University of St Thomas 2010 Self-Study

Document Sample
University of St  Thomas 2010 Self-Study Powered By Docstoc
					Transmittal Page
Internship Programs: Self-Study Report for 2010
Note: Please include all required signatures

X Currently Accredited (3 copies)                           Date Submitted: January 1, 2010

Program Name: Pre-Doctoral Internship in Professional Psychology
Department Name: Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center
Institution/Agency Name: University of St. Thomas
Location (City/State): St. Paul, MN.

Is the internship program part of a consortium?  X No        Yes
If Yes, list all affiliates, including addresses and a contact person for each site: NA
Date of last site visit: Jan 30-31, 2003          Number of interns in program this year: 3

Is the program seeking concurrent accreditation with the Canadian Psychological Association?
X No         Yes

The program is invoking Footnote 41: X No                                Yes


PROGRAM CONTACT INFORMATION: The following information will be used to update
our database. The individuals listed will receive copies of important program correspondence
(i.e., site visit reports, decision letters). Please add the contact information for any other
individuals who should receive such correspondence (i.e., co-directors, accreditation directors,
etc). Signatures indicate that the self-study has been approved for submission and serve as an
invitation to conduct a site visit to the program.

Program Director:                   Sarah K. Armstrong, Psy.D., L.P.
                                                                       (Signature)
Credential and Jurisdiction of Director of Training, i.e., licensed, registered or certified:
                         Minnesota Licensed Psychologist, LP # 3284
Title:                   Director of Training

Full Mailing Address:               Sarah K. Armstrong, M.B.A., Psy.D., L.P
                                    Personal Counseling and Testing
                                    University of St. Thomas
                                    2115 Summit Avenue, Mail # 4040
                                    St. Paul, MN. 55105

Phone Number:                       651-962-6780 Fax: 652-962-6775
Email Address:                      skarmstrong@stthomas.edu


Chief Psychologist/Dept Head: Geraldine M. Rockett, Ph.D., L.P.                                              ______________
                                                                                               (Signature)
1
    See Footnote 4 under Domain D regarding policies of religiously-affiliated institutions.
                                                                     1
Title:                  Director, Personal Counseling and Testing

Full Mailing Address: Geraldine M. Rockett, Ph.D.
                      Personal Counseling and Testing
                      University of St. Thomas
                      2115 Summit Avenue, Mail # 4040
                      St. Paul, MN. 55105

Phone Number:           651-962-6780 Fax: 651-962-6775
Email Address:          gmrockett@stthomas.edu

Dean of Students:       Karen M. Lange, M.S. _____________________________
                                                     (Signature)
Title:                  Dean of Students

Full Mailing Address:   Karen M. Lange, M.S.
                        University of St. Thomas
                        2115 Summit Avenue, Mail # MHC 101
                        St. Paul, MN. 55105

Phone Number:           6521-962-6050
Email Address:          kmlange@stthomas.edu


Vice President, Student Affairs: Jane W. Canney, MAIR, M.A. _____________________________
                                                             (Signature)
Title:                Vice President for Student Affairs

Full Mailing Address:   Jane W. Canney, M.A.
                        University of St. Thomas
                        2115 Summit Avenue, Mail # MHC 151
                        St. Paul, MN. 55105

Phone Number:           651-962-6120
Email Address:          jwcanney@stthomas.edu


Institution/Agency Vice President: Mark C. Dienhart, Ph.D.     _____________________________
                                                            (Signature or that of designee*)
Title:                  Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer

Full Mailing Address: Mark C. Dienhart, Ph.D.
                      University of St. Thomas
                      2115 Summit Avenue, Mail # AQU 121
                      St. Paul, MN. 55105

Phone Number:           651-962-6920

                                             2
Email Address:          mcdienhart@stthomas.edu


Institution/Agency President/CEO: Rev. Dennis J. Dease
                                                                 (Signature or that of designee*)
Title:                  President

Full Mailing Address:   Reverend Dennis J. Dease
                        University of St. Thomas
                        2115 Summit Avenue, Mail # AQU 100
                        St. Paul, MN. 55105

Phone Number:           651-962-6500
Email Address:          djdease@stthomas.edu

*If signed by designee, provide the full name of that individual in addition to the name of the
person for whom he/she signed.




                                                 3
                                   Domain A: Eligibility
 As a prerequisite for accreditation, the program’s purpose must be within the scope of
 the accrediting body and must be pursued in an institutional setting appropriate for the
                  education and training of professional psychologists.

1. The program offers internship education and training in psychology, one goal of
which is to prepare students for the practice of professional psychology.

X      Review Implementing Regulations C-10 and C-14.

X      State the program goal (s) describing training in the practice of
       professional psychology.

Personal Counseling and Testing and the Career Development Center at the University of St.
Thomas have a long-standing commitment to training in professional psychology. Starting with a
counseling practicum in 1984, a formal internship was developed in 1992 and was fully
accredited by the American Psychological Association in 1995.

The internship has three broad goals: 1) facilitation of interns' development into confident,
competent, ethical psychologists who are able to empower their clients and colleagues, 2)
provide a comprehensive, sequential experience that will integrate knowledge acquired through
formal academic training and practice and will prepare the intern for a generalist entry-level
professional psychologist position, and 3) provide the opportunity for interns to participate
extensively in all operational phases of a university counseling center. See Table 1 (pps. 83-84)
for additional information and objectives relating to these goals.

The University of St. Thomas pre-doctoral internship trains interns in accordance with a
practitioner-scholar model. As practitioners, interns learn to apply and integrate knowledge of
current clinical and counseling practices grounded in evidence-based literature. Our internship
has a dual focus on both clinical training and professional growth, and in a supportive, collegial
atmosphere, we provide an environment in which we expect interns to stretch, take risks, and
grow. We provide a comprehensive, sequential experience that will prepare the intern for the role
of entry level or junior psychologist. We provide the opportunity for interns to develop
programs, and to participate in evaluation. We assist interns‟ development as balanced
professionals, with a respect for lifelong learning and professional contributions to the field of
psychology. We expect interns will make significant developmental transitions during the year,
including the consolidation of a professional identity, enhancing confidence in their skills and
increasing their ability to function autonomously.

X      Describe the mission of the sponsoring agency. For consortia programs,
       please describe the mission of each of the sponsoring agencies.

Personal Counseling and Testing is the primary mental health resource for the University of St.
Thomas. The mission of Personal Counseling and Testing is "to provide comprehensive
psychological services to the UST community; to support the University's mission in its
commitment to the total development of the student; to create a learning environment where our
                                                 4
clients and staff feel safe, respected and valued; and to facilitate the process of developing a
balanced and healthy lifestyle including care for self and others”. Personal counseling services
are also offered through the Life Work Center (LWC), located on our Minneapolis campus. The
LWC provides special services and resources to meet the unique needs of graduate students,
education students (both graduate and undergraduate), and alumni/ae.

The mission of our Career Development Center is to provide “state of the art, quality career
education to University of St. Thomas students and community”. By providing expertise,
resources and support, Career Development Center facilitates student learning in the areas of
self-knowledge, world of work information, job search skills and career decision-making,
valuing the uniqueness of each individual and trusting his or her ability to choose rewarding
vocational and career paths.

Personal Counseling and Testing, Career Development Center and the LWC are integral parts of
the Division of Student Affairs. The mission of the Division of Student Affairs is to support the
broader mission of the University of St. Thomas by creating holistic educational environments
that prepare students to live, learn, and contribute to our intercultural society.

2. The program is sponsored by an institution or agency, which has among its primary
functions the provision of service to a population of recipients sufficient in number and
variability to provide interns with adequate experiential exposure to meet its training
purposes, goals, and objectives.

X      Describe the characteristics and size of the populations served. If the
       training takes place in more than one setting, describe the multiple
       settings, their service recipient populations and the types of training
       experiences offered in each setting. For consortia programs please
       describe separately the characteristics and size of the population served
       by each of the institutions or agencies in the consortium and the types of
       training experiences offered in each setting.

The University of St. Thomas (UST) is the largest private university in the Upper Midwest, with
an enrollment of approximately 11,000 students. It is Minnesota‟s largest independent college or
university, and the 16th largest non-profit organization in the state. UST is ranked in the third tier
of the national university-doctoral category. In the fall of 2009, there were approximately 6,146
undergraduate students and 4,700 graduate students, with the majority of undergraduate students
attending the St. Paul campus (where Personal Counseling and Testing, Career Development
Center and the pre-doctoral internship are physically located) and the majority of graduate
students attending the Minneapolis campus, a 15-minute shuttle ride away. The university
maintains a liberal arts focus while providing career-oriented education in 96 undergraduate
majors, 58 minors, and 46 degree programs, including 39 master‟s, two education specialist, one
juris doctor and four doctoral programs. Our students come from over 46 states and 35 foreign
countries.

From data gathered in the fall of 2009, students who identify as white comprised 80 percent of
our student population. Ethnicity of our students includes: Asian (4.6%), Black/Non-Hispanic
(3.8%), Hispanic (2.8%), and Native American or American Indian or Alaskan Native (0.2%),
                                                  5
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (.03%), and individuals who identify with two or more
races (1.6%). Race/ethnicity of 4.4% of our students is unknown (students did not identify a race
or ethnicity on demographic information form). Two point seven percent of our students hail
from countries outside the United States.

The focus of Personal Counseling and Testing is to provide individual and group counseling and
psychotherapy to students, staff, and faculty on personal issues to aid in the resolution of
personal problems and crises. Personal Counseling and Testing also provides outreach and
consultation services to the university community on a variety of issues pertinent to personal
growth and development. Individuals come to us with concerns such as depression, anxiety, bi-
polar disorder, relationship issues, eating disorders, abuse, sexuality issues, problems with
alcohol and drugs, stress management, self-esteem issues, family problems, ADHD, existential
issues, and Axis II issues. Data collected in 2009 indicated that 55.8% of personal counseling
clients identified relationships as one of their presenting concerns, 55.6% indicated problems
with anxiety, 46% identified depression, 36.2% stated self-esteem issues, 30.6% had academic
concerns, 29.2% indicated career uncertainty, 27.8% endorsed stress and psychosomatic
symptoms, 13.8% presented with existential concerns, 12.4% endorsed anger management
issues, 11.6% indicated eating disorders, 10.8% had grief and loss issues, 10.6% had substance
abuse problems, 6.4% indicated sexual abuse or harassment, 4.6% presented with sexuality
issues, 1.8% with sexual identity concerns, and 0.4% of students seen presented with concerns
about sexual behavior.

The Career Development Center offers individual counseling, seminars and a variety of
resources to assist in the following areas: vocational testing and self-assessment; major and
career choice and change; internship opportunities; resume and job search skills; interviewing
skills and coaching; information on specific careers and employers; and work adjustment
concerns. A job-search support group is offered to graduating seniors each summer.

While students with academic difficulties or disabilities are among the students we serve, they
also receive support through two departments within Academic Affairs: Academic Advising and
the Enhancement Program. Our offices have a solid history of working closely with one another.

X      Refer to your response above regarding the characteristics and size of the
       population served. Identify any barriers and how your trainees have
       overcome these barriers to meet the program’s training goals and
       objectives for adequate experiential exposure to number and variability of
       population served.

Since our last site visit, Personal Counseling and Testing has enjoyed a steady supply of students
seeking therapeutic services, crisis intervention and assessment, and our requests for outreach
and consultation services have grown as a result of increased visibility of the counseling center
campus-wide. Interns are afforded the same opportunities as senior staff in terms of client
assignments, and are given preference for groups facilitated and outreach presentations provided.

As early as their orientation, interns are introduced to University offices that serve students from
under-represented populations with the goals of helping interns understand the unique concerns
of these students as well as promoting the utilization of our interns for programming through
                                                 6
these offices. Efforts are made to ensure that interns are assigned clients from under-represented
populations and that they have opportunities to provide outreach services to these groups.
Additional avenues allowing interns exposure to serving under-represented populations include
an annual day-long workshop produced by state-wide pre-doctoral internship training directors
on multicultural training, and presentations focusing on special populations in the weekly intern
seminar program (e.g. Working with Clients with Disabilities. See Appendix J for additional
information). During the 2008-2009 year, 19.8% of Personal Counseling and Testing clients
identified their race as other than European-American and .6% identified as international
students. This exceeds the rate of students of color within the university‟s population (14.5%)
and is somewhat lower than the international student rate (2.7%). A comparison of the ethnicity
of UST students as compared to students served by Personal Counseling (in bold) is as follows:
Asian (4.6%) 7.1%, Black/Non-Hispanic (3.8%) 3.5% , Hispanic (2.8%) 3.7%, and Native
American or American Indian (0.2%) 0.8%. These data illustrate that greater percentages of
ethnic minority clients seek personal counseling services than would be expected given the
overall ethnic makeup of the university. Of students seen at Personal Counseling and Testing 3.4
% identify as LGBT on their intake forms. We know that LBGT status is likely underreported, as
significantly more clients identify as LGBT in session, including students who identified
themselves as “heterosexual” or didn‟t report any orientation on their intake forms. Personal
Counseling and Testing does not solicit data on the number of students with disabilities. Hence,
it is safe to predict that close to 25% of students served in the counseling center come from
diverse and under-represented groups.

Career counseling services have changed in nature since the time of our last site visit, with fewer
students seeking individual counseling appointments and more students preferring and using
single session interventions. As a result of an internal survey conducted in 2006 examining
utilization of Career Development Center services (Appendix V), it was determined to offer
several “pop-in” hours (drop-in career services typically focused on resume or cover letter
review and critique) each week as a substitute for individual appointment openings, which often
went unfilled. Interns currently offer three individual appointments (vs. the five they offered in
2002) and two hours of pop-in times. Hence, the number of career hours has not changed since
the last site visit (5 hours/week) but utilization of career services has increased, as career pop-in
times typically fill.

3. The program is an integral part of the mission of the institution in which it resides and
is represented in the institution’s operating budget and plans in a manner that enables
the program to achieve its goals and objectives.

X      Describe how the program is integral to the institution’s mission.

The University of St. Thomas‟s mission is as follows: “Inspired by Catholic intellectual tradition,
the University of St. Thomas educates students to be morally responsible leaders who think
critically, act wisely and work skillfully to advance the common good.” We seek to be a
recognized leader in Catholic higher education that excels in effective teaching, active learning,
scholarly research and responsible engagement with the local community as well as with the
national and global communities in which we live. Historically, our university has fostered a
tradition of service to the public and an energetic, thoughtful approach to the challenges of
contemporary life. Core university values include respecting the dignity of each person, and

                                                  7
fostering a caring culture that supports the value of each member. Currently the University of St.
Thomas is in the midst of a large capital campaign, with one of the goals of this fundraising
being the creation of a pool of scholarship and financial-aid resources for students of diverse
backgrounds. Our president Father Dennis Dease sees as “the greatest goal of the campaign and
[one which] speaks to our deepest roots.” (Fall, 2007).

Personal Counseling, the Career Development Center, and the Life Work Center are integral
departments of the Division of Student Affairs, whose mission is to support the broader mission
of the University and create holistic educational environments that prepare students to live, learn
and contribute our intercultural society. We are committed to the development of the whole
person through our resources, programs and collaborative efforts and through a high degree of
personal attention in a spiritually and intellectually stimulating campus environment. Our efforts
focus primarily in the following areas of student learning: Spiritual, Intellectual, Vocational,
Cultural, Emotional, Social, and Physical.
In accordance with the institutional mission of full-time student enrollment, counseling is offered
to full-time undergraduates (12 credits or more, enrolled in a degree program) and all active
graduate and professional students without a fee. Alumni are eligible for limited career
development services free of charge. The emphasis is on personal and career development
through the provision of goal-oriented and supportive services. Our roles are
educational/developmental (assessing and enhancing student potential), preventative
(anticipating, circumventing, forestalling difficulties), and remedial (assessing and remedying
problems).
The University and the Division of Student Affairs have a strong commitment both to Personal
Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center and to our training program. As the
mental health resource on campus, Personal Counseling and Testing strongly supports the
university‟s mission of service to our community (students, faculty, staff), our public (via
consultation and outreach services to our university and surrounding communities), our
commitment to the development of the total person, and support for personal development amidst
the challenges of contemporary life. Providing therapeutic counseling services supports spiritual,
intellectual, vocational, cultural, emotional, social and physical development. The internship
goals of developing competent, and ethical psychologists who are able to respect others and
treat them with dignity, critically examine research and work skillfully in practice, contribute to
the community, and become balanced professionals with a passion for lifelong learning are fully
compatible with the above-described UST mission. Personal Counseling and Testing is
consistent in our ongoing efforts to match with diverse interns (see Domain D) and believe that
doing so enhances the experiences of our staff and our students.
X      How does the institution ensure that the program has the resources to
       achieve its goals and objectives?

The Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center budgeting process is
implemented through the Office of the Division of Student Affairs, the central administrative
unit to which Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center report. The
internship program consistently receives an allocation of the Personal Counseling and Testing
budget and occasionally receives funds from the Career Development Center budget. Besides

                                                 8
salaries for interns and training program staff, examples of recent major financial support for the
program include purchasing Logitech webcam for monitoring/recording counseling sessions,
software for scheduling and electronic record file management (Titanium), and new ergodynamic
office chairs. Additionally, in the last seven years intern salaries have risen from $17,510 to
$25,410. Internship stipend increases have occurred regularly despite university budgetary
fluctuations that have resulted in the occasional freezing of staff salaries.

X      Describe how the program receives its budget. Consortial programs
       should describe how the program is integral to mission of each institution
       or agency and how the program receives its budget from each institution or
       agency.

