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					    Setting the Trend for a Successful Future
Approved by the Board of Education, Rapid City Area Schools
                    November 5, 2009
                              Rapid City Area Schools
                                    300 6th Street
                           Rapid City, South Dakota 57701
Board of Education
    Wes Storm............................................................................................................... President
    Bret Swanson ............................................................................................ 1st Vice-President
    Dr. Suzan Nolan ....................................................................................... 2nd Vice-President
    Douglas Kinniburgh ...................................................................................... Board Member
    Sheryl Kirkeby .............................................................................................. Board Member
    Leah Lutheran ............................................................................................... Board Member
    Daphne Richards-Cook ................................................................................. Board Member

Administration
    Dr. Peter Wharton ....................................................................... Superintendent of Schools
    Katie Bray ........................................................ Asst. Superintendent, Student Achievement

Community Advisory Committee
    Rob Mudge........................................................................................... RPM and Associates
    Carol Brown ..................................................................... Black Hills Federal Credit Union
    Duane Martenson .............................................Western Dakota Tech Business Department
    Liz Hamburg ..................................................................................... Partnership Rapid City
    Zach Swisher ........................................................................ Stevens High School Alumnus
    Kathleen Stark .................................................................................... Macerich Corporation
    Linda Rabe ............................................................ Rapid City Area Chamber of Commerce
    Tracy Manning-Egge ............................................................................. Carol White Studio
    Kay Baker ................................................................................ Black Hills Power and Light

Business Education Curriculum Committee
    Carol Nielsen ....................................................................................... Stevens High School
    Deb Reynolds ....................................................................................... Stevens High School
    Britney Clark ........................................................................................ Stevens High School
    Lance Pearson .......................................................................................Central High School




                                                                                                                               -1-
Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Board of Education ..................................................................................................................... - 1 -
Administration ............................................................................................................................ - 1 -
Community Advisory Committee ............................................................................................... - 1 -
Business Education Curriculum Committee ............................................................................... - 1 -
Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................ - 2 -
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. - 3 -
Objectives ................................................................................................................................... - 4 -
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................................... - 7 -
Course Standards Matrix............................................................................................................. - 9 -
  12051 - Introduction to Business (9-12) ................................................................................. - 9 -
  12163 - Sports & Entertainment Marketing (9-12)............................................................... - 13 -
  12165 - Principles of Selling & Advertising (10-12)............................................................ - 18 -
  12052 - Business Management (11-12) ................................................................................ - 22 -
  12053 - Entrepreneurship (11-12) ......................................................................................... - 27 -
  22210 - Personal Finance (11-12) ......................................................................................... - 32 -
Appendix A –Proposed Business Course Survey Results ........................................................ - 37 -
Appendix B –Plan of Study Explanation .................................................................................. - 47 -
  Business Plan of Study ......................................................................................................... - 48 -
  Marketing Plan of Study....................................................................................................... - 49 -
Resources .................................................................................................................................. - 50 -




                                                                                                                                             -2-
Introduction

The Business and Marketing Programs at Stevens High School were scheduled to have their
curriculum revised in 2007-2008. Because new business and marketing standards were being
developed, we waited until they became available. With that said, and based on business and
industry trends and a survey completed by students at Central and Stevens High Schools, the
committee recommends the following courses:
       Introduction to Business
       Sports and Entertainment Marketing
       Principles of Selling and Advertising
       Business Management
       Personal Finance
       Entrepreneurship
The courses are reflective of current curriculum trends in business and marketing across the
country. In addition, the High School 2025 initiative was taken into consideration as well as the
Career and Technical Education Career Clusters. In the Appendix are the SD Plans of Study for
both business and marketing. An explanation of the plan of studies is also included for
clarification. The revised Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy is used within the standards, similar to that
of the SD Business and Marketing Standards. In addition, the Business and Marketing courses
are intended to complement the RCAS computer curriculum. It is hoped that some of the courses
in computers, business and marketing may be on a two-year rotation.




                                                                                              -3-
Objectives

Business/Marketing Programs Objectives:

      Provide relevant technology and current business practices used by business and industry
       to prepare students specific career-related learning experiences that equip them to make
       well-informed decisions about further education, training and employment opportunities.

      Identify the driving forces of technology and business practices in the workplace.

      Use digital media and environments to communicate collaboratively, to support
       individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

      Use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems
       and make informed decisions using appropriate technology tools used in the business
       environment.

      Provide rigorous high-tech education tools expanding student technology knowledge in
       problem solving, communicating, researching, and evaluating information as related to
       the workplace.

Student Benefits and Experiences:
    Experience the connection between their school work and their lives outside the
      classroom, now and in the future.
    Prepared to enter the workforce either directly out of high school with the business skills
      they received in high school or choose to enter a postsecondary school.
    Gain experience using technology similar to that of business and industry.
    Students have the ability to create ―real-world‖ or ―live‖ business projects using a variety
      of resources and software.
    Collaborate, publish, interact, and communicate ideas with multiple audiences utilizing a
      variety of formats.

Needs Assessment:
In 1997 the first set of National Education Technology Standards defined new literacies and
identified crucial skills for students and educators. The standards were updated in 2007 through
the International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE). Also, the MBA Research, National
Business Education Association, and the Entrepreneurship Consortium updated the business and
marketing standards in 2008. The Office of Curriculum, Career and Technical Education of
South Dakota has been implementing new standards for each of the career clusters for the past
three years (2007-2010). Now that the business and marketing standards have been revised at the
national and state level, it is time the RCAS business and marketing standards be updated and
revised reflecting current standards and business practices. (Business and Marketing Plans of
Study are located in the Appendix.)




                                                                                             -4-
Beginning July 1, 2009, South Dakota students will be required to stay in school until age 18
(SDCL 13-27-1). Although the SB 126 allows some flexibility for school-based GED programs,
it does not address the type of courses the students will need or want as they approach age 18. In
the business and marketing programs, we will narrow this gap between high school,
postsecondary education and workforce entry by bridging their experiences to realistic outcomes.
According to the Association of Career and Technical Education (ACTE), the demand for highly
skilled workers is increasing. ACTE ―is advocating for clearly focusing American high schools
on the goal of preparing EVERY student for full participation in a spectrum of college
opportunities, meaningful work, career advancement, and active citizenship.‖ As business
educators, we need to narrow the gap for students in high school so they will be able to make a
smooth transition into higher education or the workforce.

In the past decade the business and marketing programs have seen high enrollment. However, in
recent years it has become evident that the curriculum is outdated and lacks the appeal of the
digital natives enrolled in high school. The resurgence of a new and improved business
curriculum would help increase the enrollment of the business classes at Central and Stevens
High Schools.

According to the U. S. Census Bureau, 2004, South Dakota ranked second for the number of
people 16 years or older employed in management, business, or financial occupations at 17.3%.
An additional 15.9% were employed in professional or related occupations. In 2006, South
Dakota had an 89.9% high school graduation rate with a University graduation rate of Bachelor
of Science programs of 25.3%.

This is substantiated with additional data from the U. S. Census Bureau. In 1996, 7.5 million
people had received a bachelor’s degree in business and an additional 1.9 million receiving a
master’s degree in business administration. In 2001, business was the most popular major of
those with a bachelor’s degree and was the most common degree among postsecondary
associate’s, certificates or advanced degrees. In 2001, 7.2 million people had a bachelor’s degree
in business with another 3.2 million with an associate’s degree and 2.1 million with a master’s in
business administration as indicated in the table below.

