations at
each review period (Year 1, Year 2, and post-Internship).

In order to demonstrate your competency, you must prove that your work has had an
impact on “children, youth, families, and other consumers.” The portfolio will showcase
your work consisting of evidence that you have attained the domains of school
psychology training and practice as set forth in the standards. NASP requires a summary
of the results of at least one program-embedded, comprehensive, culminating,
performance-based measure (e.g., case studies, portfolios with corresponding
requirements, rating criteria/rubrics, results). We have designed the “Signature
Assignments” to fulfill this requirement–completion of these throughout your second and
third years will ensure you have adequately addressed all the standards.

The portfolio is not designed to prove that you have met the academic requirements for a
graduate degree or for the PPS School psychologist credential. Completion of course
requirements is a separate requirement from the portfolio process and is verified by the
GGSE Student Advisor and by the GGSE Credential Analyst. Thus, coursework should
not be included in the portfolio unless it is directly related to the fieldwork standards and
provides data regarding your effectiveness as a school psychologist (e.g., behavior
intervention plan).

The portfolio provides evidence of your present level of professional skill development
vis-à-vis the training standards. In selecting samples for your portfolio, reflect on each
training standard and present high quality products that showcase your skills
development across multiple standards. Updated, detailed information about each
standard is available on the NASP website. Quality and depth of information and
reflection is what is sought, not bulk. The following pages detail the portfolio
requirements.

Reviews: Electronic copies are due to each of your reviewers two weeks prior to the
portfolio meeting. Portfolios are regularly scheduled in May of each year. The portfolio
review will include a 30 minute meeting with two faculty members during which ratings
will be shared, questions will be asked, and discussion will guide direction for further
professional development.

Jill D. Sharkey, Ph.D., NCSP
Department of Counseling, Clinical, School Psychology
Gevirtz Graduate School of Education
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490


School Psychology Handbook                                                           A17
University of California, Santa Barbara                                 2010-2011
Web: www.education.ucsb/sharkey
                                Year One Requirements
A. Design your electronic portfolio template. This is your opportunity to get familiar
with Microsoft Powerpoint technology if you are not already. Create an introduction
navigation page with hyperlinks to each required section. Have fun and make it look
professional.
B. Complete the Professional Development Section. The first section of the UCSB
school psychology portfolio includes the following professional development information
that should be developed in the first year and updated/maintained yearly after that.
    ❑ Vita / Resume
    ❑ Transcript (can download from UCSB Gold)
    ❑ Statement of Professional Philosophy
    ❑ Statement of Professional Goals and Competencies
    ❑ Conference Attendance / Presentation
       Make a list of conventions and conventions you attended along with the
       workshops, presentations, and special sessions you attended at each. Superior
       portfolios will also include reflections or handouts detailing the experience.
    ❑ Workshop Attendance / Presentation / University Presentations / Attendance
       Make a list of conventions and conventions you attended along with the
       workshops, presentations, and special sessions you attended at each. Superior
       portfolios will also include reflections or handouts detailing the experience.
    ❑ Membership in Professional Organizations
       Include a list of professional organizations along with dates you have been a
       member. Include any leadership positions or committees.
    ❑ Documentation of Meeting Credential Requirements
       Include the completed Credential Services Office Form with all four requirements
       completed (CBEST, Certificate of Clearance, TB Clearance, B.A. Degree).
C. Reflections. For each of the standards (listed below), write a summary/reflection
addressing the following questions/comments.
       What does this standard mean for the practice of school psychology, why is it
important?
       What activities would demonstrate proficiency in this standard and why?
       Outline a plan for your next stage of training to address unmet standards.
       Include your personal area of interest where you want to gain some particular
expertise.
Practices that Permeate All Aspects of Service Delivery
    ❑ Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability
    ❑ Consultation and Collaboration
Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families, and Schools
  Student-Level Services
    ❑ Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
    ❑ Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
  Systems-Level Services
    ❑ School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning
    ❑ Preventive and Responsive Services
    ❑ Family-School Collaboration Services
Foundations of School Psychologists’ Service Delivery
    ❑ Diversity in Development and Learning


School Psychology Handbook                                                     A18
University of California, Santa Barbara                                     2010-2011
   ❑ Research and Program Evaluation
   ❑ Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

D. Peer Review. Ask a peer to review your portfolio. Peers should provide constructive
criticism to help you improve the portfolio prior to final submission. The peer review must
be included in the portfolio when submitted for faculty review. Thus, the peer review of
the portfolio should be completed during the third or fourth week of the spring quarter.
Considering the results of the peer review, the student should perform appropriate
revisions before submission. Include the peer rating form and suggestions for
improvement in your portfolio (attached).
E. Log of Hours. You are responsible to keep and include in your portfolio a summary of
your hours.
H. Evaluation forms. Have your supervisor complete your final evaluation in time to
include it in your portfolio. In your portfolio include the following:
     ❑ First Year School Mid-Year and Final Evaluations
     ❑ Basic Practicum Evaluation(s)
Note: No products are required at this stage. Your reflections in part C will inform your
development of a fieldwork plan in Year Two.

                         Year Two & Three Requirements
A. Update your electronic portfolio template. Make any desired changes to your
electronic portfolio template.
B. Update the Professional Development Section. Update/renew each of the
professional development elements. Please note: for Professional Statements, include
the Year One version in addition to the updated Year Two version so the two statements
can be compared to assess growth.
❑ Vita / Resume
❑ Current Transcript (can download from UCSB Gold)
❑ Statement of Professional Philosophy – Include all prior statements (Year One and
        Year Two, if applicable) and newly updated Year Two/Intern versions so we can
        assess growth
❑ Statement of Professional Goals and Competencies- Include all prior statements
        (Year One and Year Two, if applicable) and newly updated Year Two/Intern
        versions so we can assess growth
❑ Conference Attendance / Presentation
❑ Workshop Attendance / Presentation / University Presentations / Attendance
❑ Membership in Professional Organizations
C. Reflections. For each of the standards, update your summary/reflection addressing
the following questions/comments.
        What does this standard mean for the practice of school psychology, why is it
important?
        What activities would demonstrate proficiency in this standard and why?
        Outline a plan for your next stage of training to address unmet standards.
        Include your personal area of interest where you want to gain some particular
expertise.
Include the Year One version in addition to the updated Year Two version (and then the
updated Year Three version) so the two statements can be compared to assess growth.
D. Signature Assignments. Complete the required signature assignments


School Psychology Handbook                                                         A19
University of California, Santa Barbara                                         2010-2011
E. Major Activities. Provide five additional assignments that showcase your work.
Activities should be tied to your fieldwork plan, i.e., items to include in your portfolio
should also be listed under activities in your fieldwork plan. The following are the major
content areas that are addressed NASP and CTC standards. Create a chart of these
standards and check which standard(s) each of your 5 selected assignments meet.
Practices that Permeate All Aspects of Service Delivery
     ❑ Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability
     ❑ Consultation and Collaboration
Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families, and Schools
  Student-Level Services
     ❑ Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
     ❑ Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
  Systems-Level Services
     ❑ School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning
     ❑ Preventive and Responsive Services
     ❑ Family-School Collaboration Services
Foundations of School Psychologists’ Service Delivery
     ❑ Diversity in Development and Learning
     ❑ Research and Program Evaluation
     ❑ Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice
F. Fieldwork Plan. Your final, summative fieldwork plan from the year should be included
along with updated notes and dates of activities accomplished (or anticipated if they will
be completed by the end of the school year). Interns should include plans from years 2
and internship year.
G. Log of Hours. You are responsible to keep and include in your portfolio a detailed
journal of your hours, including what activities you complete each day in what setting
(preschool, elementary, junior high, high school).
H. Evaluation forms. Have your supervisor complete your final evaluation in time to
include it in your portfolio. In your portfolio include the following:
     ❑ First Year School Mid-Year and Final Evaluations
     ❑ Basic Practicum Evaluation(s)
     ❑ Second Year Quarterly Evaluations
     ❑ Internship Year Biennial Evaluations (when applicable)
     ❑ All past Portfolio Review forms – faculty and peer
I. Peer Review. Ask a peer to review your portfolio. Peers should provide constructive
criticism to help you improve the portfolio prior to final submission. The peer review must
be included in the portfolio when submitted for faculty review. Thus, the peer review of
the portfolio should be completed during the third or fourth week of the spring quarter.
Considering the results of the peer review, the student should perform appropriate
revisions before submission. Include the peer rating form and suggestions for
improvement in your portfolio (attached).
J. PRAXIS-II Score Report (final portfolio). You must include your full PRAXIS-II score
report. Delete SSN but not your name.




