Docstoc

Nutrition Implications of Infant With Cardiomyopathy

Document Sample
Nutrition Implications of Infant With Cardiomyopathy Powered By Docstoc
					Kait Fortunato                                                              May 2011 


 
        Nutrition Implications of Infant With Cardiomyopathy 
 
Subjective: 
   1. Physical Appearance: MK is female, Caucasian newborn, no signs of wasting 
       and no apparent distress.  Pt diagnosed with mild hypertrophic 
       cardiomyopathy, question whether it was secondary to metabolic or genetic 
       carnitine deficiency. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical 
       problems in children with cardiomyopathy (3) 
   2. Diet History PTA 
           a. Patient started on Enfamil Lipil PO ad lib following birth. Pt was 
              receiving 1‐1.5oz via orthodontic nipple. Patient admitted to NICU 6 
              days after birth, when murmur was noted during routine checkup for 
              jaundice/cephalohematoma. Pt NPO upon admission to CNM. 
           b. Pt receiving feeds via bottle PO, noted to have “poor suck” from H&P 
              form. 
           c. Oral/Enteral Intake 
                    i. Specific Formula: When able to advance diet, Pt was started on 
                       Similac Advance 20kcal/oz Q 3 hours with goal of 
                       120kcals/day. 
                   ii. Mixing Procedures: N/A Formula Ready to Feed, standard 
                       concentration is 20kcal/oz 
                 iii. Caloric Density: 20 kcal/oz 
                  iv. Schedule: Every 3 hours 
                   v. Fluid Flushes: N/A no orders or documentation for flushes 
                       when pt receiving feeds via NG tube 
                  vi. WIC: N/A Family not receiving 
                 vii. 24 hour recall or typical day: Once feeds initiated, pt received 
                       60 ml in past 24 hours. Pt with difficulty feeding at first.  
                viii. Tolerance issues: No evidence of 
                       nausea/vomiting/constipation/diarrhea 
                  ix. Other Relevant Information: Pt admitted with left ventricular 
                       dysfunction and respiratory distress.  Pt diagnosed with mild 
                       hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, question whether it was 
                       secondary to metabolic or genetic carnitine deficiency. Pt was 
                       having difficulty with oral feeds. Pt intubated on admit 
                       (5/13/11) and extubated 5/16/11. Social Worker noted 
                       tobacco abuse by mother during pregnancy and physical abuse 
                       of father towards mother.  
           d. Vitamin or Mineral Supplements: None 
           e. Food Allergies: no known food allergies 
 
 
 
 


                                                                                     1
  Kait Fortunato                                                              May 2011 

  PES: 
      1. Nutrition Related Diagnosis: Inadequate energy intake related to respiratory 
         distress and left ventricular dysfunction as evidenced by pt NPO upon 
         admission and meeting 0% estimated needs.  
             a. Nutritional Significance: Pt presents with increased energy needs due 
                to current medical condition and is unable to feed at this time. Pt must 
                be started on oral/enteral nutrition support as soon as possible to 
                continue weight gain and growth. 
             b. History of Diagnosis: Pt was also having difficulty feeding prior to 
                admission. 
      2. Diet Order: Pt NPO x 3 days (pt intubated). Order for Similac Advance 
         20kcal/oz PO/NG gavage 65 ml Q 3 hours following extubation. 
      3. Age: Pt was 1 week old at time of initial assessment. DOB: 5/7/2011.  
             a. Corrected Age: N/A. Pt born at term 37 weeks. 
      4. Weight 
             a.  
Date          5/7         5/14       5/16       5/17      5/18        5/19       5/20 
              (BW) 
Weight        3.7 kg      3.43 kg  3.27 kg  3.6 kg        3.53 kg  3.51 kg  3.58 kg 
Percentile  75‐90%  50‐75%  25‐50%  50‐75%  25‐50%  25‐50%  25‐50% 
      5. Height:  
            a. 52 cm 
            b. 75‐90% 
      6. Head Circumference: 
            a. 36 cm 
            b. 90‐95% 
      7. Weight for Height Percentile: 
            a. 50‐75% 
            b. Justification: Pt at normal weight for height at time of birth. However, 
                pt weight started to trend down due to increased energy needs, 
                difficulty feeding, and NPO.  Growth failure in these patients can be 
                due to a variety of facts includes increased energy expenditure, 
                gastrointestinal malabsorption, and suboptimal dietary intake. 
      8. BMI Percentile: Pt’s BMI is 13.7. Pt is a newborn, unable to determine BMI 
         percentile. Charting for children ages 2‐20. 
      9. See Growth Charts Attached 
            a. Justify choice of growth chart: The World Health Organization Growth 
                Charts are meant for infants ages 0‐59 months.  The growth trends are 
                determined by children living in environments believed to support 
                what WHO researchers view as optimal growth of children in six 
                countries throughout the world, including the U.S. 
            b. Evaluate Patient’s Growth: Pt within normal percentiles for birth age. 
                However, pt’s weight has been trending down due to increased energy 
                needs, difficulty feeding, and NPO status x 3 days.  When pt able to 
                feed (5/16) pt weight increased 33 grams in one day. When NG tube 