                  Degree                                1996                       2001
Associate of Science in Business Mgmt.                  N/A                     3.2 million
Bachelor of Science in Business Mgmt.                7.5 million                7.2 million
Master of Science in Business Admin.                 1.9 million                2.1 million

According the National Center of Educational Statistics in 2006-07, of the 1.5 million bachelor's
degrees awarded that year, over 50 % were concentrated in five fields: business (21 %); social
sciences and history (11 %); education (7 %); health professions and related clinical sciences (7
%); and psychology (6 %). During the same time period, the fields of visual and performing arts
(6 %), engineering and engineering technologies (5 %), communication and communications
technologies (5 %), and biological and biomedical sciences (5 %) represented about an additional
20 % of all bachelor's degrees awarded. The table below identifies the trends over a 10 year
period.




                                                                                              -5-
Trends in bachelor’s degrees conferred by degree-granting institutions in selected fields of
study: 1996–97, 2001–02, and 2006–07




According to the Universities of the World, business studies ranked 5th among the most popular
(Top 10) university courses in 2008. Clearly, there is an interest and a desire for students to study
business. With the proposed graduation requirements allowing a variety of non-core subject
courses to be grouped into one category and the creation of one set of graduation requirements,
business and marketing classes would complement any student, regardless of their postsecondary
plans, graduating from high school.

Student Interest
A survey was conducted in January, 2009, to determine if there was an interest among RCAS
high school students in business courses. The survey was delivered through Survey Monkey, an
online service, during the month of January. Targeted students were enrolled in a computer
course or a personal finance course at both Central and Stevens High School. Both advisory
boards of the Business and Marketing programs, along with administrators, were invited to
participate in the survey. Approximately 478 surveys were completed: 207 from Central High
School and 272 from Stevens High School with a 100% response rate. The data was separated
per school to determine the interest of specific courses at each high school. The results indicate
that there is an interest in business and marketing courses. The proposed courses are based on the
results of the survey. Appendix A includes the complete description of the survey results.




                                                                                                -6-
Course Descriptions

12051 - Introduction to Business (9-12) One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Introduction to Business is an entry level course in which students are introduced to all aspects of
business: the domestic and international economies, financial principles, management strategies,
administrative and information systems, ethics, and organizational and professional leadership.
Students analyze the elements of the business environment and focus on attitudinal and problem-
solving skills inherent to success.

12163 - Sports & Entertainment Marketing (9-12) One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
This is an introductory course which helps students develop a thorough understanding of the
marketing concept and theories through sports and entertainment events. The areas this course
covers include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, event
marketing, promotions, sponsorship proposals, and sports and entertainment marketing plans.
This course also delves into the components of promotion plans, sponsorship proposals and the
key elements needed in operating successful sports and entertainment events.

12165 - Principles of Selling & Advertising (10-12) One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Successful completion of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and/or Introduction to Business, is
highly recommended for success in this class.
Principles of Selling and Advertising offer students an array of promotional activities for various
products. Topics include consumer buying behavior, principles of selling, interpersonal skills,
media planning, various mediums, commercial design, and developing a marketing plan
including an advertising campaign and budget.

12052 - Business Management (11-12) One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Successful completion of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and/or Introduction to Business, is
highly recommended for success in this class.
Business Management examines the process of management which is planning, organizing,
leading, and controlling the use of business resources to accomplish performance goals.
Managers produce results from resources inherent to the industry with satisfied customers and
employees. Managers use these resources such as information, technology, raw materials,
facilities, and money to produce the goods and services that the organization offers to its
customers.

12053 - Entrepreneurship (11-12) One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Successful completion of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and/or Introduction to Business, is
highly recommended for success in this class.
Entrepreneurship recognizes the importance of a business opportunity. From the initial idea to
the operating and maintaining a business, this course explores every aspect of business
ownership. Entrepreneurship is necessary not only for students who will become entrepreneurs,
but also for individuals working in the increasingly competitive corporate world. In United States
small businesses makes up close to 90% of all businesses. Entrepreneurship integrates the
functional areas of business—accounting, finance, marketing, and management – and the legal
and economic environments in which any new venture operates.



                                                                                               -7-
22210 - Personal Finance (11-12) One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
This course is designed to prepare students for life after graduation; therefore, for successful
completion it is important that it be taken as a junior or senior
This course is designed to assist students to acquire skills to manage personal financial resources
and develop the ability to solve ―real world‖ problems in ―everyday life‖. Areas of study include
personal financial planning, financial services, budgeting, investments, credit management, and
insurance protection; consumer purchases, rights, and responsibilities; and decision-making
skills for all aspects of life as consumers.




                                                                                               -8-
Course Standards Matrix

                  12051 - Introduction to Business (9-12)
                             One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Course Description
Introduction to Business is an entry level course in which students are introduced to all aspects of
business: the domestic and international economies, financial principles, management strategies,
administrative and information systems, ethics, and organizational and professional leadership.
Students analyze the elements of the business environment and focus on attitudinal and problem-
solving skills inherent to success.

Topics Covered

      Role of Business
      Economic Systems
      Forms of Business
      Management and Marketing Principles
      Financial Planning
      Investment Options



BUS.1.Indicator #1: Identify the skills needed to be successful in a global economic
                    environment.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                             Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding BUS.1.1 Explain the nature of economics and economic activity.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Explain how limited resources affect business.
                  Explain factors which affect supply and demand.
                  Explain the concept of economic resources.
                  Use economic indicators to detect economic trends and conditions.
Understanding BUS.1.2 Explain the role businesses play in society.

                 For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Explain ways in which business serves society.
                     Describe different ways our government intervenes in and/or regulates
                        business.
                     Explain the nature of labor unions.




                                                                                               -9-
  Analyzing     BUS.1.3 Distinguish among the different types of economic systems.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Explain the nature of global trade.
                    Explain each type of economic system.
                    Explain how each of the economic systems answers the basic economic
                       questions.


BUS.2.Indicator #2: Understand the different forms of business organization and
                    management styles.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                             Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding BUS.2.1 Understand the different forms of business organizations.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Discuss the most common forms of business ownership.
                    Explain the factors that affect the selection of ownership.
  Analyzing     BUS.2.2 Analyze the different management styles and discuss human
                        resource procedures.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Evaluate knowledge management strategies.
                    Use knowledge management strategies to improve the performance and
                       competitive advantage of an organization.
                    Determine human resources management’s legal responsibility in
                       maintaining labor relations.
                    Determine proper human resource procedures for managing employees.


BUS.3.Indicator #3: Monitor, plan, and control day-to-day business activities in order to
                    sustain continued business functioning.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                           Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding BUS.3.1 Understand marketing principles involved in daily business
                      operations.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Describe the factors that influence customer-business relationships.
                    Identify the elements of the marketing mix (Price, Product, Place,
                       Promotion).
                    Explain the effects of competition in a private enterprise system.



                                                                                        - 10 -
Understanding BUS.3.2 Understand the role technology plays in the daily business
                      operations.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Identify information technologies commonly used in business
                     operations.
                  Discuss the impact information technology plays in business operations.
Understanding BUS.3.3 Understand the financial process needed to start and operate a
                       business.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Understand the need for a business plan.
                   Importance of maintaining accurate business records.
                   Importance of utilizing information available to make sound decisions
                      in operating a business.
                   Explain the importance of the profit motive.
  Applying     BUS.3.4 Apply operation principles and procedures to the design of an
                         operations plan.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify methods and tools to design or redesign products.
                   Evaluate a product design process.
                   Evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of a production schedule.
                   Identify the factors considered when selecting suppliers.


BUS.4.Indicator #4: Roles individuals play as consumers in the economy and the financial
                    management tools needed to be a successful consumer.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                             Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding BUS.4.1 Understand the importance of a consumer in the global economy.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Apply the steps in a rational decision-making process to a situation
                     involving an economic decision by an individual.
                  Recognize and assume responsibility for the consequences of economic
                     choices.
Understanding BUS.4.2 Explain the processes involved in financial planning.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify the difference between needs and wants.
                   Describe the importance of financial goals.
                   Understand, create, and analyze the budget process.



                                                                                          - 11 -
Analyzing    BUS.4.3 Examine available banking services and credit options.

