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Charter Handbook - Yacht Charter Sydney

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					Charter Handbook
Introduction
This user guide is for the safe and efficient operation of Liquid Edge, a 38 foot Hunter yacht chartered
on Sydney Harbour, Australia. This guide presents useful information in an easy to read format, the
contents must be understood by all masters of the vessel, including bareboat charter operators.




Operating Area          Sydney Harbour, Australia

Vessel                  Hunter 38 foot yacht

Registration            22584 (commercial)

Boat Location           Pyrmont, NSW 2009

Postal Address          PO Box 275, Darlinghurst NSW 1300

                        T: (02) 9660 5776, M: 0427 178 244
Contact Details
                        E: info@liquidedge.com.au, W: www.liquidedge.com.au

Key Personnel           Director – Kit Marshall, Administration Manager – Cheryl Hugo




28 September 2009                                   2                                Charter Handbook
Contents
Introduction .........................................................................................................................................2
Contents .............................................................................................................................................3
Charterer Responsibility ......................................................................................................................4
General Conditions .............................................................................................................................4
Security Bond .....................................................................................................................................4
Yacht Specifications............................................................................................................................5
Yacht Layout .......................................................................................................................................6
Things to do on Sydney Harbour .........................................................................................................7
Engine Operation ................................................................................................................................8
Anchoring ...........................................................................................................................................9
Mooring ............................................................................................................................................10
Electrical Power System....................................................................................................................11
Fresh Water System ......................................................................................................................... 12
Bilge Pump System...........................................................................................................................13
Toilet System ....................................................................................................................................14
Gas System ......................................................................................................................................15
Security ............................................................................................................................................16
Tender ..............................................................................................................................................17
Boating Hazards on Sydney Harbour ................................................................................................18
Swimming in Sydney Harbour ...........................................................................................................19
Emergency Procedures.....................................................................................................................20
Actions On ........................................................................................................................................21




28 September 2009                                                         3                                                Charter Handbook
Charterer Responsibility
1.     Charterers are responsible for the yacht, unless it is under command of a Liquid Edge skipper. If
the conditions of the charter are violated you may be liable for charges or fines. The yacht must be
returned in the same condition it was found, clean and in an undamaged state. You will be responsible
for any loss, damage or theft from the yacht due to negligence – the cost of the loss or damage will be
charged to the credit card used as security for the charter.



General Conditions
2.    Please pay particular attention to the following conditions:

          Mooring alongside public jetties or other boats is strictly prohibited – this is when most
          damage to the yacht occurs. If you wish to go ashore, pick up friends, or visit another boat
          we can provide you with a dinghy at no extra charge.
          The legal blood alcohol limit for the skipper is 0.05 – we recommend the skipper not
          consume alcohol at all.
          The yacht must not be moved at night (sunset to sunrise) unless a qualified skipper is on
          board, and then only for emergency purposes.
          The yacht is not allowed past the Sydney Heads.
          The yacht is not permitted to cross the Sydney Heads if the swell entering the Harbour is
          more that 0.5 m high.
          Black soled shoes are not allowed on board.
          As the skipper you are fully responsible for ensuring your passengers are aware of the
          locations of the safety equipment, their operation and how to use the toilet.
          NO SMOKING below deck.



Security Bond
3.     Credit card details will be taken for all charters. After each charter the vessel will be inspected
for any loss and damage. In the event of loss and damage, the credit card will be charged accordingly.




28 September 2009                                   4                                 Charter Handbook
Yacht Specifications
Length               38 ft (11.5 m)

Draft                1.98 m (bottom of keel). The depth meter is calibrated from the bottom of keel.

Height               18 m

Weight               7,824 kg

Capacity             16 (skippered), 12 (bareboat)

Engine               40HP Yanmar 3 cylinder diesel engine

                     130 l fuel capacity (under mattress in aft cabin). The gauge is located in the
Fuel
                     cockpit near the ignition key.

                     280 l water capacity (under v berth – filler on foredeck). The water pump is
Water
                     located under galley sink.