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A20
University of California, Santa Barbara                                                                            2010-2011




               School Psychology Student Portfolio—Evaluation Sheet

Student Name:__________________________                                  Evaluator:________________________

Year in Program            1     2 Intern                                Evaluator Status:           Faculty           Peer

Date:_____________________________________________________________
Note: Peer review should be timed adequately prior to final portfolio deadline so student can address feedback.

Rating Rubric
HP (High Pass) = Demonstrates commendable knowledge, skill, and integration of program philosophy and values consistent
with the best practice (year in training considered).
Pass = Demonstrates adequate knowledge, skill, and integration of program philosophy and values consistent with competent
school psychology practice (year in training considered).
NR (Needs Revision) = Demonstrates minimal competency, and/or lacks integration of program philosophy and values OR
insufficient or missing information (year in program considered).

Overall Rating .......................................................................................... HP            Pass        NR
Comments/Questions


General Professional Development Information: Ratings and Comments

1. Vita / Resume.............................................................................................. HP       Pass NR

2. Transcript.................................................................................................... HP    Pass NR

3. Statement of Professional Philosophy.......................................................... HP                    Pass NR

4. Statement of Professional Goals and Competencies..................................... HP                             Pass NR


5. Conference Attendance/Presentation ........................................................... HP                    Pass NR


6. Workshop, and University Lecture Attendance / Presentations .................... HP                                  Pass NR


7. Membership in Professional Organizations.................................................. HP                        Pass NR

8. Met Credential Requirements ...................................................................... HP                Pass NR


School Psychology Handbook                                                                                                    A21
University of California, Santa Barbara                                                    2010-2011
Training Standards: Ratings and Comments
1. Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability ....................................... HP    Pass NR




2. Consultation and Collaboration ................................................................... HP   Pass    NR




3. Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills........... HP                        Pass    NR




4. Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills ......... HP                 Pass    NR




5. School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning................................................ HP            Pass    NR




6. Preventive and Responsive Services............................................................ HP       Pass    NR




7. Family-School Collaboration Services......................................................... HP        Pass    NR




8. Diversity in Development and Learning ...................................................... HP         Pass    NR




9. Research and Program Evaluation ............................................................... HP      Pass    NR




10. Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice ..................................................... HP     Pass    NR




School Psychology Handbook                                                                                   A22
University of California, Santa Barbara                                         2010-2011
Year Two Signature Assignments

Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).

#1 Psychoeducational Assessment

Educational History                               0            1            2            3
Family, Health, Development                       0            1            2            3
Language History                                  0            1            2            3
Observations                                      0            1            2            3
Assessment Results                                0            1            2            3
Interpretation                                    0            1            2            3
Recommendations                                   0            1            2            3
Goals                                             0            1            2            3

#2 Social Skills Group

Literature Review                                 0            1            2            3
Needs Assessment                                  0            1            2            3
Intervention Outline                              0            1            2            3
Evaluation                                        0            1            2            3
Critique                                          0            1            2            3

#3 Consultation
A model was specified and followed step           0            1            2            3
by step
A contract (informal or formal) was               0            1            2            3
developed
The problem was defined                           0            1            2            3
Interventions were generated and one              0            1            2            3
selected
Data were collected and charted to evaluate       0            1            2            3
and inform strategy
Follow-up sessions guided further                 0            1            2            3
implementation
Quality of reflections                            0            1            2            3




School Psychology Handbook                                                              A23
University of California, Santa Barbara                                         2010-2011
Internship Year Signature Assignments

Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).

#4 Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health

Crisis Intervention                               0            1            2            3
Needs Assessment                                  0            1            2            3
Psychoeducational Assessment                      0            1            2            3
Treatment Plan                                    0            1            2            3
Behavior Plan                                     0            1            2            3
IEP Goals                                         0            1            2            3
Intervention Fidelity                             0            1            2            3
Counseling Evaluation                             0            1            2            3

#5 Functional Assessment

Background and Setting Factors                    0            1            2            3
Functional Behavior Assessment                    0            1            2            3
Recommendations                                   0            1            2            3
Behavior Intervention Plan                        0            1            2            3
Intervention Monitoring                           0            1            2            3
Follow-Up                                         0            1            2            3




School Psychology Handbook                                                              A24
University of California, Santa Barbara       2010-2011




                                 APPENDIX E




School Psychology Handbook                          A25
University of California, Santa Barbara                                        2010-2011
UCSB Fieldwork Plan

Student:

District Supervisor:

Supervisor Qualifications (select one):

_____ Graduated from a NASP-approved program with 2 year post-internship experience
_____ NCSP with 2 years post-internship experience
_____ 5 years post-internship successful employment in the school setting and LEP
eligible

Fieldwork Plan Instructions:

The development of the fieldwork plan is a series of outcomes the student should meet at
the completion of the fieldwork. The fieldwork plan should be developed with National
Association of School Psychologist’s Domains of Professional Practice, which we have
linked with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing standards. The student
could demonstrate knowledge of each of these domains in a wide variety of ways. These
domains should be addressed in the plan by writing expected activities outcomes. The
fieldwork plan should relate to the standards for training school psychologists as
established by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. These standards are
listed in the Student Handbook and the fieldwork evaluation guide. The domains below
are not mutually exclusive and should be fully integrated into graduate level curricula,
practica, and internship. Domains of Professional Practice are more fully illustrated on
page 10 of NASP’s Standards for Training and Field Placement Programs in School
Psychology.

Students must present the University supervisor with a draft fieldwork plan prior to the
start of any new internship experience. The University supervisor will work with each
student to refine the individualized plan. A copy of the plan will be filed with the university
field placement coordinator no later than one month after the fieldwork has commenced.

NASP standards require that 2 hours of field-based supervision be provided each week
to full-time interns. We ask students to complete detailed logs of their specific activities
and note any questions that come up for their fieldwork supervision sessions.

Each quarter, the student must gain feedback from the fieldwork supervisor and turn in
the evaluation along with an updated plan (due the last day of UCSB finals each quarter).

In addition to addressing content standards, we ask that supervisors comment on the
UCSB student’s professional work characteristics: communication skills, flexibility,
effective interpersonal relations, initiative and dependability, ethnical responsibility,
personal stability, and respect for human diversity.

At the completion of the fieldwork assignment, the site supervisor provides a summative
evaluation of the student’s progress.


School Psychology Handbook                                                             A26
University of California, Santa Barbara                                         2010-2011
2.1 Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability
School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment and data
collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and
programs, and measuring progress and outcomes. As part of a systematic and comprehensive
process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service
delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to use psychological and educational
assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources and apply results to design,
implement, and evaluate response to services and programs.

Goals:



General Activity                Comment/Progress                 Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                              A27
University of California, Santa Barbara                                            2010-2011
2.2 Consultation and Collaboration
School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and strategies of consultation,
collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and
methods to promote effective implementation of services. As part of a systematic and
comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all
aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to consult, collaborate, and
communicate effectively with others.

Goals:



General Activity                 Comment/Progress                  Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                                A28
University of California, Santa Barbara                             2010-2011
2.3 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic
skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curricula
and instructional strategies. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills
to use assessment and data collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that
support cognitive and academic skills.