We are allocated funds directly from the institutional operating budget of the division of Student
Affairs. Needs of the program are assessed and funds allocated in consultation between the
Training Director and the Director of Personal Counseling and Testing. Interns receive a stipend
of $25,410 and are eligible for two weeks of paid vacation, 12 paid holidays, and 1 paid
personal day. They have full access to numerous resources on campus, including our libraries,
health and athletic facilities and receive a small stipend (usually around $100.00) to attend local
or national professional development offerings. The Director of Training receives professional
development funds to support her attendance at the Association of Counseling Center Training
Agencies annual conference, and training staff receive professional development funds as well.

4. The program requires of each intern the equivalent of 1 year full-time training to be
completed in no less than 12 months (10 months for school psychology internships) and
no more than 24 months.

X      Review Implementing Regulation C-8.

X      The program length is (Check all that apply):

       X       One year full time, 12 months
               10 months (School Psychology)
               Part-time up to 24 months

X      Elaborate on the time commitment required of the interns. Provide a
       breakdown of the time interns spend in various activities and roles.
       Consortia programs should elaborate on the time commitment required of
       interns at each site. If your program hosts both part-time and full-time
       interns, please delineate the differences in time commitment and
       responsibilities.

The internship is a full-time, year-long, 40 hour/week commitment. Interns spend approximately
half of their time in direct service activities (individual personal and career counseling, group
counseling, supervision of doctoral practicum students, consultation and outreach and supporting
activities, including case management and supervision preparation) and half their time in indirect
service activities (supervision received, case consultation, administration, meetings and
professional development).
                                                 9
With regard to direct services, a typical week includes 10 personal counseling client hours; 2-4
hours Walk In/Crisis client hours; 3 career client hours; and 2 career pop-in hours. Case
management for all of the above is typically 2-3 hours/week. Counseling groups are typically
one hour in length, supervision provided (and preparation for that supervision) to practicum
students is 2 hours (minimum), and outreach and consultation activities range anywhere from 0-2
hours/week, depending on interns schedules.

A weekly breakdown of indirect service hours includes 2.5 hours/week of individual case
supervision plus 1 hour of preparation for that supervision; 2 hours of group supervision; 2.5
hours of group case consultation; 2-3 hours of professional development; 1.5 hours for intern
seminar; 1 hour for a group check-in meeting with the training director; and up to 2 hours of
administration and/or meetings.

     5. The program engages in actions that indicate respect for and understanding of
     cultural and individual diversity2. This is reflected in the program’s policies for the
     recruitment, retention, and development of staff and interns and in didactic and
     experiential training that fosters an understanding of cultural and individual diversity
     as they relate to professional psychology. The program has nondiscriminatory
     policies and operating conditions and avoids any actions that would restrict program
     access on grounds that are irrelevant to success in an internship or the profession.

X         Provide in Domain D the description of actions that indicate respect for and
          understanding of cultural and individual diversity and the program’s policies for
          the recruitment, retention, and development of staff and interns and in didactic
          and experiential training that fosters an understanding of cultural and individual
          diversity as they relate to professional psychology.

X         In the table below, reference the program’s policies that indicate
          nondiscriminatory practices and demonstrate avoidance of any actions
          that would restrict program access on grounds that are irrelevant to
          success in an internship or the profession.

6. The program adheres to and makes available to all interested parties formal written
policies and procedures that govern intern selection; practicum and academic
preparation requirements; administrative and financial assistance; intern performance
evaluation; feedback, advisement, retention and termination; and due process and
grievance procedures for interns and training staff. It complies with other policies and
procedures of the sponsor institution that pertain to staff and interns’ rights,
responsibilities, and personal development.




2
  See Domain A, Section 5 of Accreditation Guidelines and Principles for Doctoral Graduate Programs: Throughout this document,
the phrase “cultural and individual diversity” refers to diversity with regard to personal and demographic characteristics. These
include, but are not limited to, age, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, language, national origin, race, religion, culture,
sexual orientation, and social economic status.
                                                                    10
X      In the table below, provide page references for the following program
       policies (not self-study narrative text) that can be located within the
       program’s written documents in the appendices of the self-study.

       PLEASE NOTE: The items below refer to program-level policies and
       procedures (i.e., those provided in an intern training handbook). Those
       procedures should be provided in hard-copy with the self-study. If in
       addition to these program-level policies there are more general institutional
       or agency policies and procedures in place, it is acceptable to provide the
       appropriate webpage/URL address, with page numbers or instructions on
       how to find the specific policy.


                                    Policy Item                                             Page #(s)
Intern selection    (Appendix A: Web brochure – application page)                           116
Practica and academic preparation requirements                                              115-116
(Web brochure – application page)
Administrative assistance (clerical and technical support, etc) No formal policy            NA
Financial assistance (may include benefits)                                                 117
(Web brochure – stipend and benefits page)
Intern performance evaluation, feedback, advisement, retention, minimal                     204-
requirements (Appendix B: Training Manual, section IV)                                      225
Intern termination (Training manual, Section V)                                             260, #4 and
                                                                                            5
Due process (Training manual, section V)                                                    257-259
Grievance procedures (Training manual, section V)                                           260-262,
                                                                                            268-270
Statement of nondiscrimination (Web brochure,                                               116
http://www.stthomas.edu/hr/policies/manual/default.html)
Other relevant institutional policies with which the program is required to comply          264-267
(specify) http://www.stthomas.edu/hr/policies/manual/files/sexualHarassment.pdf,
http://www.stthomas.edu/hr/policies/manual/files/sexualViolence.pdf

X   (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain A issues in
    your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the last
    review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
    reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
    summary of those issues here in the narrative):

There were no domain A issues noted in our last decision letter or other correspondence since
our last review.

               ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain A

Provide the information requested on the Transmittal Page and in Table 1.


                                               11
Include as appendices public materials on your host or sponsor institution, training
program publicity and other program related material (brochures, letters, program
manuals, handbooks, formal institutional policy and procedure memoranda, etc.,)
describing intern recruitment and selection procedures; prior preparation and other
admission requirements; program completion requirements; performance evaluation
and feedback, conflict/grievance resolution, advisement, retention and termination
policies and procedures, interns’ financial compensation and fringe benefits, etc.

     Domain B: Program Philosophy, Objectives, and Training Plan
       The program has a clearly specified philosophy of training, compatible with the
      mission of its sponsor institution and appropriate to the practice of professional
     psychology. The internship is an organized professional training program with the
    goal of providing high quality training in professional psychology. The training model
      and goals are consistent with its philosophy and objectives. The program has a
      logical training sequence that builds upon the skills and competencies acquired
                                    during doctoral training.

X      Copy and insert below the information from your public materials that
       states an explicit philosophy or model of professional training and
       education by which it intends to prepare students for the practice of
       professional psychology.

The staffs of Personal Counseling and the Career Development Center have a strong
commitment to training. We view ourselves as an organization in which all of us are both
teachers and learners. We believe training benefits our trainees, our staff, our clients, our
university and the profession of psychology. We believe that individual differences and diversity
serve as catalysts for personal and environmental development. We work in a team-based model
that values and expects participation of all staff. Interns are expected to become an integral part
of Personal Counseling and the Career Development Center staff, and are encouraged to develop
close working relationships with both Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development
Center and Student Affairs staff.

The basis of our training program is an integrated, well-planned sequence of learning
opportunities with a developmental focus. We train interns in accordance with a practitioner-
scholar model, seeking to bridge the art and science of psychology. The characteristics of such a
model are outlined thoroughly in Stricker and Trierweiler (1995) and Hoshmand and
Polkinghorne (1992). As scholars, interns are expected to learn to apply and integrate knowledge
of current clinical practices based on evidence-based literature. As practitioners, they are
expected to combine this knowledge with information gathered about their clients, which will
lead to conceptualization of the presenting concerns and formation of hypotheses. Both clinical
interventions and supervisory discussions provide means for hypothesis testing. Within a
collegial relationship with their supervisors, interns develop individualized contracts with
learning objectives.

The practitioner-scholar model is compatible with our university's mission. As our President
has stated, “UST is a comprehensive university and does not define itself as a "research"
university in terms of its mission. Our graduate degrees are mostly professional in nature and our
                                                12
doctoral degrees exclusively professional. We do not offer the Ph.D. and there are no plans to do
so. Teaching is the priority of faculty, though they are encouraged to engage the profession
through scholarship. The kind of scholarship done by faculty and students in our graduate
programs is typically more applied research than basic research. Finally, our library collections
are designed for the needs of a comprehensive university, not a research or Ph.D. - granting
institution.” (Rev. Dennis Dease, Summer, 2002).

The practice of psychology is the primary focus of the training program, and likewise the
application of scholarly theoretical and/or empirical work. While we stress the relationship
aspects of the local clinical scientist model in supervision, and apply scientific concepts to our
work with clients in this local (UST) setting, we believe that the word scholar rather than
scientist more closely describes our staff, faculty, the UST mission, training model and overall
philosophy.

The internship program has a dual focus on both clinical training and professional growth. We
expect interns will make significant developmental transitions during the year, including
consolidating a professional identity, enhancing confidence in their skills and increasing their
ability to function autonomously. We expect all interns to identify and discuss their own world
views and in turn help identify and address those of their clients. We believe people learn and
work best in a supportive, collegial atmosphere; therefore, we provide a nurturing environment
in which we expect interns to stretch, take risks and grow into confident, competent, ethical
psychologists who are able to empower clients and colleagues. In a team-based collegial
environment, we promote a balanced, healthy lifestyle and emphasize lifelong learning and
professional contribution. In providing the structure necessary for personal and professional
development (open, collegial atmosphere, intentional focus on intensive supervision and
processing time), our interns have consistently described our internship as an outstanding
environment in which to grow. While interns often seek counseling center positions as their first
employment, the training program at The University of St. Thomas is broad enough to prepare
interns well for various employment settings.

1. The program publicly states an explicit philosophy or model of professional training
and education by which it prepares students for the practice of professional psychology.
The program’s philosophy and educational model should be substantially consistent
with the mission, goals, and culture of the program’s sponsor institution. It must also be
consistent with the following two principles of the discipline:

       (a) Psychological practice is based on the science of psychology which, in turn, is
       influenced by the professional practice of psychology; and

       (b) Training for practice is sequential, cumulative, and graded in complexity.

X     Describe or insert the specific training requirements that demonstrate that
      your program curriculum is sequential, cumulative, and graded in
      complexity.

The pre-doctoral internship takes great care in introducing interns to our organization, including
its structure and its individuals. Interns begin their experience with a comprehensive, three-week
orientation (see Appendix C for 2009-2010 orientation schedule). During the first week of
                                                 13
orientation interns meet regularly, both formally and informally, with the Personal Counseling
and Testing and Career Development Center staff and become familiar with the University and
its policies and procedures. Daily meetings with the training director throughout orientation
ensure that questions and concerns are addressed promptly, thus increasing interns‟ comfort level
as they acclimate to UST. They participate in UST new employee training on benefits and
policies (including diversity training, grievance and sexual harassment policies), UST phone
training and UST computer training. They tour both our Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses,
choose their offices, and "move in".

During the second week, they orient further with the Division of Student Affairs, meeting the
directors and several staff members of the Student Affairs departments. This ensures that they
have a complete understanding of how the various departments work together, have faces to go
with names, and can begin to identify people and departments with whom they would like to
develop consultant relationships. Each intern serves as a formal consultant to one Residence Hall
and may choose to become a consultant to one Student Affairs Department. Interns meet with the
Vice President for Student Affairs, Residence Life, Dean of Students, Multicultural Student
Services, International Student Services, Student Health and Wellness Services, Campus Life,
Campus Ministry and the Life/Work Center.

During the third week, the focus of orientation is on more specific aspects of Personal
Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center, learning about our systems, procedures
and policies. All of the Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center staff
present seminars on specialty topics in areas of their interest or expertise, including overviews of
all the aspects of our career counseling model, crisis intervention, ethical issues in college
counseling centers, the Catholic culture at St. Thomas, etc. One major focus of this orientation is
assessment. Interns are given time to take each of the major assessment instruments administered
in our center (MMPI-2, MBTI Step II, CPI, Career Leader, E-Chug, AUDIT, SII, CISS). This is
followed by a preliminary seminar on each instrument to aid in their understanding of test
interpretation. Later in the year, after they've had the chance to build up their caseloads and are
using more assessments, in-depth training on several of these instruments is offered through
special intern seminars. Interns also become familiar with local resource and referral networks in
the larger Twin Cities community.

Also incorporated into the orientation is familiarization with the Intern Handbook (Appendix B).
During the course of the three weeks, interns are given time to read each section of the
handbook, and this information is reviewed with the Director of Training during daily meetings.
There are a variety of evidence-based research articles included in the manual which are read and
discussed. Interns are also given a comprehensive list of readings and resources available in our
library (see Appendix D for a list of library holdings) for their use throughout the training year.
Interns also review a current copy of the MN Board of Psychology Practice Act, and are
expected to familiarize themselves with state guidelines and principles. At the end of the 3-week
orientation, interns choose their supervisors and begin working with their consultants.

During orientation, interns complete pre-assessments (see pps. 247-253) of their personal
counseling skills, as well as career counseling, group counseling, consultation/outreach, and
supervision skills. The coordinator of each of these core competencies also conducts an informal
assessment of each intern‟s knowledge and skill level either during or immediately after the
                                                 14
Intern Orientation. This information is used by the training staff to ascertain both the group and
individual needs of the interns, and is then used to help plan both group and individual training
experiences. Interns then develop their learning contracts with their supervisors to ensure they
have experiences that will help them move sequentially from their current ability to expected and
desired levels of competence. Each semester‟s experiences build on the previous semester's work
and provide opportunities for interns to develop and refine increasingly sophisticated skills in
each competency area. All training assignments are based on interns‟ competence and interest.
As the year progresses, interns take on an increasing level of responsibility for each competency
area; for example, they see a broader range of clients, provide consultations on their own, and
move toward leadership in therapy groups. A detailed summary of the specific training
requirements that demonstrate that our program curriculum is sequential, cumulative, and graded
in complexity is listed below for each of our competency areas.

Personal counseling:
During orientation, interns review the basics of intake and diagnostic assessment and become
familiar with our policies for writing up intakes and case notes and managing files. Caseloads are
built up gradually, beginning with a few clients and moving to a full caseload of 10 personal
counseling clients weekly. Pre-assessments of skills serve as guides for learning goals in interns‟
learning contracts, and are formulated with both the Director of Training and the individual
personal counseling supervisor. Typically, interns do not see overly challenging cases until they
are established and comfortable working with such populations. For example, if, during an
intake, it becomes evident that the client has a severe personality disorder or a history of suicide
attempts, interns are encouraged and supported to make decisions congruent with their comfort
levels and to refer the client to a senior staff member if they desire. They are not required to
formalize a diagnosis or create a treatment plan until after they have consulted with their
supervisors, and are given at least 3 weeks for intake and assessment of their clients.

Interns receive two hours per week of individual supervision on their personal counseling cases,
and two hours of group supervision in the format of case consultation with staff. Sample
treatment plans and reference books on treatment planning are provided for interns to review and
use. Interns are required to be active participants in personal case consultation meetings:
however, senior staff provide interns with a written template for presenting cases and model how
to do so before expecting this behavior. Intern seminars on Personal Counseling issues begin
with general topics and move to specific treatment strategies for specific disorders, including
empirically supported treatments. Interns work with their supervisors closely (2 hours of face-to
face supervision per week, plus an "open door" culture of consultation), watching videotaped
samples of the intern's work while discussing case conceptualization, treatment planning,
therapeutic techniques and interventions, and therapy process issues. These activities are
discussed at length initially, and as each semester progresses, there is a shift to more
sophisticated supervision (issues of process, transference/countertransference, etc. and less focus
on the micro-skills of counseling).

Throughout the experience, issues of multiculturalism, assessment, crisis intervention and
professional ethics are woven into case conceptualizations in individual and group supervision.
These activities are consistent with the goals of the personal counseling competency, which are
outlined in Question 2 below. A visual representation of our core competencies can be found in
Appendix F.
                                                 15
Career counseling work begins with a thorough overview of the Career Development Center's
Model (see Appendix F) and its resources. This is followed by workshops during orientation on
the overlap between personal and career counseling, formal assessment (SII, CISS, MBTI,
Career Leader), an introduction to career technology on campus, current trends in employment,
resume and career letter writing, approaches to the job search, interview coaching and mock
interviewing and negotiating salary and job offers. As in personal counseling, interns build up
their caseloads gradually, beginning with a few clients and moving to a full caseload of three
career clients and two drop-in hours weekly. Learning goals for career counseling are set using
the Career Pre-assessment of skills and are formulated with both the Director of Training and the
individual career counseling supervisor.

Interns meet with their career supervisors for one hour of face-to-face supervision every other
week throughout the year. They attend and, after the first month, present their cases at monthly
career case consultation meetings.

Each intern is expected to present one formal career assessment battery and one multicultural
client case to the career staff during the course of the year. Again, these activities are consistent
with the goals of the career counseling competency, outlined in question 2 below.

Group counseling work at PC and Career Development Center begins during orientation with a
history of group counseling at UST, and the value of groups. Typically, interns are given a
choice in what kind of group they would like to co-lead, and encouraged to team up with a senior
staff person of their choosing to begin conceptualizing and marketing their group. They meet
every other week for Group Supervision seminar and are expected to complete assigned readings
prior to supervision, and to come prepared to discuss them (see Appendix G for Group
Supervision syllabus). During the first few months, the focus of seminars is on general theories
of group therapy, pre-screening, interviewing, starting a group, and initial stages of group
development. Interns watch a series of videotapes (Yalom, Understanding of Group
Psychotherapy Series, Volume 1) and discuss these with the group supervisor and each other. As
the semester progresses and interns are "up and running" with groups, supervision shifts to a
combination of reviewing and discussing live intern video-tapes of group counseling work with
scholarly reading and discussion. Process issues, along with co-leadership issues, are discussed
regularly. Second semester shifts to a focus on the working stages of groups and termination
issues, and requires a more formal case presentation to the seminar group. During spring
semester, interns are encouraged to co-lead with one another rather than a senior staff person,
and depending on the size of the group, may lead alone if they wish.

