Docstoc

The Magical Appendix

Document Sample
The Magical Appendix Powered By Docstoc
					                   The Magical Appendix
              A DM's Addendum to the Player's Handbook




                                By Max Gould

Table Of Contents
Spell Index
    -Crystalline Transmutation
    -Enchant Flora
    -Everlasting Music
    -Gravitational Disruption
    -Implosion
    -Magnetic Disruption
    -Permanent Contingency
Pages 3-10


Magical Commodities
    -Iounic Ore
    -Lianar
    -Luxen Roses
    -Orecrest
    -Sorcerer's Sand
    -Tenser's Telekinetic Spheres
Pages 11-17


Magical Devices
    -Fairy Rings
    -Summoning Pentacles
Pages 18-19


Magical Classes
    -Conjuror
    -Mystical Architect
    -Spellwright
Pages 20-38

Spell Index
-Crystalline Transmutation
    Level: Sor/Wiz 6
    Components: V, S, M, F
    Casting Time: 1 action
    Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
    Target: One Creature or Object (maximum: 100 cu. ft./level)


                                       2
     Duration: Instantaneous
     Saving Throw: Fortitude partial (see text)
     Spell Resistance: Yes


     As a last resort, the resourceful wizard pulls a small triangular prism from
his pocket and, by refracting a rainbow of light upon the approaching minotaur,
turns him into a magnificent statue of crystal. This spell is an excellent and neat
way of immobilizing an enemy, and perhaps making a small fortune in the
process. Some wizards keep such statues in their private gardens as reminders
of the powerful enemies they have defeated (though this isn't suggested, if a
powerful cleric ever gained entry to the place, they could quickly mobilize an
army of deadly enemies against you). Others often give such displays of
grandeur to a city whom they have recently freed from the scourge of a dragon,
and some simply sell the statues for their price in gold. The subject, along with
any gear in contact with it (defined as objects of smaller size and weight than
the intended target, and obviously in contact with it), turns into a mindless, inert
statue of crystal. If the statue resulting from the spell is broken or damaged, the
subject (if ever returned to its original state) has similar damage or deformities.
The creature is not dead, but it doesn't seem to be alive either when viewed
with spells such a 'Deathwatch'. A creature or object effected by this spell may
be sold as a precious gem with a market price of 2,000gpn (where n = 1 + 1/size
category above tiny (minus one per size category below tiny). If the statue is
shattered or otherwise damaged, all of the pieces may be sold with a total
market price of one half of the market price of the whole original object. Any
creature who succeeds at a fortitude save against this spell, or who fully
recovers from the effects of this spell (without any resulting deformities, even if
they are later magically healed), gains one permanent point of charisma. Any
charisma gained in this way cannot be gained a second time by repeated
recoveries or saves.
     Material Components: crystal worth 4,000gp
     Focus: a small prism



                                         3
-Enchant Flora
     Level: Drd 5, Sor/Wiz 8
     Components: V, S, M, DF, XP
     Casting Time: 1 hour
     Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
     Target: Any Unintelligent Plant
     Duration: Instantaneous
     Saving Throw: None
     Spell Resistance: No


     'Enchant Flora' enables you to enchant a plant with a magical quality.
The spell cannot give a plant spell-like abilities or any other abilities that would
require intelligence to use. Thus, you can create such effects as an ever-
burning tree or an ethereal bush, but not a plant that randomly teleports
anyone who touches it. The spell can only be cast upon unintelligent plant life
such as a tree or flower, a Treent would be unaffected by this spell. Once the
spell is cast, the plant is permanently changed and considered magical plant-life.
Spells such as 'Dispel Magic', or even 'Mordenkainen's Disjunction' have no
effect upon the plant after the spell has been cast. Plants affected by this spell
cannot be enchanted a second time, though any offspring of the plant retain
the same magical properties of the original. Druids often use this spell to create
bushes in their forests that produce 'Goodberries', powerful Alchemists will
sometimes own plants that produce berries filled with 'Alchemists Fire', and
Sorcerers usually create burning hedges to keep intruders out of their
laboratories.
     Material Components: The components necessary vary depending on
the type of enchantment. The spell always requires a seed from the targeted
plant, but if the enchantment mimics the effect of another spell, add any material
components necessary to it to the cost of this spell.
     XP Cost: 300XP



                                         4
-Everlasting Music
     Level: Brd 2, Sor/Wiz 4
     Components: V, S, M, XP
     Casting Time: 30 minutes
     Range: Within hearing distance of target
     Target: Any instrument or Enclosed space
     Area: Up to 100 sq. ft./level (S)
     Duration: Instantaneous
     Saving Throw: None
     Spell Resistance: No


     This spell is primarily used on instruments and in Orchestral Halls. When
used on an instrument, a skilled musician of the chosen instrument must be
present during the casting. The spell permanently enchants the instrument so
that it is considered a magical item, thus the instrument must be masterwork for
the spell to work, and any dispel attempts made upon it in the future suppresses
its magical abilities for 2d4 rounds instead of disenchanting it. The
enchantment causes the instrument to produce the music played upon it during
the casting forever into the future. However, it does not simply replicate that
music, it plays music of the same genre and with the same character as that of
the music played during casting, but never copies the music exactly. Further,
the music can only be heard when the instrument is unobserved, thus, if
someone were to watch such an instrument constantly, it would never play its
music. If the musician is a bard and if she uses her bardic music ability during the
casting, then whenever the instrument's music is heard in the future it will have
the same effects as the bardic music used during the casting. Wizard's will often
use this spell as a clever and unobtrusive alarm, when such an instrument is
placed in a wizard's laboratory, then the wizard is immediately alerted if anyone
breaks in as long as she is within hearing distance of her laboratory. This has
the added benefit of the instrument being quiet while the Wizard is trying to



                                         5
work.
     When used on an enclosed space, multiple instruments may be present
during the casting, and musicians must be present to play each instrument. The
spell functions the in the same way as with a single instrument except it
enchants the room with the music instead of the instruments themselves. Also,
the room plays the music at set times during the day, month, or year as dictated
by the caster during the casting. If the room has a ceiling height greater than ten
feet, then the caster must be a high enough level to enchant a room with double
the square footage.
     Material Component: a single silver harp string
     XP Cost: 250XP


-Gravitational Disruption
Level: Sor/Wiz 4
     Components: V, S
     Casting Time: 1 action
     Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)
     Target: One Creature or Object
     Area: 20 sq. ft./level
     Duration: 1 round/level
     Saving Throw: None
     Spell Resistance: Yes


     This spell can distort gravity so that it seems weaker or stronger, causing
objects and creatures in the effected area to appear to gain weight. This spell
may be cast on a specific creature or object, or over a larger area, affecting
everything within it. The spellcaster must choose the degree to which gravity is
affected in the chosen area before the spell is cast. If the caster wishes to alter
the degree after the spell has been cast, she must make a successful
concentration check and take one action to alter the spell. The spell may
multiply or divide the weight of all objects and creatures within the area (the



                                         6
creature targeted and her gear or the targeted object in such a case) by a
maximum number equal to a third of the caster's level (rounded down). If the
caster chooses to diminish gravity, and an object's weight would be taken below
one, then the object weighs and insignificant amount. Half of any weight that a
creature gains counts against her carrying capacity in addition to the increased
weight of her gear. This spell is most useful when used for immobilizing
opponents weighed down by heavy armor or lots of gear.


