Sample Teaching Programs Economics Hsc - DOC by pbj20508

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									                  HSC ASSESSMENT


                                CONTENTS


Designing an assessment program for the new HSC                 ………. Page 2


Developing assessment tasks                                     ………. Page 4


Marking guidelines: Getting them right?                         ………. Page 7


Providing meaningful feedback on assessment tasks ………. Page 13



This paper was compiled from Curriculum Support HSIE articles by John
Gore, Chief Education Officer, HSIE and Sue Field, Senior Curriculum
Adviser, HSIE, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, NSW
Department of Education and Training.




HSIE Stage 6                    January 2001                                Page 1 of 14
                        NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                       http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Designing an assessment program for the NEW HSC
Before designing an assessment program teachers need to be familiar with
requirements of the Board of Studies regarding HSIE syllabuses and school policies
and procedures.
The following steps may assist teachers in developing an internal assessment
program for the HSC.
Step 1: Map the HSC course outcomes
As part of the process of developing an assessment program for HSIE, it is useful to
map the outcomes of the HSC course against the different sections of the syllabus.
It is important to consider:

     the number of times an outcome is addressed; some outcomes may be
      addressed only once
     how the choice of options influences the number of times an outcome is
      addressed.
In instances where an outcome is addressed once only, teachers will need to ensure
their teaching program addresses this outcome and provides ample opportunity for
students to work toward achieving the outcome. Additionally, teachers will need to
gather and record evidence for each student to be able to provide feedback to
students about achievement of the outcome.
Where an outcome is included in more than one topic, teachers have more
opportunities to gather evidence and record student achievement of the outcome.
Teachers also need to provide meaningful feedback to students about their progress
towards achievement of the outcomes.

Step 2: Brainstorm and research the appropriate range of tasks that could be used
in your subject area. This will assist you in selecting the tasks for your assessment
program.
Some examples of non-examination type tasks include:
    laboratory, research or case study reports
    computer simulations, multimedia presentations, interviews, surveys,
      seminars, debates, hypotheticals
    oral, audio-visual or dramatic presentations and analysis
    community-based fieldwork
    analysis of participants’ observations
    interpretation of scenarios, statistics
    cooperative learning tasks
    investigation and analysis
    practical performances to demonstrate theoretical understanding designing
      plans or programs to demonstrate theoretical understanding critical literacy
      tasks.

Step 3: Using the Assessment Components, Weightings and Tasks in the syllabus,
list the components and mandatory weightings in the assessment schedule. List the
outcomes that relate to each assessment component.

Step 4: Decide on the most appropriate type of task or tasks to be used to cover the
outcomes for each component.


HSIE Stage 6                           January 2001                                Page 2 of 14
                               NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                              http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Ask the following questions when completing this step:

     What type of task will best assess student achievement of these outcomes?
     Is a range of tasks used to allow students to demonstrate achievement of
      outcomes in a variety of ways?
     Does the task fit the overall teaching and learning program?

Step 5: Design the assessment tasks. When designing a task ensure that:

       a manageable number of outcomes is being assessed
       the task chosen will enable the outcomes to be assessed effectively
       the task will measure what you want it to assess
       students have the best opportunity to demonstrate what they know and can
        do.

Step 6: Allocate the weighting for each task.

     Does the weighting for each task follow the weightings required by the
      syllabus? Is the weighting given to exam-type tasks less than the 50% limit
      that applies to this type of task? Is the total value of tasks and components
      100%?
     Does the weighting need to be spread across the topics? This may occur
      when the same outcomes are assessed in two different components.

Step 7: Decide on the timing of each task.

Consider:
    the school calendar of events
    the scope and sequence of the teaching program
    the amount of time needed to ensure that students have had access to
      curriculum content and experiences to work toward achieving the outcomes
      being assessed.

More information on task design can be found in The New Higher School Certificate:
Assessment Support Document, published by the Office of the Board of Studies and
in the New HSC cross-sectoral bulletin, Internal Assessment in the New Higher
School Certificate.