Goals:



General Activity                 Comment/Progress                  Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                                 A29
University of California, Santa Barbara                                          2010-2011

2.4 Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences
on behavior and mental health, behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills, and
evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health. School
psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to use assessment and data-
collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that support socialization, learning,
and mental health.

Goals:



General Activity                Comment/Progress                 Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                              A30
University of California, Santa Barbara                                        2010-2011

2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning
School psychologists have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory;
general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that
promote learning and mental health. School psychologists, in collaboration with others,
demonstrate skills to develop and implement practices and strategies to create and maintain
effective and supportive learning environments for children and others.

Goals:



General Activity                Comment/Progress               Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                            A31
University of California, Santa Barbara                                           2010-2011
2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services
School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk
factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multitiered
prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response. School psychologists, in
collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to promote services that enhance learning, mental
health, safety, and physical well-being through protective and adaptive factors and to implement
effective crisis preparation, response, and recovery.

Goals:



General Activity                 Comment/Progress                 Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                               A32
University of California, Santa Barbara                                        2010-2011
2.7 Family–School Collaboration Services
School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems,
strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on
children’s learning and mental health; and strategies to develop collaboration between families
and schools. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to design,
implement, and evaluate services that respond to culture and context and facilitate family and
school partnerships and interactions with community agencies for enhancement of academic and
social–behavioral outcomes for children.

Goals:



General Activity                Comment/Progress                Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                             A33
University of California, Santa Barbara                                              2010-2011

2.8 Diversity in Development and Learning
School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other
diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families,
and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and
evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to
diversity. School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide effective professional services that
promote effective functioning for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics,
cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding
and respect for diversity in development and learning and advocacy for social justice are
foundations for all aspects of service delivery.

Goals:



General Activity                  Comment/Progress                  Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                                   A34
University of California, Santa Barbara                                           2010-2011
2.9 Research and Program Evaluation
School psychologists have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data
collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation sufficient for understanding research
and interpreting data in applied settings. School psychologists demonstrate skills to evaluate and
apply research as a foundation for service delivery and, in collaboration with others, use various
techniques and technology resources for data collection, measurement, and analysis to support
effective practices at the individual, group, and/or systems levels.

Goals:



General Activity                 Comment/Progress                 Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                                A35
University of California, Santa Barbara                                               2010-2011

2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice
School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology;
multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors
related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists. School
psychologists demonstrate skills to provide services consistent with ethical, legal, and
professional standards; engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making;
collaborate with other professionals; and apply professional work characteristics needed for
effective practice as school psychologists, including respect for human diversity and social
justice, communication skills, effective interpersonal skills, responsibility, adaptability, initiative,
dependability, and technology skills.

Goals:



General Activity                  Comment/Progress                   Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                                                    A36
University of California, Santa Barbara                   2010-2011


Professional Work Characteristics


Goals:



General Activity                Comment/Progress   Date




Comments




School Psychology Handbook                                      A37
University of California, Santa Barbara                                                           2010-2011
                    Signature and Summary Pages of Fieldwork Plan:

Student:

Field Site Supervisor:                                                          Date

Placement Site:

Schedule:

University Supervisor/Coordinator Jill Sharkey                                   Date
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Final Evaluation:

This student is now ready to work as a fully credentialed school psychologist

Circle One:       YES       NO

Date ________/__________/____________

Supervisor Signature

______________________________________________________________


Final Summary Evaluation


Student ____________________________________________ Date ____/_____/_____

Field Site Supervisor _________________________________ Date ____/_____/_____

University Supervisor/Coordinator _______________________ Date ____/_____/_____




School Psychology Handbook                                                                                 A38
University of California, Santa Barbara                                     2010-2011
                          Crisis and Emergency Process Procedures

Procedures for handling emergency situation on school campus when the field supervisor

is on campus:

Don’t leave student alone.      Contact supervisor.      May need to bring student to

supervisor.

Add specific instructions here:

Procedures for handling emergency situation on school campus when the field supervisor

is NOT campus:

Contact school counselors or the school nurse. Get direction from them.

Add specific instructions here:

Phone Contact:             Cell Phone Contact:

Person to information at the school campus:

How can messages be left for regular supervisor?

If the supervisor is ill or otherwise unavailable, name of another district psychologist who

can be consulted:

Phone Contact:                    Cell Phone Contact:

Email contact to send message to regular field supervisor to inform them of

developments:



   Student was informed of the school’s crisis plan and knows their role in

responding to a crisis that occurs at school: Supervisor initials ________ Student

Initials _________

As soon as feasible, contact Jill Sharkey (805-893-3441; 805-453-5747 cell) and
send a follow-up email to explain the situation: jsharkey@education.ucsb.edu.
Also, if needed, contact the UCSB program at 893-3375 and leave a message with
the staff so that they can locate the university supervisor or a suitable alternative.


School Psychology Handbook                                                         A39
University of California, Santa Barbara                                     2010-2011
                        UCSB School Psychology Fieldwork Matrix

Student ________________________________           Date __________________________

                                 Description           Year 1    Year 2          Year 3
                                                        Field   Practicum     Internship #
         (1A) CNCSP      Introductory Practicum        50
Year 1




         274ABC          50 hours
         (1B) Ed 260B    50 hours                      50

         (2A) CNCSP      Practicum
         274DEF          300-350 hours
Year 2




         (2B) Year 2     50 hours of 209A or
         Supplemental*   50 hours of relevant
                         research
         (3A) Ed CNCSP   800 hours school based
         275             training

         (3B) Year 3     400 additional hours of
Year 3




         supplemental*   school based training
                         or
                         400 hours relevant training
                         with prior approval of
                         faculty
Total Hours                                            100      350          1,200


Years 1 & 2: Grand Total Practicum (450 hours required) = 1A + 1B + 2A + 2B =
_______

Year 3: Grand Total Internship (1200 hours required) = 3A + 3B
=___________________

*Supplemental hours are optional. All supplemental hours involving relevant research and
other training activities must be documented and receive pre-approval from the school
psychology faculty. The plan for alternative hours should be included in the practicum
and internship written plan (i.e., during the fall term).

# Internship hours can be accumulated as a culminating experience and only after review
by the school psychology faculty to approved moving to the internship level of fieldwork.

Verification in the form of Daily Report Forms and/or Field logs required for all
hours.




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A40
University of California, Santa Barbara                                   2010-2011

UCSB Fieldwork Documentation: Setting Types

Use the form to record the number of fieldwork hours accrued in each type of setting (you
are required to accrue at least 200 hours in two different settings).

Course       Quarter    Hours    Field Sup    Setting (Type)             Verify
Ed274D       F 07       50       Walker       High School                JDS




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A41
University of California, Santa Barbara                                    2010-2011

UCSB: Supplemental Hours Plan and Documentation
It is important to recognize that all practicum and internship hours can be accrued in a
variety of ways. If supplemental hours are to be credited, you must document all hours
completed in fieldwork related activities. Use this section only if using supplemental
hours.

Recognizing the importance of relevant non-school-based experiences, it is possible to
use 50 hours of related experiences toward the 450 hours of required practicum and 400
hours toward the required 1200 hours of internship –to do so requires a prespecified
plan. Use the section below to document this plan. Verification by your credential
advisor is required. Hours accrued prior to authorization will not be counted.

             Describe Activity and Purpose                Start    End    Hours    Verify




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A42
University of California, Santa Barbara        2010-2011




                                  APPENDIX F




School Psychology Handbook                           A43
University of California, Santa Barbara                                      2010-2011


                                Signature Assignments
Attached are descriptions for five assignments you must complete in your fieldwork
training to demonstrate competency as a school psychologist. These are intensive
opportunities to implement best practices and receive feedback on your implementation
from both the University Supervisor and another School Psychology faculty member.

One goal of these assignments is to reflect the breadth and diversity of your skills. Thus,
you may not use the same case/student/family for multiple signature assignments. For
example, if you select a student for signature assignment #1, this same student may not
be included in any other signature assignment (e.g., consultation, FBA).