-Implosion
Level: Sor/Wiz 8
     Components: V, S
     Casting Time: 1 action
     Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)
     Target: One Creature or Hollow Object
     Area: 200 sq. ft./level
     Duration: Instantaneous
     Saving Throw: Fortitude partial
     Spell Resistance: Yes


     Simply by pointing and muttering a few words, a wizard can bring down an
entire castle with this spell. The spell causes any hollow object (such as a
building or a bottle) or a creature to implode, effectively destroying the target.
The spell can only effect one creature or object, but if used on a building, the
caster can only effect 200 square feet per level. The spell requires a successful
ranged touch attack and target must be within full view of the caster. A
creature or object that makes a successful Fortitude save is only partially
affected. It takes 5d6 points of damage instead of imploding.


-Magnetic Disruption
Level: Sor/Wiz 4
     Components: V, S, F (see text)



                                         7
     Casting Time: 1 action
     Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)
     Target: One Magnet or Magnetic Field
     Area: 50 cu. ft./level
     Duration: Instantaneous
     Saving Throw: None
     Spell Resistance: No


     'Magnetic Disruption' disrupts magnetic fields by demagnetizing or
destroying anything producing them. A simple magnet affected by this spell
becomes nothing more than a plain piece of metal. If a magnetic field created by
something other than a magnet, such as an electric current, is targeted by this
spell, than the effective size of the field cannot exceed the spell's area. This
spell may be used to counter electrical spells such as 'Chain Lightning' and
'Call Lightning' because of the electro-magnetic fields that they produce, and
can also be used to permanently disenchant magic items with electric
characteristics. If this spell is used to counter an electric spell, than it functions
just like an ordinary counterspell, without any sign that any spells were cast.
When 'Magnetic Disruption' is used to disenchant a magic item such as a
shocking weapon or a 'Staff of Evocation' the spell only disenchants the
electrical magic. For example, when a + 2 shocking flaming greatsword is
targeted, it becomes a +2 flaming greatsword. Also, when a 'Staff of
Evocation' is targeted, it only loses the ability to cast 'Chain Lightning' it
doesn't lose any charges or any other spells. If multiple wizards attempt to cast
this spell in unison, then the spell takes two rounds per caster to cast, and the
maximum size of the magnetic field affected is the sum of all of the caster's
areas. One legend tells of a large number of powerful evil wizards who
attempted to destroy the Earth's magnetic field with this spell, causing a slow
destruction of all life on the material plane. Thankfully, several powerful good
deities discovered the plot and ambushed the spellcasters during the ceremony,
killing many of them, and ending the threat.



                                           8
     Focus: When this spell is used to counter an electrical spell, a positively
charged piece of metal (lightning rod) is needed.


-Permanent Contingency
Level: Sor/Wiz 8
     Components: V, S, M, F, XP
     Casting Time: At least 20 minutes (see text)
     Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)
     Target: Any Creature, Object, or Area
     Area: 200 sq. ft./level
     Duration: Permanent
     Saving Throw: None
     Spell Resistance: No


     The essential piece to any magical security system is a contingency, a
spell to trigger every other magical defense that a wizard can erect. This spell is
essentially a permanent version of the 'Contingency' spell, except that the spell
may also be cast on an area or object. The wizard may choose any
circumstances under which the contingency activates, though those
circumstances have to be identifiable from the area of the spell. For example, a
'Permanent Contingency' can activate a 'Guards and Wards' spell when
anyone other than the spellcaster enters the area of the spell, but it can't cast a
'Teleport' spell on anyone in the area when a dragon leaves her cave in some
far off mountain range. The contingency also cannot activate a spell outside of
its area unless it’s magically linked to the area. For example, if a window is
broken in the wizard's home, a contingency can teleport her to her house
because one end of the teleport spell enters the area of the contingency. After
a 'Permanent Contingency' spell has been activated, it takes one hour to reset
per level of the total spell levels of all of the spells attached to it. The twenty
minute casting time is the minimum total for all of the castings involved in the
creation of a 'Permanent Contingency'. If the total casting time for all of the



                                          9
spells involved in the contingency exceeds twenty minutes, then use that total
instead. Similar to a regular 'Contingency' spell, the 'Permanent Contingency'
can only activate a total number of spell levels equal to one-third of your caster
level, but there is no maximum level. Essentially any spell may be activated by a
'Permanent Contingency' as long as the caster sets any necessary
requirements, such as the spell's origin, during the casting of the spell. Also,
during the casting, the spellcaster must cast each of the spells that she wishes
to be incorporated. Unlike 'Contingency', multiple 'Permanent Contingency'
spells may operate at the same time in the same area, however, there cannot be
more 'Permanent Contingency' spells in one area than half the caster level of
the spell cast with the lowest caster level. If another spell is cast which exceeds
this maximum, then the spell cast with the lowest caster level is dispelled.
     Material Components: Those of the companion spells, plus quicksilver,
an electrum ring worth 200gp, and an eyelash of an ogre mage, ki-rin, or similar
spell-using creature
     Focus: A scripture written using liquid mithral, gold, and silver having a
total worth of at least 2,000gp. The scripture must always remain in the area of
the contingency if it is cast upon an area. If the spell is cast upon an object then
the scripture must be engraved somewhere upon the object itself (this requires
at least five square inches of space for the inscriptions). If cast on a creature,
then a statuette of the target carved from elephant ivory and decorated with
gems worth 2,000gp must be carried on their person at all times. If the scripture,
or statue, is ever damaged, then the 'Permanent Contingency' has a chance of
failure every time the contingency would normally become activated equal to the
percent of damage done to it. The 'Permanent Contingency' is completely
dispelled if the scripture, or statue, is ever completely destroyed.
     XP Cost: 500XP + 100XP/spell level



Magical Commodities
-Iounic Ore



                                         10
     This ore is the primary ingredient of all Ioun Stones. Iounic Ore is a
seemingly ordinary dull gray metal when found underground, but when refined,
Iounic Ore is found to be unaffected by normal gravity, and instead is drawn by
the gravity of living creatures. Iounic Ore is not all that rare, but it is only ever
found in small quantities. The market price of a typical piece of Iounic Ore
(approximately one cubic inch in size) is 25gp. However, wizards may use
various spells to create environments of extreme heat and pressure, and
through their various magical influences, Iounic Ore may be shaped and
changed into new forms. There are currently sixteen known forms which Iounic
Ore can be changed into, taking on a vast variety of colors and five unique
shapes. The market prices of these various alloys vary depending on the
amount of magic that went into their creation, though they all retain the same
gravitational properties.