                                                                                       2
Kait Fortunato                                                                 May 2011 

                 was removed and pt relying on oral feeds, weight trended down again. 
                 Increase in weight seen as child became stronger with oral feeding via 
                 bottle.  
      10. Estimated Requirements: 
              a. Kcals/Kg: 100‐110 
              b. Grams Protein/Kg: 1.5‐2.2 
              c. mL/day to meet maintenance fluid: 100‐150ml/kg 
              d. Justification:  Children who are in congestive heart failure often have 
                 increased metabolic rates due to the increased work of breathing, 
                 eating, or other routine activities of daily living.  A newborn normally 
                 requires 102kcal/kg, 1.52g/kg protein, and 100ml fluid. This patient’s 
                 needs are slightly elevated due to increased left ventricular 
                 dysfunction/respiratory distress as well as difficulty feeding and NPO 
                 status x 3 days.  
      11. Medications: 
 
 
    Medication                          Use                           Nutrition Implication 
      Lasix            Diuretic used for edema/excess fluid      Dehydration, Hypotension. Monitor 
                                                                 hyponatremia, hypomagnesaemia, 
                                                                           hypokalemia 
     Potassium           Potassium deficiency/Fluid and            Hyper/Hypoglycemia common 
      Chloride             electrolyte replenishment 
      Calcium                    Hypocalcaemia                   Oral injections can irritate GI tract; 
      Chloride                                                   IV only for infants. Can cause N/V 
                                                                          and constipation 
      Fentanyl        Can be used as an anesthetic in infants       Could leave infant fatigued‐
                                                                          difficulty feeding 
     Gentamicin             To treat/prevent infection            Can lead to lethargy, decreased 
                                                                            appetite, N/V 
     Dopamine            Commonly used for infants with               Can lead to hypertension 
                       hypotension of any etiology, with the 
                       goal of improving cardiac output and 
                            preventing its detrimental 
                                  consequences 
    Vecuronium        Can be used as an anesthetic in infants        Could leave infant fatigued‐
                                                                          difficulty feeding 
    Levocarnitine    Treats carnitine deficiency. L‐carnitine       Can lead to N/V and diarrhea 
                     and its derivates play an important role 
                      in myocardial energy production (3) 
          
          
          


                                                                                         3
Kait Fortunato                                                                    May 2011 

    12. Pertinent Lab Values: 
           a.  
Lab                    Normal Range              5/14        5/17            5/19 
Calcium                8‐11                      9.3         8.2             8.2 
(mg/dL) 
Magnesium              1.5‐2.2                   1.9         1.4             1.4 
(mg/dL) 
Free Carnitine         10‐28                     11.3        14.3            X 
(mcmol/L 
Total Carnitine        15‐300                    29.01       24.8            X 
(mcmol/L) 
           b. Nutritional Significance: Mg deficiency can result from 
              malabsorption/decreased feeds. Hypocalcaemia is often secondary to 
              hypomagnesaemia. Both calcium and magnesium are commonly 
              decreased in infants with cardiovascular problems. Magnesium can 
              continue to decrease at pt is unable to grow at necessary rate as well 
              as a result of refeeding syndrome. Carnitine levels can be low due to 
              metabolic or genetic reasons. RBC transfusion can also cause false 
              positive fatty oxidation profile. Carnitine is essential for the transfer of 
              long‐chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane for 
              subsequent beta‐oxidation (2). 
            