Given as assignments in second-year fieldwork and Internship, these five products will be
the core of your final portfolio, supplemented by individualized experiences designed to
meet your goals and enhance the NASP standards. To reduce redundancy, select
different, diverse students to work with on each assignment. By the end of the Internship
experience, you must complete and receive passing scores on all five Signature
Assignments.




School Psychology Handbook                                                          A44
University of California, Santa Barbara                                  2010-2011
                                  Signature Assignment #1
                               Psychoeducational Assessment

   •   Review cumulative file and document important background information
   •   Observe student in all relevant settings.
   •   Administer and score assessments. Use scoring software.
   •   Review and interpret attendance, grades, and discipline history. Use district
       database to look up educational records.
   •   Gather teacher comments, reports
   •   Use a parent interview or questionnaire including a health and development
   •   Write up results, interpretations, and recommendations and include all mandatory
       statements
   •   Develop goals for the student – both academic and social emotional. Use the IEP
       software and link goals to CA state standards. Goals must reflect knowledge of
       effective instruction and development of cognitive/academic skills.
   •   Present your findings at an IEP meeting

Final Products:
   • Psychoeducational Report,
   • Copy of IEP Goals,
   • IEP presentation feedback form

Required Report Elements:
Independent classroom (or appropriate setting) observation by a psychoeducational
team member
Educationally relevant health and development
Statement regarding the effects of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage
Statement regarding if academic progress is impacted by lack of appropriate education
or poor school attendance
Tests selected are considered valid and appropriate for this student
Scores are valid measures of present levels of cognitive and academic functioning
Basis for determination of special education services
Relationship of behavior to pupil’s academic/social functioning
Statement regarding whether the student needs special education and related services:
(1) Does the student meet eligibility requirements AND
(2) Does student need special education to benefit from regular education services
Need for specialized services, materials, and equipment for low incidence disabilities




School Psychology Handbook                                                      A45
University of California, Santa Barbara                                   2010-2011
IEP Feedback Questions
The school psychology trainee treated me     Especially True      False       Especially
with respect.                                True                             False
The school psychology trainee helped         Especially True      False       Especially
make me feel like an equal part of the IEP   True                             False
team.
The school psychology trainee presented      Especially True      False       Especially
assessment results in a clear manner.        True                             False
The school psychology trainee answered       Especially True      False       Especially
my questions about the assessment            True                             False
results.
The school psychology trainee report         Especially True      False       Especially
addressed the referral concerns.             True                             False
Comments:

Rating Rubric
Faculty will rate the overall assignment for quality.
    • University supervisor will rate the assignment immediately and provide feedback
       for improvement.
    • One additional faculty member will rate the assignment as part of the portfolio
       review process.
Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).
Educational History                             0        1           2             3
Family, Health, Development                     0        1           2             3
Language History                                0        1           2             3
Observations                                    0        1           2             3
Assessment Results                              0        1           2             3
Interpretation                                  0        1           2             3
Recommendations                                 0        1           2             3
Goals                                           0        1           2             3

Standards Addressed (primary highlighted)
   • Data-based Decision-Making and Accountability
   • Consultation and Collaboration
   • Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
   • Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
   • Preventive and Responsive Services
   • Family-School Collaboration Services
   • Diversity in Development and Learning
   • Research and Program Evaluation
   • Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A46
University of California, Santa Barbara                                       2010-2011
                                  Signature Assignment #2
                                 Social Skills Group Projects

Design and implement an intervention in the schools for a group of students (can be in
pairs). Topics should focus on socialization and development of life skills. Select one of
the following four intervention areas: academic (i.e., study skills), personal-social (i.e.,
social skills, divorce or grief group) family-school (i.e., parenting group), or
classroom/school-wide (i.e., conflict resolution, in-service on ability awareness).

Required products:
  • Literature review - What is the background literature on the problem being
      addressed? What might be effective interventions according to the literature? Use
      scientific journal articles/book chapters only.
  • Needs Assessment – Procedure, results, how assessment data were used to form
      group curriculum and choose participants. Obtain informed consent from parents
      of participants. Include parents in needs assessment.
  • Intervention Outline - Target population, session dates, topics and content
      covered, materials needed, evaluation instruments/components.
  • Evaluation – Include your evaluation procedures and results, with data including
      charts and graphs that demonstrated your impact on the target social/life skill. You
      must include a single subject evaluation technique and ABA is recommended
      (baseline, treatment, post-treatment). Select an observable, measurable behavior
      that is alterable and targeted in the skills group. Discuss how data were used to
      inform treatment decisions – both in the needs assessment and in curriculum
      adaptation.
  • Critique - A critique of the implementation - A synopsis of how your group went,
      what went well, what would you do differently, how group members responded to
      intervention.

Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).
Literature Review                             0          1           2           3
Needs Assessment                              0          1           2           3
Intervention Outline                          0          1           2           3
Evaluation                                    0          1           2           3
Critique                                      0          1           2           3

Standards Addressed
   • Data-based Decision Making and Accountability
   • Consultation and Collaboration
   • Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
   • Preventive and Responsive Services
   • Diversity in Development and Learning
   • Research and Program Evaluation
   • Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice


School Psychology Handbook                                                            A47
University of California, Santa Barbara                                   2010-2011
                                  Signature Assignment #3
                                        Consultation

Complete a consultation experience in the school setting. Start early because this will
take time. For example, you may decide to address a problem identified by a teacher
through a school’s pre-referral intervention process (Student Success Team). Select a
consultation model to follow. You will need to take the necessary steps to identify
the problem and develop an intervention plan. Involve the client’s parents in the
process. Chart the student’s progress to provide feedback to consultee and parent. Upon
completion of the consultation experience, write a paper describing:
    • The setting
    • The model you selected
    • The steps you followed
    • Examples of how you met each step in the consultation process
    • Challenges you faced in maintaining the consultation process
    • How well the model you selected worked in the selected setting
    • Alternative models you would try, if any
    • Future challenges for you to apply consultation in the applied setting
    • Goals for further training and how you will meet these goals
    • How you will further develop your consultation skills

Example consultation process (over several meetings)
  1. Introductions
         a. Greeting
         b. Purpose of the meeting (provide context)
         c. Definition of the consultant/consultee roles (how do you see
            consultation/what do you see as role of each participant)
  2. Problem Definition
         a. Define problem in behavioral terms
         b. Identify antecedent determinants
         c. Identify consequences that may maintain the behavior
         d. Assess other relevant environmental factors
  3. Intervention Development and Selection
         a. Identify goals
         b. Brainstorm range of possible interventions
         c. Evaluate pros and cons of each intervention
         d. Select intervention from the alternatives generated (it may be that your
            intervention is to further assess the problem)
         e. Identify all available resources
  4. Closure
         a. Summarize what transpired
         b. Clarify responsibilities of each party
         c. Decide on next meeting date




School Psychology Handbook                                                       A48
University of California, Santa Barbara                                  2010-2011
Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).
A model was specified and followed            0          1           2           3
step by step
A contract (informal or formal) was           0          1           2           3
developed
The problem was defined                       0          1           2           3
Interventions were generated and one          0          1           2           3
selected
Data were collected and charted to            0          1           2           3
evaluate and inform strategy
Follow-up sessions guided further             0          1           2           3
implementation
Quality of reflections                        0          1           2           3

Standards Addressed
   • Data-based Decision Making and Accountability
   • Consultation and Collaboration
   • Pick One
        o Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
        o Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
   • Preventive and Responsive Services
   • Family-School Collaboration Services
   • Diversity in Development and Learning
   • Research and Program Evaluation
   • Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice




School Psychology Handbook                                                      A49
University of California, Santa Barbara                               2010-2011
                 Signature Assignment #4 (note: Revised for 2010-2011)
       School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning: Three Tiered Responses

For this assignment, you will use a “crisis event” as a starting point. A crisis is broadly
defined for this assignment in order to facilitate finding a case. A crisis could include a
suicide threat, a threat of violence, or a discipline infraction requiring a manifestation
determination. If a significant crisis type cases is not available or unlikely, you may use
the case of a student with social/emotional difficulties who could benefit from a
psychoeducational assessment (requested review, triennial, or initial). If a student is
already in special education and is having behavioral or emotional issues that are not
adequately addressed by the IEP, the case meets the goals for this assignment. If a
student has difficulties with behavior in class and the teacher requests assistance, this
could be used for this assignment.