-Lianar
     Lianar is wood from a very rare and magical tree. Lianarial trees are
magical plants that grow in the hearts of the most remote forests. Lianarial
trees are almost always attended and protected by a number of dryads and
nymphs. A few of the most reclusive Elven communities dwell in and protect
Lianarial forests. Lianarial trees grow at 1/10 the rate of normal trees and only
drop seeds once a year on the first day of spring when hundreds of Lantern
Archon gather around the Lianarial and spread their seeds. Elves call these
gatherings of Lantern Archons the 'festival of spring' and will often journey
long ways to witness one. Lianar itself is wood willingly given by the Lianarial to
individuals who have protected and aided them in some way. Lianarial are highly
intelligent trees and never give Lianar to evil creatures or to those who expect a
reward for their work. Lianar can thus come in a number of forms and sizes, the
most common forms being, a wand, a staff, or a club.
     Lianar cannot be broken or damaged by any means short of a 'Wish' or
'Miracle'. A Lianar staff or club can be used as a masterwork weapon of that
type, but it doesn't gain any special bonuses pertaining to combat. Anyone in



                                          11
possession of Lianar always knows in what direction north lies. With a
successful knowledge nature check (DC 15), the possessor of Lianar can
locate which direction any terrain type or city lies. The DC increases to 25 to
locate a landmark or identify any kind of magical or non-magical plant and its
properties. Upon a successful knowledge nature check (DC 40), the
possessor of Lianar can locate the direction in which any person or object for
which they are searching lies (they must know the name of the target for the
check to be successful). Lianar also makes its possessor immune to all magical
and non-magical diseases and poisons, as well as the effects of aging. When a
piece of Lianar is in the hands of a druid, the Lianar grants her a plus two
bonus to caster level simply by holding it in her hand. When in the hands of a
non-druid, it gives the character all of the abilities (including spell casting) of a
second level druid. The possessor of Lianar receives a plus five bonus on all
checks when interacting with good forest creatures such as unicorns and
dryads.
     Lianar is not a magical item, so it cannot by disenchanted in any way.
Lianar is also unaffected by 'Dispel Magic', though its abilities are still
suppressed for 1d4 rounds if targeted by a 'Greater Dispelling' or a
'Modenkainen's Disjunction' spell. Because Lianar isn't a magic item or a
special material, it cannot be created by wizards artificially, Lianar must be given
or bought. Though Lianar is given only to specific individuals, due to Lianar's
durability, its numbers have become large enough that some pieces may be
found in the market. A typical piece of Lianar has a market price of
400,000gp, but because of its rarity, it is usually found selling for much more.
     Note: Possessors of bought or found Lianar are advised to stay away
from Lianarial forests, as they may be angry that the Lianar is not still in the
hands of its original owner.


-Luxen Roses
     These flowers only grow in temperate grassy fields or forests where
sprites have died of old age. These plants are said to be normal roses that



                                          12
simply absorb the sprite's magical essence. Others believe the plant to be a
unique species with seeds scattered throughout the world lying dormant that
will only start growing when a sprite's magic has entered the soil. The Luxen
Rose itself is a pure white rose with a splash of red on the inside growing off of
a short green-blue stem. Such roses are highly valued by tribes of wood elves
or gnomes living in regions inhabited by pixies. These tribes often use Luxen
Roses in certain ceremonies, or more industrious gnomes as a form of self-
defense.
     Luxen Roses produce a pollen that, when blown by the wind, acts as a
color spray upon any downwind of it. It is unknown as to just how the flowers
get pollinated or how they spread their seeds. Luxen Roses never wilt or die,
nor do they create any identifiable seed. In fact, these roses can be used as
very effective insect repellents because insects are naturally repelled by the
flower, and any insects that stumble near one accidentally is usually stunned by
the flower's pollen. Those who do use Luxen Roses for such purposes, usually
contain them in glass vials, to avoid the effects of their pollen themselves.
Alchemists can carefully extract the pollen from one of these roses with a
successful alchemy check (DC 22, suffering the effects of the pollen upon a
failure) and fill a small breakable glass vial, making an effective weapon that
releases a color spray (in the form of a circular burst centered on the vial),
effecting all in the vicinity. The pollen, however, requires a fortitude saving
throw instead of will, and is not affected by spell resistance. Also, the pollen
can affect even sightless creatures, but creatures that have no mouth or nose
are unaffected. This is, however, a magical plant and emanates a slight aura of
mind-affecting magic.
     These flowers can be activated by anything from a simple breeze or
sneeze, to a 'Gust of Wind' spell or a tornado. Some legends even tell of an
army being defeated because very strong wind blew pollen from a nearby forest
throughout its ranks, causing the entire army to become stunned. As long as a
flower is still alive and in the ground, it will re-cumulate any lost pollen in only a
few hours. Luxen Roses, though uncommon, are not rare and are commonly



                                           13
found in well-stocked herb or alchemical shops. Luxen Roses have a market
price of 25gp apiece, and tribes that value these flowers will often pay in excess
of 40gp for a single flower, despite the fact that the areas where these tribes
are located contain more of these flowers than anywhere else. Alchemists will
often go to great lengths to obtain a potted Luxen Rose for its never-ending
supply of valuable pollen. Many wealthy alchemists have small airtight
greenhouses containing multiple specimens of the plant so that they may be
profited from safely.


-Orecrest
     This is a very rare magical stone usually found near deep underground
lakes. There are many old Dwarven legends involving Orecrest, and many
Dwarves fear it. Most Dwarf mines will sell export it if they come across it
because of its value.
     Orecrest has many properties, because of its close relation to earth
magic, the Orecrest can be used to control earth elementals. Anyone in the
possession of Orecrest need only utter a few words of summoning, and a huge
earth elemental comes to the summoner. The summoning words require one full
round to speak, and in all ways the summoning functions as the 'Summon
Monster VII' spell. The elemental appears in 1d4 rounds. Only one elemental
can be summoned at a time. A new elemental requires a new patch of earth or
stone, which cannot be accessed until after the first elemental disappears. This
ability can only be used twice per day. The Orecrest can also light up as per
the 'Daylight' spell whenever the command word is spoken. When a piece of
Orecrest is in the hands of a druid, it can be used to increase her caster level
by two simply by holding it while she casts the spell.
     Orecrest is not a magical item, so it cannot by disenchanted in any way.
Orecrest is also unaffected by 'Dispel Magic', though its abilities are still
suppressed for 1d4 rounds if targeted by a 'Greater Dispelling' or a
'Modenkainen's Disjunction' spell. Because Orecrest isn't a magic item, it
cannot be created by wizards artificially, Orecrest must be discovered or



                                        14
bought. When in a mountainous region or near a Dwarven mine, players receive
a 15% chance of finding Orecrest being sold if they are actively searching for
it. If they don't find any, then they cannot re-roll for one month unless they
move to a new town, city, or region. If the players are searching for Orecrest
anywhere else, they receive only a 5% chance of finding it. A typical four
pound, eight cubic inch, piece of Orecrest has a market price of 300,000gp,
but because of its rarity, it is often found selling for much more.