For further assistance refer to examples of assessment programs in the Stage 6
Support Document for the particular subject. These can be downloaded from the
Board of Studies web site: http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/




HSIE Stage 6                        January 2001                                Page 3 of 14
                            NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                           http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Developing assessment task

It is taken as given that a school subject assessment program has been established
which meets the Board of Studies requirements for components and weightings.

Step 1: Refer to the school subject assessment program

This first step is to check the type of task, the topics it refers to, when the task will
occur and the weighting allocated. Although not required by the Board, school
programs are likely also to have the outcomes to be addressed in each task as a way
of ensuring that the full range of outcomes is covered.

One of the challenges teachers are facing is that, with a small number of tasks (3-5),
each task is attempting to address a number of outcomes. As a result, tasks are
often multifaceted and the associated marking guidelines sometimes complex. Over
assessing by way of too many tasks is not the only form of over-assessment. Too
many outcomes per task is another.

It is important to plan an assessment program so that each task is used to maximum
effect but has a small number of outcomes and a minimum number of components.
One way to deal with this matter is to acknowledge the breadth of outcomes tested in
the half-yearly and trial examinations. The remaining three or four tasks need only
cover those outcomes not included, or those that need to be emphasised. Dealing
with fewer outcomes per task makes the assessment process more manageable.

Step 2: Linking outcomes and subject matter

Outcomes drive both teaching and assessment. They are the focus of all student
learning activities and the focus of both school assessment and HSC examinations.
Outcomes make the link between what is taught and what is assessed.

This link is good news for students. They can be confident about what is to be taught,
because syllabuses are explicit about outcomes and subject matter, and confident
about what will be assessed, because school assessment and HSC examinations
are based on the same outcomes and subject matter as the teaching.

Before an assessment task is designed, clear links between outcomes and subject
matter need to be determined. In HSIE subjects, outcomes in the Preliminary and the
HSC courses are mostly repeated in two or more topics. Some outcomes may need
to be assessed later in a course, when students have been able to study a number of
topics related to a particular outcome. Careful decisions on this matter may also help
to refine the number of outcomes being assessed in any one assessment task.

Step 3: Designing the task

Teachers have been writing assessment tasks for years, and subject department files
are full of those that have worked best in the past. What is required for the new HSC
is a stronger focus on good assessment practices, explicit links to outcomes and a
marking scheme that expresses the standards inherent in the syllabus.

The following questions will assist teachers to develop a task and to evaluate how
well they have done this.

       Is the task integral to the overall teaching and learning program?

HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                                Page 4 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
       Has the task a direct link with syllabus outcomes?
       Is the task explicit about what students are required to do?
       Does the task meet the principles of validity, reliability, fairness and equity?
       Is the task time-efficient and manageable?
       Does the task include clear and explicit criteria for making judgements about
        student achievement?

When the task is developed you may find that it looks good but doesn’t fully include
all the outcomes chosen. The task could be changed to accommodate all the desired
outcomes or, depending on whether the omitted outcomes are assessed in other
tasks, they could be taken out of this task. The realisation that not all of the outcomes
that were intended for the task can be achieved needs to be checked against the
subject assessment program before the final design of the task is decided.

Step 4: Using assessment rubrics

The specimen papers for the new HSC indicate that, for complex and essay-type
questions, the students will be told the criteria for marking their responses through a
rubric at the beginning of the question or section of the examination, for example:

    ECONOMICS
    Section III
    Total marks (20)

    Attempt either Question 25 or Question 26
    Allow about 35 minutes for this section.

    In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:

           apply economic terms, concepts, relationships and theory
           present a sustained, logical and well-structured answer to the question.
           use your knowledge and the economic information provided.


This is a change for students and teachers. In the past, it has been easier to mark
students’ work when the task is large and open-ended. Answers to questions which
basically say “Tell me everything you know about” an ancient society, or the business
environment, make it easy to rank students, but these questions can be a great
frustration to the students. They ask themselves: “What is being tested? What
importance does the assessor put on the various parts that I can include? Will the
teacher like the plan I have for writing this essay?”