Consistent with trends in small to mid-sized universities, our center has experienced a decrease
in the number of groups filled despite an increase and variation of group offerings, a deliberate
and thoughtful response to a group needs assessment, and substantially improved marketing
efforts. Frequently filled groups include Eating Concerns/Body Image groups, Grief and Loss
groups, General Issues counseling groups, and Interpersonal Relationships groups. Additionally,
interns co-facilitate a support group for incoming students of color each summer, and have the
option to co-facilitate a job-search support group. These activities are in concert with the goals
for the group work competency listed in question 2 below: " Interns are expected to demonstrate
an ability to effectively lead process and psycho-educational groups through the various stages of
                                                  16
group development and exhibit an understanding of significant issues of group work, such as
pre-group screening, leader issues, the value of groups, and process issues".

Multicultural and Diversity Issues permeate all aspects of our training program. Interns are
expected to be sensitive to and value the richness of diversity in age, gender, ethnicity, race,
religion and spirituality, socioeconomic status, culture, sexual orientation and differing abilities.
They are expected to translate these into culturally relevant interventions with students and
consultees. During their orientation, interns review the APA Guidelines for Providers of
Psychological Services to Ethnic, Linguistic and Culturally Diverse Populations (Appendix B,
Section X, p. 10. 381), and take a self-assessment of their multicultural counseling competencies
(Arredondo et. al, 1996). Multicultural and international students comprise the majority of
diverse clientele seen in our counseling center, so presentations by the staff from Multicultural
Student Services and International Student Services are included as part of intern orientation.
Additionally, readings on counseling diverse populations are included in the training manual and
discussed during orientation (e.g. APA Division 44 Guidelines for Psychotherapy with Lesbian,
Gay and Bisexual Clients, ACPA Commission for Career Development Newsletter Career
Counseling with Gay and Lesbian, and Bi-sexual Persons: an under-served population). Our
library is rich with current journal articles related to multicultural counseling (see Appendix D
for listings) for interns' use throughout the year. Since the dominant culture at UST is White Irish
Catholic, we have interns read a chapter from Ethnicity and Family Therapy by Monica
McGoldrick entitled "Irish Families", which helps interns further their understanding of this
culture. They also attend orientation sessions on issues specific to working within a Catholic
culture (see Domain A, question 5), and receive training in the use of spirituality in counseling.
Interns attend a full day of training each October with other interns from APA-Accredited
Internship sites in MN, the focus of which is ethnic and racial diversity and multiculturalism.

The intern seminars have a focus on multicultural issues as well, including but not limited to:
Culture Sharing, Counseling Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Clients, Increasing Self-
Awareness around Disability Issues, and Counseling Clients with Disabilities (see Appendix J
for a listing of current seminars offered). Since issues of diversity permeate all aspects of our
work, there are frequent discussions on these issues in supervision and consultations with staff
both inside and outside of the center, with the goal of enhancing relationships with clients and
developing relevant and appropriate interventions. With their individual supervisors and the
Training Director, interns prepare two formal case presentations on multicultural and diverse
clients during the year. They are required to present these case presentations along with a written
summary of the case, highlighting what they have learned through working with diverse clients.
In the summer months, interns co-lead a support group for incoming students of color as part of
the REAL program, whose mission is to provide students of color with the resources they need to
have a successful university experience.

Supervision goals require that interns assume responsibility for supervising advanced practicum
students from local doctoral programs, including: assessment of counseling skills development,
establishing developmental goals and giving appropriate feedback on counseling, multicultural,
ethical and interpersonal issues. As with all the competency areas, there is a complete overview
during orientation of how supervision of practicum students proceeds at St. Thomas, and again,
interns develop goals for this competency using the Supervision Self-Assessment of Skills and in
concert with the coordinator of Supervision and the Training Director. They meet with both the
                                                 17
Practicum coordinator and the Supervision coordinator before practicum students arrive on
campus, and are assigned a student to work with.

Each week, interns spend one hour in supervision with their students, and are allowed another
hour to review tapes of their supervisee's work and to sign off on all casenotes. All supervision
sessions are taped, and are regularly discussed in a one and one-half hour weekly Supervision of
Supervision Seminar. The focus of these meetings is to address supervisor learning needs and
developmental issues. In addition, interns are in turn expected to assess and develop the
practicum student's counseling skills (including goal-setting, interventions, etc.), and learn how
to effectively communicate feedback on both counseling strengths and areas for growth.
Multicultural and diversity issues, professional and ethical issues, and the supervision
relationship are paramount in these discussions. Also included in the seminar are reviews of
predominant theories and models of supervision, and how these may apply in clinical work (see
Appendix H for current supervision syllabus).

Consultation and Outreach: Our interns‟ experience and expertise in consultation and outreach
activities are assessed in the first meeting with the Consultation coordinator, typically during the
first few days of orientation. Interns can highlight those activities and opportunities at UST that
best fit their occupational goals and interests. This information is used to plan and refine
subsequent training sessions. Also at this time, the coordinator reviews the basics of delivering
an effective outreach presentation. Interns also develop a consultant relationship with one
Residence Hall on campus, and are expected to provide crisis intervention, outreach and
consultation programs for that hall as requested. Outreach and consultation projects (e.g.
Depression Screening Day, planning and consulting for other departments both within and
outside of Student Affairs, giving talks on mental health issues in the classroom), are observed
by the Consultation coordinator as her schedule permits.

Outreach and consultation activities average from one to three hours per week, and are typically
scheduled for times when client load is somewhat lower. This includes the intern‟s liaison
relationship with a Residence Hall in which they provide both crisis intervention and
programming. In consultation with the senior staff, interns may choose a department on campus
with which to develop a relationship, assess needs, provide appropriate interventions, and learn
more about specific populations. For example, interns may choose to develop consultant
relationships with Multicultural Student Services, consulting with their staff and helping to plan
a support group for incoming students of color. Or, they may choose to partner with the Wellness
Center, helping to develop programs for students with eating concerns. Depending on their
interests, interns may also choose to serve on UST‟s FLAG team (UST‟s version of a threat
assessment team). Interns move from outreach topic areas where they feel relatively comfortable
(e.g. talking about assertive communication skills) to more complex topics, such as how to
intervene with students who have been sexually abused or are seriously abusing substances.
Interns are provided with information on consulting with parents of students and with other UST
staff (e.g. Dean of Student‟s office, Academic Counseling office) as these are important
components of the direct services they provide. Three outreach/consultation presentations are
required each semester, but on average, our interns typically do twice that amount.

Outreach and consultation seminar meets weekly for one hour during the first two months of the
internship, and then moves to an every other week format. Seminars start with a literature review
                                                 18
of basic consultation theories and strategies and move toward more sophisticated interventions,
such as process-consultation. The seminars are both didactic and experiential, and are based on
interns' needs. In the spring, and summer months, interns meet with professionals in the
community to learn about outreach and consultation in a variety of practice settings. Also in the
summer months, they have the opportunity to co-lead a support group for multicultural students,
and students seeking job-search support. A copy of the consultation/outreach syllabus is included
in Appendix I.

Clinical Assessment: We begin in the orientation by having the interns take each of the
assessment instruments they will be expected to administer over the course of the year, and
follow this with test interpretation seminars offered by staff members who are experts in the
particular instrument. Additionally, we offer training in alcohol assessment and diagnostic
interviewing. After completing the self-assessment outlining assessment experiences and skills,
interns are expected to discuss with their supervisors and the director of training their growth
edges and goals for training in assessment. Assessment of clients at UST is dependent on client
informed consent and the referral question(s) of the parties involved, and is always used in
conjunction with other information obtained through interviews, prior records, etc. Therefore,
interns discuss with their clients and supervisors the reasons for assessment, and how they will
use the information gathered with their clients.

We provide an intensive seminar series in assessment, which begins with definitions of
assessment, pros and cons of its use, ethical and multicultural considerations, and giving
feedback to clients and referring professionals. Six weeks are spent in advanced training on the
MMPI-2, followed by further training in the CPI and projective assessment, including the TAT.
Internal and external professionals in the community conduct these seminars. Twice during the
year, interns are required to write up and formally present in case consultation the results from a
battery of tests on clients of their choosing. We ask that they prepare one case using findings of
career-related instruments and one case using personality assessment. We believe very strongly
in the value of observational and vicarious learning. Therefore, senior staff mentor trainees as
staff bring the results of assessments they perform to case consultation for input by the entire
staff. The Director of Training (who has a Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology and extensive testing
experience), along with our outside consultant (a licensed and board-certified psychologist), are
available for consultation on all assessments.

Crisis: Interns are expected to respond effectively, ethically and professionally to crisis
situations. During orientation, the agency‟s crisis and hospitalization procedures are thoroughly
outlined, and interns become familiar with referral networks both within and outside the
university. It is standard practice for interns to always have the support and guidance of senior
staff as they respond to any crisis situation. Interns provide two hours per week of Walk In crisis
hours, and are encouraged to use the center‟s policies to ensure safety for both client and
therapist (e.g. excuse self from the room to get a supervisor when in doubt as to how to proceed
in a crisis situation, phone the receptionist with the “please call Dr. Thomas” directive when
situation is very serious or there are safety concerns, which ensures that a senior staff will
immediately enter the interns office to assist). The University, fortunately, has experienced only
one completed suicide in its residence halls in its one hundred and seventeen-year history.
Typically, crises on campus entail situations where a student is feeling overwhelmed and/or
suicidal, and is brought to the center by a professor, friend, member of the residence life staff or
                                                 19
concerned family member. We also have a fair number of students who are self-referred for
Walk In/Crisis hours. Most often the session consists of helping the student to calm down, sort
through their problems, and identify sources of support to help them get through the immediate
difficulties. Commitment to counseling contracts are routinely used, and an example of this is
included in the training manual (see Appendix B, Section VIII, p. 310).

Occasionally, crises involve groups of students and center around a traumatic event. Interns are
trained (via didactic and experiential methods, such as role-plays) to use critical incident stress
debriefing techniques, and have assisted staff in debriefing such events. In all cases, interns
debrief their experiences in individual and group case consultation supervision meetings.
Readings on suicide assessment and responding in crisis situations are included in the training
manual (Appendix B, Section VIII) and are discussed with the interns in a group format.

Professional Ethics: Interns are expected to act in an ethical, professional manner consistent with
the professional and ethical principles governing the practice of psychology. During orientation,
they are required to re-read the APA code of ethics, the Minnesota Board of Psychology Practice
Act, and the Canadian Psychological Association ethics code, and discuss these with both the
Training Director and Director of Personal Counseling. They receive training in ethical issues
during their orientation and throughout the year in intern seminars, case consultation meetings,
supervision, and at an annual presentation to Minnesota APA interns by Gary Schoener, M. Eq.,
an international expert in ethical issues facing psychologists. The Director of Personal
Counseling also presents a seminar to the interns titled “Ethical Issues in College Counseling
Centers”. Interns are expected to follow organizational policies, and sign a statement following
orientation that they have read and agree to abide by all policies outlined in the Intern Handbook
(Appendix B, p. 120).

We see professional and ethical behavior as also encompassing the development of interns in
their interpersonal relationships; therefore, they are expected to demonstrate appropriate
interpersonal relationships with clients, staff, Student Affairs liaisons, referring professionals,
etc. Interns are evaluated on such behaviors on a regular basis, both formally and informally, by
clients, supervisors and liaisons. Professional and ethical behavior involves the timely and
professional completion of tasks accompanying clinical work (e.g. returning phone calls, writing
up casenotes and reports, following through with suggestions made by supervisors), and interns
are given feedback on this from both the Director of Training and individual supervisors. Finally,
we believe that professional and ethical behavior requires an awareness of current developments
within the field of professional psychology; therefore, interns are expected to participate in
discussions of current issues with colleagues and in case consultations. We allow up to 2 hours
of professional development time per week for interns, and this time can be spent working on
dissertations, reading journal articles, or attending conferences and workshops. Experiences from
such activities are expected to be shared with staff, who also model this behavior by sharing with
staff what they have learned from their own professional development activities.

Additional Activity: Summer Projects

During the summer, when client loads are lower, interns are expected to contract with the
Training Director for summer projects. The projects vary according to intern interest, skill and
expertise. Interns may choose to do one large project, or several smaller ones. We encourage
                                                 20
interns to do something which a) they can take with them upon leaving the internship and
continue to use in professional practice and b) something they consider meaningful. Recent
summer projects have included the development of a manual for counseling LGBT clients,
updating the local Resource and Referral directory, evaluating agency outcome data, the
development of a manual for the treatment of eating disorders, a study on vocational calling and
the promotion of meaningful work, a manual for the treatment of sexually abused clients, and a
manual for working with Somali immigrants.

 2. The program specifies education and training objectives in terms of the
competencies expected of its graduates. Those competencies must be consistent with:

      (a) The program’s philosophy and training model; and

      (b) The substantive area(s) of professional psychology for which the program
          prepares its interns for the entry level of practice.

X     Review Implementing Regulation C-14.

      Remember that this is an outcome-oriented evaluation process. To that
      end, each program will be evaluated on: (1) the clarity, consistency, and
      appropriateness of the program goals and objectives; (2) the quality of
      training outcomes in relation to these goals/objectives; (3) the ability of a
      program to achieve its goals/objectives; and (4) the likelihood that such
      outcomes can be consistently maintained. In general, numbers 1 and 2 are
      addressed here in Domain B, while numbers 3 and 4 are addressed in
      Domain F where aggregated outcome data are presented.

X      List the program’s goals, objectives, and competencies that follow and
       support the stated philosophy and model (add rows for additional
       goals/objectives/competencies as necessary):

 Goal #1: Facilitation of interns' development into confident, competent, ethical psychologists
 who are able to empower their clients and colleagues. Assist interns‟ development as balanced
 professionals who become increasingly active in professional organizations and intentional in
 making significant contributions to the larger professional community.
 Objective(s) for Goal #1: Interns will develop the skills listed under “competencies” below to
 the point where they are judged by their supervisors to be functioning at a level typical of or
 exceeding expectations for their degree of training. They will possess an appropriate level of
 confidence in their clinical abilities; have a sense of themselves as “psychologists” and skilled
 professionals confidently growing in competence; demonstrate the ability to balance personal
 and professional commitments; demonstrate behavior consistent with professional standards
 and ethical guidelines; have a mature understanding of issues of age, culture, differing abilities,
 ethnicity, gender, gender identity, national origin, race, religion and spirituality, sexual
 orientation and socio-economic status incorporating an awareness of the guidelines issues by
 APA or its constituent divisions and approved by APA; and demonstrate active professional
 involvement. Toward these ends the training program will:
      Provide interns with comprehensive training in professional psychology (see specific
                                                 21
     competency area objectives for goal #2, below).
   Require interns to read and review with the Training Director the Intern Handbook
     including: UST culture and mission statements; Division of Student Affairs mission;
     Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center missions; all policies
     and procedures; guidelines for provision of professional psychology services; APA
     Code of Ethics; guidelines for work with multicultural clients; community resource and
     referral guide; and all accompanying journal articles.
   Require interns to attend and participate in all group supervision sessions, and complete
     all assigned corresponding seminar readings, which include book excerpts or book
     chapters, and peer-reviewed research articles.
   Require interns to attend and participate in all ethics presentations, including Ethics in
     College Counseling (orientation) and full day seminar on Legal and Ethical Aspects of
     Supervision workshop (MAAPIC seminar).
   Require interns to demonstrate awareness of multicultural issues and develop their
     multicultural counseling skills. Require interns to complete all assigned multicultural
     readings and complete the Self-Assessment of Multicultural Competencies.
   Require interns to attend and participate in seminars devoted to multicultural issues and
     to attend the MAAPIC seminar on diversity issues.
   Require interns to present multicultural clients in case consultation meetings, and to
     write two formal multicultural case presentations.
   Provide interns with readings and seminars on Catholic culture
   Provide interns with two hours/week of professional development time in which they are
     expected to continue work toward completion of their doctoral dissertations, and read
     psychological books and/or journal articles related to professional psychology and/or
     their individual clinical caseload presenting concerns.
   Require interns to present a poster of their dissertation research at the Minnesota
     Psychological Association‟s annual meeting.
   Provide interns with release time to attend colloquia, workshops and professional
     conferences.
   Require interns to complete a summer project of their choosing (designed to further their
     professional development in the field) and present this to Personal Counseling and
     Testing and Career Development Center senior staff.
   Provide interns with ongoing information about professional development opportunities
     at the University of St. Thomas, in the greater community, and nationally.
   Provide interns with specific information about phases of the licensure process through
     an intern seminar.
   Provide interns with scheduled time each week for cohort support, which can be used
     for cohort processing, peer case consultation, or other activities of interns choosing.
   Provide interns with seminars on intern development and self-care.
Competencies Expected:
   Demonstrated development in professional identity from graduate student to
     professional
   Demonstrated ability to function professionally and autonomously
   Demonstrated ability to communicate awareness of own competencies and skills
   Demonstrated ability to recognize own deficiencies and work actively to overcome them
   Demonstrated ability to take initiative to get training needs met
                                             22
     Demonstrated ability to accept and incorporate feedback
     Demonstrated ability to prepare for counseling and supervisory sessions
     Increasing ability to think through issues independently
     Demonstrated understanding of issues in professional psychology
     Demonstrated awareness of own culture and impact of own culture on clinical work
     Demonstrated awareness of own beliefs about other cultures
     Demonstrated ability to work with clients who are diverse, including but not limited to:
      age, culture, differing abilities, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, national origin, race,
      religion and spirituality, sexual orientation and socio-economic status.
    Demonstration of awareness of UST culture, including Catholic culture.
    Demonstrated identification and resolution of ethical dilemmas
    Active participation in counseling center and student affairs activities
    Demonstrated knowledge of various campus and community resources
    Utilization of consultation and supervision with professional psychologists
    Increasing clarity of professional career goals
    Membership and participation in professional associations
    Presentations at professional meetings and conferences
    Ability to identify and utilize strategies of self-care
Appendix and Page Number for Evaluation Forms Used for Expected Competencies:
    Personal Counseling Supervisor‟s evaluation Sections I and III: Appendix B, pps 208-
      210; Career Development Supervisor‟s evaluation Appendix B, pp. 211-212; Group
      supervisor‟s evaluation sections II and III, Appendix B, pps. 215-216; Supervision
      evaluation, Sections II, III, and IV, section II, Appendix B, pps. 217-219; Consultation
      evaluation, Appendix B, pps. 221-222.
    Pre and Post Intern Self-assessment of Skills, Career, Group, Supervision and
      Consultation/Outreach Pre and Post assessments, Appendix B, pps. 246-253
    Intern Evaluation of the Experience, Appendix B, pps. 242-244.
    Survey of Former Interns, Appendix N, pps. 516-529
How Outcomes are Measured:
    Satisfactory scores on supervisors‟ evaluation forms (see below)
    Pre and post self assessment ratings
    Attending and satisfactorily presenting clinical cases in case consultation meetings
    Successful preparation and presentation of poster of dissertation research
    Culture sharing and review of multicultural counseling competencies with individual
      supervisors
    Multicultural case presentations
    Formal and informal staff reviews
    Post-Internship Survey summary of professional activities
Minimum Thresholds for Achievement for Expected Competencies:
    Average score of 3 or above on criterion-based evaluation forms completed by primary
      supervisors.
    Increased ratings on post self-assessments of skills.
    Satisfactory completion of multicultural case written assignments
    Successful presentation of one diverse client per semester at Personal or Career case
      consultation meeting.
                                                23
      Satisfactory ratings (3 or above) on diversity and multicultural competencies for core
       competency areas.
      Satisfactory reviews by staff in quarterly supervisors meetings