-Sorcerer's Sand
     This sand is the ground up bones of dead wizards and sorcerers. The
sand must be so fine that it takes 1,000 years of natural erosion, or a
disintegration spell must be cast upon the bones for the sand to have value.
Two types of Sorcerer's Sand exist, Black Sorcerer's Sand and White
Sorcerer's Sand. Black Sorcerer's Sand can be made out of the bones of a
wizard or sorcerer who was murdered or otherwise killed without her consent.
White Sorcerer's Sand must be made from the bones of a wizard or sorcerer
who gave his life willingly (if the subject died of old age, the bones are useless).
The sand is highly valued by spell-casters for its magical properties. 1/10 of
an ounce of Sorcerer's Sand can replace 500XP of experience point cost for
any spell. The same amount can also be used to increase the caster level of any
spell by four. White Sorcerer's Sand cannot be used in any spell that hinders
or causes harm to good creatures, summons or calls evil creatures, or aids evil
creatures. White Sorcerer's Sand also cannot be touched by evil creatures or
used by them in spells, any evil creature who does attempt to do such
immediately gains two negative levels and loses 50 hit points. Black Sorcerer's
Sand is the opposite of White Sorcerer's Sand and therefore can only be
used by evil creatures and cannot advance the causes of good creatures in any
way, nor can it hinder the causes of evil creatures in any way. White and Black
Sorcerer's Sand is also mutually exclusive, if even one grain of one touches
any amount of the other, all of the Sorcerer's Sand turns into mud. For this
reason some very old kingdoms distribute small amounts of white Sorcerer's



                                         15
Sand among its magical law-enforcers. Many kingdoms have even gone so far
as to make it illegal to cary Black Sorcerer's Sand because of its usefulness in
evil spells. Any spell using Sorcerer's Sand that is dispelled or countered (or
if the opposite type of Sorcerer's Sand used is added) the spell fails and the
caster gains two negative levels. One full skeleton provides two full ounces of
Sorcerer's Sand if a 'Disintegrate' spell is cast upon it. Sorcerer's Sand
(especially White Sorcerer's Sand) is extremely rare and considered priceless.
For this reason, Sorcerer's Sand is more likely to be found in old graves and
tombs than in a magical item shop.
     Note: When used in a spell, Sorcerer's Sand is an additional material
component and is consumed by the spell.


-Tenser's Telekinetic Spheres
                                      These small spheres of hollow glass,
                                 ranging from two to four inches in diameter, are
                                 commonly found in old lava tubes. These
                                 spheres are highly attuned to telekinetic magic
                                 and will are known to levitate if telekinetic magic
                                 is used anywhere in their vicinity. Any
                                 'Telekinesis' spell cast upon such a sphere is
                                 hugely amplified, making Tenser's Telekinetic
                                 Spheres highly valuable to most spellcasters. A
                                 spellcaster who casts 'Telekinesis' upon a
sphere may then use telekinesis at will upon any other object or creature within
range at plus five the original caster level for the original spell's duration.
     Telekinetic Spheres amplify telekinetic power so much, in fact, that any
resulting forms of 'Telekinesis' can affect even such substances as water or air.
Weight rules apply normally in these circumstances, though due to the near
weightlessness of air and other gasses, the entire quantity of air within the
spell's area may be affected. Using this amplified version of 'Telekinesis'
spellcasters can move even such effects as the area of a 'Cloud Kill' spell. In



                                          16
addition to the traditional forms of movement with objects, air can be made
denser or less dense with the use of one of these spheres. Any creature caught
in a dense area takes crushing damage as if 25 pounds per caster level were
upon it. The creature also begins to suffocate, and dies in eight rounds plus
one round per point of constitution modifier. Any creature caught in an area of
low-density air also suffers from suffocation but does not take the crushing
damage. When these telekinetic powers are used upon air in the more
traditional way, creating a strong wind by moving the air in any one direction,
any objects caught by the wind are affected in the usual way. The wind may be
made to blow at ten miles per hour per caster level.
     The mage Tenser discovered these spheres when he was forced into a
lava tube by a large group of angry giants. He tried to seal the entrance using
'Telekinesis' but was unable to move the large boulder, however, he noticed
one of these spheres rise up during the spell. Tenser eventually escaped and,
after studying the sphere more closely, discovered its unique magical
properties. Today, these spheres are very rare, though many were found in
various places when the discovery was first announced, they have gradually
disappeared due to their delicacy. Some knowledgeable merchants will move to
regions of high volcanic activity, searching newly created lava tubes for these
spheres, but even these merchants find them in short supply. In general,
Tenser's Telekinetic Spheres are extremely rare and are never seen in open
markets. In volcanic regions, there is a 10% chance that any given town or city
contains a store selling these spheres (though any such stores will most likely be
well advertised throughout the area), and a 20% chance that any town that does
have such a shop has more than one. Telekinetic Spheres are valued at a
market price of 280,000gp for their rarity and magical abilities. Like all magical
commodities, these spheres cannot be disenchanted or created by any non-
natural means, any attempt to dispel such a sphere only suppresses its abilities
for 1d4 rounds.


Magical Devices
                                        17
-Fairy Rings
     These are circles of mushrooms commonly found in fields in damp climates.
Fairy Rings can be of any size and are believed among many cultures to be the
locations of secret fairy dances and ceremonies. Fairy Rings are indeed
created by sprites, created as portals for their use, they utilize an ancient and
powerful magic. Druids may tap into the powers of Fairy Rings to to call
sprites out of other Fairy Rings or to even teleport to another Fairy Ring. To
call a sprite, the druid need only be of a level equal to the challenge rating of the
sprite and take two rounds to call it. However, there is a 20% chance that there
is no sprite of the kind that the player is attempting to call in another Fairy
Ring, and the player may not attempt another calling for at least one minute.
Only very powerful druids may use Fairy Rings to travel, a druid must be
fourteenth level before she can attempt to teleport to another Fairy Ring. To
use a Fairy Ring in this manner, the druid must succeed at a wisdom check (DC
18) and may then travel to any other Fairy Ring that the druid knows of. If a
druid attempts this without knowledge of any other rings, or if the ring she is
trying to get to was destroyed, then she is teleported to a random Fairy Ring
and becomes stunned for one round. If a druid uses a Fairy Ring in any way
successfully, she cannot use a Fairy Ring again for four hours.
     To destroy a Fairy Ring, every mushroom in it must be torn out of the
ground and burned. Any sprite in a Fairy Ring elsewhere receives a 50%
chance to notice the damage occurring to another Fairy Ring, and may travel to
that ring to defend it. Therefore, any Fairy Ring being destroyed has a 40%
chance of a random sprite appearing to defend it for every minute it takes for
the Fairy Ring to be completely destroyed.
     Sprite characters cannot create Fairy Rings on their own, at least five
sprites, including one pixie, must be involved in their creation. The sprites must
spend thirty minutes dancing in the area of the Fairy Ring, and during that time,
each sprite will use up their 'Entangle' and 'Dancing Lights' spell-like abilities.
Once this is done, the mushrooms will sprout within five hours and the Fairy
Ring will become activated within twelve hours. A larger band of sprites with



                                         18
more pixies can create larger Fairy Rings, which require five sprites per five
foot square. Larger Fairy Rings allow sprites to teleport freely within them and
all sprites within a large Fairy Ring have damage reduction 10/-, fast healing
10, and regeneration 5. For this reason, many sprites have erected large Fairy
Rings around their gathering places and homes. It is rumored that there is a
Fairy Ring with a two-mile diameter in some remote forest, populated with
hundreds of sprites.