             For example, to meet this standard students may:
                 Describe the different types of financial institutions and their services.
                 Explain the various types of consumer credit, including credit cards,
                    installment loans, student loans and mortgages.
                 Describe the positive and negative consequences of using credit.
Evaluating   BUS.4.4 Evaluate savings and investment options to meet short and long
                      term goals.

             For example, to meet this standard students may:
                 Explain the time value of money.
                 Differentiate between savings and investing.
                 Apply criteria for choosing savings and investment options.




                                                                                        - 12 -
        12163 - Sports & Entertainment Marketing (9-12)
                           One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Course Description
This is an introductory course which helps students develop a thorough understanding of the
marketing concept and theories through sports and entertainment events. The areas this course
covers include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, event
marketing, promotions, sponsorship proposals, and sports and entertainment marketing plans.
This course also delves into the components of promotion plans, sponsorship proposals and the
key elements needed in operating successful sports and entertainment events.

Topics Covered
    Marketing Concepts & Theories that apply to Sports & Entertainment Events
    Basic Marketing
    Sponsorship
    Event Marketing
    Promotion Plans
    Sponsorship Proposals



SEM.1.Indicator #1: Discover the world of sports and event marketing.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                            Standards and Examples
   Level
Understanding SEM.1.1 Summarize the components of the marketing mix as it relates to
                      sports marketing.

                For example, to meet this standard students may :
                    Define sports marketing, marketing, exchange, producer, consumer, etc.
                    Describe the ―Four Ps‖ of sports marketing.
                    Explain the marketing functions and activities related to each.
  Analyzing     SEM.1.2 Discover reasons a company would utilize sports marketing.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Describe activities to market non-sports products using sports.
                    Explain reasons for using sports as a medium for promotion.
                    Distinguish the different roles of people in sports.




                                                                                          - 13 -
 Analyzing     SEM.1.3 Compare components and summarize exchange of the event
                       triangle.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identification of the components of the event triangle: event, sponsor,
                      fan.
                   Describe the exchanges developed in the event triangle.
                   Explain the effects of media broadcasting on the event triangle.

SEM.2.Indicator #2: Assess sports marketing from the spectator, consumer, and
                    participants’ view.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                               Standards and Examples
   Level
  Applying    SEM.2.1 Illustrate the role of the fan as a sports participant.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Recognize reasons why fans attend sporting events.
                  Discuss the interest and attraction of sports for fans.
                  Determine and discuss fan motivation and attraction to sports.
                  Explain and evaluate fan attendance factors.
                  Compare and contrast audience, consumers, and customers.
                  Identify sports fans as valuable target markets.
Understanding SEM.2.2 Explain the different types of sporting events and how fans can be
                       involved.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify and define types of sporting events.
                   Explain stadium as a place of distribution.
                   Discuss media distribution of events.
                   Identify ways for fans to be involved in events.
 Evaluating    SEM.2.3 Deliberate broadcast rights, media options, contracts, and
                        programming issues in securing media distribution of an event.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Research history of sports television.
                   Identify types of media broadcasting.
                   Identify components of a television proposal and contract.
                   Plan and classify operations issues for television programming at an
                      event.




                                                                                        - 14 -
SEM.3.Indicator #3: Create an effective corporate partnership proposal in sports and
                    entertainment marketing.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                               Standards and Examples
   Level
 Evaluating   SEM.3.1 Research the role and components of sponsorships.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Describe reasons a company would be involved in an event or sports
                     property.
                  Use goals of sponsorship to develop/assess effective sponsorships.
                  Identify and discuss the desire for event exclusivity-importance in
                     sponsorship.
                  Investigate ambush marketing, its use, appeal, and ethical
                     considerations.
                  Illustrate how sponsors leverage sponsorship to maximize investments.
Understanding SEM.3.2 Discover and evaluate why businesses would sponsor a sports
                       property.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Determine sponsorship goals and objectives and their use in
                      sponsorships.
                   Recognize major goals of sponsorship.
                   Understand and discuss the concept of borrowed equity.
                   Discuss SWOT concept and evaluation applications in sponsorship.
  Creating     SEM.3.3 Plan and create a sponsorship.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Investigate importance and use of marketing plans in sports.
                   Identify and describe target marketing efforts of sponsors to fans at
                      events.
                   Explain the components and costs associated with sponsorship
                      proposals.
                   Identify types of sponsorship sales and relationship development.
                   Develop a sponsorship contract and letter agreement for an event.




                                                                                            - 15 -
SEM.4.Indicator #4: Develop a promotional mix for a sports and entertainment
                    marketing.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                             Standards and Examples
   Level
  Creating    SEM.4.1 Define, explain and design event and sports components at
                       various properties.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Explain event marketing applications to all components of the ―event.
                    Apply visual merchandising opportunities.
                    Design concessions layout and ―Special VIP‖ seating configuration.
                    Realize the potential of personal seat licenses, luxury boxes and season
                       tickets.
                    Explore elements such as aesthetics, music, color, smells, lighting, and
                       motion.
                    Explore elements of parking, comfort, and signage.
  Creating      SEM.4.2 Plan staffing and identify issues and effects on pre- and post-event
                          operations.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Identify personal attributes that aide in effectively managing an event.
                  Identify positions, staffing, roles and duties of event personnel.
                  Identify game day/event day management issues and focuses.
                  Develop an operations time line for implementation and event
                     management.
                  Explain the importance of event load-in and site preparation.
                  Understand load-out and post event activities in ending an event.
Understanding SEM.4.3 Explain the purpose of sports marketing promotions.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Determine sports marketing purposes for promotions.
                    Recognize and discuss the role of promotion.
                    Identify components of the promotion mix: advertising, personal selling,
                       sales promotion and sponsorship.
                    Recognize and discuss media types, advantages and limitations.




                                                                                        - 16 -
SEM.5.Indicator #5: Evaluate the processes used in developing a sports marketing plan for
                    a team or event.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                               Standards and Examples
   Level
 Analyzing     SEM.5.1 Determine the components of a sports marketing plan.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Discuss and develop an outline for a conventional marketing plan.
                  Explore existing marketing plans and their application in business.
Understanding SEM.5.2 Explain the role of a promotion plan and sponsorship proposal in
                       a sports marketing plan.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify how a sponsor promotions and event promotion plans are
                      integrated into a sports marketing plan.
                   Identify how a sponsorship proposal and sponsorship plans are
                      integrated into a sports marketing plan.
  Creating     SEM.5.3 Develop a sports marketing plan for a team or event.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify and explain the required components of a marketing plan.
                   Explain optional components of a marketing plan.




                                                                                        - 17 -
        12165 - Principles of Selling & Advertising (10-12)
                            One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Course Description
Successful completion of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and/or Introduction to Business, is
highly recommended for success in this class.
Principles of Selling and Advertising offer students an array of promotional activities for various
products. Topics include consumer buying behavior, principles of selling, interpersonal skills,
media planning, various mediums, commercial design, and developing a marketing plan
including an advertising campaign and budget.

Topics Covered
    Promotional Activities for Various Products
    Consumer Buying Behavior
    Principles of Selling
    Interpersonal Skills
    Media Planning
    Various Mediums
    Commercial Design
    Developing a Marketing Plan
    Advertising Campaign
    Advertising Budget



PSA.1.Indicator #1: Explore selling and advertising careers.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                    Standard and Examples
   Level
Remembering      PSA.1.1 Describe the employment process of a career in marketing.

                 For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Identify tentative occupational interests.
                     Assess personal interests and skills needed for success in business.
                     Analyze employer expectations in the business environment.
                     Identify sources of career information.
                     Identify skills needed to enhance career progression.
                     Identify sources of career information.