Students want to know how judgements about their work will be made. What are they
going to be marked on? These are the assessment rubrics that the Board of Studies
has included in the specimen papers. The rubric needs to reflect the outcomes being
tested, be defined by the person setting the task and made explicit to the students.

Step 5: The marking guidelines

Essays, extended responses and performance tasks will require the development of
marking guidelines that reward students who display higher levels of performance.
Before marking students’ work, teachers should decide what students need to know

HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                                Page 5 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
and do to get the marks available for the task. Ideally, the marking guidelines need to
be developed at the same time as the task. Large, multifaceted tasks that address
many outcomes usually lead to a single marking scheme with various levels of
achievement. Each level is a broad statement that amalgamates the assessment
criteria and sets a range of marks. To apply these guidelines teachers have to make
decisions using holistic judgements across a range of criteria to decide on the level of
achievement, and then to allocate a mark within this level.

Another type of marking guideline provides explicit statements for each element of
the criteria and combines them into a single marking guideline with levels of
achievement. Again, teachers have to make on-balance judgements when different
elements of the criteria are met at different levels of the marking guideline. Students
do not always produce a response that fits neatly into only one level of these
composite marking guidelines. In these instances, teachers need to be open to
amending the marking guidelines to accommodate different student responses.

Another way to develop marking guidelines could be to allocate marks to different
parts of the criteria and develop several marking guidelines, one for each criterion or
combination of criteria. This approach is more time consuming to develop, but
allocating marks is faster, as it is more obvious, whether or not, and to what extent, a
student’s work matches the various marks available.

It is desirable, when designing the task, to develop the marking guidelines at the
same time. The development of the task and the marking guidelines is interactive.
Maintaining a holistic view of the relationship: outcomes – task –marking criteria –
marking guidelines will help teachers achieve standards-referenced assessment
practices.

Step 6: Reviewing the task instructions

Now that the task is clear and the marking guidelines have been decided, the
instructions to students need to be reviewed. Make sure these are clear and include
the rubric, where appropriate. It is important to consider in advance what feedback
you will be giving students. It may be possible to expand feedback to include peer
assessment where oral or practical work presentations are made, as long as it is in
relation to the rubric and guidelines.




HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                                Page 6 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Marking guidelines: Getting them right?

In HSC assessment, teachers want to know exactly what has to be done so that they
can get it right for their students and their school. One answer is to read the growing
volume of support publications available to teachers:

       Board of Studies subject syllabuses
       Subject Examination, Assessment and Reporting Supplements (EARS)
       Specimen Papers (not the Sample Papers)
       Board of Studies Assessment Support Document
       Board of Studies subject support documents
       New HSC Assessment and Reporting Bulletins (green and yellow)
       Materials from LIG assessment events
       CURRICULUM SUPPORT (HSIE): New HSC supplements
       New HSC web site: http://www.newhsc.schools.nsw.edu.au

There really is a lot of important information available. When this information is
absorbed, teachers still have to apply it to their subject and their class.

Developing assessment tasks (p. 4) outlines a process for development and the
issues that teachers need to address at each step. It advocates a small number of
outcomes for each task and that tasks be straightforward, that is, not multifaceted.
This advice is given so that teachers can make the development of a rubric and
marking guidelines an easier task.

Teachers following this advice have found the process simpler but still had difficulty
with the development of marking guidelines. The reasons for this difficulty are that:

       it is a new process for most teachers
       it takes practice
       teachers have too high an expectation of their first efforts
       there is no one correct model.

As outlined in the Assessment and Reporting Bulletin No. 3, marking guidelines are
particularly important because:

     they are linked to standards, with reference to the outcomes and content of
      syllabuses
     they support consistent marking
     they distinguish different levels of achievement.

Improving assessment practices by writing explicit criteria in the marking guidelines
for different levels of achievement is a challenge. In accepting the challenge, here is
an annotated example. Although it’s for Modern History, all HSIE teachers will find
the process and annotated comments of interest




HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                                Page 7 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Outcomes, task and rubric

OUTCOMES
P1.2 describes the role of key individuals, groups, events and ideas in different
nineteenth and twentieth century historical investigations.