-Summoning Pentacles
     These are essentially permanent versions of the Calling Diagram. Any
creature summoned in a Summoning Pentacle, however, is automatically under
the effects of a 'Dimensional Anchor' spell. The creature also isn't allowed a
charisma check to break free, and it can quickly be dismissed by the caster with
a simple phrase. The creature is allowed a charisma check to resist the
dismissal, but with every subsequent dismissal, the creature receives a -2
penalty on its charisma check.
     Unlike Calling Diagrams, however, Summoning Pentacles can also be
drawn in reverse as an extra security measure for the caster. Such Protection
Pentacles have circles of protection against evil, good, chaos, and law, which
come into effect when any spell-caster enters them. These Pentacles are also
uncross-able by either summoned or called creatures.
     Pentacles can be drawn on any surface, but require engraving; silver, gold,
platinum, electrum, and mithral inlays; and permanent magical effects. To create
a Pentacle, the spell-caster must be able to cast 'Dimensional Anchor', 'magic
circle of protection', and a summoning or calling spell of any power. A Pentacle
costs 8,000gp + 3,000gp/size category above medium, in raw materials, and
1,000XP (The size category of the circle is equal to the largest creature that
can be summoned or called into it. For multiple creatures, use the size and face
rules in the Player's Handbook (pg 131, Table 8-7: Creature Size and
Scale). A spell-caster also has to succeed at a Spellcraft check (DC 30) or
the attempt fails. A failed attempt still costs 1,000XP, but half of the raw



                                        19
materials can be reclaimed and re-used or sold. It takes one week plus an
additional day per size category above medium to draw a pentacle, if the caster
doesn't have to sleep, then two days may be deducted from the total time.


Magical Classes
Mystical Architect
-Adventures
     Mystical architects prefer to research the various aspects of any
particular adventure carefully before throwing herself down some dark hole.
When prepared, mystical architects can use their inventive spells to devastating
effect. However, when caught unprepared, a mystical architect can be
vulnerable. Always seeking knowledge (and for many, solitude), mystical
architects will go to great lengths to retrieve ancient tomes rumored to hold
powerful unknown spells. Evil mystical architects often take on apprentices to
do their work for them, but when provoked, they will use their spells to silence
anyone who gets in their way. Neutral mystical architects are usually dedicated
completely to their libraries, and tend to be the least confrontational. Good
mystical architects are just as likely to seek out a tome with powerful spells in it
for themselves, as they are to destroy it. Many good mystical architects would
prefer to destroy a tome that contains a powerful necromantic or particularly
destructive spell rather than keep it. Mystical architects may also have any of
the noble or ignoble motivations that other adventurers have.


-Characteristics
     The mystical architect is a talented spell-caster, but specializes in the
creation and invention of magic. Mystical architects invent and learn new spells
as they research and experiment, and they may also commune with other
mystical architects or wizards, sharing and learning various spells. In addition to
creating spells, mystical architects are masters at creating lasting magical
effects and magic items. Mystical architects are lore-masters, advancing magical
theory over time.


                                         20
-Alignment
     Mystical architects tend to be scholarly and reserved, so they are more
likely to be lawful than chaotic. However, chaotic mystical architects are not
unheard of, some of the most dangerous mystical architects were chaotic,
reaping havoc upon the world.


-Religion
     Mystical architects, like wizards, commonly revere Boccob, god of magic.
Some, especially necromancers or simply more misanthropic mystical architects,
prefer Wee Jas, goddess of magic and death. Evil necromancers are known to
worship Nerull, god of death. Mystical architects in general, however, are more
devoted to their studies than to their spiritual sides.


-Background
     Mystical architects recognize each other as comrades or rivals, even
mystical architects from very different cultures or magical traditions have much
in common. All mystical architects seek to bend and expand the universal laws
of magic to their benefit. Unlike wizards who see magic as a set of incantations
and laws, mystical architects consider magic to be an art, requiring creativity and
an open mind. Mystical architects usually become apprentices for a few years,
learning the basics of the art before breaking out on their own. However, a few
apprentices continue to study with their masters, often developing life long
friendships and working closely together for the rest of their lives. For this
reason, younger mystical architects are often judged by the accomplishments of
their masters. Some mystical architects learn in academies in more civilized
lands, these mystical architects are usually more focused on magical item
creation than spell research and invention. There is only one known guild of
mystical architects, which has branches almost everywhere. Academy mystical
architects are more likely to join this guild than apprentices, but both groups
still recognize each other as mystical architects and very little enmity exists



                                         21
between the guild and other mystical architects.


-Races
     The various races are attracted to careers as mystical architects for the
same reasons that they become wizards.


-Other Classes
     Mystical architects prefer to work on their own, cloistered in their studies,
researching and inventing spells. Some mystical architects take a liking to
publicity and become well known for inventing some of the most powerful spells.
Some of these well-known mystical architects include Bigby, Leomund,
Mordenkainen. Otto was another famous mystical architect who sadly
perished when a pixie cast his own spell upon him, causing him to dance right
into the lair of a Naga. Pixies have since taken a liking to the spell, and fewer
mystical architects have decided to go public since then. Other mystical
architects open shops in places like Union, enjoying the wealth from selling
their magical inventions. Mystical architects prefer to associate with studious
wizards or sorcerers, and are intrigued by the divine magic of clerics and druids,
but rarely relate to barbarians. Some wealthier mystical architects develop
strong friendships with bards due to their fine musical talents, but in general
find them not quite serious enough. Some mystical architects prefer a more
adventurous life similar to that of some wizards, enjoying surprising foes with
unknown spells. Though these mystical architects are rare, they can become
highly valued members of any party.


Game Rule Information
-Abilities
     Intelligence determines how powerful a spell a mystical architect can cast,
how many spells she can cast, and how hard those spells are to resist. To cast a
spell, a mystical architect must have an Intelligence score of ten plus the spell's
level. In addition, a mystical architect gets bonus spells based on Intelligence.



                                         22
The Difficulty Class of a saving throw against a mystical architect's spell is ten
plus the spell's level plus the mystical architect's Intelligence modifier. High
Dexterity is helpful for a mystical architect, who typically wears little or no
armor, because it provides her with an Armor Class bonus. A good
Constitution gives a mystical architect extra hit points, a resource that she is
otherwise very low on.


-Alignment: Any


-Hit Die: d4


-Class Skills
     The mystical architect's class skills are Alchemy, Appraise,
Concentration, Craft, all Knowledge skills, Profession, Scry, and Spellcraft.
Skill points at first level: (2 + Int. modifier) x 4. Skill points at each additional
level: 2 + Int. modifier.


Class Features
-Weapon and Armor Proficiency
     Mystical architects are skilled only with the dagger and quarterstaff.
Mystical architects are not proficient with any type of armor or shields. Armor
of any type interferes with a mystical architect's movements, which can cause
her spells to fail.