                                                                                             - 18 -
PSA.2.Indicator #2: Research the concept of marketing research and its use with
                            consumers in selling and advertising.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                Standard and Examples
   Level
  Creating      PSA.2.1 Conduct marketing research to determine the viability of a new
                        product or service.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Describe the need for marketing information.
                    Extrapolate market information to conduct a SWOT and PEST analysis.
                    Describe sources of secondary data.
                    Collect marketing information from others.
                    Describe the use of technology in the marketing-information
                       management function.
  Analyzing     PSA.2.2 Differentiate consumer needs and wants.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Identify major psychological influences on consumer behavior.
                    Explain factors the make up a target market.
                    Identify methods in which a market can be segmented.
                    List Advantages and disadvantages of market segmentation.


PSA .3.Indicator #3: Explain the role of promotion and how it relates to marketing.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                             Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding PSA.3.1 Explain the promotional mix, its concepts and strategies.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Explain the role of promotion as a marketing function.
                    Explain the elements of the promotional mix.
Remembering     PSA.3.2 Identify major sales promotion techniques.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Compare the basic differences in the major types of promotions.
                    Discuss the impact on consumers of the different sales promotions.
                    Assess the effectiveness of ―point-of-purchase‖ based on shopping
                       habits of consumers and needs of retailers.
                    Explain the use of fulfillment forms for premiums and contents.
                    Collect examples of each major type of promotion and present to class.


                                                                                       - 19 -
   Creating     PSA.3.3 Create various promotional plans.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Develop a sales promotion plan.
                    Develop an advertising plan.
                    Develop a public relations plan.


PSA.4.Indicator #4: Analyze the history and regulations of selling and advertising.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                 Standard and Examples
   Level
 Evaluating     PSA.4.1 Evaluate the background of today’s advertising.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Compare and contrast old and new broadcast and print ads.
                    List favorite commercials from radio, television, and print.
                    View various ads and explain their appeal.
Remembering     PSA.4.2 Define state and federal laws governing advertisement practices.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Define the Federal Trade Act, the Wheeler-Lea Act, Food, Drug, and
                       Cosmetic Act, the Wool Labeling Act, the Truth in Menu Act, and the
                       Truth in Advertising Act.
                    Explain the copywriting policy.


PSA .5.Indicator #5: Demonstrate the selling process.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                               Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding PSA.5.1 Describe the selling process.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Explain the nature and scope of the selling function.
                    Analyze product information for use in selling.
                    Identify customer’s buying motives for use in selling.
                    Facilitate customer buying decisions.




                                                                                       - 20 -
Creating    PSA.5.2 Role-play initiating the sale and the sales process.

            For example, to meet this standard students may:
                Determine customer/client needs.
                Explain key factors in building a clientele.
                Differentiate between consumer and organizational buying behavior.
                Explain the selling process.
                Describe methods to establish relationships with the client/customer.
Analyzing   PSA.5.3 Analyze the effectiveness of telemarketing on consumer buying.

            For example, to meet this standard students may:
                Discuss the impact of telemarketing.
                Discuss laws that may impact telemarketing companies.
                Interview consumers about phone solicitations.
Creating    PSA.5.4 Model how to present a product.

            For example, to meet this standard students may:
                Understand how to demonstrate a product.
                Understand how to recommend a specific product.
                Prepare for the sales presentation.
Creating    PSA.5.5 Synthesize customer buying signals and identify how to close a
                    sale.

            For example, to meet this standard students may:
                Facilitate customer buying decisions.
                Demonstrate suggestive selling.
                Understand how to sell a good/service to individuals.
                Understand how to close a sale.
                Plan follow-up strategies for use in selling.




                                                                                    - 21 -
                  12052 - Business Management (11-12)
                           One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Course Description
Successful completion of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and/or Introduction to Business, is
highly recommended for success in this class.
Business Management examines the process of management which is planning, organizing,
leading, and controlling the use of business resources to accomplish performance goals.
Managers produce results from resources inherent to the industry with satisfied customers and
employees. Managers use these resources such as information, technology, raw materials,
facilities, and money to produce the goods and services that the organization offers to its
customers.

Topics Covered

      Importance of Management
      Management Functions
      Human Resource Activities
      Diverse Workforce
      Government Regulation
      International Competition



 MGT.1.Indicator #1: Define management’s role in effective and efficient performance in
                     business.

    Bloom’s
   Taxonomy                                 Standard and Examples
     Level

 Understanding    MGT.1.1 Explain the importance of management in business.

                  For example, to meet this standard students may:
                       Define management and the management process (planning,
                         organizing, leading, controlling).
                       List what managers do in the business.




                                                                                         - 22 -
Remembering    MGT.1.2 Describe characteristics of good managers.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Identify personal characteristics of an effective manager (goal-oriented,
                      self-confident, leader, fair).
                    Explain how managers are effective (task and goal oriented) and
                      efficient (costs with goal).
                    Define ways a manager becomes a leader.

  Evaluating   MGT.1.3 Evaluate how a manager’s accountability is a daily challenge in
                       business.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Determine how a code of ethics applies to decisions made by managers
                      (hiring practices, positive role model, set expectations, social
                      responsibility).
                    Evaluate ethical considerations involving managers and business
                      relationships (employees--working conditions, hours wasted on the job,
                      employee theft; consumers--false advertising, shoplifting;
                      competition—unfair labor practices, bribery, human rights violation,
                      computer hacking; government--lobbying, gifts).


MGT.2.Indicator #2: Explain how the functions of management are implemented and why
                    they are important.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                Standard and Examples
   Level

Remembering    MGT.2.1 Identify and describe the planning function of management.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Explain what planning is and why it is important.
                    Explain the business decision-making process.
                    Explain the role of operations planning (transform resource inputs into
                      product and service outputs) and strategic planning (long term needs
                      and directions of the organization).
                    Write short- and long-term strategic goals.
                    Identify planning tools such as budgets, schedules, and policies.




                                                                                        - 23 -
Remembering   MGT.2.2 Identify and describe the organizing function of management.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify and provide examples of ownership forms: sole proprietorship,
                     partnership, corporations, franchises, cooperatives, and S-corporations.
                   Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each form of ownership.
                   Identify types of organization structure: line, line and staff, matrix,
                     team, committee, and grapevine (optional); centralized vs.
                     decentralized.
                   Create organization charts.

Remembering   MGT.2.3 Identify and describe the directing (leadership) function of
                      management.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify leaders and effective leadership qualities.
                   Compare and contrast leadership styles: autocratic, democratic, laissez-
                     faire.
                   Describe techniques managers use to motivate individual employees
                     (e.g. goal setting, management, cross-training, empowerment, and self-
                     direction).
                   Describe professionalism and why participation in professional
                     associations is important.

Remembering   MGT.2.4 Identify and describe the controlling and evaluating functions of
                      management.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Describe the importance of business mission statements, vision
                     statements, goals (long-term) and objectives (short-term).
                   Understand the need to measure performance against established
                     expectations (e.g. performance gaps).
                   Determine how to choose standards for internal and external controls.
                   Evaluate and determine alternative actions when goals are not being
                     met in a specific situation (e.g., changing goals, changing strategies).




                                                                                        - 24 -
MGT.3.Indicator #3: Describe the human resource activities of a manager and their
                    importance to the successful operation of a business.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                 Standard and Examples
   Level

Remembering     MGT.3.1 Describe the role of human resources and management theories
                        in a business organization.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Understand management theories such as Theories X, Y, Z, Herzberg’s,
                       and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.
                     Identify methods used in recruiting, hiring, training, and firing of
                       employees.
                     Identify trends in the modern workplace such as downsizing, quality
                       control circles, teams, flexible work schedules, job-sharing, and
                       telecommuting.
                     Report on compensation and benefits.

  Analyzing     MGT.3.2 Analyze strategies for bringing together a diverse workforce.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Explain social responsibility (e.g. philanthropy, human rights
                       violations, child labor, etc.).
                     Analyze ways to manage conflict and stress in the workplace.