Goal #2: Provide an intensive, comprehensive, and sequential clinical experience that allows
interns to integrate knowledge acquired through their formal academic training. Prepare interns
for a generalist entry or junior-level positions in counseling or clinical psychology.
Objective(s) for Goal #2: Interns will develop the skills listed under “competencies” below to
the point where they are judged by their supervisors to be functioning at a level typical of or
exceeding expectations for their degree of training. They will treat individuals with a wide
range of presenting concerns; perform competent assessments; conduct effective psychotherapy
and career counseling in both individual and group formats; provide effective supervision of
practicum students; provide effective consultation and outreach services; and demonstrate
appropriate crisis management skills. Toward these ends the training program will:
    1. Provide interns with ongoing supervised training and instruction in the following areas:
        personal, career, and group counseling; crisis intervention; assessment; outreach
        and consultation; and supervision. Supervision and instruction includes the following:
       At least 2 hours per week of individual face-to-face supervision for personal counseling
        clients with a senior licensed psychologist with supervision competency
       2 hours per week of group case consultation
       Semi-monthly group psychiatric case consultation
       Semi-monthly face-to-face supervision with a senior career specialist
       Weekly group supervision of practicum supervision with a licensed senior psychologist
       Semi-monthly group supervision of group work with a licensed senior psychologist
       Semi-monthly group supervision of consultation and outreach with a licensed senior
        psychologist
       Weekly didactic seminars focused on fostering competency in areas related to
        professional practice of psychology. Areas covered in intern seminar include assessment
        and test interpretation, evidence-based clinical interventions, multicultural competence,
        professionalism, and therapeutic strategies for working with specific clinical sub-
        populations (e.g. eating disorders, depression).
       Thorough review of Intern Training manual, which includes didactic information such
        as sample treatment plans, resource and referral guide, and hospitalization and crisis
        procedures.

   2. Provide interns with specific training and outreach opportunities related to working with
      college student populations.
    Interns are oriented to all Student Affairs offices and units prior to working directly with
      student clients.
    Interns serve as campus liaisons and consultants to various student groups and Student
      Affairs units as needed.
    Interns create and present professional outreach programming to various student groups
      and units as requested. Interns will be encouraged to pair with senior staff initially, and
      will be expected to take increasing responsibility for content development and outreach
      delivery as the year progresses.
    Intern seminars include specific training related to issues of particular concern to student
                                               24
      populations (e.g. alcohol use/abuse, eating disorders).
Competencies Expected:
Personal Counseling:
     a) Individual Therapy Skills:
    Establishment of the therapeutic alliance – ability to communicate interest in and
      acceptance of the client
    Facilitation of client expression of feelings
    Ability to communicate understanding of and reflection of feelings
    Ability to explain and interpret assessment tools
    Ability to give appropriate feedback
    Ability to give clients accurate and complete information
    Appropriate judgment in crisis situations or at critical points in therapy
    Appropriate use of treatment interventions
    Ability to use modeling
    Ability to open sessions in a manner that promotes interaction and disclosure
    Ability to close sessions in a manner that helps clients to summarize and integrate their
      learning
    Appropriate referrals
    Appropriate termination
     b) Ability to respond to therapy issues
    Demonstrated awareness and appropriate handling of client cues
    Ability to deal effectively with silence
    Ability to challenge clients to look at discrepancies
    Ability to confront behaviors that interfere with the counseling process
    Appropriate use of self-disclosure
     c) Ability to deal with clients on process as well as content levels
    Effective use of immediacy in the counseling process
    Demonstrated awareness of reactions to here-and-now events
    Demonstrated awareness and effective addressing of transference issues
    Demonstrated awareness and effective addressing of countertransference issues
      Case Conceptualization
    Ability to demonstrate theoretical knowledge from multiple perspectives that relate to
      client issues
      Treatment Planning
    Ability to develop with clients appropriate treatment plans based on clients goals
    Ability to review and update goals and treatment plans as appropriate
Career Counseling
    Demonstrated knowledge of theories and models of career development
    Demonstrated ability to asses personal characteristics, such as achievement, interests,
      values, and personality traits
    Demonstrated ability to assess leisure interests, life roles, career maturity, vocational
      identity, career indecision, work environment preference, and other related
      lifestyle/development issues.
    Accurate and effective use of career assessment instruments
    Ability to report and interpret findings from career assessment instruments appropriately

                                             25
      and write an accurate report of the results
    Ability to conduct mock interviews, perform resume critiques, and help students with
      cover letters
    Knowledge of education, training and employment trends; labor market information and
      resources that provide information about job tasks, functions, salaries, requirements and
      future outlooks related to broad occupational fields and individual occupations
    Demonstrated knowledge of community/professional resources available to assist client
      in career planning
    Ability to use job search services available on the internet
    Demonstrated ability to support and challenge clients to examine life-work roles,
      including the balance of work, leisure, family and community in their careers
    Effective and professional case management skills
Group Counseling:
     a) Group leadership skills
    Ability to work with supervisor and co-leader to develop, define and market the group to
      potential members
    Active recruitment of members, using the marketing plan
    Ability to educate and prepare potential group members during pre-group interviews
    Ability to establish a code of behavioral rules or norms to guide group interaction
    Demonstrated knowledge of group theories, process, and practice
     b) Beginning stages of group
    Ability to create safe climate which encourages members to take risks
    Ability to safeguard members from taking unnecessary psychological risks
    Encouragement of members to openly express their feelings and expectations
    Ability to help members define concrete and meaningful goals
    Ability to open sessions in a manner that promotes interaction and disclosure
    Ability to close sessions in a manner that helps members summarize and integrate their
      learning
     c) Working stages of the group
    Ability to demonstrate support by providing encouragement and reinforcement
    Ability to demonstrate empathy and reflect feelings
    Ability to initiate action to facilitate group participation and to introduce new directions
      in the group
    Ability to give feedback honestly and directly, revealing reactions to here-and-now
      events in the group
    Ability to use modeling
    Ability to facilitate member-to-member interactions
    Ability to deal effectively with silence
    Ability to time interventions in a way that facilitates individual and group development
    Ability to intervene effectively to stop counterproductive group behavior
    Ability to evaluate ongoing group process and individual and group dynamics
    Ability to appropriately use facilitative therapeutic skills
    Ability to interpret behaviors, feelings and thoughts
    Ability to confront – challenge participants to look at discrepancies and conflicting
      messages

                                              26
     Ability to use sense of humor appropriately
     Ability to use self-disclosure appropriately
     Ability to use good judgment in crisis situations or at critical points in the group
     Demonstrated awareness of stages of group development and ability to help members
      successfully move through these stages
    Ability to identify and work effectively with diversity issues as part of the group process
      d) Ending the group
    Ability to terminate effectively
    Ability to help members generalize learning to situations outside the group
    Ability to make appropriate referrals
      Co-leadership and supervision issues
    Ability to identify, discuss and prioritize goals for group supervision
    Presentation of examples of group work in seminars and ability to analyze key elements
      of group interactions
    Scheduling time with co-leader to process group
    Demonstrated understanding of the co-leadership relationship and its development and
      discussion of these in group supervision
    Demonstrated ability to work effectively through conflicts with co-leader
    Ability to be appropriately assertive in articulating own needs, beliefs, reactions, doubts,
      and perceptions with co-leader
    Ability to use supervision to develop awareness of strengths and limitations as group
      therapist
      Professional/ethical issues:
    Demonstrated adherence to APA, ACA and MN Board of Psychology guidelines
    Demonstrated concern and advocacy for client welfare
    Demonstrated awareness of professional limitations and need for consultation
    Effective and professional case management skills – completes commitments in a
      prompt and professional manner.
Supervision
   Supervisory Relationship
    Demonstrated empathy, respect, and concern for supervisee
    Ability to promote a learning environment which is supportive and challenging
    Encouragement of independent thinking and responsible actions
    Modeling of ethical behavior
    Ability to exhibit openness to feedback on supervisory behavior
    Ability to support supervisee‟s strengths and competencies
    Ability to confront supervisee and do so in an appropriate and facilitative manner
    Ability to examine supervisee/supervisor relationship
    Demonstrated awareness and respect for issues of diversity in supervision
   Structure of Supervision
    Schedules and maintains sufficient time for supervision
    Ability to establish clear expectations for supervision and monitor and adjust
      supervisory goals as needed
    Ability to address issues of informed consent in the supervisory relationship
    Ability to help the supervisee set appropriate goals and learning objectives

                                               27
     Preparation for supervision (i.e. listens to tapes, seeks additional consultation as needed,
      etc.)
   Ability to give on-going focused and specific feedback
   Ability to set and maintain appropriate boundaries in supervision
   Ability to select effective and appropriate aids in supervision (i.e. role playing, didactic
      instruction, discussion of feeling, etc.)
   Ability to provide an overall evaluation of the supervisee‟s strengths and limitations
   Development of Counseling Skills
   Demonstrated ability to assess supervisee‟s basic counseling skills
   Ability to assist in case conceptualization
   Ability to discuss legal/ethical issues as they pertain to supervisee‟s clients
   Ability to help supervisee define and clarify treatment goals for counseling
   Ability to provide insight into client dynamics
   Ability to offer supervisee general strategies for treatment
   Ability to provide specific suggestions and response for sessions without imposing own
      style on supervisee
   Appropriate balance of focusing on content and thoughts in supervision with focus on
      process and feelings
   Appropriate responsiveness to sensitive/crisis situations
   Ability to exhibit sensitivity to and aware of clients‟ culture (e.g. family, ethnic group,
      gender, sexual orientation, religion)
   Ability to promote accurate use of assessment tools
   Ability to assist supervisee in planning and implementing termination
  Use of Supervision Seminar
   Attends seminar consistently and punctually
   Identifies and discusses needs for learning supervision
   Recognizes the importance of reviewing samples of his/her work and readily provides
      videotapes
   Responds openly to feedback and supervisory suggestions
Outreach and Consultation
  Consultation theories and skills
   Demonstrated understanding of theories of outreach/consultation
   Demonstrated ability to integrate consultation/outreach theory into program
      development
   Demonstrated use of formal/informal interviews, written and observational methods to
      best assess clients‟ needs
   Demonstrated understanding of issues unique to the client group and ability to reflect
      these back to the client
   Effective development of written or oral client contract outlining expectations of client
      and consultant and proposed action plan
   Effective determination of appropriate mode of intervention
   Demonstrated ability to coordinate logistical aspects of program i.e. scheduling, room
      assignments, AV equipment, etc.
   Demonstrated ability to works as an effective team member
   Demonstrated ability to build rapport with program participants

                                               28
       Demonstrated ability to engage participants in program
       Ability to recognize and effectively deal with participant dynamics
       Demonstrates appropriate balance in relationship with co-facilitator
       Ability to evaluate intervention effectively
       Ability to uses evaluation results to improve subsequent performance
       Comes prepared to consultation seminar and participates actively
       Ability to use supervision to develop awareness of strengths and limitations as a
        consultant
Crisis Intervention
    Availability in crisis situations (seeing crisis clients, taking crisis calls)
    Demonstrated ability to manage crisis situations effectively
    Demonstrated ability to seek consultation with senior staff supervisors during and after
        crisis interventions
Assessment
    Attendance at and active participation in all assessment seminars
    Effective explanation to clients of assessment tools and rationale for testing
    Demonstrated ability to provide accurate interpretations of psychological and career
        assessments
    Ability to synthesize test-derived information and write at least two comprehensive
        assessment batteries
    Active participation in case consultation meetings where assessments are discussed
Professional Behavior/Ethics
    Development of effective relationships with Residence Life and other professionals
    Demonstrated awareness of professional limitations and need for supervision/peer
        consultation
    Completion of commitments promptly and professionally
    Ability to recognize legal/ethical issues in consultation
    Ability to deal effectively with diversity issues
    Ability to demonstrate good judgment at critical points in the consultation/outreach
        process
    Demonstrated adherence to all APA/MPA ethical guidelines and standards of practice

Appendix and Page Number for Evaluation Forms Used for Expected Competencies:
Appendix B, Training manual pages 208-225
   Personal Counseling Supervisor‟s Assessment of Intern Progress: pps. 208-210
   Career Counseling Supervisor‟s Assessment of Intern Progress: pps. 211-212
   Group Counseling Supervisor‟s Assessment of Intern Progress: pps. 213-216
   Supervision Coordinator‟s Assessment of Intern Progress: pps 217-219
   Consultation/Outreach Coordinator‟s Assessment of Intern Progress: pps. 220-221
   Co-facilitator/Observer Consultation Evaluation Form: pps. 222-223
   Intern Consultant Evaluation Form: pps. 224-225
How Outcomes are Measured:
   Job placements in the field of professional psychology
   Satisfactory scores on supervisors‟ evaluation forms (see below)
   Satisfactory consultation/outreach liaison evaluations
                                             29
     Pre and post self assessment ratings
     Intern Evaluation of the Experience ratings
     Former Intern Survey ratings
     Attending and satisfactorily presenting clinical cases in case consultation meetings
     Formal and informal staff reviews
Minimum Thresholds for Achievement for Expected Competencies:
     Average score of 3 or above on criterion-based evaluation forms completed by primary
        supervisors.
     Increased ratings on post self-assessments of skills.
     Satisfactory completion of written assignments
     Successful presentation of assessment batteries at Personal or Career case consultation
        meeting.
     Satisfactory reviews by staff in quarterly supervisors meetings
     Satisfactory ratings on Intern Evaluation of the Experience
     Satisfactory ratings on Former Intern Survey
Goal #3: Provide the opportunity for interns to participate extensively in all operational phases
of a counseling center, to develop programs, and to participate in evaluation.
Objective(s) for Goal #3: Interns will develop the skills listed under “competencies” below to
the point where they are judged by their supervisors to be functioning at a level typical of or
exceeding expectations for their degree of training. They will demonstrate a mature
understanding of all phases of counseling center work; possess clinical skills specific to
counseling center work as outlined in #2, above, including the ability to conduct appropriate
consultation with others and to develop effective outreach programs; and will fully participate
in evaluation of the training program. Toward these ends the training program will:
     Require interns to conduct personal, career, and group counseling
     Require interns to supervise one practicum student each semester
     Require interns to conduct outreach and consultation services
     Require interns to conduct psychological and career assessment
     Require interns to serve as liaisons to residence halls and to provide crisis intervention
        services
     Provide opportunities for interns to develop and present outreach and consultation
        programs of their choosing for UST community
     Require interns to complete a summer project of their choosing which can be related to
        counseling center work and to present this to staff
     Require interns to provide crisis/walk-in shifts two hours/week
     Provide interns with opportunities to serve on the Training Committee
     Provide interns with opportunities to examine and evaluate agency data
     Require interns to evaluate all aspects of their training experience, including evaluation
        of Personal Counseling supervisors, Career Counseling supervisors, Group Counseling
        supervisor, Supervision of Supervision coordinator, Consultation/Outreach coordinator,
        Evaluation of the total experience and Evaluation of the Training Director
Competencies Expected:
     Demonstrated ability to conduct personal, career and group counseling, supervision,
        consultation and outreach, assessment, and crisis intervention (See specific
        competencies listed in these domains for Goal #2, above)
     Demonstrated ability to develop programs and program evaluations
                                               30
      Demonstrated ability to develop effective needs assessments
      Ability to engage participants in programs
      Ability to work effectively as a team member
      Ability to write proposal and complete summer project
      Ability to represent intern cohort accurately if serving on training committee
      Ability to participate in evaluation and selection of intern candidates if serving on
       training committee or if not, to participate in selection of practicum candidates
     Ability to assist training committee with program evaluation
     Availability in crisis situations (seeing crisis clients, taking crisis calls)
     Ability to evaluate all aspects of the training experience
 Appendix and Page Number for Evaluation Forms Used for Expected Competencies:
 Appendix B, Training manual Section IV, pages 222- 246
     Intern‟s Evaluation of Personal Counseling Supervisor: pps. 226-229
     Intern‟s Evaluation of Career Counseling Supervisor: pps. 230-232
     Intern‟s Evaluation of Group Supervisor: pps. 233-235
     Intern‟s Evaluation of Supervision Supervisor: pps. 236-238
     Intern‟s Evaluation of Consultation Supervisor: pps. 239-241
     Co-facilitator/Observer Consultation Evaluation: pps. 222-223
     Intern Consultant Evaluation: pps. 224-225
     Intern Evaluation of the Experience: pps. 242-244
     Intern Evaluation of the Training Director: p 245
     Former Intern Survey (Appendix N) pps. 516-529
     Pre-Post Assessments pps. 246-253
 How Outcomes are Measured:
     Satisfactory scores on supervisors‟ evaluation forms (see below)
     Satisfactory consultation/outreach liaison evaluations
     Pre and post self assessment ratings
     Intern Evaluation of the Experience ratings
     Former Intern Survey ratings
     Attending and satisfactorily presenting clinical cases in case consultation meetings
     Formal and informal staff reviews
 Minimum Thresholds for Achievement for Expected Competencies:
     Satisfactory ratings (3 or above) on all Supervisors‟ Evaluations
     Satisfactory ratings (3 or above) on Co-facilitator/Observer Consultation Evaluation (see
       also Goal #2)
     Satisfactory ratings (3 or above) on Evaluations of Supervisors
     Increased scores on post assessments

3. The internship is an organized program. It consists of a properly administered,
planned, structured, and programmed sequence of professionally supervised training
experiences that are characterized by greater depth, breadth, duration, frequency, and
intensity than practicum training. The training program includes the following:




                                              31
       (a) The program’s training activities are structured in terms of their sequence,
           intensity, duration, and frequency as well as planned and programmed in the
           modality of the training activities and their content;

       (b) The primary training method is experiential (i.e., service delivery in direct
           contact with service recipients). The experiential training component includes
           socialization into the profession of psychology and is augmented by other
           appropriately integrated modalities, such as mentoring, didactic exposure,
           role-modeling and enactment, observational/vicarious learning, supervisory or
           consultative guidance;

X     Review Implementing Regulation C-17.