Knowledge
    • What is done universally to prevent crisis events at this school? Refer to the
       school’s overall crisis management document. Summarize and critique citing
       sources for evidence-based practice.
    • What is done at the secondary prevention level to address crisis at this school?
       Identify district protocol for handling a crisis event related to this student’s behavior
       (suicide, violence threat, other externalizing behaviors). Summarize and critique
       citing sources for evidence-based practice.
    • What is done at the tertiary level to intervene with students in crisis? Summarize
       and critique citing sources for evidence-based practice.
Skills
    • Follow district protocol to respond to the crisis; augment with evidence-based
       practice as needed.
           o Conduct a crisis intervention
           o Conduct a mental health needs assessment (obtain parental consent and
               input, consult with teachers regarding previous interventions)
           o Conduct additional assessment as needed (including all aspects needed for
               a psychoeducational evaluation to address the referral question such as
               background information, observations, new assessments)
           o Determine services/treatment plan-review the literature for evidence-based
               treatments for the presenting problem (consult with school
               psychologist/mental health professional; refer to outside services?)
               including a behavior plan and IEP goals (note: if the student is in regular
               education, create a regular education behavior plan and treatment plan
               goals). Consider school and classroom-level factors and collaborate/consult
               with other team professionals to implement the plan.
    • Complete intervention using a model of collaboration: you will be providing some
       of the services as part of a team member.
           o Get feedback each session with student(s) (keep notes, track feedback;
               change intervention if necessary, chart data to inform goal attainment)
           o Graph the progress noting decision points if changes to treatment are made
           o Complete a mental health referral if needed
    • Design modified school policies and practices at all three levels (universal,
       secondary, tertiary) to address any gaps in school policies, regulations, services,


School Psychology Handbook                                                             A50
University of California, Santa Barbara                                    2010-2011
       or accountability systems to ensure effective services.

Final Product(s):
   • Knowledge write-up: three-tiered district response (in practice and the critique)
   • Crisis Intervention
   • Treatment Plan
         o Assessments
         o Treatment Plan
         o Monitoring Data
   • School-system response plan: to this crisis at all levels.

Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).
Knowledge Write-Up                            0          1           2           3
Crisis Intervention                           0          1           2           3
Assessment                                    0          1           2           3
Treatment Plan                                0          1           2           3
Monitoring Data                               0          1           2           3
School-System Response Plan                   0          1           2           3

Standards Addressed
   • Data-based Decision-Making and Accountability
   • Consultation and Collaboration
   • Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
   • School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning
   • Preventive and Responsive Services
   • Diversity in Development and Learning
   • Research and Program Evaluation
   • Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A51
University of California, Santa Barbara                                  2010-2011
                                    Signature Assignment #5
                                     Functional Assessment

   •   Review cumulative file and document important background information
   •   Conduct Functional Behavior observations
   •   Look at attendance, grades, and discipline
   •   Gather teacher comments, reports
   •   Use a parent interview or questionnaire including a health and development
   •   Write up results, interpretations, and recommendations
   •   Using consultation skills, work with a team to develop a Behavior Plan
   •   Use Consultation skills to promote fidelity of Behavior Plan
   •   Monitor and chart target behavior
   •   Provide feedback regarding progress and change treatment as necessary
   •   Conduct a new FBA if needed if behavior changes

Final Product:
   • Complete Functional Assessment report including a description of background
       factors, observations, conclusions, and recommendations.
   • Report of intervention effectiveness with data

Signature Assignment Rating Rubric
0 - Unsatisfactory: Demonstrates substantial lack of competency (redo).
1 - Fair: Demonstrates minimal competency but lacks some important components (redo).
2 - Good: Demonstrates ability consistent with competent school psychology practice (pass).
3 - Excellent: Demonstrates commendable ability (pass).
Background and Setting Factors                0          1           2           3
Functional Behavior Assessment                0          1           2           3
Recommendations                               0          1           2           3
Behavior Intervention Plan                    0          1           2           3
Intervention Monitoring                       0          1           2           3
Follow-Up                                     0          1           2           3

Standards Addressed
   • Data-based Decision-Making and Accountability
   • Consultation and Collaboration
   • Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills
   • Preventive and Responsive Services
   • Diversity in Development and Learning
   • Research and Program Evaluation
   • Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice




School Psychology Handbook                                                      A52
University of California, Santa Barbara                                   2010-2011
                                      2010 NASP Standards
  Standard          Psychoed       Social Skills Consultation   School-Wide       FBA
                  Assessment          Group

    Data        X               X              X                X             X


Consultation    X               X              X                X             X


 Instruction    X                              Choose One


Socialization   X               X              Choose One       X             X


School-Wide                                                                   X


Preventative    X               X              X                X             X


   Family       X                                               X


  Diversity     X               X              X                X             X


  Research      X               X              X                X             X


    Legal       X               X              X                X             X


Final Product                   X              X                X             X
Demonstrates
  Impact of
your services
on a student




School Psychology Handbook                                                        A53
University of California, Santa Barbara       2010-2011




                                 APPENDIX G




School Psychology Handbook                          A54
Name_______________________________________                                             NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 1


     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                           CTC                                                       APA
2.1: Data-Based Decision-Making and                                      Standard 4 - Assessment                                 Procedures
Accountability: School psychologists                                                                                             • All
                                              The program provides candidates with the knowledge of current theories and
have knowledge of varied models and                                                                                              Core Knowledge Base
                                              methods of using assessment data to support data-based decision making for
methods of assessment and data collection                                                                                        • All
                                              the purpose of understanding, evaluating and promoting positive pupil
methods for identifying strengths and
                                              performance, program outcomes, and school climate. Candidates develop an
needs, developing effective services and
                                              understanding of the influence of multiple factors on pupil achievement. The
programs, and measuring progress and
                                              program requires candidates to analyze assessment information in a manner
outcomes. As part of a systematic and
                                              that produces valid inferences when evaluating the needs of individual pupils
comprehensive process of effective
                                              and assessing the effectiveness of educational programs.
decision making and problem solving that
permeates all aspects of service delivery,                Standard 22 - Individual Evaluation and Assessment
school psychologists demonstrate skills to    Candidates are well versed in a variety of assessment methods, including
use psychological and educational             formal and informal test administration, behavioral assessment, interview,
assessment, data collection strategies, and   ecological or environmental assessment, as well as assessment methodologies
technology resources and apply results to     to define a student’s problems and needs, to assess current status, and to
design, implement, and evaluate response      measure the effects of the problems-solving process. Candidates also
to services and programs.                     understand contextual influences on outcomes, such as: (a) personal attributes
                                              of the pupil; (b) types of aptitude; and (c) community, cultural, gender, and
                                              language influences, and (d) classroom climate and instructional practices.
                                              Candidates understand how to use assessment information in a problem
                                              solving process and are able to convey findings in an articulate way to a
                                              diverse audience. Candidates are able to use data-based decision making to
                                              improve outcomes for instruction, development of cognitive and academic
                                              skills, and the development of life competencies. Candidates also demonstrate
                                              an understanding of the process and procedures identified in federal and state
                                              laws related to special education services, such as the Individuals with
                                              Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
                                                            Standard 23 - Program Planning and Evaluation
                                              Candidates understand the school as a system. Candidates work with
                                              individuals and groups to facilitate organizational structures and policies that
                                              create and maintain safe school environments that promote learning and
                                              enhance positive educational outcomes for pupils. Candidates utilize data-
                                              based decision making skills to (a) assist in the development of challenging
                                              but achievable goals for all pupils; (b) provide information about ways in
                                              which pupils can achieve these goals; and (c) monitor pupil progress toward
                                              these goals. Candidates are skillful in evaluating local school programs and in
                                              interpreting findings to other educators and to the public.