-Spells
     A mystical architect casts arcane spells. She is limited to a certain number
of spells of each spell level per day, according to her class level. The number of
spells per day that a mystical architect may cast is equal to that of a wizard. A
mystical architect must prepare spells ahead of time by getting a good night's
sleep and spending one hour studying her spellbook. While studying, the
mystical architect decides which spells to prepare. To learn, prepare, or cast a



                                          23
spell, a mystical architect must have an Intelligence score of at least ten plus the
spell's level. A mystical architect's bonus spells are based on Intelligence. The
Difficulty Class for saving throws against a mystical architect's spells is ten
plus the spell's level plus the her Intelligence modifier. Mystical architects, like
wizards, may know any number of spells.


-Bonus Languages
     A mystical architect may substitute Draconic for one of the bonus
languages available to the character because of her race, since many ancient
tomes of magic are written in Draconic and apprentice mystical architects often
learn it as part of their studies.


-Craft Spell
     Every four levels beginning at first, the mystical architect's research
results in the creation of a new spell. A mystical architect can only create a spell
of a level which she can cast, and the new spell must be approved by the DM.
The mystical architect may cast and prepare any spells of her own creation
without her spellbook as if she had the feat Spell Mastery applying to those
spells. The mystical architect receives a plus five bonus on her Spellcraft
checks when researching a new spell. Also, the mystical architect need only pay
1,000gp - 50gp/level (minimum 100gp) to research the spell, and upon reaching
20th level, the mystical architect need only spend five days per spell level
instead of seven.


-Alchemical Research
     Mystical Architects may invent new alchemical substances and items in the
same manner as they would spells. However, the research requires an alchemy
check rather than a spellcraft check.


-Intelligent Item Creation
     Upon reaching twelfth level, the mystical architect may imbue an item that



                                          24
she is crafting with intelligence. She can only imbue items that she has crafted
herself and may not imbue an existing item. The mystical architect may create
an intelligent item based on table 8-31 of the Dungeon Masters Guide in the
Intelligent Items section (pages 228-231). The most powerful intelligence that
she can imbue an item with has a d% equal to or less than her class level times
four, plus her intelligence bonus. The mystical architect may then design the
item with any of the purposes and powers listed whose d% score does not
exceed the magical architect's level times four, plus her intelligence bonus. If the
magical architect is powerful enough to access the options, 'Roll twice again on
this table' or 'Roll again on table...', then she may create the item as if she had
randomly rolled either one or the other only once during the creation process.
No matter how intelligent the mystical architect wishes the item to be, the
experience cost for creating the item is increased by 250XP.


-Permanent Magic
     At eighteenth level a mystical architect has become so experienced at
creating magical effects that she can cast 'Permanency' and create other
permanent or lasting magical effects (including creating magic items) with only
half the experience point cost.


-Artificer
     At twentieth level, a mystical architect may research and create a minor
artifact. Such an endeavor should take a minimum of one year of research and
experimentation. This duration must be decided by the DM, though it is very
unlikely that a mystical architect would need to spend more than five years
researching. The DM may inform you of an approximate duration, but need
not tell you how long the research will end up taking until you have committed to
it. Any rare material components could extend the duration, and the DM may
feel free to create an adventure for the purpose of locating such components.
Examples of artifacts are listed in the Dungeon Master's Guide, but no two
artifacts may be identical. The DM may limit the number of artifacts that a



                                         25
mystical architect may create, and the experience cost may be as high as the
DM wishes, though it should never exceed 20,000XP.


-Spellbooks
     Mystical architects must study their spellbooks each day just like a wizard.
A mystical architect's spellbook functions in exactly the same manner as a
wizard's spellbook, including the number of spells she gains each level.


-Spell Mastery
     Like a wizard, mystical architects have access to the special feat, spell
mastery.


Conjuror
-Adventures
     Conjurors are fascinated by the flexibility of magic, and are usually very
resourceful spellcasters. When prepared, conjurors can use their spells to
devastating effect, but even when facing the unknown, a conjuror's ability to
meddle with her spells, makes her adaptable to many circumstances. Many
conjurors prefer to develop their skills out in the world, finding that adrenaline
and peril help them discover new ways of using magic. Some conjurors spend
more time in their studies, preferring to reason and experiment before testing
their spells against a dragons and beholders. No matter what the
circumstances, however, all conjurors are quick to adapt to changing situations.
Conjurors may have any of the noble or ignoble motivations that other
adventurers have.


-Characteristics
     The Conjuror is a talented spellcaster, but specializes in the manipulation
of magic. Conjurors invent new ways of using spells, often using metamagic
feats to augment them. As they research and experiment, some conjurors
become famous for the creation of a new metamagic feat, while others may



                                         26
achieve fame only in the same manner as other adventurers. Those who have
neither still live long lives, capable of defending themselves against even the
cleverest of surprise assaults. In addition to manipulating spells, conjurors have
a spontaneity similar to that of a sorcerer, though they still prepare spells and
use spellbooks like wizards.


-Alignment
     Conjurors tend to be more sporadic, often spontaneously going on an
adventure, so they are more likely to be chaotic than lawful. However, lawful
conjurors are not unheard of, despite the adaptive nature that all conjurors
possess, some are stricter with other aspects of their personalities. Some of
the most famous conjurors pursued their purposes relentlessly, swatting the
first diversion away like a fly, without deviating from their purposes in the least.


-Religion
     Conjurors, like wizards, commonly revere Boccob, god of magic. Some,
especially necromancers or simply more misanthropic conjurors, prefer Wee
Jas, goddess of magic and death. Evil necromancers are known to worship
Nerull, god of death. Conjurors in general, however, are more devoted to their
studies than to their spiritual sides. Though fanatic religious conjurors are very
powerful and often widely feared.


-Background
     All conjurors seek to bend and expand the universal laws of magic to their
benefit. Unlike wizards who see magic as a set of incantations and laws,
conjurors consider magic to be an art, requiring creativity and an open mind.
Over the decades, conjurors have always been at the forefront of discovery.
Their accomplishments range from the first conjuror who combined the arts of
alchemy and magic through her potions, to the feats of metamagic that can now
be performed by most arcane spellcasters. As many inventors, conjurors are
more competitive than cooperative, and no formal association of conjurors



                                         27
exists of yet. Most conjurors learn their craft from ordinary wizards and begin
exploring magic’s intricacies on their own. However, some conjurors do take on
apprentices, training them from a young age to be open-minded.


-Races
     The various races are attracted to careers as conjurors for the same
reasons that they become wizards.


-Other Classes
     Conjurors rarely relate to other conjurors simply because they find
members of other classes far more interesting. Most conjurors consider
themselves to be experts of their class, and find it boring to listen to other
conjurors talk about their craft. Conjurors prefer to associate with
spontaneous sorcerers than studious wizards, and are intrigued by the divine
magic of clerics and druids, but rarely relate to barbarians. In general however,
conjurors are impartial, and have no particular prejudices. Those conjurors who
prefer a more studious lifestyle similar to that of some wizards, do tend to hold
better relations with others of a similar persuasion, but these conjurors are
fewer and far between.