X      Provide or insert a description of the structure of your program’s training
       activities. Consortia programs should describe the structure of activities at
       each site, and which interns receive this training (i.e., interns at that
       specific site or interns in the consortia as a whole).

The internship is a highly structured, planful program that trainees follow throughout the year.
Additionally, however, the Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center
internship has the flexibility to individualize aspects of the training to each intern‟s goals,
previous experiences, and professional aspirations. For example, interns who are interested in
pursuing careers in professional consulting are invited to co-lead campus-based consultations
and organizational development efforts when such requests are made to the counseling center, or
are encouraged to undertake summer projects that further their skills in this area. Similarly,
interns interested in teaching are invited to be guest lecturers for senior staff who are engaged as
faculty, or to give lectures for other professors on campus who request psychologists as speakers
for their classes. What remains constant during the internship is the philosophy, model of
training, and developmental aspect of the program. Additionally, each core competency area of
direct service is structured sequentially so that expectations for productivity, initiative and
responsibility increase over the year. Listed below are the formal structures and expectations that
shape the Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center internship for all
trainees.

Formal Training Structure: Orientation
As described in depth above (1B) the training program begins with a comprehensive, 3-week
orientation that is designed to give interns familiarity with the university, related campus offices
and programs, and the Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center staff,
and a comfort level to begin working effectively with these individuals. It is also designed to
give them a basic comfort level with the policies and procedures used in our center. Training
activities begin with an assessment of current level of knowledge and skill (see Appendix S, pps.
596-632 for summaries from past 7 cohorts), and scholarly didactic instruction before practical
application. For some competency areas, (supervision, career counseling) the training is intensive
at the beginning of the internship, as interns start providing supervision and career counseling
after their orientation. In others, such as crisis work, group work and assessment, interns assume
responsibilities more gradually, as they and their supervisors assess readiness. The structure,
intensity, duration and frequency of the 9 competency areas has been described in detail in
                                                 32
question 1, above.

Formal Training Structure: Learning Contracts
Interns and supervisors establish goals and expectations at the beginning of each semester. These
are formalized into learning contracts which include behavioral objectives. At mid-semester, an
oral evaluation session is scheduled during which the interns‟ development and counseling
effectiveness are appraised, feedback on supervisory effectiveness is solicited by the supervisor,
and learning objectives are re-examined and revised as necessary. (A sample learning contract is
found in Appendix K).

Formal Training Structure: Direct Service
  Interns are expected to schedule 18 hours of direct service per week in the following areas:
   Individual counseling (15–17 hours/week). Personal Counseling and Testing and
       Career Development Center serve a diverse student population using both brief and
       occasional longer-term counseling. Interns work with students presenting with both
       personal (10 hours) and career (5 hours) concerns. They are expected to gain proficiency
       in psychological testing as part of the assessment process. They also receive training in
       crisis intervention and provide 2 hours of walk-in/crisis service during regular hours.
   Practicum supervision (2 hours/week). A core component of the internship is the
       development of supervision skills. Interns supervise practicum students from the
       University of St. Thomas‟s APA-accredited counseling psychology program and from the
       University of Minnesota‟s APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. We use
       Logitech webcams to tape practicum supervision sessions and these are reviewed in
       supervision of supervision seminar.
   Group counseling (1 hour). Personal Counseling and Testing offers process groups and
       support groups. Interns are expected to co-facilitate a minimum of two groups per year,
       eventually taking responsibility for both.
   Outreach/consultation (0–1 hour). Through this program, interns give presentations and
       conduct training sessions that emphasize developmental/preventative techniques. Interns
       work with students, faculty and/or staff in a variety of settings: campus organizations,
       university departments, parents, staff offices, and residence halls.

Formal Training Structure: Supervision
  Interns receive the following supervision and training:
   Individual supervision: For two hours each week, interns meet with their primary
       supervisors in an individual supervisory session. Doctoral-level licensed psychologists
       with a competency in supervision discuss clinical work, review tapes of session, and help
       further develop interests and skills.
   Supervision of supervision: Intern supervisors meet weekly for one hour with the
       supervision of supervision coordinator to discuss models of supervision and to receive
       supervision on their supervision of practicum students.
   Supervision of group counseling: Interns meet every other week for one hour with the
       group training coordinator for training and supervision on their group work.
   Outreach/consultation supervision: During the first month of fall semester, interns
       meet weekly for one hour with the Director of Personal Counseling, who serves as our
       outreach/consultation coordinator, for training and supervision on interns‟ consultations
       and outreach efforts. Thereafter, meetings occur every other week.
                                                33
      Consultation meetings: Interns meet with their peers, practicum students, and senior
       staff each week for two hours to present and discuss clinical work. Every other week, the
       entire staff meets for one hour with one of our two psychiatrists to present and discuss
       clinical cases of clients conjointly receiving individual therapy and medication
       management. In addition, the intern cohort meets one hour per week with the Director of
       Training to check in and discuss the internship experience.
      Intern seminars: Weekly intern seminars are arranged around a theme such as
       assessment, multicultural competency, evidence-based practice, and professional issues.
       Seminars are conducted jointly with the counseling center at the University of Minnesota
       and meet for one and one half hours. University and community mental health
       professionals noted for expertise in their fields teach the seminars. Current year seminar
       schedule is found in Appendix J.

Formal Training Structure: Evaluations
  Structured evaluations include the following:
   Pre and post assessment of skills
   Intern evaluation of orientation
   Intern learning contracts
   Intern and supervisor written evaluations of each other for individual supervision for both
      personal and career counseling, supervision of group counseling, supervision of
      practicum supervision, and outreach/consultation supervision
   Intern evaluation of the training director
   Brief evaluation of each seminar
   Intern evaluation of the semester‟s experience
   Final evaluation of the internship.

  Summaries of supervisor evaluations are sent to the Academic Training Director for each
  intern at the end of each semester.

Formal Expectations of Interns’ Behaviors and Displayed Professionalism:
  Interns are expected to:
   Act within the bounds of the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists: Standards for
       Providers of Psychological Services and Speciality Guidelines for the Delivery of
       Services.
   Act within the bounds of the laws and regulations of the State of Minnesota and the
       Minnesota Psychology Statues.
   Behave in a manner that conforms to the professional standards of the University of St.
       Thomas
   Demonstrate proficiency in counseling skills as required to successfully maintain a
       clinical caseload at the counseling center
   Demonstrate proficiency in group counseling, supervision, outreach and consultation as
       required to successfully complete contracted activities at the counseling center
   Demonstrate proficiency in relevant assessment and evaluation procedures as required to
       successfully carry out assigned tasks at the counseling center
   Demonstrate the ability to communicate clearly and professionally in both oral and
       written formats
   Complete all written documents in a timely manner
                                               34
       Participate in the training and service activities of Personal Counseling and Testing and
        Career Development Center with the year-end goal of being able to provide services
        across a range of activities and with a frequency and quality appropriate to that of a staff
        psychologist at our center.

X       List the required training activities that demonstrate that the training
        method is experiential.

Our training program is primarily experiential (e.g. the interns deliver direct psychological
services to their clients, providing individual personal and career counseling, group counseling,
assessment supervision, outreach and consultation). Approximately half of interns‟ time is spent
in direct service activities as noted above. Their sessions are recorded on Logitech web cameras,
and are reviewed regularly in supervision. Interns‟ experiences are augmented by didactic
activities, including seminars and workshops, reading and discussion, and group case
consultations. During case consultations, all staff are expected to discuss
difficult/challenging/interesting cases, and assessment, current research and ethical issues are
regular topics of discussion. Case consultations offer interns exposure to a variety of ways of
thinking about clients and about therapy, and provide them the opportunity to participate in
group assessment, diagnosis and intervention.

Our agency culture is “open door”, meaning that interns are encouraged to consult with anyone
at any time about anything. We believe socialization into the profession is enhanced by an
atmosphere of safety, and have made it a priority to create a center where interns can take risks,
stretch and grow. Each senior staff member treats the interns to a luncheon during fall semester
to further get to know each other, and training staff routinely share their therapeutic successes
and growth edges, professionally and ethically challenging clinical situations, and model the use
of consultative guidance. Over the years, interns have shared with us that this accessibility of our
staff is something they truly appreciate about our setting, and something that has helped them
develop as balanced professionals. Mentoring of interns is an activity carried out by all staff and
support staff members, not merely designated supervisors. Interns also serve as fully functioning
members of several teams within the agency (training committee, practicum selection committee,
Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center staff meetings) and outside the
agency (student affairs or university committees and task forces).

        (c) Intern supervision is regularly scheduled and sufficient relative to the intern’s
            professional responsibility assuring, at a minimum, that a full-time intern will
            receive 4 hours of supervision per week, at least 2 hours of which will include
            individual supervision;

X       Review Implementing Regulation C-15(b).

X       List the required supervision provided to your interns in the format below.
        Consortia programs should list supervision hours separately for each site,
        if they differ, so the breakdown of supervision hours is clear for each
        intern.



                                                 35
     Amount of individual face-to-face supervision per week by licensed
      psychologists: 2 hours

     Amount of individual face-to-face supervision per week by other licensed
      health care providers: 0-1 hour every other week by career specialists, one of whom
      is a licensed psychologist.

     Amount of group face-to-face supervision per week, and definition of what
      group supervision entails for your internship: 4 hours, including: 2 hours of
      personal counseling case consultation; 1 hour of supervision of supervision; and 1 hour of
      either supervision of group counseling or supervision of consultation/outreach (these
      supervisions alternate every other week).

X      List any additional supervision activities that do not fall into any of the
       above categories in the table below. Consortia programs should note the
       site at which each activity occurs, and which interns receive this training
       (i.e., interns at that specific site or interns in the consortia as a whole).

Additional supervision activities (and site,         Amount of time spent per week
if applicable)
Check in meeting with training director              1 hour/week
Psychiatric case consultation meetings               1 hour every other week


       (d) The content of internship training activities addresses the application of
           psychological concepts and current scientific knowledge, principles, and
           theories with regard to the professional delivery of psychological services to
           the consumer public; professional conduct and ethics; and standards for
           providers of psychological services;

X      List and describe in the table below the required training activities that
       integrate science with practice and include training in professional
       standards and ethics. Consortia programs should note the site at which
       each activity occurs, and which interns receive this training (i.e., interns at
       that specific site or interns in the consortia as a whole).

                         Training Activities (and site, if applicable)
                           List and provide brief description for each
Interns receive extensive training during orientation and throughout the year in supervision and
seminars regarding current standards of care, applicable research, professional ethics, and
evidence-based practice. Many of the presenters are local experts in their fields. The modes of
training are listed below:
Topical weekly intern seminars – see Appendix J for descriptions
Full-day training on working with diverse clientele - see Appendix J for descriptions
Full-day training on supervision and ethics - see Appendix J for descriptions
Weekly check-in with Training Director
Orientation – pps. 13-15
                                               36
 Supervision – Appendix B pps. 194-196
      (e) Describe the program’s administrative structure and process which
          systematically coordinates, controls, directs, and organizes the training activity
          and resources;

The Director of Training chairs a bi-weekly meeting of the training committee, which consists of
all supervising licensed psychologists, the Director of Personal Counseling and Testing, the
Director of the Career Development Center, and an intern. The goals of this committee are to
systematically coordinate, evaluate and refine the training program. We work in a team-based
model, and expect and value the input of all committee members. The Director of Training
organizes and directs the program with the guidance of the committee. Dr. Geraldine Rockett, as
Director of Personal Counseling and Testing and with the support and recommendations of the
training committee, has been able to advocate for and maintain financial support for the
internship program despite budgetary cuts within the Division of Student Affairs over the past
several years.

X      Describe the components of the administrative structure:

      (f) The program has a designated leader who is a doctoral psychologist,
          appropriately credentialed (i.e., licensed, registered, or certified) to practice
          psychology in the jurisdiction in which the internship is located and who is
          primarily responsible for directing the training program.

Dr. Sarah Armstrong is a doctoral-level licensed psychologist in the State of Minnesota, is listed
in the National Register of Health Service Providers, and has received the Certificate of
Professional Qualification from the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards. Dr.
Armstrong regularly attends and presents programs at the Association of Counseling Center
Training Agencies (ACCTA) conference, has served on its Board of Directors, managed the
organization‟s internal listserv surveys, co-hosted an ACCTA conference, and currently serves
on ACCTA‟s research committee. She served for 11 years as secretary of the Education and
Training committee for the Minnesota Psychological Association, and facilitates a poster
program for pre-doctoral interns to present their research at the MPA annual meeting.
Additionally, she has attended and presented programs at several APPIC conferences. She
currently serves as an ad hoc reviewer for the journals Professional Psychology: Research and
Practice and Training and Education in Professional Psychology.

X     The name and credentials of the designated leader are provided on the
      transmittal page.

4. In achieving its objectives, the program requires that all interns demonstrate an
intermediate to advanced level of professional psychological skills, abilities,
proficiencies, competencies, and knowledge in the areas of:

       (a) Theories and methods of assessment and diagnosis and effective intervention
           (including empirically supported treatments);

      (b) Theories and/or methods of consultation, evaluation, and supervision;
                                                37
X     Review Implementing Regulation C-1.

X     Address training in all 3 areas of B.4(b): consultation, program evaluation,
      and the provision of supervision to others in the table below. Consortia
      programs should note the site at which activities occur, and which interns
      receive this training (i.e., interns at that specific site or interns in the
      consortia as a whole).

      (c) Strategies of scholarly inquiry; and

      (d) Issues of cultural and individual diversity relevant to all of the above.

In January 2007, our Training Committee agreed to focus on updating the program‟s approach to
naming, educating for, and measuring competencies. We elected to initially focus on practicum
competencies because ADPTC already had a well formed document about naming and
evaluating such competencies. We have made significant progress on this project. We are aware
that the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies (ACCTA) is currently at work on
documents to further define the competencies outlined in the document put forth by the
Assessment of Competency Benchmarks Workgroup in June 2007 and have elected to postpone
implementing any plan for internship until this document is complete, as it will address the
implementation of competency guidelines in a university setting. We have, however, been
actively discussing and reviewing the June 2007 Workgroup document in our training committee
meetings and plan to refine and shape how we approach our training competencies upon
completion of the ACCTA document. We are also currently reviewing the supplemental issue of
Training and Education in Professional Psychology (November 2009) devoted to the
establishment and assessment of core competencies and want to make the Commission on
Accreditation aware that we intend to follow the national trends and also to be proactive about
implementing recommendations around competencies. It is our intent to eventually organize our
training around the foundational and functional competencies which are outlined as core
competencies in these documents (Workgroup and articles in TEPP).

 X Elaborate in as much detail as necessary to specifically address how your
 program provides training in areas B.4.a-d in the table below.

 ***NOTE: If any of the below “required training activities” for any curriculum area
 include seminars/didactic experiences, you must provide a thorough description of
 those seminars within an Appendix of the self-study. Those descriptions should
 include information such as an abstract/description of the content, learning objectives,
 and any other additional material necessary (i.e., bibliography, readings) to
 demonstrate the material covered. Include Appendix/page number references to any
 such descriptions in the table below.