Hot Water            23 l hot water capacity (under seat in front of galley sink)

Marine Toilet        Salt water used for toilet, refer to specific instructions.

Holding Tank         130 l holding tank (access via aft cabin through hatch – port side)

Macerator & Sump     Under floor boards in aft cabin (port side)

Certification        CE Certification A & Bureau Veritas Safety Certification

Survey               4E, 2E, 1E (smooth water only)

                     4 kilogram cylinder (gas locker in cockpit). The gas is shut off with a solenoid
Gas
                     switch near the galley sink.

Transducer & Log     Impellor type (under forward cabin floor).

                         Main switches are on the breaker board
Cabin Lights             Each light has its own switch
                         Group switches are under the sink in the galley

                         Automatic electric pump in main bilge area above keel bolts
Bilge Pumps              Manual bilge in cockpit & saloon (handles in locker & under seat)
                         Engine bilge switch under navigation table (key in navigation table)

                         16 x Lifejackets (under saloon seat cushions)
                         8 x life buoys (on transom)
                         Flares, first aid kit, air horn, v-sheet, torch (companionway locker)
Safety Equipment
                         2 x fire extinguishers (forward & aft cabin lockers)
                         Emergency tiller, bailing buckets (cockpit locker)
                         Boat hook (saloon cabin shelf)

Batteries            Isolation switches under navigation table seat (start & house).

Thru Hull Fittings   Under floor boards forward of companionway steps.



28 September 2009                                 5                                 Charter Handbook
Yacht Layout
4.   The yacht has the following main areas:

        Forward cabin (vee berth, locker, reading lights, shelves),
        Aft cabin (double berth, locker, reading lights, shelves, hull ports),
        Saloon (table lowers to form a double berth, reading lights, TV, DVD/CD player),
        Navigation table (electrical board, instruments, VHF radio, chart table)
        Galley (sink, refrigerator, freezer, gas stove & oven), and
        Head (toilet, shower, sink).
        Cockpit (helm station, seating, cockpit locker, transom access)
        Transom (transom lockers, transom shower, boarding ladder, fuel filler, holding tank empty)
        Foredeck (anchor, water filler, mast)




28 September 2009                                 6                                Charter Handbook
Things to do on Sydney Harbour
Introduction

5.    Sydney Harbour offers a variety of places to visit, ranging from clear sandy beaches, to
stunning real estate, exhilarating sailing to quiet bush anchorages.

Sydney Harbour Tour

6.     The classic trip, travel under the harbour bridge, past the opera house and do a lap of the
harbour. There are public moorings in Athol Bay (in front of Taronga Zoo) which offer stunning views
of the bridge and opera house. It’s possible to stay overnight on these moorings but they are subject
to ferry wash.

Blackwattle Bay / Fish Market

7.      This bay next to the famous Fish Market is one of the most sheltered locations to spend the
night. The anchorage area is secure, free from ferry wash and full of atmosphere. It’s also possible to
visit the Fish Market to purchase some fresh seafood.

Lane Cove

8.    This is an interesting excursion into the protected waters of Lane Cove where it’s possible to
view some of Sydney’s most stunning real estate. This is also a great location to find a vacant mooring
and spend the night.

Middle Harbour

9.    Touring Middle Harbour is a great adventure. The Spit Bridge must be negotiated before
exploring the upper reaches such as Bantry Bay or Sugarloaf Bay – both of these bays have public
moorings and offer secluded locations for overnight stays.

Balmoral

10. It is possible to anchor out from Balmoral Beach over the white sand and clear water. This is an
ideal location on a hot day to swim off the back of the yacht. Be aware of the normal hazards
associated with swimming, and never swim whilst the engine is running.




28 September 2009                                  7                                 Charter Handbook
Engine Operation
Introduction

12. The engine is an expensive part of Liquid Edge and must be cared for. Prior to starting, the
engine should be inspected to ensure it is in good working order with no fluid leakage.