  Evaluating    MGT.3.3 Evaluate the importance of human relations, self-management,
                        technological, organizational, and professional leadership skills
                        in managing a business.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Discuss the importance of time management including the
                       consequences of poor time management skills.
                     Describe the role of technology in the overall management process.
                     Describe the advantages of networking to achieve personal and
                       professional advancement.
                     Discuss strategies to develop liaisons with professional organizations
                       such as internships, volunteer work, and membership in organizations.




                                                                                       - 25 -
MGT.4.Indicator #4: Analyze the impact of international and government regulation on
                    management decisions.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                Standard and Examples
   Level

  Evaluating   MGT.4.1 Examine the legal environment of managing a business.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Describe how the workplace has changed as a result of labor legislation
                      (e.g., drug testing, ADA, sexual harassment, safety, right-to-privacy,
                      affirmative action, termination/demotion).
                    Explain laws pertaining to business practices (Sherman Act, Wheeler
                      Lea Act, Clayton Act, Robinson-Patman Act).
                    Know the legal aspect of starting a business (e.g. licensing, zoning,
                      taxations).
                    Analyze and identify illegal marketing practices.

  Evaluating   MGT.4.2 Examine the economic and international environment of
                       managing a business.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Explain economic terms (e.g. recession, depression, inflation, GDP).
                    Identify ways businesses compete domestically and globally.
                    Understand forces of supply and demand in the economy.
                    Compare various types of competition (e.g. monopoly, monopolistic
                      competition, oligopoly, pure competition).




                                                                                      - 26 -
                     12053 - Entrepreneurship (11-12)
                           One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Course Description
Successful completion of Sports and Entertainment Marketing and/or Introduction to Business, is
highly recommended for success in this class.
Entrepreneurship recognizes the importance of a business opportunity. From the initial idea to
the operating and maintaining a business, this course explores every aspect of business
ownership. Entrepreneurship is necessary not only for students who will become entrepreneurs,
but also for individuals working in the increasingly competitive corporate world. The United
States small business make up close to 90% of all businesses. Entrepreneurship integrates the
functional areas of business—accounting, finance, marketing, and management – and the legal
and economic environments in which any new venture operates.

Topics Covered

      Functional Areas of Business – accounting, finance, marketing, and management.
      Legal and Economic Environments
      Government Regulations
      Business Ethics



ENT.1.Indicator #1: Recognize the unique skills and characteristics necessary to be a
                    successful entrepreneur.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                             Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding ENT.1.1 Understand the importance of entrepreneurship in our society.

                 For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Define entrepreneurship.
                     Define the costs and benefits of choosing to become an entrepreneur.
                     Define business, its’ products / services, and customers.
                     Define types of ownership (i.e. sole proprietorship, partnership,
                        corporation, etc.) and select best option for business.
                     Define risks and rewards of owning a business.
                     List essential factors needed to choose type of business to start.
                     Define business opportunities and trends: both domestic and global
                        (include new and existing ideas, franchises, and web-based enterprises).




                                                                                           - 27 -
Remembering    ENT.1.2 Describe characteristics, advantages and disadvantages for being
                       an entrepreneur.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify personal characteristics (goal-oriented, self-confident,
                      independent).
                   Compare advantages and disadvantages (being your own boss, decision
                      making, irregular income).
                   Identify desirable entrepreneurial traits.
                   Identify and develop necessary entrepreneurial skills (i.e.
                      communication, business math, and career building).
                   Identify ethical issues in business.
                   Identify personal goals and capabilities to determine entrepreneurial
                      potential.
                   Identify purposes of a business plan.
                   Compare advantages and disadvantages of a business plan.
                   List common components of a business plan.
                   Identify available sources for business plan information.
  Applying     ENT.1.3 Resolve problems of business.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Calculate gross earnings including benefit packages.
                  Calculate net earnings.
                  Prepare a federal income tax return and other tax forms.
                  Analyze the effects of supply, demand and scarcity on businesses.
                  Analyze the concepts of equilibrium.
Understanding ENT.1.4 Understand the importance of entrepreneurship in our society.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Select potential business opportunities in relation to personal
                      preferences, financial worthiness, and perceived risk (making a
                      brochure or presentation to offer potential lenders).
                   Argue the importance of entrepreneurship as a choice in a market
                      economy (i.e. write a magazine article supporting entrepreneurship
                      within one’s community and the financial benefits for community and
                      self).




                                                                                      - 28 -
ENT.2.Indicator #2: Apply marketing and economic concepts when making decisions for
                    an entrepreneurial venture.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                              Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding ENT.2.1 Define and identify potential buyers of specific products at
                      various price levels.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Define and give examples of target markets for specific products.
                    Identify elements of marketing (i.e. product, place, price, and
                       promotion).
                    Define opportunity cost and give examples.
                    Identify competitors and identify their niche.
                    Identify competitors' strengths and weakness.
                    Define and give examples of industry characteristics.
  Analyzing     ENT.2.2 Analyze customer groups and develop a plan to identify, reach,
                         and keep customers in a specific target market.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Select / prepare appropriate publicity / advertising activities for a
                     business to attract a specific target market.
                  Select appropriate channels of distribution to reach a specific target
                     market.
                  Select appropriate methods to respond to customer concerns
                  Select a specific target market.
                  Distinguish the difference between primary and secondary research.
                  Select a market segmentation by demographics, psychographics,
                     geographic and buying characteristics.
                  Select a focus group.
                  Distinguish and define the steps of market research.
Understanding ENT.2.3 Compare economic concepts when making decisions for an
                       entrepreneurial venture.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Compare and contrast the different types of market structures (i.e.
                       competition and monopoly).
                    Compute the difference between total revenue and total expenses and
                       explain the risks involved.
                    Assess how government plays a role in determining what is and what is
                       not provided in a market economy.




                                                                                        - 29 -
ENT.3.Indicator #3: Use financial and accounting concepts and tools to make sound
                    business decisions.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                Standard and Examples
   Level
Remembering    ENT.3.1 Identify the cash needs and/or resources necessary to product a
                      specific product.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Identify the costs associated with producing a specific product.
                   Identify the resources needed to start a planned business.
                   Identify available resources and government agencies to assist small
                      business owners.
Remembering    ENT.3.2 Describe and identify sources and types of funding for a specific
                        product/service business.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Compare and contrast common sources from which entrepreneurs can
                      borrow money.
                   Describe the differences between debt and equity.
                   Discuss types of funding within each funding source (i.e. mortgage,
                      short-term loan, long-term loan, angel network, investors and credit
                      line).
 Analyzing     ENT.3.3 Distinguish, classify and analyze appropriate records to make
                         business decisions.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Compare and contrast various types of financial records.
                   Prepare an opening day balance sheet for a planned business.
                   Calculate gross income, net income, and break-even point.
                   Develop pricing strategies.
                   Develop inventory controls.
                   Forecast sales in order to plan purchases.
                   Differentiate between fixed and variable costs.
                   Determine profitability of a business.
                   Estimate start-up costs, costs of goods sold, and operating expenses.




                                                                                        - 30 -
  Creating     ENT.3.4 Develop a management plan for an entrepreneurial venture.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Create a personal vision statement for the next five years.
                   Plan human resource needs and determine the types of employees
                      required.
                   Assess alternatives to hiring permanent and full-time employees.
                   Assess product brands, product mix, and inventory systems: perpetual,
                      physical, and just-in-time (JIT).
                   Create pricing strategies utilized to make a profit: mark-up, cost-based,
                      competition-based, demand-based, methods of psychological pricing,
                      discounting and credit.
                   Plan various components of a promotional mix and how each will be
                      utilized in a business.
                   Assess rationale for starting business by utilizing market research
                   Assess locations for business.
                   Create organizational structure and management skills to needed to
                      operate business.