Assessment: 
    1. Nutrition Risk Level: High 
           a. Justification: Pt is high risk due to increased energy needs, decreased 
              weight trend, and NPO x3 days at initial assessment. 
    2. Pertinent Lab Values: 
           a. Mg deficiency can be related to inadequate macro/micro nutrient 
              intake. Supplement can be given to infants if status does not improve. 
              Mg deficiency can lead to decreased calcium levels. Mg is necessary 
              for organ function of the heart, kidneys, and muscles and helps 
              regulate calcium, potassium, vitamin D, copper, and zinc levels. 
    3. IV fluids: Pt was receiving IV fluids during intubation and NPO status for 
       hydration purposes. 
    4. Growth: 
           a. Rate of weight change: pt weight decreased 27 grams in 1 week 
              following birth. Pt’s weight continued to decrease160 grams x 3 days 
              following this initial assessment. Pt’s weight did trend up 26grams in 



                                                                                         4
Kait Fortunato                                                                 May 2011 

              2 days, however this is slower than goal weight gain and pt still not at 
              birth weight at day 12.  
           b. Appropriateness of growth: Decline in weight expected due to medical 
              condition, difficulty feeding, and NPO status. Weight gain began day 
              10‐day 12.  
           c. Justification: Slow rate of weight gain. Goal is for pt to gain 25‐
              35gm/day. 
    5. Diet Prior to Admission: 
           a. Adequacy of macro/micro nutrients: Pt not receiving adequate 
              nutrition. Pt having difficulty feeding and was at risk due to increased 
              calorie needs. Pt’s weight declining on growth curve.  Pt admitted to 
              hospital 27 grams decreased birth weight. 
           b. Adequacy of fluid: Though pt’s mother unable to provide exact 
              amounts of feeds, suspect deficient fluid intake due to difficulty 
              feeding and decrease in weight. 
           c. Appropriateness of supplements: N/A pt was receiving Enfamil as 
              primary source of nutrition, not as supplement. 
           d. Contribution of supplements to overall intake: N/A 
           e. Justification: Patient’s diet prior to admission inadequate due to 
              difficulty feeding, decrease in weight, and increased energy needs 
              secondary to respiratory distress and left ventricular dystrophy. 
    6. Diet Order:  
          Initial Assessment 5/14: Pt NPO. Recommendations needed to cover all 
           options depending on hospital course of the patient.  Recommendations 
           include: 
              o If pt to remain NPO for more than 2‐3 days initiate central 
                parenteral nutrition with GIR: 4‐6mg/kg/min, 2.5 gms/kg protein, 
                and 1 gm/kg lipids. Advance GIR daily by 2 mg/kg/min to goal of 
                10‐12mg/kg/min and advance lipids daily by 1gm/kg to goal of 2‐
                3gm/kg. Goal of 0‐85 kcals/kg while intubated on TPN. 
              o In enteral feeds desired while intubated initiate feeds of Similac 
                Advance 20kcal/oz at 2ml per hour and advance by 2ml q 12 
                hours to goal of 20 ml/hr to provide 93kcals/kg and 139ml/kg 
                fluid.  
              o If pt extubated: initiate PO ad lib feeds of Similac Advance 
                20kcal/oz q 3 hours with goal intake of 120kcals/kg/day. 