Cold Start

            Turn battery on (start battery)
            Ensure gear lever is in neutral
            Turn start key to the left for 10 seconds to heat the glow plugs
            Turn the start key to the right to start engine
            Increase idle if necessary (depress black button on the gear lever & push lever forward)
            Allow oil pressure to build before engaging engine

Hot Start

            As above but glow plugs don’t need heating.

Motoring

13. The maximum revs while motoring are 2,800; this achieves the yachts hull speed of approx 6-7
knots.

14. When reversing, the prop ‘walks’ the yacht to the port side, this should be taken into account if
trying to reverse into a berth.

Engine Stop

            Ensure the key is still turned to the right (on position)
            Press the red stop button
            Turn the key to the left (off position)


 Important Points

             Do not force the gear level to neutral before starting – be gentle
             Always allow revs to slow before changing gear – be gentle
             Do not turn the start key off whilst the engine is running
             Revs necessary to heat water and charge batteries is 1,500 rpm
             Maximum revs are 2,800 rpm
             Check cooling water is being discharged through the exhaust




28 September 2009                                      8                             Charter Handbook
Anchoring
Introduction

15. There are a number of locations for anchoring in Sydney Harbour – some are better than others
for a variety of reason. It is important to practice anchoring or serious damage can occur.

16.   Factors for selecting locations for anchoring are:

          Security – Many areas in Sydney Harbour have a mud bottom which is ideal.
          View – There are some spectacular locations in Sydney Harbour such as Taronga Zoo,
          Botanic Gardens, Bantry Bay, Vaucluse & Blackwattle Bay.
          Comfort – Ferry wash or other waves can make an anchorage uncomfortable. One of the
          quietest anchorages is Blackwattle Bay in front of the Fish Market.

Anchoring

17.   The following rules apply when anchoring:

          The engine must be running when using the anchor winch – it draws a lot of power.
          Never leave the anchor loaded directly onto the winch, tie off the chain or rope to the cleat.
          Ensure the length of rode is at least 3 times the depth of water – preferably 5 times.
          Ensure enough swinging room is available
          Ensure enough depth is available throughout the swinging arc – be aware of low tide.

          Beware of catching fingers in the anchor winch, serious injury can occur.


18.   The procedure for anchoring is:

          Select the appropriate location, if necessary, take time to explore the anchorage area
          Ensure the boat has come to a stop but the engine is running
          Ensure the ‘windless’ switch is turned on and open the anchor locker (secure with bungy)
          Release some chain & push the anchor forward so that it will lower under its own weight
          Release enough chain/rope to match the depth of water and weather conditions
          Secure anchor on the cleat so that the load is removed from the windlass
          Put engine into reverse (slow) and take up the slack in the anchor
          Watch transit marks (land objects) to determine why boat stops moving backwards
          Place engine into neutral and the boat should be observed to ‘spring’ forward
The procedure for retrieving the anchor is:
          Ensure the engine is running and ‘windless’ switch is on
          Slowly recover the anchor (do not overload the winch)
          Feed the anchor chain in the locker to stop it jamming (watch your fingers!)
          Wash hands and anchor (take a bucket from the cockpit locker)



28 September 2009                                  9                                  Charter Handbook
Mooring
Introduction

19.   Mooring is often easier than anchoring, and more secure.

Public moorings

20. There are a number of public moorings available in the harbour (Athol Bay, Sugarloaf Bay,
Bantry Bay) – they are often used during summer months – especially on weekends. On busy days it
will be necessary to arrive early in order to secure a public mooring.

Private moorings

21. Private moorings can be used as long as the yacht is never left unattended and you are
prepared to move on if the owner of the mooring returns or asks you to leave. This is an unofficial rule
so courtesy and discretion is required. It is possible to stay in some stunning locations in the harbour.

Procedure for mooring

22.   When mooring, use the following procedure:

          Obtain the boat hook from inside the saloon,
          Ensure good communications between skipper and crew,
          Approach the mooring from downwind,
          Bring the boat to a stop so that the bow is above the mooring,
          Use the boat hook to gather the loop of rope,
          DO NOT try to stop the movement of the yacht using the boat hook,
          Thread the rope through the spare anchor channel, and
          Secure the loop onto the anchor cleat.