 Curriculum           Theories and methods of assessment and diagnosis
 Area:
 Required                    Training seminars and orientation training in diagnosis, testing
 Training Activity            and assessment: 6-session MMPI-2 seminar; CPI; 2 sessions
                                               38
                            assessing alcohol and drug use; 2 sessions projective assessment
                            with the TAT, DAP, HTP and Kinetic Family Drawings; MBTI;
                            SII; CISS
                         Orientation training: conducting personal counseling and career
                            intake sessions; overview of diagnostic assessment
Competencies             Ability to write comprehensive intake notes
Expected                 Ability to write effective treatment plans
                         Ability to explain assessment tools and provide rational rationale
                            for testing
                         Ability to provide accurate interpretations of psychological and
                            career assessments
                         Ability to synthesize test-derived information and write at least
                            two comprehensive assessment batteries
How Outcomes             Satisfactory scores on supervisors‟ evaluation forms (see below)
are Measured             Pre and post assessment ratings
                         Intern Evaluation of the Experience ratings
                         Attending and satisfactorily presenting clinical cases in case
                            consultation meetings
                         Satisfactory case file audits
                         Formal and informal staff reviews
Minimum                  Scores of 3 or above on all items of evaluation related to these
Thresholds for              areas
Achievement              Increased scores on post assessments
                         Scores of 3 or above on Intern Evaluation of the Experience
                         Written treatment plans within first three sessions with clients
                         Completion of two assessment batteries per year deemed
                            satisfactory by supervisor and training director
Appendix and        Appendix B Training Manual, Section IV:
Page Number         PC supervisor‟s assessment p. 226, items # 9 and 10; CD supervisor‟s
for Evaluation      assessment p. 211, item #3; Supervision assessment p. 217, item #29;
Form Used           consultation assessment p. 220, item #3; co-facilitator/observer
(specify which      evaluation p. 222, item # 2; consultant evaluation p. 224, item #3
items on            Pre-post assessments: Personal Counseling Self-Assessment, p. 248,
evaluation form     section V, items a-d; Career, p. 250, items #4, 5, and 6; Consultation, p.
correspond)         253, item #4, Intern Evaluation of the Experience p. 243, item #8

Curriculum          Theories and methods of effective intervention
Area:
Required                  Training seminars: 2 session counseling students in academic
Training Activity          difficulty; working with dreams; managing suicidal risk; grief and
                           loss; self-injurious behaviors; mindfulness in psychotherapy
                          Orientation trainings on crisis intervention
                          Orientation trainings on career development model
                          Read groups manual provided by group supervision coordinator
                          Semi-monthly group supervision seminar
                          Individual supervision
                                            39
Competencies               Understand and implement basic career counseling model
Expected                   Understand and implement effective group counseling
                           Implement basic counseling skills in the services of therapeutic
                            relationship and making therapeutic progress
                          Exhibit professionalism and good judgment in crisis situations
                          Ability to maintain relationships with clients over time, timing
                            intervention as appropriate
How Outcomes              Satisfactory scores on supervisors‟ evaluation forms (see below)
are Measured              Pre and post assessment ratings
                          Attending and satisfactorily presenting clinical cases in case
                            consultation meetings
                          Observation of recorded sessions
                          Review of casenotes by supervisors
                          Feedback from group co-facilitator
                          Formal and informal staff reviews
                          Outcome monitoring forms (POAMS) filled in by clients
                          Engagement in professional psychology service delivery upon
                            completion of the program
Minimum                   Scores of 3 or above on all items of evaluation related to these
Thresholds for              areas
Achievement               Increased scores on post assessments
                          Satisfactory feedback from supervisors, co-facilitators and staff
                          Satisfactory ratings on POAMS outcome monitoring forms
Appendix and        Appendix B Training manual Section IV:
Page Number         PC evaluation, pps. 208-210, item # 7,8,13, 19-22, 28-31; CD evaluation,
for Evaluation      p. 211, item #1-7; Group evaluation, pps. 213-216items # 6-32;
Form Used           Supervision evaluation, pps. 217-219, items # 1-30; Consultation
(specify which      evaluation, pps. 220, items # 2-13; Observer/consultant evaluations, p.
items on            222, items # 1-12; Pre-post assessments: PC, p. 246- 248, sections I – III,
evaluation form     all items; CD, p. 250, items # 2-12; Group, p. 251, items # 2-4;
correspond)         Supervision, p. 252, items # 1-15; Consultation, p. 253, items # 2-11

Curriculum          Theories and methods of empirically based / supported treatments
Area:
Required                  Seminar Training: Accelerated experiential dynamic
Training Activity          psychotherapy, CBT for anxiety disorders, CBT for eating
                           disorders; brief therapy; acceptance and commitment therapy;
                           common factors in therapy, narrative therapy
                          Individual supervision
Competencies              Demonstrate knowledge of when and how to use empirically
Expected                   supported treatments
                          Demonstrate knowledge of common factors across all therapies
                          Ability to integrate above knowledge into clinical service delivery
How Outcomes              Attending and satisfactorily presenting clinical cases in case
are Measured               consultation meetings

                                            40
                         Observation of recorded sessions
                         Discussions with supervisors that demonstrate above knowledge
Minimum             Satisfactory case presentations, discussions with supervisors
Thresholds for
Achievement
Appendix and        No formal evaluation forms for this activity.
Page Number
for Evaluation
Form Used
(specify which
items on
evaluation form
correspond)

Curriculum          Theories and/or methods of consultation
Area:
Required                  Orientation: Training in how to provide clinical consultation to
Training Activity          the university community
                         Seminar: Consultation and organizational development
                         Consultant to residence halls and residence life staff
                         Optional participation in university response committees (e.g.
                           Sexual Violence prevention committee, Eating Disorders
                           consultation group, Flag Team meetings)
Competencies             Effective response to consultation situation
Expected                 Ability to know when to consult with senior staff in a consultation
                           situation
How Outcomes             Satisfactory scores on supervisors‟ evaluation forms (see below)
are Measured             Satisfactory scores on consultants/observers‟ evaluation forms
                         Observations of consultation/outreach activities by
                           consultation/outreach coordinator
                         Pre and post assessment ratings
                         Formal and informal staff reviews
Minimum                  Scores of 3 or above on all items of evaluation related to these
Thresholds for             areas
Achievement              Increased scores on post assesments
                         Satisfactory feedback from supervisors, co-facilitators and staff
Appendix and        Appendix B Training Manual Section IV
Page Number         Consultation supervisor‟s evaluation, p. 220-221, items#1-16 and 1-7
for Evaluation      Observer/consultant evaluations, pps. 222-223, items # 1-12
Form Used           Pre-Post consultation evaluation, p. 253, items #1-11
(specify which
items on
evaluation form
correspond)

Curriculum          Theories and/or methods of evaluation (see IR C-1for definition)
                                            41
Area:
Required                  Training in evaluating consultation and outreach activities in
Training Activity          consultation/outreach supervision seminar
                          Read didactic materials provided in consultation/outreach manual
Competencies              Ability to establish learning objectives for consultation/outreach
Expected                   activities
                          Collect evaluative comments from participants
                          Implement plan to evaluate and improve consultation/outreach
                           activities
How Outcomes              Consultation supervisor‟s evaluation form
are Measured              Co-facilitator/observer consultation evaluation form
                          Intern consultant evaluation forms
                          Observation of consultation/outreach activity by
                           consultation/outreach coordinator and feedback sessions about the
                           consultation/outreach activities
Minimum                   Scores of 3 or above on all items of evaluation related to these
Thresholds for             areas
Achievement
Appendix and        Appendix B Training Manual Section IV
Page Number         Consultation supervisor‟s evaluation, pps. 220-221, items#I:1-16 and
for Evaluation      II:1-7; Observer/consultant evaluations, pps. 222, items # 1-12
Form Used
(specify which
items on
evaluation form
correspond)

Curriculum          Theories and/or methods of supervision
Area:
Required                  Weekly supervision of supervision seminar that includes
Training Activity          dissemination of information on theories and methods of
                           supervision.
                          Read all didactic materials provided in supervision manual
                          Full day seminar on supervision and ethics related to supervision
                          Completion of supervision paper
Competencies              Ability to articulate and apply model of supervision
Expected                  Demonstrated supervision skills appropriate to interns‟ level of
                           development
                          Demonstrated effective formative and summative evaluation skills
                           of supervisees‟ strengths and areas for growth
                          Demonstrated ability to assist trainees in skill development
                           through the use of supervisory interventions
How Outcomes              Observations of recorded supervision sessions
are Measured              Satisfactory completion of supervision paper applying model of
                           supervisory development with supervisee
                          Supervision of supervision coordinator‟s evaluation
                                           42
Minimum                   Scores of 3 or above on supervision coordinator‟s evaluation
Thresholds for
Achievement
Appendix and        Appendix B, Training Manual, Section IV
Page Number         Supervision evaluation, pps. 217-219, items # 1-34
for Evaluation
Form Used
(specify which
items on
evaluation form
correspond)

Curriculum          Strategies of scholarly inquiry
Area:
Required            Specifically addressed in Domain B.1
Training Activity       Completion of assigned readings/manuals for all core competency
                           areas
                        Satisfactory progress on dissertations/doctoral projects and
                           preparation of poster related to dissertation/doctoral project
Competencies            Understand the practitioner scholar model of training and how it
Expected                   applies in the university setting
                        Understand the importance of professional participation as this
                           relates to staying current in the field of professional psychology
                        Preparation of poster presentation of dissertation for Minnesota
                           Psychological Association annual convention
How Outcomes            Conversations with training director during intern check-ins and
are Measured               conversations with supervisors
                        Participation in didactic seminars
                        Memberships and participation in professional organizations and
                           societies
                        Satisfactory presentation of poster at MPA annual meeting
Minimum                 Satisfactory participation in all didactic seminars
Thresholds for          Satisfactory presentation of poster at MPA annual meeting
Achievement
Appendix and        No formal evaluation forms for this activity
Page Number
for Evaluation
Form Used
(specify which
items on
evaluation form
correspond)

Curriculum          Issues of cultural and individual diversity
Area:
Required            Specifically addressed in domain D
                                            43
 Training Activity           Intern Seminars: 2 sessions on working with clients with
                              disabilities; asperger‟s disorder; addressing internalized
                              homophobia in counseling; ethics and diversity; using spirituality
                              in counseling
                             Full Day training on Ethics and Multicultural Competency
                             Written and oral presentations of clinical work with diverse
                              clients
 Competencies                Understanding of ethical imperatives underlying multicultural
 Expected                     competence. Demonstrated awareness of own culture and impact
                              of own culture on clinical work
                             Demonstrated awareness of own beliefs about other cultures
                             Demonstrated ability to work with clients who are diverse,
                              including but not limited to: age, culture, differing abilities,
                              ethnicity, gender, gender identity, national origin, race, religion
                              and spirituality, sexual orientation and socio-economic status.
                             Demonstration of awareness of UST culture, including Catholic
                              culture.
                             Understanding of potential obstacles as well as positive strategies
                              for working with diverse populations
                             Understanding of multiple relationships and boundary issues
                              working with multicultural clients
 How Outcomes                Supervisors‟ evaluation form ratings
 are Measured                Participation in seminar discussions
                             Participation in case consultation discussions
 Minimum                     Scores of 3 or above on all items of evaluation related to these
 Thresholds for               areas
 Achievement
 Appendix and          Appendix B, Training manual Section IV
 Page Number           PC supervisor‟s evaluation, pps. 208-210, item # 29; CD evaluation, p.
 for Evaluation        211, item # 7; Group evaluation, pps. 213-216, item # 29; Supervision
 Form Used             evaluation, pps. 217-219, item # 28; Consultation evaluation, pps. 220-
 (specify which        221, item # II-5
 items on
 evaluation form
 correspond)
5. The program has the responsibility to further the training experiences of its interns
and to promote the integration of practice and scholarly inquiry. Consistent with these
responsibilities, the program should:

       (a) Demonstrate that interns’ service delivery tasks and duties are primarily
           learning oriented and that training considerations take precedence over
           service delivery and revenue generation; and

X      Provide the number of hours interns spend in direct service, as well as the
       number of hours spent in training activities, during a typical week.
       Consortia programs should provide this information for each site.

                                               44
        Service hours: 18-20
        Training hours: 10

X     If your sponsoring institution is revenue-generating, describe how you
      ensure that intern training requirements take precedence over service
      delivery and revenue generation requirements. Consortia programs should
      provide this information for each site:

We are a non revenue-generating agency.

      (b) Ensure that the interns’ educational and practicum experiences are consistent
          with the program’s model, philosophy, and training goals and are appropriate
          for doctoral training in professional psychology.

X     List practicum requirements used during intern selection to ensure that
      interns’ educational and practicum experiences are consistent with the
      program’s model, philosophy, and training goals and are appropriate for
      doctoral training in professional psychology. If you have instructions for
      applicant review and/or a review sheet that you use to review intern
      applicants, include that in an Appendix and provide a page reference to that
      information.

We require a minimum of 1,000 supervised practicum hours, 300 of which must be individual
direct therapy hours. See Application Page and Policy on Intern Selection (Web Brochure,
Appendix A: Applications Page, 116 and Intern Applicant rating form (Appendix L).

Furthermore, given its stated goals and expected competencies, the program is
expected to provide information regarding the minimal level of achievement it requires
for interns to satisfactorily progress through and complete the internship program, as
well as evidence that it adheres to the minimum levels it has set.

X      This information is included in the required Tables under Domains B and F
       in the self-study document.

X      A schedule of all seminar topics and presenters are located in Appendix J,
       Page 446-461 (add additional appendices/page numbers as needed).
       Consortia programs should note at which site(s) these seminars occur, and
       which interns participate in these seminars (i.e., interns at that specific site
       or interns in the consortia as a whole).

       As noted at the beginning of the B.4 table, if seminars are used to provide
       coverage in any of the required curriculum areas, it is the program’s
       responsibility to include adequate information on those seminars within
       the self-study to convey their nature and content. Those descriptions
       should include an abstract/description of the content, learning objectives,


                                             45
       and any other additional material necessary (i.e., bibliography, readings) to
       demonstrate the material covered.

X   Descriptions of all seminars/didactics are provided in Appendix J, Page #
    446-461.

X   (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain B issues in
    your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the last
    review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
    reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
    summary of those issues here in the narrative):

No Domain B issues were noted in our last decision letter or in other correspondence since our
last site visit.

               ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain B

Submit any other documentation relevant to the above questions. Provide clear
references in the responses to the questions above on where the information referred to
is located in the appended documentation.

Be sure to include seminar syllabi and reading lists in appendices so that the nature and
content of the seminar is clearly conveyed.


                          Domain C: Program Resources
    The program demonstrates that it possesses resources of appropriate quality and
                sufficiency to achieve its training goals and objectives.

X      Tables 2(a), 2(b), and 2(c) are provided on pages # 85-89. Consortia
       programs should provide a separate Table 2 (all sections) for each site.

X      Abbreviated curriculum vitae (c.v.) that include all of the requested
       information and that follow the prescribed two page format are provided in
       Appendix M, pages # 469-515 for all training supervisors, including
       adjuncts.

1. The program has formally designated intern training supervisors who:

       (a) Function as an integral part of the site where the program is housed and have
          primary responsibility for professional service delivery;

      Yes X       No        If no, please explain.

       (b) Are sufficient in number to accomplish the program's service delivery and
          supervision of training activities and goals;

                                               46
X      Discuss how the program has determined the sufficiency of number of
       supervisors:

Each of the six senior psychologists is designated as an individual supervisor. All are doctoral
level psychologists who have a licensed competency in supervision. Five have been licensed for
a minimum of three years, with most having significantly more experience (e.g. 15-20 years). At
the time of our last site visit our psychology senior staff training supervisors consisted of four
doctoral level licensed psychologists, so since that time as positions have become available we
have been intentional in selecting psychologists qualified for various supervisory capacities. All
psychology supervisors are members of the training committee and attend semi-monthly training
committee meetings and semi-annual supervisors meetings. All supervisors work at UST a
minimum of .8 FTE and are on 12-month contracts. Each training supervisor has extensive
experience in providing services at a university counseling center. All are generalists with
particular areas of expertise, and all work from a developmental model of training. Our most
senior three career specialists (tenure at UST ranging from 17-24 years and including the director
of the Career Development Center) serve as individual supervisors for the interns. Each holds a
master‟s degree and one is a licensed psychologist. Two are full time, the third is .75 FTE, and
all are on 12 month contracts. All attend supervisors meetings and the director of the Career
Development Center is a member of the training committee.

X      Provide the total FTE (full time equivalent) number of staff that have direct
       responsibility in training. The number of staff should be reflected in Table
       2, but please provide here your best estimate on the number of FTE staff
       dedicated to internship training, based on a 40-hour work week (i.e. 10
       hours per week devoted entirely to the internship program = 0.25 FTE):

Using the ranges provided in Table 2, the number of FTE staff having direct responsibility in
training ranges between .965 – 1.055.

       (c) Are ALL doctoral-level psychologists who have primary professional (clinical)
           responsibility for the cases on which they provide supervision, and are
           appropriately credentialed (i.e., licensed, registered or certified) to practice
           psychology in the jurisdiction in which the internship is located.

       Yes        (Abbreviated c.v. for EACH supervisor should provide evidence.)

       No X     If no, please explain the role of supervisors who do not meet
       these qualifications.

Our three supervising career specialists all hold master‟s degrees (in Counseling Psychology,
Guidance and Counseling, College Student Development), and one is licensed as a psychologist
at the master‟s level.

X      Review Implementing Regulation C-15.

       (d) Are responsible for reviewing with the interns the relevant scientific and
           empirical bases for the professional services delivered by the interns,

                                                47
X      Discuss how your program accomplishes this.

Each training supervisor has extensive experience in providing services at a university
counseling center and each is responsible for reviewing relevant scientific, evidence-based
professional services delivered by the interns. All supervisors are generalists with particular
areas of expertise, and each is active in local, state and national organizations. All have presented
professionally at state and national meetings, and many have served in leadership roles within
these organizations. All work from a developmental perspective and a practitioner scholar model
of training. Supervisors collaborate with intern supervisees to develop and assess learning
contracts each semester. They remain current with the research literature and work with
supervisees on the application of scholarly inquiry to client interventions. Once applied, client
feedback and ongoing evaluation of counseling are used to fine-tune subsequent interventions.
Assessment instruments may be used for initial assessment as well as repeated assessment
measures (e.g. Beck Depression Inventory). Additionally, we use a behavioral health monitor
(POAMS) that all personal counseling clients complete prior to each session. Therefore, both the
intern and the supervisor may receive weekly feedback about symptoms reduction and
therapeutic bond.