                                                                                      5
Kait Fortunato                                                              May 2011 


          Follow Up Assessment 5/17: Pt extubated/Diet order initiated 5/16: 
           Similac Advance 20 kcal/oz 65 ml Q 3 hours PO/NG gavage; remainder 
           through NG tube over 60 minutes.  
          Follow Up Assessment 5/19: NG tube removed 5/18 for full PO trial. 
           Continue Similac Advance 20kcal/oz PO ad lib ml Q 3 hours. Goal is 65 ml 
           at each feed. 
          Prior to Discharge (5/21): 2 days prior to discharge, pt was meeting 96% 
           estimated energy needs via oral feedings. 
           a. Adequacy of macro/micro nutrients: At goal rate, pt would receive 94 
              kcal/kg and 1.9gm/kg protein. (Calculated using BW 3.7 kg). 
              Micronutrient needs would be met with goal rate of formula and 
              multivitamin. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve 
              cardiac function (3).  Increased free radical formation and reduced 
              antioxidant defenses found in patients with heart failure can result 
              from a combination of insufficient dietary intake and excessive 
              utilization of specific antioxidants without adequate recycling or 
              replacement. These patients require correction of vitamin/mineral 
              deficiencies (2).  
           b. Adequacy of fluid: At goal rate pt would receive 140ml/kg fluid. 
              (Calculated using BW 3.7 kg). 
           c. Appropriateness of supplements: N/A pt not taking supplements 
           d. Contribution of supplements to overall intake: N/A 
           e. Justification: At goal rate pt would meet estimated needs for protein 
              and fluid. Calories would be slightly below estimated needs however 
              we do not want to concentrate formula at this time because pt is not 
              meeting necessary volume of fluid intake.  
    7. Accuracy of data available: 
           a. The available data in the chart was accurate to the best of the author’s 
              knowledge. 
Plan/Goals: 
    1. Oral Nutrition: Continue Similac Advance 20kcal/oz Q 3 hours. Goal is 65 ml 
       at each feed.  Goal intake of 353 ml total/day to meet maintenance fluids. Add 
       1 ml/day tri‐vi‐sol to meet daily micronutrient requirements. 
    2. Enteral Nutrition: If patient does not meet kcal and fluid needs, would 
       recommend NG tube be replaced to provide feeds PO/NG gavage. 
    3. Parenteral Nutrition: N/A Pt with PO/NG feeds only 




                                                                                       6
Kait Fortunato                                                              May 2011 

    4. Labs/Studies: Continue to monitor Mg/Ca deficiency. No intervention needed 
       at this time. 
    5. Growth: regain birth weight by 2 weeks of age. Goal is 25‐35 gm/day average 
       weight gain once pt reaches BW. Check weekly length and HC to assess 
       growth trends. 
    6. Additional: Consult speech therapy to determine PO feeding ability. 
           a. SLP consult completed the afternoon following assessment. Per Mom‐
              pt feeding better in past 24 hours since birth, immediate latch and 
              suck without difficulty. SLP recommends not feeding longer than 30 
              mins at a time. Recommend feeding every 2 hours. Mom denies 
              difficulty with feeds at this time. 
    7. Follow Up: Will continue to follow weight status and monitor intake to 
       provide updated nutrition recommendations. Determine need for 
       concentrated formula and/or NG tube replacements depending on PO 
       feeding ability.  
    8. Justification: It was the nutrition’s best judgment that pt would benefit from 
       slightly increased estimated needs due to medical condition, decrease in 
       weight, and difficulty feeding. Growth problems can lead to further 
       complications that may directly or indirectly impact on heart function, 
       leading to a vicious downward cycle (3). Concentrating the formula was not 
       appropriate at this time because pt needed to obtain goal for maintenance 
       fluid, which would help the pt meet kcal/protein needs. If the patient 
       continued to have poor feeds, nutrition support would be indicated over a 
       concentrated formula. Speech consult recommended due to pt’s varied intake 
       volumes and different nipples used for feeds at home and in the hospital. 
       Since pt was NPO and not eating well prior to admission, SLP needed to 
       determine if pt capable of adequate intake via oral route.  Similac formula 
       recommended because it contains Lutein, an important nutrient found in 
       breast milk, is critical for infant development, had prebiotics for digestive 
       health, and supports excellent calcium absorption. Similac Advance is also 
       provided to WIC patients, and if patient’s family ever needed support from 
       this organization, it would be predetermined if the patient could tolerate this 
       formula.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


                                                                                     7
Kait Fortunato                                                                May 2011 

References: 
 
1.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2011). WHO Growth Charts United 
States. http://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/who_charts.htm. 
 
2.) Cristina Amat di San Filippo, Matthew R. G. Taylor, Luisa Mestroni, Lorenzo D. 
Botto, and Nicola Longo (2008). Cardiomyopathy and Carnitine Deficiency. Mol 
Genet Metab. 94(2): 162–166. doi:10.1016 
 
3.) Miller Tracie L., Neri Daniela, Extein Jason, Sombarriba Gabriel, Strickman‐Stein 
Nancy (2007). Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy. Prog Pediatr Cardiol. 24(1): 
59–71. 
 
4.) Pediatric Nutrition Reference Guide, 8th Edition (2008). Texas Children’s Hospital.  
 
5.) Seelig, Mildred (1980). Magnesium Deficiency in the Pathogenesis of Disease. 
Goldwater Memorial Hospital, NYU Medical Center. Part 1, Ch 4. 
 




                                                                                       8

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:14
posted:8/8/2011
language:English
pages:8