          Some moorings can have barnacle growth on them; take care not to cut hands.




28 September 2009                                  10                                 Charter Handbook
Electrical Power System
Introduction

23. There are a lot of electrical items on board Liquid Edge; if they are all used concurrently then
the batteries will be drained quickly. Attention is required to select the right appliances, to monitor the
battery levels, and to recharge them on a regular basis.

Isolating batteries

24. There are two batteries on board; they are located under the floor boards near the navigation
table. The house battery is large and used for powering all on board systems. The start battery is
smaller and is used to start the engine. The isolation switches are under the navigator’s seat.

25. The start battery must be turned off unless running the engine. If this battery is not isolated it
may be accidently run down and the boat cannot be started.

Charging batteries

26. The engine must be run for at least 40 mins each morning and evening – especially if a lot of
power is being used such as running the refrigerator or entertainment.

Monitor voltage

27. The voltage meter (near the bank of switches) should be monitored, if it is registering less than
12v then the battery needs to be recharged.

Conserve power

28. Remember to turn off items that are not critical in order to conserve power, and carefully select
those that you need e.g. the fluorescent lights use less power than the halogens.

Low voltage alarm

29. There is a 300w inverter attached to the entertainment circuit (under the port side saloon seat),
this inverter supplies 240v power for the stereo. If the batteries are low, the inverter will emit a high
pitched noise. To avoid this overnight, turn the entertainment circuit off at night.

Stop buzzing

30. On the main switch board is a switch that backlights the entire switchboard (in green). This
backlight emits a low hum which can be annoying at night, to avoid this simply turn the backlight off.

240v inverter

31. There is an extension cord under the seat on the port (left) side of the boat. This cord is
attached to the inverter on the entertainment circuit and can be used to power small items such as a
laptop computer. It is only 300 watt so can’t used for toasters or heaters. Normal care is needed for
240v power.




28 September 2009                                   11                                  Charter Handbook
Fresh Water System
Introduction

32. There is enough fresh water on board to last for a number of days as long as it is used sensibly.
Fresh water is used in the sinks and the shower (the toilet uses salt water).

Conserve water

33. The boat has storage for up to 280 litres of water, this may sound like a lot but it is used quickly
unless an effort is made to conserve it. Take very short showers (wet, turn off, lather, wash off) and
only run as much water as needed to wash dishes. With careful use the water should last up to 7
days.

Monitor water

34. There is a water gauge on the bank of switches, to identify the water level a small switch on the
gauge needs to be pushed to one side.

Heating water

35. Unless the boat is plugged into shore power, the water is heated from the engine. To get hot
water the engine needs to run for at least 40 mins at 1,500 rpm.

36. If you experience difficulty heating the water, the engine may need to be run longer, or at higher
revs.

Sump pump

37. The sump pump on the main bank of switches should be turned on when taking a shower – it
drains the shower water from the sump. There is also a switch under the basin near the shower which
must be turned on also. Remember to turn this pump off though, it can’t be allowed to run dry. The
pump can be heard to run if the engine is turned off.

Showering

38. Shower water is discharged into the sea; any products used in the shower must be
biodegradable to protect the harbour waters.




28 September 2009                                  12                                Charter Handbook
Bilge Pump System
Introduction

40. This yacht has a variety of pumps to empty the bilge of water. Whilst not normally needed, it is
important to understand the bilge pumping system in the event of an emergency.

Automatic pump

41. This pump is located in the main bilge area above the keel bolts. It will automatically start if
water enters the bilge.

42.   To operate manually, use the ‘bilge pump’ switch on the main circuit board.

Manual pump

43.   There are two manual pumps:

          A pump is in the saloon near the forward saloon seat. The handle is under the seat cushion.
          A pump is in the cockpit near the transom walk-through. The handle is in the cockpit locker.