Game Rule Information
-Abilities
     Intelligence determines how powerful a spell a conjuror can cast, how many
spells she can cast, and how hard those spells are to resist. To cast a spell, a
conjuror must have an Intelligence score of ten plus the spell's level. In addition,
a conjuror gets bonus spells based on Intelligence. The Difficulty Class of a
saving throw against a conjuror's spell is ten plus the spell's level plus the
conjuror's Intelligence modifier. High Dexterity is helpful for a conjuror, who
typically wears little or no armor, because it provides her with an Armor Class
bonus. A good Constitution gives a conjuror extra hit points, a resource that
she is otherwise very low on.



                                         28
-Alignment: Any


-Hit Die: d4


-Class Skills
     The conjuror's class skills are Concentration, Craft, all Knowledge skills,
Profession, Scry, and Spellcraft. Skill points at first level: (2 + Int. modifier) x
4. Skill points at each additional level: 2 + Int. modifier.


Class Features
-Weapon and Armor Proficiency
     Conjurors are skilled only with the dagger and quarterstaff. Conjurors
are not proficient with any type of armor nor with shields. Armor of any type
interferes with a conjuror's movements, which can cause her spells to fail (if
those spells have somatic components).


-Spells
     A conjuror casts arcane spells. She is limited to a certain number of spells
of each spell level per day, according to her class level. The number of spells
per day that a conjuror may cast is equal to that of a wizard. A conjuror must
prepare spells ahead of time by getting a good night's sleep and spending one
hour studying her spellbook. While studying, the conjuror decides which spells
to prepare. To learn, prepare, or cast a spell, a conjuror must have an
Intelligence score of at least ten plus the spell's level. A conjuror's bonus spells
are based on Intelligence. The Difficulty Class for saving throws against a
conjuror's spells is ten plus the spell's level plus the her Intelligence modifier.
Conjurors, like wizards, may know any number of spells.


-Bonus Languages
     A conjuror may substitute Draconic for one of the bonus languages



                                          29
available to the character because of her race, since Draconic is often used in
magical texts and it is highly valued and often used amongst the greater magical
community.


-Bonus Feats
        Every six levels, beginning at sixth, a conjuror gains a bonus feat. This
feat must be a metamagic feat.


-Weave Magic
        At fifth level a conjuror gains the ability to weave spells together. A
conjuror can weave lower-level spells together to power a higher-level spell, if
the conjuror can cast spells of the higher level. A conjuror can combine three
slots of one level to cast one spell of the next higher level. A conjuror can also
unweave higher-level spells to power lower-level spells. One slot of a given spell
level can be used to power two spells of the next lower level.


-Magical Meddling
        At eleventh level a conjuror becomes so experienced at meddling with
magic that she can use metamagic feats without raising the spell level as high. A
conjuror can cast a metamagic spell using a spell slot one level lower than usual.
For example, a conjuror can cast a maximized fireball using up a fifth level spell
slot.


-Spontaneous Casting
        At twentieth level a conjuror has become so experienced at creating
magical effects that she can cast one spell at each level spontaneously. A
conjuror may cast any spell spontaneously that she has cast at some time in the
past. This ability functions in the same way as a sorcerer's normal spell casting.
A conjuror preparing a spontaneous spell need not decide what spell it is until
she casts it. Spontaneously cast spells cannot be weaved, nor can metamagic
feats be used to augment them.



                                           30
-Spellbooks
     Conjurors must study their spellbooks each day just like a wizard. A
conjuror's spellbook functions in exactly the same way as a wizard's spellbook,
including the number of spells she gains each level.


-Spell Mastery
     Like a wizard, conjurors have access to the special feat, spell mastery.


Spellwright
-Adventures
     Spellwrights use their spellwrought scrolls to deliver multiple blows of their
favorite spells to their enemies. Writing runes upon the armor and weapons of
their defenders and drawing symbols in the air to stun their opponents,
spellwrights are universally feared. Though spellwrights are most powerful
when surrounded by tough fighters using spellwrought items, they can still be
dangerous on their own. In general however, spellwrights stay behind the
scenes, writing runes and powerful scrolls for a price.


-Characteristics
     Spellwrights are not common, but they exist in a wide variety. Evil
spellwrights use their powerful spellwrought scrolls to devastate whole cities
with repeated castings of ‘Meteor Swarm’ and ‘Rain Of Fire’. Good
spellwrights are often seen working for good kingdoms, giving out special
spellwrought swords to deserving paladins, or using their scrolls to build entire
cities out of magic in a matter of days. Many spellwrights open shops, selling
their creations and their services for thousands of gold. Few people become
spellwrights however, drawn to more exciting carriers as mages and sorcerers,
few choose to follow such a path. However, spellwrights are the foundations of
most of the modern day kingdoms; if it weren’t for their creations, many would
never have finished their castles and cities because of continuous barbarous



                                        31
assaults.


-Alignment
     Spellwrights, like most arcane spellcasters, tend to lead more structured
lives than barbarians and bards, but this is due only to the study required to
learn the complex art of using magic. Spellwrights are ambiguous and lack any
defining characteristics (though they can sometimes be identified by their rune
engraved staffs).


-Religion
     Spellwrights, like wizards, commonly revere Boccob, god of magic. Some,
especially necromancers or simply more misanthropic spellwrights, prefer Wee
Jas, goddess of magic and death. Evil necromancers are known to worship
Nerull, god of death. Religious spellwrights are often highly favored by their
gods, and can be instrumental in advancing their deity’s goals.


-Background
     Spellwrights devote themselves to the study of magic in its written form.
While wizards rely on the magic from gestures, words, and other various sources
to give them power, spellwrights are able to delve into the mysteries of their
craft, discovering the true potential of spellwrought magic. The golden age of
nearly every empire to hold dominion over the material plane has been preceded
by the emergence of a powerful spellwright. This is partially due to the runes
that a spellwright can create, powerful runes could protect the entire empire,
and less powerful runes could protect the various castles guarding it, warning
against attack and erecting powerful magical barriers in seconds. The other
reason is simply the speed with which these castles could be built, spellwrights
with spellwrought scrolls of ‘Fabricate’ and ‘Move Earth’ and other such spells
could quickly build an empire, cities could be quickly erected along trading
routes and in other areas allowing for quick expansion. Spellwrights are not the
most adaptable spellcaster though; many have fallen to wizards and sorcerers



                                        32
who were able to be more flexible in their spellcasting. The most powerful
spellwrights in history are those who have also studied the arts of sorcery and
conjuring. There are myths that tell of a group of spellwrights who use their
powers to control the course of the world, building empires and crushing them
again for the fun of it. This theory has been all but forgotten in most parts of
the world, but no hard evidence has ever been given on the matter supporting
either view.


-Races
     The various races are attracted to careers as spellwrights for the same
reasons that they become wizards.


-Other Classes
     Spellwrights tend to be friendly with wizards and sorcerers and other
arcane spellcasters, but they are for the most part impartial. Elven spellwrights
often have good relations with druids and rangers, and more religious
spellwrights usually know many clerics. The barbarian’s crudeness is usually
looked down upon by spellwrights, but some tolerate it.