P2.1 identifies the forces that contributed to change and continuity in different
nineteenth and twentieth century historical investigations and describes their
significance.

P3.1 uses historical terms and concepts appropriately within the contexts of
nineteenth and twentieth century historical investigations.

P5.1 selects and organises relevant historical information from a variety of sources.

TASK
1. Select one of the following people: Asquith OR Poincaré OR Kaiser Wilhelm II OR
Emperor Franz Josef OR Tsar Nicholas II.

2. Research and write an essay of 1000 words in answer to the following: Explain the
way in which the role of the selected person reflected three emerging forces in the
world at the beginning of the twentieth century.

3. Attach a consistently formatted bibliography of the sources you used for your
essay.

Component:
The world at the beginning of the twentieth century (Research)

Weighting: 20

RUBRIC
In this task you will be assessed on your ability to:
1. explain the role of the key individual and the significance of three forces that
contributed to change and continuity
2. use historical terms and concepts appropriately
3. list and use information from a variety of relevant primary and secondary sources
to support your argument.

Note the selection of a small number of outcomes and the straightforward (although
not simple) task.

What model of marking guidelines?

There is a choice about what model of marking guidelines can be used. Each model,
or variation, or combination, has its own advantages and disadvantages.

1. Holistic criteria statements
In this model, broad statements are developed using the outcomes and rubric. The
number of levels of performance to be written can be a difficult decision.
The greater the number, the more difficult it is to find the words to differentiate
performance from one level to the next.


HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                                Page 8 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
If five levels are chosen and assigned the 20 marks available, 0-4, 5-8, 9-12, 13-16,
17-20, one problem, differentiating performances, is solved but another
is created. The additional problem is within each level, where teachers need to
differentiate four further levels of performance without any specific criteria. For
example, what is the difference in performance between a 9, 10, 11, or 12?

One way to partly overcome this problem is to use a simpler set of marks: 0-2, 3-4, 5-
6, 7-8, 9-10, and to adjust the final score to the allocated weighting. Within each level
it is difficult, but possible, to distinguish performance on a two-point scale.

The holistic criteria statements allow for single judgements of student performance
but require teachers to keep all the criteria in mind when marking.
They encourage teachers to have holistic pictures in their mind of the standard
represented by each of the levels. Each picture needs to be clear to assist
accurate judgements.

Another problem with this model is that teachers can, intentionally and
unintentionally, give different criteria a different weighting when applying them. These
decisions are often hidden (from students) by both the way in which performance is
described holistically in the marking guidelines and the way in
which teachers use them.

Marking guidelines (Mark to be converted to the task weighting)
Criteria                                                                                 Marks
uses a range of primary and secondary sources and an appropriate wide range
of historical terms and concepts to explain in detail the way in which the role of       9-10
the selected leader reflected each of three emerging forces in the world at the
beginning of the 20th century
uses a range of primary and secondary sources and an appropriate wide range              7-8
of historical terms and concepts to explain the way in which the role of the
selected leader reflected emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the
20th century, but is unable to sustain the explanation
uses some primary and secondary sources and a range of historical terms and              5-6
concepts to provide a descriptive narration of the way in which the role of
the selected leader reflected each of three emerging forces in the world at the
beginning of the 20th century
uses some primary and secondary sources and some historical terms and                    3-4
concepts to provide a descriptive narration of the way in which the role of the
selected leader reflected some emerging forces in the world at the beginning of
the 20th century
uses mainly secondary sources and some historical terms and concepts to                  1-2
provide a limited or part narration of the way in which the role of the selected
leader reflected emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th
century.



2. Separate criteria

Rather than holistic statements, this second example uses the statements within the
rubric and outcomes to develop performance levels for each part of the criteria. Each
level of performance has separate statements for each part of the criteria. Again not
having too many levels, or too many marks per level, will help teachers in making
judgements.

HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                                Page 9 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Marking guidelines
Criteria                                                                            Marks
     explains in detail the way in which the role of the selected leader
        reflected each of three emerging forces                                     9-10
     uses appropriately a wide range of historical terms and concepts
     lists and uses a wide range of relevant primary and secondary
        sources
     explains the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected           7-8
        some, but not all three, emerging forces
     uses appropriately a wide range of historical terms and concepts
     lists and uses a range of relevant primary and secondary sources
     describes the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected          5-6
        all three emerging forces
     uses appropriately a range of historical terms and concepts
     lists and uses some relevant primary and secondary sources
     describes the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected          3-4
        some, but not all, of the emerging forces
     uses a limited range of historical terms and concepts
     lists and uses some primary and secondary sources
     provides limited description of the way in which the role of the              1-2
        selected leader reflected some of the emerging forces
     uses some historical terms and concepts
     lists and uses a few sources, mainly secondary

The advantage of this model is that teachers can have the performance level on each
marking criterion clearly in their mind when assessing students’ work. The problem is
that students do not always perform at the same level on each part of the criteria.
Their performance may be at a different level for different parts of the criteria.
Teachers have to make a judgement about where the student’s average performance
lies or which level is the best fit or picture of performance. An advantage for some
students, and a difficulty for others, could be that the assessor values some criteria
more than others, resulting in a higher or lower mark than the student might expect.

3. Multiple guidelines

Although more difficult to develop, the use of multiple guidelines or scales for some
questions can make teacher judgements about performance easier. In this model
each of, or combinations within, the criteria have separate scales.

Marks need to be allocated to each scale and this allocation should be
communicated to students before they do the task. The model suits tasks where the
marks are allocated already to different parts of the task.

Scale 1 *Rubric, point 1 (Possible marks 10)
Criteria                                                                          Marks
explains in detail the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected     9-10
each of three emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th
century
explains in detail the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected     7-8
three emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th century, but
is unable to sustain the explanation
provides a descriptive narration of the way in which the role of the selected     5-6
leader reflected each of three emerging forces in the world at the

HSIE Stage 6                        January 2001                               Page 10 of 14
                            NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                           http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
beginning of the 20th century
provides a descriptive narration of the way in which the role of the selected      3-4
leader reflected some emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the
20th century.
provides a limited or part narration of the way in which the role of the           1-2
selected
leader reflected emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th
century.

Scale 2 *Rubric, point 2 (Possible marks 4)
Criteria                                                                             Marks
includes appropriately a wide range of historical terms and concepts                 4
includes appropriately a range of historical terms and concepts                      3
includes appropriately a limited number of historical terms and concepts             2
includes, not always appropriately, a limited number of historical terms and         1
concepts

Scale 3 *Rubric point 3 (Possible marks 6)
Criteria                                                                       Marks
lists a range of primary and secondary sources and uses them to
provide relevant information to support the explanation of the role of         6
the selected leader in relation to all three emerging forces.
lists a range of primary and secondary sources and uses them to
provide relevant information to support the explanation of the role of
the selected leader in relation to some of the emerging forces
lists some primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide
information to explain the role of the selected leader in relation to
some of the emerging forces
lists some primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide
relevant information to support the descriptive narration of the role of
the selected leader in relation to the three emerging forces
lists some primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide
information to support the descriptive narration of the role of the
selected leader in relation to some of the three emerging forces
uses a few sources, mainly secondary, to provide information to
support the narration of the role of the selected leader in relation to
some of the emerging forces

There is no single right answer about the model to be chosen for marking guidelines.
Clearly teachers have options to choose from. Their choice will depend on the nature
of the task, the outcomes chosen and the rubric. Some of the key messages are:
     There is no one right way.
     It’s all right to try different models.
     Quality will improve with practice.




HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                               Page 11 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
        Providing meaningful feedback on assessment task

The importance of feedback

New HSC Assessment and Reporting Bulletin No 4: Establishing sound assessment
practices – providing meaningful feedback has been issued to all schools in Term 4,
2000. The following comments are based on that issue.

Providing students with meaningful information prior to an assessment task gives
them every opportunity to present their best possible response to a given task.
Teachers are their prime source of support. Students rely on their teachers to give
them feedback about the things they are doing well and how they might improve in
other areas.