       (e) Describe how supervisors, including adjuncts, are of appropriate quality for
           the program’s philosophy or training model and goals and cite evidence from
           the abbreviated curriculum vitae:

See response to question above. Each of the supervising staff has a doctoral degree in counseling
or clinical psychology from a regionally or nationally-accredited institution, or, in the case of
career specialists, a master‟s degree in a related field (Guidance and Counseling, Counseling
Psychology, and College Student Development). All have significant practicum, internship and
work experience in university counseling centers and all are primarily practitioners. All
psychologists ascribe fully to the program‟s philosophy (practitioner-scholar) and training goals.
Two psychologists possess the Psy.D. degree, which is a practitioner-oriented rather than
research-based degree, and three senior staff psychologists also have private therapy practices
outside of their employment at UST as does our master‟s level career specialist (who is also a
licensed psychologist at the master‟s level). Three psychologists teach or have taught in adjunct
positions (at UST and at the University of Minnesota). Most have published articles in peer-
reviewed journals and two currently serve as Ad-hoc reviewers for peer-reviewed journals
(PPRP, TEPP, JCP). Our staff is active in contributing professionally to our local (e.g. MPA,
MCPA, MWP) and national (e.g. ACCTA, AUCCCD, ACPA, Big Ten College Counseling
Centers) communities.

       (f) Describe how supervisors, including adjuncts, participate actively in the
           program’s planning, its implementation, and its evaluation:

Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center operate on a continuous
quality improvement model, and consistently and regularly evaluate the training we provide.
Supervisors receive written evaluations from intern supervisees at the end of each semester. The
training director reviews all evaluations, and any ratings below 3 and/or concerns raised in the
narrative section of the evaluation are discussed with the supervisor. In addition, at the end of
                                                 48
internship, interns are invited to give additional verbal feedback following their written
evaluation. This feedback is shared with the training committee.

Formal supervisors‟ meetings are held each semester where the internship as a whole, and
individual interns, are evaluated. The training committee is made up of a cross-functional team
that includes the Training Director, the Director of Personal Counseling and Testing, all senior
psychologists, the Director of Career Services and one intern. This committee meets every other
week throughout the year and determines training model, goals, training philosophy and training
policies. The training committee also reviews summaries of all intern evaluations and makes
recommendations for improvement. For example, some of the changes made in the past several
years include modifying the career case consultation meetings and changing nature of career
appointment offerings, changing the consultation/outreach seminar structure, strengthening the
partnership and communication between practicum supervision and the supervision of
supervision seminar, and initiating an intern peer consultation group. During yearly staff retreats,
internship planning and evaluation are regular agenda items.

      (g) Describe how supervisors, including adjuncts, serve as professional role
          models to the interns consistent with the training goals and objectives. Please
          provide examples:

Supervisors take seriously their responsibility to serve as competent, confident, ethical role
models for all of the trainees, which is consistent with the program‟s training goals and
objectives. Supervisors strive to maintain the highest standards of ethical and legal conduct as
outlined by APA, the accreditation requirements of the International Association of Counseling
Services (IACS), and the laws of the state of Minnesota. Through the diverse range of their
responsibilities, supervisors demonstrate the full range of professional proficiencies expected of
a psychologist practicing in a university counseling center. We value life-long learning in the
ever-changing fields of psychology and career development. In addition, our staff are highly
committed to embodying a balanced professional and personal life and as such, serve as strong
role models for managing typical work/life stress.

Supervisors maintain appropriate and collegial boundaries with interns and are available both
formally and on an informal basis. Each supervisor provides orientation training and/or an intern
seminar on his/her area(s) of expertise. Supervisors are expected to stay current in the field by
attending professional development seminars, reading relevant professional literature and
participating in regularly scheduled supervision meetings. Personal Counseling and Testing and
Career Development Center provide funding for attendance at professional development
activities, and a number of our supervisors routinely present at local, state, and national
conferences.

Internship training is augmented by input from non-supervising Personal Counseling and Testing
and Career Development Center staff. Interns develop close working relationships with these
individuals, and many form rewarding personal relationships as well. For example, interns have
co-led groups with non-supervising senior staff members and/or have co-presented seminars
and/or outreach presentations with them, and have worked with our former Testing Coordinator
to supervise the administration of group tests offered by the agency. Adjunct seminar presenters


                                                 49
routinely extend the invitation to interns to contact them with additional professional questions
and concerns and serve as excellent resources for interns during and after their internships.

In addition to the designated intern training staff, the program may include appropriately
qualified adjunct staff/supervisors to augment and expand interns’ training experiences,
provided these adjuncts are integrated into the program and are held to standards of
competence appropriate to their role/contribution within the program (as in 1 d, e and g
above).

2. The program has an identifiable body of interns who:

        (a) Are of sufficient number to ensure meaningful peer interaction, support,
            and socialization;

X      Describe briefly how the program fosters meaningful peer interaction,
       support, and socialization and how it determines whether the number of
       interns is sufficient for these purposes. Any programs in which interns are
       often dispersed across sites should note how interns at different sites have
       the opportunity to interact with one another.

Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center have a yearly cohort of three
interns. Intern offices are adjacent to each other, offering opportunities for frequent informal
interaction and support. Prior to beginning internships, interns are given emails for each other
and encouraged to contact one another and begin building relationships. During orientation
interns are encouraged to continue to development of their relationships both informally during
“down time” and also more formally during group activities (e.g. field trip with the Training
Director). Interns also meet for an hour a week with the training director to informally discuss
their general experiences of internship and have used these meetings to process their interactions
as a cohort. Interns may co-facilitate groups with each other during second semester. Our interns
also attend seminars with the four interns from the University of Minnesota counseling center,
thus affording them the opportunity to socialize with peers in a similar internship setting.
Furthermore, interns have the ability to network with all interns from Minnesota APA-
Accredited Internship Centers (MAAPIC) twice per year at full day workshops.

       (b) Are either in the process of completing a doctoral degree in professional
           psychology from a regionally accredited, degree-granting institution in the
           United States or have completed a doctoral degree in psychology in a field
           other than professional psychology and are certified by a director of graduate
           professional psychology training as having participated in an organized
           program in which the equivalent of pre-internship training has been acquired
           at a regionally accredited degree-granting institution in the United States. In
           the case of Canadian programs, the institution is publicly recognized as a
           member in good standing by the Association of Universities and Colleges of
           Canada;

X      Review Implementing Regulation C-7.


                                                50
X      Explain how the program determines this:

All interns in the past 7 years have come from regionally and nationally accredited institutions,
and all have come from APA-accredited doctoral programs in professional psychology. Most
(52.4%) have come from universities ranked in the top 10 of national rankings for Psychology
doctoral programs, and 61.9% hail from schools ranked in the top 20. Interns from 2003-2010
have come from the following schools: University of Minnesota Counseling and Student
Personnel Psychology program, University of Minnesota Counseling Psychology program,
University of Akron, University of Wisconsin (Madison), Loyola University (Maryland),
Marquette University, University of University of North Dakota, University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign, University of Kansas, University of Florida, Southern Illinois University
(Carbondale), Pacific University, and the University of St. Thomas. When we screen for
interviews during the selection process we ensure that applicants come from accredited
programs.

       (c) Have completed adequate and appropriate supervised practicum training,
           which must include face-to-face delivery of professional psychological
           services;

X     Explain how the program determines that interns’ practicum experiences
      are sufficient for the program’s requirements:

As seen in Table 3, interns are consistently selected from accredited counseling or clinical
psychology programs. We require them to have a minimum of 1000 hours of practica, with a
minimum of 300 hours of face-to-face direct client contact. Successful applicants have also had
prior experience working in a university counseling setting or have been able to articulate the
link between their experiences and learning/working within a university setting.

      (d) Have interests, aptitudes, and prior academic and practicum experiences that
          are appropriate for the internship’s goals and objectives;

X     Explain how the program determines that interns’ qualifications are
      appropriate for your training program (a description of Match procedures is
      not sufficient):

Applicants are screened for fit with our setting on their experiences and interests in each of our
core competency areas in addition to their academic achievement and openness to learning. Most
interns have completed practica in college or university counseling centers and most state that
they would prefer careers in such settings. Hence, most are familiar with the competency areas
offered by our training program and desire additional training in these areas.

       (e) How are interns prepared to have an understanding of the program’s
           philosophy, goals, and model of training?

X      Specify when and how interns are provided with information about the
       program’s philosophy, goals, and model of training.


                                                51
Our program‟s philosophy, goals, and model of training are outlined in detail on our website and
program information is also shared with applicants during intern interviews. During orientation,
interns thoroughly read and discuss with the training director all aspects of our philosophy, goals,
and model of training, ensuring that all interns have adequate understanding before beginning
their clinical experiences.

       (f) How are interns involved in the activities and decisions that serve to enhance
           internship training and education?

X      Describe when and how interns provide feedback to the program and are
       involved in activities and decisions that enhance their training and
       education.

Interns evaluate each component of the training program on a regular basis. For example,
orientation is evaluated at the end of the process (see Appendix T for selected outcome data).
Each core competency is evaluated each semester, as is each supervisor. Each of the speakers for
the intern seminar is evaluated as well. In weekly meetings with the Training Director, interns
discuss and provide suggestions for improving their training and education. Finally, the overall
internship is evaluated at the end of the year (Appendix R). Intern feedback is taken very
seriously. For example, as a result of intern feedback and subsequent discussion in Training
Committee, training for the career competency was scheduled during orientation rather than later
in the fall to accommodate the interns‟ need to feel comfortable early on with the provision of
the full range of career services offered by the Career Development Center.

Interns are socialized into professional psychology by participating in those activities expected of
a counseling staff member. Interns are full participants at counseling staff meetings and an intern
always serves on the Training Committee to ensure that intern perspectives are consistently
included in decision-making. They participate in both the screening of intern applications and
participate in rank ordering of intern applicants. Interns also participate in informal discussions
with staff members about a range of issues relevant to professional psychology. A former intern
survey was conducted in July for graduates of the internship since 2003. Results of that survey,
including comments and suggestions for improvement, are included in Appendix N.

       (g) Interns have a training status at the site that is officially recognized in the form
           of a title or designation such as “psychology intern” (consistent with the
           licensing laws of the jurisdiction in which the internship is located).

X      Review Implementing Regulations C-4 and C-6.

X      What is the training status label used within the program?

Interns are formally recognized by the title “Pre-doctoral Intern”. This status is conveyed to
clients at the start of counseling both verbally and in written form. Clients are required to provide
written consent to video-recording. All casenotes and reports are co-signed by the supervisor.

X      Tables 3(a), 3(b), and 3(c) are provided on pages # 90-92


                                                 52
X      Table 4 is provided on page # 93-94.

X      Table 5 is provided on page # 95-98.

3. The program has the necessary additional resources required to achieve its training
goals and objectives. The program works with the administration of the sponsor
institution to develop a plan for the acquisition of those additional resources that may be
necessary for program development.

       Note: Consortia programs should specify the below information for each
       site at which interns complete training/perform services.

       (a) Describe financial support for intern stipends, staff, and training activities;

Personal Counseling and Career Development Center training resources are excellent and we
have full administrative support from our Vice President for Student Affairs, who advocates on
our behalf with senior administrators. Our intern stipend has risen consistently over the years to
its current annual amount of $25,410 per intern. There are some professional development funds
(around $100.00 per intern) as well, so that interns may attend local seminars on topics of
interest, purchase books and/or receive assistance with their dissertations (e.g. providing postage
for mailings, copying). Additionally, as part of her service to the Minnesota Psychological
Association‟s Education and Training committee, the Training Director was able to negotiate a
free MPA workshop for all interns in APA-accredited sites in Minnesota. We have adequate
professional development monies that also allow us to tap into the considerable expertise of
psychologists in the Twin Cities, as a significant number of our training seminars are presented
by outside speakers who are locally or nationally recognized for their expertise in a particular
area (see Training Seminar Schedule, Appendix J and Appendix M for seminar presenter CVs).
Interns receive 10 days of paid vacation and 5 days of paid professional development leave as
well as all university-paid holidays. We continue to advocate for health benefits for our interns,
who currently purchase these independently or through their doctoral programs.

Senior staff receive professional development money ($1,200.00 per year) which supports their
attendance at conferences and professional workshops. The Training Director typically uses this
money to attend the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies conference and the
Director typically attends the Association of University and College Counseling Center
Director‟s conference. Membership in professional organizations (e.g. APA, MPA) is fully
supported, as are all state licensure fees. Senior staff salaries are consistent with local market
averages. Despite challenging economic times the university has been able to provide consistent
annual salary increases.


X      Review Implementing Regulation C-9.

       (b) Describe clerical and technical support:

The office manager of Personal Counseling and Testing, who has been a UST employee for over
10 years, is an invaluable resource and significant support to interns. She handles all reception
                                                53
duties, all scheduling and client case file management, and assists the Training Director with
intern orientation scheduling, applications and file management, and an assortment of other
administrative tasks throughout the training year. The Career Development Center‟s office
coordinator and front desk staff make intern career appointments. Personal Counseling and
Testing and Career Development Center have a technical support manager in the suite who is
available to assist interns with their technical needs, as is the University‟s Technical Support
Services department, located in an adjacent building.

       (c) Describe training materials and equipment:

We have a rich library of books and videotapes to enhance internship training. See Appendix D
for a listing of current library holdings. We review our resources on a regular basis and purchase
relevant books and training tapes as needed. Recent purchases include the Cognitive Behavioral
Therapy videos from the APA Psychotherapy Videotape Series, and books on Multicultural
Assessment and Eating Disorders. All intern offices are equipped with web cameras. Computers,
which are connected to e-mail, the Internet and local printers, are replaced every three years to
ensure the latest programming and technology. There is a state of the art Career Resource Center,
which has extensive career information both in print and through the Internet, and has recently
been refurnished. Copy machines, printers, and basic office supplies are readily available for
intern use.

       (d) Describe physical facilities and training settings:

As described in our website (Appendix A), the pre-doctoral internship boasts state of the art
physical training facilities. Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center are
located together on the third floor of Murray Herrick Hall. Interns have large, bright private
offices in a suite of offices in one wing, with the seminar and meeting conference room located
there as well. Each office is equipped with Logitech webcams so that interns may tape and
review their therapy and supervision sessions. Each office has a “busy light”, indicating when
interns are in session with clients. The suite is newly carpeted, and all intern offices are
soundproofed. Ergodynamic office chairs have been purchased for each individual office since
our last site visit. We have a fully functional library in our group therapy room, which is also
equipped with wall-mounted cameras, a television, VCR and DVD player. The agency is housed
on the center of campus in a building that is home to most Student Affairs departments, and is
completely accessible. All buildings and offices are well maintained, and facilities management
staff promptly make repairs when necessary.

       (e) Describe the specific training settings provided which are appropriate to the
       program’s training model.

The majority of training takes place in the University Counseling Center, as described above. As
a comprehensive counseling center that provides personal and career counseling as well as
outreach, consultation, testing and assessment services, our suite is an ideal site for training in
the delivery of services to a university population. Interns also receive seminar training at the
University of Minnesota Counseling and Consulting Services, the private offices of local
psychologists, or other APA- accredited internship sites (e.g. the Minneapolis VA for the semi-
annual MAAPIC training). Consistent with our practitioner scholar training model, integration of
                                                 54
research and practice occurs at all levels. Each training activity is evaluated and the data used for
feedback and continuous improvement of both the program and the intern. Both the University of
St. Thomas and Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center ascribe to a
developmental model of education.

4. Consortia: An internship program may consist of, or be located under, a single
administrative entity (institution, agency, school, department, etc.) or may take the form
of a consortium. A consortium is comprised of multiple independently administered
entities that have, in writing, formally agreed to pool resources to conduct a training or
education program.

X      Not applicable (the program is not a consortium).

X   (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain C issues in
    your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the last
    review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
    reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
    summary of those issues here in the narrative):

Following our 2003 site visit, we were asked to update the Commission on Accreditation on the
stability of funding for our internship program given budgetary cuts that were made during the
prior accreditation cycle (1998-2003). This was done in a letter to Susan Zlotlow dated June 28,
2004 (See Appendix O) and summarized the positive changes made since the site visit (re-
instatement of one senior psychologist to full-time status, increase in internship stipend, coverage
by our St. Paul Career Development specialists for trainings that had taken place on our
Minneapolis campus).

We are pleased to report hiring of an additional licensed psychologist at .91 FTE on our
Minneapolis campus, bringing our total number of licensed senior staff psychologists to 6 since
the time of our last site visit. We are also pleased to report that through continuous advocacy by
the Training Director and the Director of Personal Counseling to our Dean of Students and Vice
President for Student Affairs, we have achieved significant increases to our internship stipend,
from $17,510 at the time of the last site visit to $25,410 today. Our professional development
funds have remained relatively stable over time despite increases in the costs of licensure,
attending conferences, etc.. Hence we will continue to advocate for sufficient funds to support
the professional development that is required for licensure as psychologists and for attendance at
the national conferences of our professional organizations (e.g. AUCCCD, ACCTA, APPIC).

               ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain C

Complete all sections of Tables 2, 3, 4, and 5. Ensure numbers of staff/interns are
consistent across all sections of the tables.

Provide abbreviated CV’s for relevant staff in Table 2 as indicated by the instructions for
that table.

Include any documentation related to intern selection in an Appendix.
                                                 55
          Domain D: Cultural and Individual Differences and Diversity
     The program recognizes the importance of cultural and individual differences and
                       diversity in the training of psychologists.