ENT.4.Indicator #4: Analyze how forms of business ownership, government regulations,
                    and business ethics affect entrepreneurial ventures.
  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                               Standard and Examples
   Level
Understanding ENT.4.1 List cultural differences.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Define culture.
                   Compare and contrast business practices in different cultures.
  Applying     ENT.4.2 Apply information learned about imports and exports to business
                       opportunities.

              For example, to meet this standard students may:
                  Apply the concepts of imports and exports to a business simulation.
                  Examine the influence of domestic businesses on foreign markets.
                  Demonstrate ways the Internet has impacted trade between countries.
Understanding ENT.4.3 Explain how business ethics affects ownerships and government
                      regulations with any entrepreneurial venture.

               For example, to meet this standard students may:
                   Assess specific franchising opportunities.
                   Acquire the information necessary to comply with governmental
                      regulations affecting a planned business.
                   Develop a code of ethics for a small business.
                   Prepare a timetable for establishing a planned business.


                                                                                         - 31 -
                       22210 - Personal Finance (11-12)
                             One Semester - .5 Credit Hour
Course Description
This course is designed to prepare students for life after graduation; therefore, for successful
completion it is important that it be taken as a junior or senior
This course is designed to assist students to acquire skills to manage personal financial resources
and develop the ability to solve ―real world‖ problems in ―everyday life‖. Areas of study include
personal financial planning, financial services, budgeting, investments, credit management, and
insurance protection; consumer purchases, rights, and responsibilities; and decision-making
skills for all aspects of life as consumers.

Topics Covered

      Earning a Living
      Money Management
      Spending and Credit
      Savings and Investing



 P1.Indicator #1: Identify various forms of income and analyze factors that affect income.

    Bloom’s
   Taxonomy                                    Standard and Examples
     Level

   Analyzing       P1.1 Analyze how career choices, education, skills, and economic
                        conditions affect income.

                   For example, to meet this standard students may:
                       Identify various ways people earn a living.
                       Analyze how career choices can be affected by economic conditions.
                       Research, using availability of jobs, salary, cost of living expenses, and
                          standard of living, similar occupations in different locations and how
                          this affects personal decision making.




                                                                                              - 32 -
Understanding   P1.2 Explain how taxes, government transfer payments, and employee
                     benefits impact disposable income.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Calculate gross earnings including benefit packages.
                     Calculate net earnings.
                     Prepare a federal income tax return and other tax forms.



P2.Indicator #2: Explain the processes involved in managing your personal finances.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                  Standard and Examples
   Level

Understanding   P2.1 Explain the importance of taking responsibility for personal financial
                     decisions.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     List specific ways that young people can demonstrate that they are
                       financially responsible.

  Evaluating    P2.2 Evaluate available money management tools.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Compare two sources of online financial advice.
                     Compare and contrast financial services and/or financial institutions.

   Creating     P2.3 Design a plan for managing finances.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Create a personal income and expense statement.
                     Plan, prepare, and manage a balanced budget.
                     Determine net worth.
                     Create and implement a personal financial plan using current information
                       from newspapers, magazines, the internet, etc.

Understanding   P2.4 Organize personal finance records.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Reconcile a financial statement.
                     Develop a system for maintaining records.
                     Use a simulation.




                                                                                           - 33 -
  Analyzing     P2.5 Analyze how risk-management strategies protect against financial loss.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Compare and contrast risk-management strategy.
                     Research the financial responsibility laws for your state.
                     Explain types of insurance.



P3.Indicator #3: Use a rational decision-making process as it applies to informed decisions
                 on spending and credit.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                   Standard and Examples
   Level

  Applying      P3.1 Apply a rational decision-making process to personal buying decisions.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Identify the steps in the decision-making process.
                     Distinguish between needs and wants.
                     Explain the factors that affect personal spending patterns.
                     Evaluate information about products and services.
                     Apply comparison shopping practices.
                     Identify alternative sources for purchases.

Understanding   P3.2 Compare the advantages and disadvantages of different payment
                     methods.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Compare the total costs of leasing, borrowing to buy and rent-to-own
                       options.
                     Examine security issues related to various payment options.

  Analyzing     P3.3 Analyze the sources, benefits and costs of consumer credit.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Calculate how long it takes to repay debt and the total cost when a
                       borrower makes minimum payments.
                     Compare credit card offers.
                     Explain why the amount of principal, the period of the loan, and the
                       interest rate affect the amount of interest charged.
                     Explain why the interest rate varies with the amount of assumed risk.
                     Explain the various types of consumer credit, including credit cards,
                       installment loans, student loans and mortgages.




                                                                                          - 34 -
  Evaluating    P3.4 Assess the positive and negative consequences of using credit.

                For example ,to meet this standard students may:
                     Describe the negative consequences of bankruptcy.
                     Explain factors that affect a credit report.
                     Identify signals of credit problems and resources available for consumer
                       credit counseling.
                     Explain factors that affect creditworthiness and the purpose of credit
                       history.

Understanding   P3.5 Explain the rights and responsibilities of buyers and sellers under
                     consumer protection laws.

                For example ,to meet this standard students may:
                     Research consumer advocacy groups that address consumer rights and
                       responsibilities.
                     Explain the purposes and features of consumer protection laws and
                       regulations.
                     Write a letter of complaint to resolve a consumer issue.


P4.Indicator #4: Evaluate savings and investment options to meet short- and long-term
                 goals.

  Bloom’s
 Taxonomy                                  Standard and Examples
   Level

Understanding   P4.1 Compare and contrast the risk, return, and liquidity of saving and
                     investment options.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                    Create a chart showing the characteristics of investments.
                    Create a chart showing the characteristics of savings.
                    Explain the time value of money.

  Applying      P4.2 Apply criteria for choosing saving and investment options.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Participate in a simulation.
                     Differentiate between savings and investing.
                     Evaluate personal savings and investment plans.




                                                                                           - 35 -
Understanding   P4.3 Explain why and how regulating agencies protect savers and investors.

                For example, to meet this standard students may:
                     Research and report on the different agencies.




                                                                                      - 36 -
Appendix A –Proposed Business Course Survey Results

              Proposed Business/Marketing Courses for Fall 2010
                               Survey Results
A survey was created to determine if there was interest in the proposed business courses. The
survey was delivered through Survey Monkey, an online service, during January, 2009. The
classes selected to survey were Personal Finance and the computer courses at both high schools.
In addition, both advisory boards from Marketing and Business Technology, and the
administrators on this committee also had the opportunity to complete a survey. Approximately
478 surveys were completed: 207 from Central High School and 272 from Stevens High School
with a 100% response rate. The data was separated per school to determine the interest of
courses at each high school. Then the total percentage was created from the data combining both
high schools. The results indicate there are two favorite courses having percentages greater in
―Take the Course‖ than the other two responses (Think About, No Way). The courses are Career
Preparation and Sports and Entertainment Marketing. Below are the results of the survey by each
course.

Logically, it is known that parents do have an influence on the courses in which their teen
enrolls. With that in mind, combining the response rates of ―Take Course‖ and ―Think About‖
gives a better indication of the interest in the courses.

Question 1: Introduction to Business- You are introduced to the concepts and skills required
for success in today's world. Practical applications connect you to the business world allowing
you to explore the foundations of business operations. The course is a survey approach, touching
on a variety of topics related to business.

                                                                            Approximately 86%
                                                                            of respondents said
                  Introduction to Business                                  they were interested
    80.00%
                                                                            in Introduction to
                                                                            Business based on
    60.00%
                                                                            the course
    40.00%
                                                                            description given.
                                                                            The percentages are
    20.00%                                                                  comparable in both
                                                                            high schools. This
     0.00%                                                                  introductory course
                Take Course      Think About         No Way                 for incoming
      CHS         24.64%           63.29%             12.08%                freshman would be
      SHS         21.69%           63.60%             14.71%                one of few electives
                                                                            available for
      Total       23.0%             63.5%             13.6%
                                                                            freshman.