To operate, insert the handle into the pump and operate up and down.

Engine pump

44. The emergency engine bilge pump is for high volume use when other pumping activities are not
keeping enough water out of the bilge. The switch is under the navigation table – the key to operate
the switch is inside the navigation table.

45.   To operate – ensure the engine is running, insert the key and turn.

Buckets

46.   Two buckets with lanyards are located in the cockpit locker.

Galley sink

47.   The galley sink empties direct to the sea via the thru hull fitting under the galley floor.

Sump pump

48. The shower drains into a sump, the sump is emptied using the sump pump (switch on using the
sump switch on the main switchboard plus the switch under the vanity sink).




28 September 2009                                   13                                  Charter Handbook
Toilet System
Introduction

49. Marine toilets are notorious, all passengers must be aware of how to use the toilet. Instructions
are provided near the toilet to make this process easier. The following points should be noted by the
skipper.

Blockages

50. DO NOT block the toilet! Nothing will spoil your charter experience more. Be careful with what
you put in it.


          If the toilet is blocked then users will be charged a $500 fee.


Water usage

51. The toilet uses salt water; there is no need to conserve water, but extensive use will fill the
holding tank quickly.

Use

52. There is a switch that allows water to be pumped into the toilet, or out. Before use, operate the
switch and pump the handle to fill the bowl with water. After use, operate the switch and pump the
handle to empty the bowl.


          The toilet valve should be left in the ‘closed’ position to stop flooding.


Holding tank

53. The toilet contents are pumped to a holding tank. Under normal use, the holding tank should be
suitable for up to 7 days use before it needs to be pumped out. The tank can be pumped out at marina
facilities, or emptied using the macerator if more than 2nm offshore.

Toilet cleaner

54. A small amount of toilet cleaner can be added to the bowl each day to help control odours.
Marine cleaner will be provided for multiple day charters.




28 September 2009                                   14                                 Charter Handbook
Gas System
Introduction

55. Gas is a major hazard on boats; it is heavier than air and can settle in the bilge causing an
explosion if ignited. It is very important to make sure that gas is not allowed inside the yacht unless
specifically being used for cooking.

Gas cylinder

56. The cylinder is in the gas locker under the rear seat in the cockpit. The cylinder is not a
standard size (it is a US cylinder) and cannot be exchanged at a ‘Swap and Go’. There is a gauge on
the cylinder to indicate how much gas is available. Liquid Edge will fill up the gas as required.

Turning off

57. Gas must be turned off when not being used using the solenoid switch under the galley sink
(the red light is on when the switch is on).

58.   If leaving the boat, the gas must be turned off at the gas cylinder.


           Gas can cause an explosion – ALWAYS TURN IT OFF.




28 September 2009                                   15                                 Charter Handbook
Security
59. Leaving the yacht unattended is NOT recommended and should only be done in
EXCEPTIONAL circumstances with the authorisation of Liquid Edge. Whilst it is possible to lock the
boat, it is not very secure so valuables should not be left on the yacht. Of most concern is the yacht
itself, it must be left in a location where it can’t drift free, swing into other boats or rub against a berth.

           NEVER leave the boat unless appropriately endorsed.
           In principle, don’t leave the boat unless absolutely sure that it is safe to do so.

Basic preparations

           Location/weather – Only leave the boat if the location and weather allows it.
           Gas - Make sure the gas is turned off at the gas cylinder.
           Engine – never leave the engine running when leaving the yacht.
           Battery – make sure as a minimum the start battery is turned off.
           Switches – Turn off all switches such as lights, water pump & entertainment.
           Anchor - It is very important to make sure that the yacht won’t drift, deploy extra rode.
           Berth – If left at a berth, the yacht should be protected using fenders to avoid damage.

Secure anchorage

60. The yacht must be 100% secure at anchor, or on a mooring. If attached to a private mooring the
yacht must be attended at all times. The yacht should never be left unattended during high winds
unless left on a very secure berth or mooring.