                                                                 UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                            NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 2




     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                         CTC                                                        APA
2.2: Consultation and Collaboration:                                  Standard 10 - Consultation                               Procedures
School psychologists have knowledge of                                                                                         • Psychological and Educational
                                             The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
varied models and strategies of                                                                                                Consultation
                                             demonstrate knowledge and application of theories, models, and processes of
consultation, collaboration, and
                                             consultation. The program provides candidates with opportunities and
communication applicable to individuals,
                                             experiences to display the ability to use communication, interpersonal, and
families, groups, and systems and methods
                                             problem-solving skills in consultation with teachers, administrators, other
to promote effective implementation of
                                             school personnel, family members, community groups, and agencies.
services. As part of a systematic and
                                             Candidates demonstrate skills in using a decision-making process when
comprehensive process of effective
                                             consulting and collaborating with others to (a) identify problem areas, (b)
decision making and problem solving that
                                             collect and analyze information to understand problems, (c) make decisions
permeates all aspects of service delivery,
                                             about service delivery, and (d) evaluate the implementation and outcome of
school psychologists demonstrate skills to
                                             the service delivery plan.
consult, collaborate, and communicate
effectively with others.
                                              Standard 13 - Collaboration and Coordination of Pupil Support Systems
                                             The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
                                             collaborate effectively with community-based organizations, agencies, and
                                             other professionals. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of programs and
                                             services within a comprehensive model of support at the school site level
                                             designed to promote high expectations and increase pupil learning and
                                             achievement.

                                                             Standard 20 - Collaboration and Consultation
                                             Candidates have positive interpersonal skills with which to facilitate
                                             communication for the purposes of consultation and collaboration with
                                             teachers, teams of school personnel, community professionals, agencies, and
                                             families. Candidates are prepared to listen, adapt, deal with ambiguity, and be
                                             patient in difficult situations. Candidates are able to clearly present and
                                             exchange information in a variety of contexts with diverse audiences such as
                                             families, teachers, school boards, policy makers, business leaders, and fellow
                                             school pupil service providers.




                                                                UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                               NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 3




     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                            CTC                                                         APA
2.3: Interventions and Instructional               Standard 5 - Comprehensive Prevention and Early Intervention for                Procedures
Support to Develop Academic Skills                                               Achievement                                       • Direct Intervention
School psychologists have knowledge of         The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to               Problems
biological, cultural, and social influences    display an understanding of the factors that contribute to successful learning.     • Individuals
on academic skills; human learning,            In order to help pupils attain high learning goals, the program provides            • Learning
cognitive, and developmental processes;        candidates with the knowledge to identify problems in their earliest stages         • Learning Environments
and evidence-based curricula and               and to implement prevention and early intervention strategies for addressing        • Adverse Social Conditions
instructional strategies. School               these problems. The program requires candidates to demonstrate knowledge              Core Knowledge Base
psychologists, in collaboration with others,   of classroom, school, family, and community factors that support pupil              • Education
demonstrate skills to use assessment and       learning and to develop skills to assist pupils who experience learning             • Psychology
data collection methods and to implement       difficulties.                                                                       • Measurement
and evaluate services that support                                                                                                 Professional Practice
                                                       Standard 11 - Learning Theory and Educational Psychology
cognitive and academic skills.                                                                                                     • Educational and Psychological
                                               The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to                 Interventions
                                               display an understanding of learning theories and factors influencing learning
                                               and teaching such as cognition, memory, attention skills, perceptual-sensory,
                                               emotional state, motivation, organizational skills, gender, cultural differences,
                                               and linguistic differences. Candidates know how to evaluate the congruence
                                               between instructional strategies and pupil learning assets and deficits.

                                                                   Standard 18 - Educational Foundations
                                               The program provides candidates with a foundation in the knowledge base of
                                               education concerning the organization and operation of schools, school and
                                               community-based resources, as well as alternative service delivery systems.
                                               The program requires candidates to be prepared to help design and operate
                                               programs to promote school-family interactions. The program requires
                                               candidates to be knowledgeable about: (a) family influences on pupil
                                               cognitive, motivational, and social characteristics that affect classroom
                                               performance; (b) family involvement in education; (c) ways to promote
                                               partnerships between parents and educators to improve outcomes for pupils;
                                               (d) cultural issues that impact home-school collaboration; and (e) methods to
                                               facilitate safe and caring school communities.




                                                                  UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                            NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 4




     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                          CTC                                                       APA
2.4 Interventions and Mental Health                  Standard 8 - Self-esteem and Personal and Social Responsibility           Procedures
Services to Develop Social and Life                                                                                            • Direct Intervention
                                               The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to assess
Skills. School psychologists have                                                                                              • Individual, Group & Family
                                               their own self-esteem and to demonstrate an understanding of principles
knowledge of biological, cultural,                                                                                             Interventions
                                               associated with the building of (a) self-esteem, (b) personal and social
developmental, and social influences on                                                                                        Problems
                                               responsibility, and (c) their relationship to the life-long learning process.
behavior and mental health, behavioral and                                                                                     • Individuals
emotional impacts on learning and life                                                                                         • Adjustment
skills, and evidence-based strategies to                                                                                       • Learning Environments
promote social–emotional functioning and                                                                                       • Adverse Social Conditions
mental health. School psychologists, in                                                                                        Core Knowledge Base
collaboration with others, demonstrate                                                                                         • Psychology
skills to use assessment and data-collection                                                                                   • Measurement
methods and to implement and evaluate                                                                                          • Education
services that support socialization,                                                                                           • Effective Family Processes
learning, and mental health.




                                                                 UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                             NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 5




     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                          CTC                                                        APA
2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote                     Standard 12 - Professional Leadership Development                      Procedures
Learning. School psychologists have                                                                                             • Psychological and Educational
                                              The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
knowledge of school and systems structure,                                                                                      Consultation
                                              display an understanding of the development, improvement and evaluation of
organization, and theory; general and                                                                                           • Organizational
                                              programs that support effective pupil learning. The program also provides
special education; technology resources;                                                                                        Core Knowledge Base
                                              candidates with an understanding of the importance of leadership by the pupil
and evidence-based school practices that                                                                                        • Education
                                              personnel services provider in operating as a systems change agent.
promote learning and mental health.                                                                                             • Psychology
School psychologists, in collaboration with                                                                                     • Social
others, demonstrate skills to develop and                            Standard 14 - Human Relations                              • Professional Practice
implement practices and strategies to         The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to             • Organizational and Community
create and maintain effective and             demonstrate self-awareness, sensitivity to others, and skillfulness in relating   Dynamics
supportive learning environments for          to individuals and groups. The program provides candidates with
children and others.                          opportunities and experiences to understand the importance of socio-
                                              psychological concepts of group formation, reference groups, inter-group and
                                              intra-group relations and conflict. The program provides candidates with
                                              opportunities and experiences to demonstrate an ability to facilitate group
                                              process and mediate conflict.