The school assessment program provides a major source of information on how
successfully students are performing in their courses. The information is valuable for
both the student and the teacher. Feedback can provide students with information
about strengths and weaknesses of responses, the outcomes achieved and students’
performance in relation to standards and to other students.

For students, effective feedback on responses to assessment tasks should include:

       what was expected from the task
       meaningful information about the quality of work
       clear statements about how to improve
       correction of misunderstandings
       reinforcement of what has been done well.


For teachers, effective feedback enables them to evaluate:

       teaching and learning programs
       teaching strategies
       assessment strategies
       assessment task design
       marking guidelines.

Some ways of providing feedback

Teachers can provide effective feedback in a variety of ways. Some of these include:

     annotating the student’s work
     writing summative comments about strengths and weaknesses
     speaking to the class about the responses and the aspects that were well
      done and those that need further attention
     providing a written summary to the class of the responses with some
      examples
     with the permission of the student, providing the class with a copy of the best
      response
     annotating separate marking guidelines sheets for each response so that
      students can see their strengths and weaknesses against the criteria.

The last dot point has a number of strengths. It provides explicit feedback in relation
to the criteria, illustrates the best answer, leaves students in no doubt
about how their mark was derived and indicates clearly strengths and weaknesses.
HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                               Page 12 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
This example of an assessment task was used in CURRICULUM SUPPORT, Vol. 5,
No. 3, pp. 9-12. The example has been developed to include feedback. This is only
one possible model and there is no suggestion that this model should be used with
all tasks.


TASK:
1 Select one of the following people: Asquith OR Poincaré OR Kaiser Wilhelm II OR
Emperor Franz Josef OR Tsar Nicolas II.
2. Research and write an essay of 1000 words in answer to the following.
Explain the way in which the role of the selected person reflected three emerging
forces in the world at the beginning of the twentieth century.
3. Attach a consistently formatted bibliography of the sources you used for your
essay.

Scale 1 Criterion 1 (Possible marks 10)
9-10 explains in detail the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected
each of
       three emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th century
7-8 explains in detail the way in which the role of the selected leader reflected
       three
       emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th century but is unable
to
       sustain the explanation
5-6 provides a descriptive narration of the way in which the role of the selected
leader
       reflected each of three emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th
       century
3-4 provides a descriptive narration of the way in which the role of the selected
leader
       reflected some emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th
century
1-2 provides a limited or part narration of the way in which the role of the selected
       leader reflected emerging forces in the world at the beginning of the 20th
       century

Your explanation is of this standard for 2 of the three emerging forces. Your
explanation of your third force, political ideologies, was not of the same quality. 7

Scale 2 Criterion 2 (Possible marks 4)

4   includes appropriately a wide range of historical terms and concepts
3   includes appropriately a range of historical terms and concepts
2   includes appropriately a limited number of historical terms and concepts
1 includes, not always appropriately, a limited number of historical terms and
concepts
A wider range of historical concepts would have assisted your explanations. 3




HSIE Stage 6                         January 2001                               Page 13 of 14
                             NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                            http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/
Scale 3 Criterion 3 (Possible marks 6)

6    lists a range of primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide relevant
     information to support the explanation of the role of the selected leader in relation
to
     all three emerging forces
5    lists a range of primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide relevant
     information to support the explanation of the role of the selected leader in relation
to
    some of the emerging forces
4 lists some primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide information
to
    explain the role of the selected leader in relation to some of the emerging forces
3 lists some primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide relevant
    information to support the descriptive narration of the role of the selected leader
in
    relation to the three emerging forces
2 lists some primary and secondary sources and uses them to provide information
to
    support the descriptive narration of the role of the selected leader in relation to
some
    of the three emerging forces
    uses a few sources, mainly secondary, to provide information to support the
    narration of the role of the selected leader in relation to some of the emerging
forces
A wider selection of sources and understanding of them would have supported your
explanations. 4

Total             14/20
Rank              6/17




HSIE Stage 6                          January 2001                               Page 14 of 14
                              NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum K-12                             http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/

								
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