Locking the hatches

61. If securing the yacht, it is necessary to lock the forward cabin and saloon hatches because they
can be opened from the outside. To lock them, use the red switches on the inside of the handles.

Locking the companionway

62. The companionway hatch is located in the cockpit locker. There are 3 pieces that need to be
inserted in the correct orientation – they can only fit one way. The key is then used to lock the hatch.

Keys

63. It is common for boat keys to be left in gas lockers, DO NOT do this on Liquid Edge – other
people know where to look!




28 September 2009                                     16                                   Charter Handbook
Tender
64. The tender is a 2.6 m inflatable boat fitted with oars and a 5 hp engine (optional). The tender is
not normally included for a charter – it is provided upon specific request.

65. A 5 hp engine can be supplied but the skipper must be endorsed by Liquid Edge. The engine
can be very dangerous if not used correctly. In particular, skippers must be aware of the following
dangers:

            Propeller strike – do not operate engine around swimmers.
            Fuel – NO SMOKING in the tender, it uses 2-stroke petrol.
            Other boats – stay clear of other boats, the tender is small and not easily seen.

Licence requirements

66.    A boat licence is not needed for the dinghy, but users must be endorsed by Liquid Edge.

Inflating

67. The dinghy will be provided already inflated; if extra air is needed then a foot pump is located
inside the tender bag in the cockpit locker. The valves are one-way, the caps need to be removed and
the pump nozzle locked in with a twist.

68.    The floor often deflates in the dinghy – it is not always necessary to have the floor fully inflated.

Engine use

69. On the left side under the forward/reverse lever is the latch to lower the engine. It needs to be
lifted (lightly) whilst slightly raising the engine to unlock it. The engine is then lowered to the desired
level. To raise the engine simply lift it to the required level, it will automatically lock into place.

70.    The engine is reliable but it can flood with fuel, use this procedure to start:

            Turn the choke on by twisting clockwise (if the engine is warm the choke won’t be needed),
            Apply a small amount of throttle (about half),
            Pull the start cord (take the strain on the cord before pulling it).

71.    To stop the engine, press the red button on the front.

Fuel

72.    The tender engine uses 2-stroke petrol with an oil mix ratio of 1:100.

Safety equipment

73. Safety equipment is not needed when using the dinghy as a tender (transporting passengers to
shore over a distance no greater than 200m).

Towing

74. The tender needs to be secured on a short tether to the yacht. This will be demonstrated if the
tender is being used for charter.




28 September 2009                                     17                                 Charter Handbook
Boating Hazards on Sydney Harbour
75. Sydney Harbour is an excellent location for boating but there are some hazards that skippers
must be aware of. Over recent years, there have been a number of boating accidents that have
resulted in the tragic loss of life. The key to safety is to be aware of the hazards, be conservative in
decisions and ensure you have the required skills and knowledge.


Swell                        Liquid Edge is not permitted north of an imaginary line between
                             Camp Cove (South Head) and Middle Head if the swell is over 0.5
                             meters.


Sow and Pigs Reef            This reef is 0.5 nm SW of South Head (refer to chart). Keep well
                             clear of the cardinal marks (yellow and black poles) surrounding
                             the reef. The reef is marked with an isolated danger mark (black
                             post with a red band and black ball on top). The reef is sometimes
                             only just covered with water and can be difficult to see.


Gowlland Bombora             Stay outside of the three cardinal marks as this bombora breaks
                             dangerously in strong winds.


South Head                   Keep well clear of the rocks on South Head.


Rose Bay                     The far eastern shore is very shallow, keep well clear.


Shark Island                 There are shallow waters with a rocky bottom north west of the
                             island. It is marked with a western cardinal mark.


Circular Quay                It is illegal to enter circular quay.


Harbour Bridge               Collisions have occurred under the harbour bridge. It is important
                             not to stop under the bridge and to keep to the northern side when
                             heading west, and the southern side when heading east.




           Always give way to ferries displaying an orange diamond & vessels with restricted
           maneuverability such as large ships.