                                                                 UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                              NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 6


     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                            CTC                                                       APA
2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services                      Standard 9 - School Safety and Violence Prevention                    Procedures
School psychologists have knowledge of                                                                                            • Prevention
                                                The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
principles and research related to resilience                                                                                     • Direct Intervention
                                                understand ways in which school environments can enhance the safety and
and risk factors in learning and mental                                                                                           • Crisis Intervention
                                                well-being of all pupils. The program provides candidates with the knowledge
health, services in schools and                                                                                                   • Health-related Consultation
                                                and models of systematic school safety planning that include comprehensive
communities to support multitiered                                                                                                Core Knowledge Base
                                                school climate and crisis response plans addressing elements of prevention,
prevention, and evidence-based strategies                                                                                         • Psychology
                                                intervention, and treatment. The program provides candidates with
for effective crisis response. School                                                                                             • Developmental Psychopathology
                                                opportunities and experiences to demonstrate knowledge and skills to assist in
psychologists, in collaboration with others,                                                                                      • Developmental Psychology
                                                the development and implementation of a comprehensive program to reduce
demonstrate skills to promote services that
                                                the incidence of school site violence. The program provides candidates with
enhance learning, mental health, safety,
                                                knowledge and skills that address the needs of witnesses, victims and
and physical well-being through protective
                                                perpetrators of violence as they relate to improved behavior and enhanced
and adaptive factors and to implement
                                                teaching and learning.
effective crisis preparation, response, and
recovery.
                                                 Standard 21 - Wellness Promotion, Crisis Intervention, and Counseling
                                                Candidates are prepared to help design, implement and evaluate wellness,
                                                prevention, intervention, and other mental health programs at the individual,
                                                group and system levels. They are knowledgeable about academic,
                                                behavioral, and serious personal difficulties. As primary mental health service
                                                providers, candidates are able to recognize the behaviors and contexts that are
                                                precursors to the development of internalizing disorders, externalizing
                                                disorders, and dropping out of school. Candidates can design programs and
                                                implement prevention, intervention, and treatment services across the
                                                hierarchy of pupils’ development needs. Candidates can work with school
                                                personnel, pupils, parents, and the general community in the aftermath of
                                                personal, school and community crises.




                                                                   UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                            NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 7




     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                          CTC                                                     APA
2.7 Family–School Collaboration                                 Standard 7 – Family-School Collaboration                      Core Knowledge Base
Services. School psychologists have                                                                                           All
                                               The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
knowledge of principles and research
                                               display an understanding of the ways in which pupil development, well being,
related to family systems, strengths, needs,
                                               and learning are enhanced by family-school collaboration. The program
and culture; evidence-based strategies to
                                               requires candidates to work with parents to foster respectful and productive
support family influences on children’s
                                               family-school collaboration.
learning and mental health; and strategies
to develop collaboration between families
and schools. School psychologists, in
collaboration with others, demonstrate
skills to design, implement, and evaluate
services that respond to culture and context
and facilitate family and school
partnerships and interactions with
community agencies for enhancement of
academic and social–behavioral outcomes
for children.




                                                                 UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                              NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 8




     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                           CTC                                                       APA
2.8 Diversity in Development and                                   Standard 2 - Growth and Development                           Core Knowledge Base
Learning. School psychologists have                                                                                              • Psychology
                                               The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
knowledge of individual differences,
                                               acquire an understanding of typical and atypical growth and development,
abilities, disabilities, and other diverse
                                               including relevant theories, research, and other information related to pupils’
characteristics; principles and research
                                               strengths and weaknesses that affect learning in school, community and
related to diversity factors for children,
                                               family environments. The program provides candidates with an understanding
families, and schools, including factors
                                               of the effects of (a) health and developmental factors, (b) language, (c)
related to culture, context, and individual
                                               cultural variables, (d) diversity, (e) socioeconomic status, and (f) factors of
and role differences; and evidence-based
                                               resiliency on pupil development.
strategies to enhance services and address
potential influences related to diversity.
School psychologists demonstrate skills to                      Standard 3 - Socio-Cultural Competence
provide effective professional services that   The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to
promote effective functioning for              display an understanding of ways in which ethnic, cultural, socioeconomic,
individuals, families, and schools with        and environmental factors influence pupil learning and achievement.
diverse characteristics, cultures, and         Candidates will learn skills to work effectively with pupils and their families
backgrounds and across multiple contexts,      from diverse backgrounds. The program provides candidates with an
with recognition that an understanding and     understanding and appreciation for diversity.
respect for diversity in development and       An understanding of the importance of developing cultural competence is
learning and advocacy for social justice are   provided to candidates in order to effectively serve diverse and changing
foundations for all aspects of service         communities. The program provides candidates with an understanding of the
delivery.                                      ways in which educational policies, programs and practices can be developed,
                                               adapted, and modified to be culturally congruent with the needs of pupils and
                                               their families.

                                                                 Standard 17 - Psychological Foundations
                                               The program provides candidates with a strong foundation in the knowledge
                                               base for the discipline of psychology in order to facilitate the individual
                                               development of all pupils. This knowledge base includes biological
                                               foundations of behavior, human learning, social and cultural bases of
                                               behavior, child and adolescent development, and the diversity of individual
                                               differences in development and learning.




                                                                  UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                              NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 9


     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                            CTC                                                       APA
2.9 Research and Program Evaluation                      Standard 24 - Research, Measurement, and Technology                     Procedures
School psychologists have knowledge of                                                                                           • Monitoring and Evaluating
                                                Candidates know basic principles of research design. This includes traditional
research design, statistics, measurement,                                                                                        Services
                                                experimental designs as well as qualitative and single-subject designs.
varied data collection and analysis                                                                                              Core Knowledge Base
                                                Candidates are able to differentiate high quality from inadequate research,
techniques, and program evaluation                                                                                               • Measurement
                                                and understand measurement and statistics in sufficient depth to evaluate
sufficient for understanding research and
                                                published research and conduct investigations relevant to their work.
interpreting data in applied settings. School
                                                Candidates understand and utilize computer technology and attendant
psychologists demonstrate skills to
                                                technological applications.
evaluate and apply research as a foundation
for service delivery and, in collaboration
with others, use various techniques and
technology resources for data collection,
measurement, and analysis to support
effective practices at the individual, group,
and/or systems levels.




                                                                  UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                               NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 10


     2010 NASP STANDARDS                                                                   CTC                                                        APA
2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional                          Standard 1 - Program Design, Rationale and Coordination                         Core Knowledge Base
Practice. School psychologists have                                                                                                            • All
                                                The program is coordinated effectively in accordance with a cohesive design that has a
knowledge of the history and foundations
                                                cogent rationale. Foundation and theoretical courses precede and are designed to be
of school psychology; multiple service
                                                taken prior to more specialized and advanced courses.
models and methods; ethical, legal, and
professional standards; and other factors                         Standard 6 - Professional Ethics and Legal Mandates
related to professional identity and            The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to display an
effective practice as school psychologists.     understanding of professional codes of ethics and current legal mandates, as well as an
School psychologists demonstrate skills to      awareness of the range of legal issues, such as, statutory, regulatory, and case law
provide services consistent with ethical,       affecting the delivery of pupil services. The program requires candidates to demonstrate
legal, and professional standards; engage in    the ability to access information about legal and ethical matters.
responsive ethical and professional                                      Standard 16 - Supervision and Mentoring
decision-making; collaborate with other         The program provides candidates with opportunities and experiences to demonstrate
professionals; and apply professional work
                                                knowledge of models of supervision used to mentor pre-professionals in practica and
characteristics needed for effective practice
                                                field experience placements. Candidates recognize the important role that field-site
as school psychologists, including respect
                                                supervisors play in pre-professional training of future pupil personnel service providers.
for human diversity and social justice,
communication skills, effective                                Standard 19 - Legal, Ethical and Professional Foundations
interpersonal skills, responsibility,           The program provides candidates with the knowledge base specific to the professional
adaptability, initiative, dependability, and    specialty of school psychology. This knowledge base includes (a) the history and
technology skills.                              foundations of school psychology, (b) legal and ethical issues, (c) professional issues and
                                                standards, (d) alternative models for the delivery of school psychological services, (e)
Professional Work Characteristics               emergent technologies, and (f) the roles and functions of the school psychologist. The
The candidate’s professional work               program requires candidates to understand the diverse values that influence the lives of
characteristics will be evaluated and           people, and to be prepared to practice in schools in ways that meet all appropriate ethical,
verified by the school psychology training      professional, and legal standards both to enhance the quality of services and to protect
program through information collected           the rights of all parties.
during courses, practica, internship, and                        Standard 27 - Determination of Candidate Competence
other appropriate means. Professional work      Prior to recommending candidates for a School Psychologist Credential, one or more
characteristics will include:                   persons who are responsible for the program determine that candidates have satisfied
1. Respect for human diversity                  each professional standard. This determination is based on thorough documentation and
2. Communication skills                         written verification by at least one district supervisor and one institutional supervisor.
3. Effective interpersonal relations
4. Ethical responsibility                                                  Standard 15 - Technological Literacy
5. Adaptability                                 The program provides candidates with opportunities to understand and demonstrate skills
6. Initiative and dependability                 in current technology for communication and collecting, organizing, distributing and
                                                analyzing data and resources in order to facilitate effective and appropriate outcomes in
                                                program management and individual student achievement.