                                                                                           - 37 -
Question 2: Business Management- This course provides an introduction to business
management concepts in a realistic, investigative, and enriching manner. Business operations are
approached from the entrepreneurial and management perspective. All the functions of business
management are covered extensively, including the use of technology and communication as
tools of business. Exploration of the global dimension of business and possible career
opportunities help bring the world of business to the classroom.
                                                                            Business
                                                                            Management
                                                                            received 85% in the
                    Business Managment                                      ―Take Course‖ and
                                                                            ―Think About‖
            60.00%                                                          categories. The
                                                                            percentages were
            40.00%                                                          approximately 20%
                                                                            higher at Stevens
            20.00%                                                          High School than
                                                                            Central High School
             0.00%                                                          as to the level of
                     Take Course     Think About      No Way                interest in this
             CHS       33.33%          51.21%         15.46%                course. This may
                                                                            indicate that the
             SHS       30.88%          54.04%         15.07%
                                                                            course may be
             Total      32.0%           52.9%          15.3%                available only at
                                                                            Stevens High
                                                                            School.

Question 3: Career Preparation- This course continues from the freshman introductory course
to include extensive use of Career Cruising, an assessment-based career exploration program, to
further refine possible career choices. You will participate in job shadows in various career
fields; work with a business mentor, practice writing a scholarship application and complete
financial aid forms.
In addition you will
write your resume                             Career Preparation
and interview for a
job. You will discuss               60.00%
employment issues,
ethics, networking,                 40.00%
and your
responsibilities in                 20.00%
the workplace.
                                     0.00%
Ultimately, you get                         Take Course      Think About      No Way
the edge on life
                                     CHS      57.00%           29.47%         13.53%
beyond high school.
                                   SHS       56.62%         34.19%          9.19%
                                   Total     56.9%          32.2%           11.1%




                                                                                           - 38 -
Career Preparation also ranked high with 89% based on the description given for the course.
Again the level of interest suggests that a course of this nature would be beneficial.

After a few conversations with Liz Hamburg and Joyce Lorenzen, it appears a ―Careers‖ type
department is being established. Under Partnership Rapid City, Liz Hamburg is developing a
course for Apprenticeships that mirrors that of the State’s Youth Internship Program. In addition,
Stevens High School has WISE, which is similar to an internship. CHS and SHS have Learn and
Serve which is taking on the role of this Career Preparation course in an informal means but also
offers internships, job shadows, etc. And at Central High School, High School 101 is being
offered.

What this suggests is that there is a core of careers courses available to RCAS students in what
appears to be a ―Career Department.‖ A ―Careers Department‖ could actually alleviate the
Career and Technical Education program duties in the district, by teaching the careers portion of
each program, mandated by the state, within the ―Career Department‖ thus giving CTE programs
more time to concentrate on the specific skills areas. It is recommended a Career Preparation
course be developed, similar to the description, but the Business Department does not want to
interfere with other departments by developing this course. Therefore, the Business Department
recommends eliminating this course from the proposed business courses.

Question 4: Sports & Entertainment Marketing- The popular sports and entertainment
industry is excellent example to use in understanding marketing concepts. How a business gets
                                                                               the right product
                                                                               to the right
                                                                               place and
                                                                               promoting the
                                                                               message you
                                                                               want to convey
                                                                               is complex.
                                                                               Real life sports
                                                                               and
                                                                               entertainment
                                                                               business
                                                                               examples are
                                                                               used throughout
                                                                               the course.

                                                                                Sports and
                                                                                Entertainment
                                                                                Marketing was
also a course that was highly popular from the respondents where 210 students state that they
would take this course if it were offered. Combining the ―Take Course‖ (43.9%) and ―Think
About‖ (36.4%) categories gives an overall rating of 80.3%. This course would also be available
to freshman entering high school.




                                                                                            - 39 -
Question 5: eCommerce- eCommerce doesn't simply show students how to design Web sites –
this flexible class takes students on a comprehensive tour of every facet of electronic commerce.
You will learn about Web success stories; you will work through hands-on ecommerce projects;
and you’ll discover how to use your skills in reading, writing, science, and math to resolve
eCommerce questions.

Ecommerce did not
fare as well as
expected. Only 22%
of the respondents
stated they would
take the course
while 46.4% said
they would have to
think about it. Mid-
way through the
surveying, a
question was added
to the survey on a
course entitled
Advertising and
Sales.

Question 11: Advertising and Sales-You will gain a solid understanding of advertising, by
creating various advertisements in different mediums. You will also gain promotion and sales
techniques used to enhance your advertising. This course is activity-based.

Only 118 students
responded from
Stevens High
School to the
question where as
all of the Central
High School sample
had this question
included in the
survey instrument.

Approximately 78%
of the respondents
from both school
stated that the
students would take
the course or think
about taking the course. In addition to the Sports and Entertainment Marketing course, this
would be a good second course to take within the marketing arena. Furthermore, the Adobe
Master Collection is available at both high schools’ computer departments and with the type of


                                                                                            - 40 -
computer courses that are offered, a course in Advertising and Sales would only solidify the
students’ computer education in the area of marketing.

Questions 6: International Business- International Business gives you the competitive edge in
today's global economy! This course prepares you to work and live in the expanding world of
                                                                           international
                                                                           business. Current
                                                                           and emerging
                                                                           applications of
                                                                           technology, world
                                                                           markets, current
                                                                           events and cultures
                                                                           are addressed. In
                                                                           addition interesting
                                                                           careers are explored
                                                                           in the world of
                                                                           international
                                                                           business and details
                                                                           the skills and
                                                                           training needed to
                                                                           succeed.

International Business had more students from Central (32.3%) that would ―Take Course‖ than at
Stevens (23.9%). However, approximately 53% of students at Stevens High School would think
about taking the course. This is a course that could either do extremely well or not. Based on the
current economic conditions, students may be looking at business within the United States more
than going international. It is recommended that we do not offer this course but to continue
offering Entrepreneurship in its place. The rationale is that approximately 85% of all businesses
are small business where one or two people came up with an idea and decided to go into
business. This would give students a better understanding of the process of starting their own
business.

The current course description for Entrepreneurship- Entrepreneurship will take students
through the process of conceiving, creating, and managing a business. The goal is to provide a
solid background with practical application of important concepts for students. Finance,
accounting, marketing, and management issues will be addressed from an entrepreneurial
perspective. The course relies on classroom discussion, participation, guest speakers, basic case
analysis, and the creation of an elementary business plan based on each student's specific area of
interest.




                                                                                               - 41 -
                                                                                Question 7: How
                                                                                were the proposed
                                                                                course offerings?

                                                                                Eighty-nine percent
                                                                                of the sample stated
                                                                                that the course
                                                                                offerings
                                                                                highlighted in this
                                                                                survey were ―Great
                                                                                to Okay.‖ This
                                                                                suggests that the
                                                                                survey for the most
                                                                                part, was
                                                                                worthwhile.



The last three questions were open-ended. The following is a list of the comments. Many said
‖no‖ and were indicated with the question number.

Question 8: Do you have any suggestions for the names of the courses?

      378 people said ―No‖

Central Comments

      Name the classes a little more interesting to grab the student’s attention better.

      The word business has a boring connotation to it.

      Make the names a little shorter

Stevens Comments

      Put something in the name that makes that class special and outstanding from the other
       classes

      Perhaps something with another name for business, some more exciting!

      The names given are straight forward and realistic

      Don’t make the names flashy. Make the names what the course actually is, so the name
       will not be misleading that way kids that take it will enjoy the class more.

      I think for #3 they should just call it Job shadowing or something else instead of calling it
       Career Preparation.



                                                                                              - 42 -
      I would change a few of the names that sound like the name of the course.

      rename them to make them sound more interesting

      Get cooler names. It'll sound more interesting and maybe more students would like to
       attend those courses.