Game Rule Information
-Abilities
     Intelligence determines how powerful a spell a spellwright can cast, how
many spells she can cast, and how hard those spells are to resist. To cast a
spell, a spellwright must have an Intelligence score of ten plus the spell's level. In
addition, a spellwright gets bonus spells based on Intelligence. The Difficulty
Class of a saving throw against a spellwright's spell is ten plus the spell's level
plus the spellwright's Intelligence modifier. High Dexterity is helpful for a
spellwright, who typically wears little or no armor, because it provides her with
an Armor Class bonus. A good Constitution gives a spellwright extra hit
points, a resource that she is otherwise very low on.




                                          33
-Alignment: Any


-Hit Die: d4


-Class Skills
     The spellwright's class skills are Alchemy, Concentration, Craft, all
Knowledge skills, Profession, Scry, and Spellcraft. Skill points at first level: (2
+ Int. modifier) x 4. Skill points at each additional level: 2 + Int. modifier.


Class Features
-Weapon and Armor Proficiency
     Spellwrights are skilled only with the dagger and quarterstaff.
Spellwrights are not proficient with any type of armor nor with shields. Armor
of any type interferes with a spellwright's movements, which can cause her spells
to fail (if those spells have somatic components).


-Spells
     A spellwright casts arcane spells. She is limited to a certain number of
spells of each spell level per day, according to her class level. The number of
spells per day that a spellwright may cast is equal to that of a wizard, with a
maximum of two spells per day of each level instead of four. A spellwright must
prepare spells ahead of time by getting a good night's sleep and spending one
hour studying her spellbook. While studying, the spellwright decides which
spells to prepare. To learn, prepare, or cast a spell, a spellwright must have an
Intelligence score of at least ten plus the spell's level. A spellwright 's bonus
spells are based on Intelligence. The Difficulty Class for saving throws
against a spellwright 's spells is ten plus the spell's level plus the her Intelligence
modifier. Spellwright, like wizards, may know any number of spells.


-Bonus Languages
     A spellwright may substitute Draconic for one of the bonus languages



                                          34
available to the character because of her race, since Draconic is derived from a
runic language and is often used in magical texts.


-Scribe Scroll
     At first level, spellwrights gain scribe scroll as a bonus feat.


-Read Magic
     Because spellwrights devote most of their time to studying the written
aspects of magic, they are very adept at reading magic. All spellwrights may use
the spell ‘Read Magic’ at will.


-Spellwrought Scrolls
     At first level a spellwright may write spells upon pieces of parchment to
create a variety of magical effects. A single spell written upon such a parchment
acts like a regular scroll, except the parchment may only contain one spell,
though it can be of any level, and burns up after being used. If the spellwright
has any metamagic feats, she may apply them to any spells that she writes. At
twelfth level, a spellwright can add a permanency line to any spellwrought scroll
she writes containing no more than six spell levels. The permanency line draws
directly from the spellwright’s power, and only four permanent spellwrought
scrolls may be in existence at any time for any given spellwright, however, these
scrolls may be used indefinitely. A spellwright need not pay the usual
experience cost for creating a spellwrought scroll, however, adding a
permanency line requires an additional two days and 200gp. At eighteenth
level, a spellwright may write multiple spells upon a scroll that come into effect in
specific circumstances as with a ‘Permanent Contingency’ spell, but these
spellwrought scrolls burn up after the contingency goes into effect and a
permanency line cannot be added to these scrolls.


-Symbols
     At tenth level, a spellwright may cast ‘Symbol’ as a spell-like ability once



                                         35
per day.


-Spellwrought Runes
     Runes are arcane symbols, holding limitless potential in their ancient forms.
Spellwrights study the many runic languages and learn the potential held by
each rune they write. Wizards use a runic language to imbed spells in their
spellbooks, and the draconic language is derived from ancient magical runes.
Runes are often engraved upon objects or etched into dungeon walls, creating
spellwrought swords that never miss, and deadly spellwrought traps. Runes may
also be written upon creatures in the form of tattoos, these runes gain more
power from the life force of the creature, but that same life also drains the
magical potential from the runes over time.
     Spellwrights gain the knowledge necessary to carve runes with a spell level
that she has been able to cast spells at for at least two levels. Runes may act as
a ‘Permanent Contingency’ spell, activating any number of magical effects when
the circumstances are met. Any such runes must, like the scripture described by
the spell, remain within the area of the magical effects at all times, unless there
exists a magical link. Runes carved upon an item, such as a sword, often have
triggers regarding when the object touches something, such as flesh or blood.
Runes do not have any experience cost, but it takes a number of hours per spell
level to carve temporary runes. Lasting runes, which only stop functioning if
they are damaged or if the surface upon which they are written is destroyed,
take a number of days equal to the spell level to write. Often, even lasting runes
that activate a nearby fireball spell don’t last long due to the damage they inflict
upon themselves.
     Runes do not always mimic the effects of certain spells. Runes may be
carved into a bow that improves its wielder’s attack bonus, or damage; similarly,
runes may be carved into tools that give bonuses to the skill checks of anyone
using them. Runes may even be carved upon an object that gives temporary hit
points to anyone holding it. The duration of work required for these effects is
ultimately decided by the DM, some examples that should be used as a general



                                         36
benchmark for these cases are one day per ten extra hit points given, or per +2
skill check bonus.
     Tattooed runes require special tools to create, and their magical effects
(including damage and area) are automatically multiplied by one and a half.
These runes have a duration of ten times the spellwright’s level before they
lose their magical effects, and during the second half of that duration the rune’s
effects are no longer multiplied by one and a half. Only one rune may be written
on any part of the body (from feet; to lower and upper legs; to torso and back;
to arms, forearms, and hands; to neck and face; and the head may also be used
if the subject is bald) and even after the magical effects wear off, another rune
cannot be written there again (though small non-magical tattoos may added). A
creature may undergo an expensive procedure to remove a tattooed rune so
that the body part may be used again, but the procedure requires several
hours, during which time the subject looses half of her hit points, and costs
2,000gp.
     Runes that do not have continuous effects (such as runes that activate a
‘Fireball’ or ‘Purify Water’ spell) can only be activated once every hour, this
time period may be reduced by increasing the spell level by one per division
(1/2 an hour increases the level by one, 1/3 of an hour increases it by two, and
so on). Also, because runes draw directly from the spellwright’s magic, she can
only have a number of spell levels of active magical runes in existence at any time
equal to four times her level. She may craft a rune that does not count against
this limit by expending 100XP/spell level.


-Spellbooks
     Spellwrights must study their spellbooks each day just like a wizard. A
spellwright's spellbook functions in exactly the same way as a wizard's
spellbook, including the number of spells she gains each level. To carve runes
or craft a scroll, a spellwright must have the spells prepared if any specific spells
are required.




                                         37
-Spell Mastery
    Like a wizard, conjurors have access to the special feat, spell mastery.




                                      38

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:8/9/2011
language:English
pages:38