28 September 2009                                   18                                 Charter Handbook
Swimming in Sydney Harbour
76. One of the greatest experiences is swimming off the back off the yacht. There is a boarding
ladder, walk through transom and fresh water transom shower to make this an easier thing to do.

77. There are sharks and other hazards in the water of Sydney Harbour, whilst a shark attack is a
remote possibility; it is recommended that swimming only occur in clear water areas during hours of
bright sunlight. Suggested areas for swimming in Sydney Harbour are:

          Balmoral
          Rose Bay
          Chowder Bay
          Vaucluse

78. Swimming in the upper reaches of bays such as Lane Cove or Bantry Bay is not recommended
due to the risk of shark attack.

79.   If deciding to swim, use the following procedure:

          Make sure the boat is securely anchored or moored
          Ensure the area is free from hazards such as other boats
          Ensure the engine is turned off
          Lower the transom walk through
          Lower the boarding ladder
          Swim

          Never swim while the engine is running, it is very dangerous.




28 September 2009                                 19                              Charter Handbook
Emergency Procedures
Procedure

80. Whilst an emergency is unlikely, it’s important to know what actions are required in case one
happens. The procedure for emergencies involving Liquid Edge is:

          Take immediate actions to protect life & minimise damage
          Raise the alarm
          Continue managing the situation whilst awaiting assistance
          Complete a report

Raising the alarm

81.   It is important to ensure that both Liquid Edge and marine authorities are notified.

Telephone             If loss of life is possible, it may be appropriate to call 000 & request an
                      ambulance.

                      The Director must be contacted as soon as possible in all situations.

Marine Radio          Alternatively, you may use the VHF radio on channel 16 to issue a mayday.
                      There are emergency services on Sydney Harbour that can respond at short
                      notice to an emergency. If a mayday is issued on the VHF radio, other boats in
                      the area may hear it and respond.

Reporting

82. If an incident were to occur (or a near miss), Liquid Edge will interview the persons involved and
collect a written report on the incident.




28 September 2009                                  20                                  Charter Handbook
Actions On

Man Overboard       Lifelines should be secure to prevent passengers from falling
                    overboard, if someone does fall overboard though, use the
                    following procedure:

                       Shout ‘man overboard’
                       Never lose sight of the person in the water – point to them
                       Lower sail, slow boat and motor back to the person in the water
                       Slowly approach the person in the water
                       A life buoy can be thrown to the person in the water
                       Open the transom walkthrough and lower the boarding ladder
                       Disengage the engine before allowing access to the transom
                       Allow the person in the water to board the yacht at the transom

Fire                Fire on board vessels is a major hazard, whilst prevention is by far
                    the best way to manage a fire, the following procedure should be
                    used if a fire is detected:

                       Fight the fire – Immediate action is required using extinguishers
                       Inform others – Passengers, skipper, 000 and/or VHF 16
                       Return to the fire – Continue efforts to extinguish the fire if safe
                       Evacuate – If necessary, abandon ship

Collision           A lookout is needed at all times, all collisions are avoidable. In the
                    event a collision does occur, use the following procedure:

                       Check for casualties – apply first aid & notify others
                       Assess damage – determine if the vessel is safe to continue
                       Report the incident – to Liquid Edge (authorities will be notified)

Grounding           Sydney Harbour is a safe harbour for sailing with lots of deep
                    water. Some of the key hazardous areas will be pointed out in your
                    brief, but if a grounding does occur, use the following procedure:

                       Check for casualties – apply first aid & notify others
                       Assess damage – determine if the vessel is safe to continue
                       Report the incident – to Liquid Edge
                       Follow instructions from Liquid Edge

Medical Emergency   A medical emergency can present at any stage, if any of your
                    passengers or crew experience a medical emergency, use the
                    following procedure:

                       Provide first aid – DRABCD (a first aid kit is on board)
                       Inform others – Liquid Edge & 000
                       Evacuate – Follow instructions to meet with an ambulance




28 September 2009                       21                               Charter Handbook

				
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