      Ten Commandments of Business

      They all seem to be great future planning courses.

      I really like the idea of #4 and I think that it's name is good enough

      Business trades, Global Business, business 101

      Maybe change ecommerce to more of a name that tells what the class is because
       ecommerce just doesn’t sound like a class when you hear it.

      Something unique and that would easily catch the eye of a high schooler.

      Business in the Economy Today

      Your titles preceding the content description is clear and concise. I'd suggest using what
       you have!

      I still maintain that the basics are most important. With any of the above-mentioned
       classes, correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation should always be emphasized. I don't
       care how smart someone is--if he or she can't spell or speak properly, I don't want them
       working for me!!

Question 9: Do you have any suggestions to the course content?

      378 people said ―No‖

Central Comments

      Name the classes a little more interesting to grab the student’s attention better.

      The word business has a boring connotation to it.

      Make the names a little shorter

Stevens Comments

      Do a lot of hands on activities and not so much reports and essays because to learn that
       stuff it need to be a little entertaining. Take field trips to different businesses not too
       much book work, more experiences within the course, that’s what we remember with the
       classes, do a lot of hands on activities and not so much paper and book work besides


                                                                                             - 43 -
       when needed. Make sure the classes are in an organized manner and not so much jumping
       from one thing to another I think for #3 they should just call it Job shadowing or
       something else instead of calling it Career Preparation.

      They'd get kids ready for the future. applications to colleges. and which schools to choose
       for your designated major Get cooler names. It'll sound more interesting and maybe more
       students would like to attend those courses.

      In the #4 you would have to teach a lot about the basics of sports and how they work so
       then people could understand what they’re doing. But instead of the teacher telling the
       students what the rules and how everything works you could have the students that play
       the sport give their own input and explain the basics and the advanced things.

      I would want to know more about the content of each course before I would make any
       suggestions about what is suited or not, but judging but what the course overviews are
       they sound like they have good content. Maybe change ecommerce to more of a name
       that tells what the class is because ecommerce just doesn’t sound like a class when you
       hear it.

      More things students can relate to the two courses I'd have to think about are GREAT
       courses to attract new students who may not have thought about being business majors or
       entrepreneurs. So although I'd have to think about taking that class as a high school
       student interested in business, I believe other students not knowing their interest would be
       attracted. Great job!!! Your titles preceding the content description is clear and concise.
       I'd suggest using what you have!

      I still maintain that the basics are most important. With any of the above-mentioned
       classes, correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation should always be emphasized. I don't
       care how smart someone is--if he or she can't spell or speak properly, I don't want them
       working for me!!

Question 10: Do you have any comments or suggestions?

      340 people said ―No‖

Central Comments

      A class that focuses on investments (stock market, IRA’s, 401K, C.D.’s) requires that
       every student must take some of these classes! Make one credit of business required to
       graduate.

      The class that looks most appealing is the Sports and Entertainment Marketing and it
       would be a good class because a lot of people are interested in sports.




                                                                                             - 44 -
Stevens Comments

     I think these classes are very neat. I really like the career planning class. Filling out an
      application sounds simple but it is not as easy as you would think, and that would be a
      great thing to learn, to get an idea of what to put on an application.

     They sound like helpful classes to know for the future and I would like to see some of
      them on next year’s class choices.

     I think these would be cool classes. I know that many of my friends are interested in
      business and learning about it would make them more successful in the future.

     Perhaps have a course where you would make a business and role play it out in the
      classroom. Also you could try the idea of job shadowing, it gives the ideas of what real
      work life is like for us and would prepare us better for the real world!

     get interesting teachers

     no homework

     I think those classes sound like great ideas’

     give more detail to some of the courses before putting them into the student coarse
      manual

     The career class sounds like it would be interesting and helpful.

     I think these would be fun classes to take and would help me in the future

     I am interested in sports & entertainment marketing

     make classes shorter or block

     These classes sound reallllllly boring!

     If possible you can make the courses sound more interesting.

     I think these courses are only appealing to a very specific group of students and may only
      be taken by them.

     The sports one would be huge, guaranteed.

     They'd teach kids that life isn't going to be great when they get out of high school.

     The more options you give us the students the easier it'll be for us to make the choice of
      what we want to be when we grow up.

     Go to school board and ask to continue debate


                                                                                                - 45 -
      I think these classes sound amazing and will be helpful for when kids graduate high
       school and have to head to the real world.

      Please edit question 7 on this survey. It says to rate the courses on a scale of 1-3. There
       are no numbers.

      I think there should be more cooking classes offered at Stevens’s high school.

      I think that these explanations would be hard to comprehend if you were a freshmen

      A course on "Starting Your Own Business" could help show a student how to go from
       brainstorming (what they've thought of doing) to alignment (what they like to do/can do)
       to assessment (how their idea may fit their skills) to a marketing plan to a business plan
       to financing through to "Opening Day". This type course builds self-confidence and
       provides tools that every business person could use throughout their lives....

      None at this point. Would like to know more about the content of these courses.

      Business classes are so important regardless of what you do for a living

      I applaud you for recognizing the importance of readying the students for the real world!

      I believe these are very important subjects that should be taught in High School, as they
       are essential in becoming successful in life.

Conclusion

Based on the results of the survey, the recommended courses are identified in the table below. It
is highly recommended that a Career Preparation course be developed, but not under the
Business Department.

                                               Year 1
First Semester                            Cr Hr Second Semester                              Cr Hr
Introduction to Business                    .5     Sports and Entertainment Marketing          .5
Personal Finance                            .5     Business Management                         .5
                                                   Personal Finance                            .5
                                           1.0                                                1.5
                                               Year 2
Third Semester                            Cr Hr Fourth Semester                              Cr Hr
Sports and Entertainment Marketing          .5     Introduction to Business                    .5
Entrepreneurship                            .5     Advertising & Sales                         .5
Personal Finance                            .5     Personal Finance                            .5
                                           1.5                                                1.5




                                                                                               - 46 -
Appendix B –Plans of Study Explanation




                                         - 47 -
Business Plan of Study




                         - 48 -
Marketing Plan of Study




                          - 49 -
Resources
South Dakota Department of Education
       http://doe.sd.gov\
SD DOE Graduation Requirements
       http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/gradrequirements
Office of Curriculum, Career and Technical Education
       http://doe.sd.gov/octe/index.asp
SD Career Clusters-Business Administration
       http://doe.sd.gov/octe/careerclusters/BusinessManagementAdministration.asp
SD Career Clusters-Marketing Sales and Service
       http://doe.sd.gov/octe/careerclusters/MarketingSalesService.asp
SD High School 2025
       http://www.highschools2025.com
SD Codified Law SB
       http://legis.state.sd.us/statutes/DisplayStatute.aspx?Statute=13-27-1&Type=Statute
SD Senate Bill 126
       http://legis.state.sd.us/sessions/2001/126.htm
United States Department of Education, National Center of Educational Statistics
       http://nces.ed.gov
Universities of the World
       http://www.educate2.org
Bureau of Labor Statistics
       http://www.bls.gov
US Census Bureau
       http://www.census.gov/
Jump$tart Coalition
       http://www.jumpstartcoalition.org
Family Economics, Financial Education
       http://fefe.arizona.edu
MBA Research
       http://www.mark-ed.org/2.0/Joomla/index.php
National Business Education Association
       http://www.nbea.org
Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education
       http://www.entre-ed.org
Association for Career and Technical Education
       http://www.acteonline.org
International Society for Technology in Education
       http://www.iste.org
21st Century Connections
       http://www.techlearning.com
Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy
       http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/file/view/blooms+elluminate.pdf
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy
       http://www.acesc.k12.oh.us/bloom's%20revised%20taxonomy.pdf



                                                                                            - 50 -

				
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