                                                                   UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                                 NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 11




NASP STANDARD-                                                                       CTC Standard 25 – Practica
PRACTICA
                                Candidates are provided the opportunity to engage in field-based activities in all areas of professional training. Specifically,
Practica will consist of a
                                candidates are provided with practica experiences in the areas of (a) collaboration and consultation, (b) wellness promotion, (c)
sequence of closely
                                counseling and crisis intervention, (d) individual assessment, (e) educational planning and evaluation, (f) program planning and
supervised on-campus or
                                evaluation, (g) and research and measurement. Candidates demonstrate the ability to select and apply core knowledge regarding
field-based activities
                                psychological foundations, educational foundations, and legal, ethical, and professional foundations in their work in schools.
designed to develop and
                                Practica consists of a series of supervised experiences that occur prior to the field experience, are conducted in laboratory or field-
evaluate a candidate’s
                                based settings or both. They provide for the application of knowledge and mastery of distinct skills. There must be a systematic
mastery of distinct
                                means of evaluating the practica experiences that seeks to ensure the acquisition of desired skills by pupils.
professional skills
                                A minimum of 450 clock hours of practicum is required according to the following standards and guidelines:
consistent with program
and/or course goals.
                                    1.   A minimum of three hundred (300) clock hours in a preschool to grade 12 school setting providing direct and indirect pupil
Practica activities may be
                                         services.
completed as part of
                                    2.   Up to 150 hours of experience may be offered through on-campus agencies (for example, child study center, psychology
separate courses focusing
                                         clinic, relevant educational research or evaluation activities), or community agencies (for example, private schools,
on distinct skills or as part
                                         community mental health centers).
of a more extensive
experience that covers a
                                    3.   The supervision and principle responsibility for the practicum experience typically remains with faculty of the training
range of skills.
                                         program, in coordination with field-based professionals. Whether provided by faculty or a field-based professional,
                                         practicum supervision must be provided by an experienced (minimum of two years) professional who possesses
                                         background, training and credentials appropriate to the practicum experience.

                                    4.   Practicum is offered for academic credit, or is a part of a course for which a candidate receives credit. However organized,
                                         the experience is a direct extension of program training goals and objectives, and concurrent instruction is provided as a
                                         part of the experience.

                                    5.   All practica experiences are evaluated. Practica evaluations are appropriate to the program objectives, whether the
                                         experience is accomplished through on-campus or off-campus placements or through practical application components of
                                         separate courses. The evaluation also seeks to clarify the utility of the experience in terms of setting, supervision, and
                                         appropriateness of experiences.

                                In this manner, the evaluation process is twofold, evaluating both the candidate’s progress and the suitability of the various
                                characteristics of the experience.




                                                                     UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                  NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 12




                                              UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                              NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 13

     NASP STANDARD FOR                                                   Standard 26 – Culminating Field Experience
        INTERNSHIP:                            During the culminating field experience, candidates have the opportunity to demonstrate the full range of skills
The internship experience will consist of a    acquired during formal training, and to acquire additional knowledge and skills most appropriately gained through
full-time experience over one year, or half-   supervised professional experience. Under the supervision of a credentialed school psychologist, candidates
time over two consecutive years, with a        provide direct and indirect services to pupils, parents, and school staff in all areas of training.
minimum of 1200 clock hours, of which at       Note: This culminating field experience is called an “internship” when the candidate is granted an Internship
least 600 hours must be in a school setting.   Credential issued from the California.
A comprehensive internship experience is
required for candidates to demonstrate,        Commission on Teacher Credentialing and receives a salary from a school district. A minimum of twelve hundred
under supervision, the ability to integrate    (1,200) clock hours of field experience is required according to the following standards and guidelines:
knowledge and skills in the professional
practice domains and to provide a broad            1.   The field experience is typically completed within one (1) academic year but shall be completed within no
range of outcome-based school                           more than two (2) consecutive academic years.
psychological services. Internship                 2.   The field experience must include eight hundred (800) clock hours in a preschool-grade 12 school setting
experiences are provided at or near the end             providing direct and indirect services to pupils.
of the formal training period, are designed        3.   Up to four hundred (400) hours of field experience may be acquired in other settings. Other acceptable
according to a written plan that provides a             field may be acquired in (a) private, state-approved educational programs; (b) other appropriate mental
broad range of experiences, occur in a                  health-related program settings involved in the education of pupils; or (c) relevant educational research or
setting appropriate to the specific training            evaluation activities.
objectives of the program, are provided            4.   Supervision and principle responsibility for the field experience typically is the responsibility of the off-
appropriate recognition through the                     campus educational agency, although training program faculty provides indirect supervision.
awarding of academic credit, occur under           5.   A field-based professional holding a current and valid Pupil Personnel Services Credential authorizing
conditions of appropriate supervision, are              service as a school psychologist provides intern supervision. The primary supervisor must have at least the
systematically evaluated in a manner                    equivalent of two (2) years of full-time experience as a school psychologist. A field experience placement
consistent with the specific training                   site is approved by the candidate’s credential-granting institution and provides experiences that are
objectives of the program, and are                      consistent with the credential-granting institution’s training objectives. In those few instances when an
conducted in accordance with current legal              appropriate field experience site is located outside of California, the field experience site supervisor must
and ethical standards for the profession.               be a Nationally Certified School Psychologist, or a graduate of a program approved by the National
                                                        Association of School Psychologists.
                                                   6.   A written plan for the field (or intern) experience is prepared and agreed upon by representatives of the
                                                        local educational agency, the field (or intern) supervisor(s), training program supervisory staff. The field
                                                        experience plan is completed early in the field experience and periodically reviewed and revised. The plan
                                                        identifies the field experience objectives, describes appropriate experiences for the achievement of the
                                                        objectives across settings, and outlines the evaluation plan for determining the achievement of each
                                                        objective. The plan also delineates the responsibilities of both the university and the local supervisory
                                                        personnel.
                                                   7.   Candidates receive academic credit for the field experience, and the experience is recognized primarily as
                                                        a training activity with appropriate supervision by the cooperating school district. On-campus course work
                                                        is reduced in proportion to the demands of the field experience.




                                                                  UCSB School Psychology
Name_______________________________________                                   NASP / CTC / APA STANDARDS – Page 14


                                    The four basic field experience settings for school psychologists include (a) preschool, (b) elementary, (c) middle
                                    school or junior high, and (d) high school. It is expected that candidates will complete a total of 450 clock hours of
                                    practica and 1,200 clock hours of culminating field experience (called “internship” when completed for pay using
                                    an Internship Credential). Although candidates are encouraged to obtain diverse field experiences, it is recognized
                                    that many candidates will accrue most of their 1,650 clock hours of field experience in one primary setting. To
                                    ensure that candidates have a breadth of field experience, candidates are required to complete a minimum of 200
                                    clock hours across a second, third, or fourth field experience setting. These 200 hours can be accrued in both
                                    practica and the culminating field experience (internship) settings combined.




                                                       UCSB School Psychology

				
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