1. The program has made systematic, coherent, and long-term efforts to attract and
retain interns and staff from differing ethnic, racial, and personal backgrounds into the
program. Consistent with such efforts, it acts to ensure a supportive and encouraging
learning environment appropriate for the training of diverse individuals and the provision
of training opportunities for a wide spectrum of individuals. Further, the program avoids
any actions that would restrict program access on grounds that are irrelevant to success
in internship training or a career in professional psychology.3

          NOTE: Describing only the program’s outcomes (whether successful or
          not) in this area is not sufficient. The primary focus in this domain is on
          the systematic, coherent, and long-term efforts the program has made in
          recruiting and retaining diverse students and faculty. These should be
          described as efforts to recruit diversity as opposed to avoiding
          discriminatory practices. Refer to Domain A.5 of the GandP for Doctoral
          Programs for the definition of “diversity” as used in this domain.

X         Describe the program’s efforts to attract and retain diverse STAFF.
          Consortial programs should provide this information by site, if such efforts
          are coordinated separately.

UST‟s faculty and administration are committed to the objective of promoting diversity within
our internship, and we consistently seek to improve recruitment of trainees and faculty from
diverse backgrounds. Recruiting a more diverse group of interns and faculty has been and
continues to be a long-term training committee goal. Applicants are considered strong when they
demonstrate a desire to work in a multicultural work environment and can make a positive
contribution to the value of diversity on the staff. Staff position openings are advertised in
venues targeted specifically to minority populations (e.g. CLUES – Comunidades Latinas Unidas
En Servicio, MinnesotaDiversity.com, Black Ivy League, MN Association of Black
Psychologists) as well as distributed through national listservs (AUCCCD, ACCTA) with
statements encouraging applications from minority applicants. When adding new seminar
presenters to our faculty, concerted efforts are made (in conjunction with the University of
Minnesota internship program) to invite diverse speakers and such individuals are given priority
over similarly qualified majority candidates. Annual MAAPIC presentations on cultural diversity
3
  See Footnote 4 of the Accreditation Guidelines and Principles for Doctoral Programs: “This requirement does not exclude
programs from having a religious affiliation or purpose and adopting and applying admission and employment policies that directly
relate to this affiliation or purpose so long as: (1) Public notice of these policies has been made to applicants, students, faculty, or
staff before their application or affiliation with the program; and (2) the policies do not contravene the intent of other relevant portions
of this document or the concept of academic freedom. These policies may provide a preference for persons adhering to the religious
purpose or affiliation of the program, but they shall not be used to preclude the admission, hiring, or retention of individuals because
of the personal and demographic characteristics is described in Domain A, Section 5 of this document (and referred to as cultural
and individual diversity). This footnote is intended to permit religious policies as to admission, retention, and employment only to the
extent that they are protected by the United States Constitution. It will be administered as if the United States Constitution governed
its application.”

                                                                    56
are offered primarily by individuals of color (e.g. Dr. Manajeh Danshpor (Iranian Muslim) in
‟05-‟06, Dr. Jessica Henderson Daniel (African-American) in ‟07-‟08 and „08-‟09, and this year
APA-president electDr. Melba Vasquez (Latina, Mexican-American). All hiring conforms to the
University of St. Thomas‟s Equal Employment Opportunity Policy and is in compliance with the
University‟s Diversity Action Plan. In terms of gender and age, there is a mix of male and female
faculty from seminars through senior levels. Religious diversity spans the gamut from self-
proclaimed atheists to conservative Christian. We have asked interns and staff members from our
Multicultural Student Services office to conduct multicultural audits of our counseling center,
and have use these recommendations to enhance the services we offer as well as to make our
center more inviting to diverse populations.

We encourage staff and intern participation in diversity professional development opportunities
on campus (some examples of recent offerings include presentations on American culture,
Muslim perceptions of the Iraq war, challenges faced by Asian Pacific Islander students, and
gender and race in mass media), and we provide outreach and consultation services to offices on
campus that serve students from underrepresented communities. Our professional publications
and presentations reflect our value of diversity by utilizing inclusive language and incorporating
examples that mirror a pluralistic society.

Underrepresentation of racial and ethnic groups in the mental health workforce is a serious
problem (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001). Our faculty composition does
not differ substantially from national statistics on diversity among psychologists, nor does it
differ remarkably from local institutions. The relatively low rates of diverse students and faculty
in our internship and other Minnesota internships reflect the Minnesota demographics. A review
of 8 of the 9 APA-accredited psychology internships in Minnesota between 2002/03 and 2008-
2009 revealed that the diversity of UST‟s core staff was equal to local programs. Minnesota has
a less heterogeneous population than other regions of the country, though the proportion of our
population that is ethnically and culturally diverse is growing. The current demographics are
illustrated in the 2000 data from the US Census Bureau (next census is to be conducted in 2010)
presented below.

Group              % Minnesota Population            % US Population
White                                89.4                   75.1
Black or African American             3.5                   12.3
Hispanic or Latino                    2.9                   12.5
Asian                                 2.9                    3.6
American Indian and Alaska Native       1.1                  0.9
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander      n.a.         0.1
Other                                 1.3                    5.5
2 or more races                       1.7                    2.4
Foreign born                          5.3                   11.1

X      Describe the program’s efforts to attract and retain diverse INTERNS.

We individually contact by email all students identified by the APA as minority applicants
inviting them to apply to the internship (see Appendix W for sample letter), invite all qualified
minority applicants for interviews, and strive to extend training offers to minority applicants

                                                 57
through the ranking system. Staff and interns informally network with potential internship
applicants and program directors at local and national conferences. Qualified applicants who
demonstrate advanced experience and training with underrepresented communities and/or
identify as members of an underrepresented community on the AAPI are granted interviews.
Intern applicants are asked questions assessing their affirmation of diversity and asked to
respond to a clinical vignette with someone from a culture different from their own. We have
ranked ethnically diverse candidates among our top choices in 6 out of the past 7 years. Foreign
nationals were among our top choices in 2 of those 7 years, and LGBT students were among the
top choices 6 of those years. Three ethnically diverse students, one Foreign National, and three
LGBT candidates have matched with us over that time period, with most of the other diverse
candidates accepting internships in a geographical area closer to their doctoral programs or their
hometowns.

X      Describe the outcomes of the program’s efforts to attract and retain a
       diverse group of:

Interns: Since 2003 one third of our matched interns (33.3%) have represented diverse
categories. We have matched with a Latino gay male, a Latina lesbian, a Canadian citizen, a bi-
sexual female, a bi-cultural female, and two additional gay or lesbian-identified counselors. All
have successfully completed their internships with us. We strive to attract a diverse practicum
cohort as well. Seven of our 21 practicum trainees (33.3%) have been diverse students, including
6 international students (5 female, 1 male), one lesbian, and a gay male. During that period,
offers were made to an additional 9 diverse students, who accepted offers at other practicum
sites. All practicum students successfully completed their practica with us.

Staff: 4 out of 6 of our senior psychology staff come from underrepresented communities
including communities of color, international and sexual orientation. Since our last site visit
Personal Counseling and Testing and the Career Development Center have hired a Hispanic
psychologist (2005 – selected from among +/- 30 total applicants); a Hispanic career specialist
(2005 – applicant pool statistics unavailable); one foreign national psychologist (2007 –
Canadian National, 56 total applicants/4 persons of color); and a Hmong Career Development
Coordinator (2008, 316 total applicants/48 persons of color). One of the two psychologists at the
Life Work Center is a gay male psychologist who was hired shortly before our previous site visit,
and our Director of Personal Counseling holds dual citizenship.

X      Describe how the program acts to ensure a supportive and encouraging
       learning environment appropriate for training diverse interns and providing
       training opportunities with diverse individuals:

All staff who work with interns are expected to provide an emotionally and physically safe
learning environment for interns. Our staff, in training committee meetings and staff retreats,
consistently affirms our belief that a supportive environment is essential for interns to take risks
and grow both personally and professionally. The Training Director intentionally sets the tone
for the preferred climate for interns during orientation by inviting introductions based on
individual‟s various cultures. Additionally, interns are given the opportunity to provide feedback
to supervisors and the program and any concerns about non-supportive or a discouraging
atmosphere are addressed.
                                                 58
X      Explain how the program avoids any actions that would restrict program
       access on grounds that are irrelevant to success (policy should be
       referenced in Domain A.6):

Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center abide by all University
policies for equal access and non-discrimination and the Personal Counseling and Testing
mission statement intentionally affirms our commitment to diversity. Our offices invited a
University of Minnesota disabilities consultant to conduct an audit of Personal Counseling and
Testing and Career Development Center and offices were made completely accessible to those
with mobility impairments. All internship applicants are evaluated according to the same
standards, standards that are focused on the skills necessary to successfully complete an
internship at our center. Our internship has taken a leadership role in training interns on
spirituality as part of counseling and we also provide comprehensive training on working with
clients within a Catholic culture, however a religious background is not a pre-requisite for
internship.

2. The program has a thoughtful and coherent plan to provide interns with relevant
knowledge and experiences about the role of cultural and individual diversity in
psychological phenomena and professional practice. It engages in positive efforts
designed to ensure that interns will have opportunities to learn about cultural and
individual diversity as it relates to the practice of psychology. The avenues by which
these goals are achieved are to be developed by the program.

X      Describe (do not just list) in the table below the components of the
       program’s plan to provide interns with relevant knowledge and experiences
       about the role of cultural and individual diversity in training and practice.
       Consortial programs should provide a separate table for each site if
       activities differ.

        Description of Training Activity                    Method of Evaluation of Intern Competency
                                                                              for this Activity
Orientation activities (see paragraph below for full      Training Director assesses intern participation in this
descriptions)                                             activity
Intern Seminars addressing diversity topics (see           Training Director assesses intern participation in this
Appendix J                                                activity
Full Day workshop on the topic of diversity (as part      Training Director assesses intern participation in this
of intern seminar series – see Appendix J)                activity
Culture sharing exercise within the intern cohort         Training Director assesses intern participation in this
facilitated by the Training Director                      activity
Cultural sharing discussions between interns and their    Individual supervisors assess intern participation in
individual supervisors each semester                      this activity – Rating of 3 or above on evaluations
Multicultural case presentations                          Training staff assesses intern participation in this
                                                          activity

The Training Committee has made thoughtful, systematic and concerted efforts to provide
quality training in multiculturalism and diversity. During their orientation, interns review the
                                                59
APA Guidelines for Providers of Psychological Services to Ethnic, Linguistic and Culturally
Diverse Populations (Appendix B, Section X, p. 381), and take a self-assessment of their
multicultural counseling competencies (Arredondo et. al, 1996). They then contract with their
supervisors to incorporate action steps into their learning contracts. Multicultural and
international students comprise the majority of diverse clientele seen in our counseling center, so
presentations by the staff from Multicultural Student Services and International Student are
included as part of intern orientation. Additionally, readings on counseling diverse populations
are included in the training manual and discussed during orientation (e.g. APA Division 44
Guidelines for Psychotherapy with Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Clients, ACPA Commission for
Career Development Career Counseling with Gay and Lesbian, and Bi-sexual Persons: an
under-served population). Interns also attend orientation sessions on issues specific to working
within a Catholic culture and receive training in the use of spirituality in counseling. Our internal
library and shared local computer directory are rich with current journal articles or resources
related to multicultural counseling, particularly LGBT populations and spiritual diversities, (See
Appendices D (Library Holdings) and J (Seminar Schedule Descriptions) for interns' use
throughout the year. Since the dominant culture at UST is White Irish Catholic, interns read a
chapter from Ethnicity and Family Therapy (Monica McGoldrick) entitled "Irish Families",
which helps them further their understanding of this culture. Interns attend a full day of training
each October with other interns from APA-Accredited Internship sites in MN, the focus of which
is ethnic and racial diversity and multiculturalism.

Interns are also given opportunities to provide outreach to offices on campus that serve students
from underrepresented communities. For example, each summer interns work with our
Multicultural Student services (MSS) office to provide a support group and psycho-educational
workshops for incoming students of color. Interns have also served as liaisons to both MSS and
our International Student Services office.

We view multiculturalism and diversity as a transcending core competency area, and thus
demonstration of interns‟ skills in working with multicultural issues and an ability to show
awareness of client‟s culture (e.g. family, ethnic/racial group, gender, sexual orientation,
religion) is evaluated as part of core areas (Appendix B, Section IV). Interns must score at least a
3 on items addressing these issues on the individual supervisor‟s evaluation of their progress.
Interns are expected to be sensitive to diversity issues in all interactions and receive formal and
informal feedback throughout the year. They are expected to present at least one diverse client
per semester at both personal and career case conference.

X   (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain D issues in
    your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the last
    review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
    reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
    summary of those issues here in the narrative):

There were no Domain D issues noted in our last decision letter or in other correspondence.

               ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain D



                                                 60
Include all documents on institutional, agency and program policies and procedures on
nondiscriminatory recruitment and personnel practices (should be referenced in Domain
A.6).

Provide samples of staff and intern recruitment announcements or advertisements, etc.
to document the program’s efforts in recruiting diverse staff and interns.

Append and reference information or copies of training calendars listing diversity
training events and experiences to document the program’s efforts in educating interns
about diversity.



                           Domain E: Intern-Staff Relations
  The program demonstrates that its education, training, and socialization experiences
are characterized by mutual respect and courtesy between interns and training staff and
that it operates in a manner that facilitates interns' training and educational experiences.

1. The program recognizes the rights of interns and staff to be treated with courtesy and
respect. In order to maximize the quality and effectiveness of the interns’ learning
experiences, all interactions among interns, training supervisors, and staff should be
collegial and conducted in a manner that reflects the highest standards of the profession
(see APA “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct” American
Psychologist, December 2002). The program has an obligation to inform interns of
these principles and of their avenues of recourse should problems arise.

X      Internship and institutional documents that discuss intern rights (due
       process) and grievance procedures are located in Appendix P, page # 542-
       550 (add additional appendices/page numbers as needed for different
       documents).

X      Describe how interns are provided training consistent with the most
       current APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct:

Intern orientation: Intern training begins with a three week orientation. Throughout this period,
interns are provided with the following training elements regarding ethical practice: Interns are
required to read the Personal Counseling and Testing Training Manual (Appendix B, Section
VII). Under Professional Practice Issues for Trainees (p. 282), the first item regarding intern
behavior and performance states, “As colleagues in training, interns and practicum students
follow the standard of good professional practice formulated by the American Psychological
Association and all other principles of ethical practice that pertain to senior professional staff.”
The APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (American Psychological
Association, 2002) is included in Section VII of the Training Manual. Interns are required to read
this document and both the Training Director and Director of Personal Counseling and Testing
subsequently discuss it with them. Sections IX and X of the intern manual address ethical
management of client records and counseling procedures, and interns receive training from
several senior psychology staff and our office coordinator on employing these procedures. They
                                                61
receive training on ethical issues in college/university counseling centers from the Director of
Personal Counseling and Testing.

Ongoing clinical supervision: Senior staff psychologists and individual counseling supervisors
have ongoing discussions of relevant ethical principles with interns during the course of
individual and group supervisions. Ethical principles for group therapists, supervision and
consultation are covered in respective seminars. Our staff have a variety of theoretical
orientations and applied techniques, all of which are discussed openly and respectfully in case
consultation meetings. This models collegiality around differing approaches to clients as well as
informs interns on areas of practice with which they may not be familiar (e.g. emotion-focused
therapy, eating disorders).

Full day training during spring term on Clinical Supervision: Ethical and Practice Issues. A joint
training for interns from all Minnesota APA-Accredited internship sites addresses ethics as
related to providing clinical supervision. This training is conducted by Gary R. Schoener, M.Eq.,
an internationally recognized expert in supervision and ethics. All supervising staff are invited to
this event each year.

Other relevant APA Ethical Principles used in our training program:

1.       Principle 7.01. Consistent with this principle, our internship offers experiences and
training in a broad range of interests and activities valuable to a generalist, while emphasizing
the development of skills necessary for work in a university counseling center. We meet or
exceed the amount, frequency, and duration (12 months) of supervision provided (minimum of
two hours per week provided by a licensed psychologist over 12 months), consistent with
standard licensure requirements for pre-doctoral experience.
2.       Principle 7.02. In accordance with this principle, the training goals and objectives,
program content, stipend/benefits, and expectations of the internship are outlined on our website.
3.       Principle 7.03 (b). Personal Counseling and Testing is in compliance with this principle,
which states that “when engaged in teaching or training, psychologists present psychological
information accurately.” This is achieved through commitment to examining and presenting
empirical research in presentations.
4.       Principle 7.04. In accordance with this principle, Personal Counseling and Testing
training staff does not require the disclosure of many forms of personal information. In our
training program, however, we believe that trainees can benefit from sharing some forms of
personal information. For example, counselors‟ personal reactions in the therapy room may
provide valuable information about the course of therapy. UST also values the exploration of
cultural diversity through individual and group counseling supervision; these opportunities
represent avenues where trainees and staff can exchange information about their own diverse
identities with others. We believe that personal and professional growth go hand-in-hand, and
there are times when personal information is introduced into the supervisory relationship. At
such times, the supervisor‟s exploration of personal qualities and history will be carried out with
a focus on enhancing the trainee‟s effectiveness in a helping relationship. The supervisor or
trainer is also expected to carry out all such exploration in a manner that is not perceived as
coercive by the trainee. Given that a safe, trusting, and collaborative relationship between
supervisor and supervisee is important to promote effective communication in these situations, it


                                                 62
is expected that the establishment and maintenance of such a relationship be addressed at the
outset of work together.
     As noted, while the supervisor may inquire about personal data that might be influencing
trainees‟ clinical work, the trainee still retains the right to decide how much and when to divulge
personal information. The supervisor or trainer is expected to respect a refusal to disclose
personal information but to also explore ways in which the relationship can be improved so that
personal disclosures can occur more effectively.

2. Program staff are accessible to the interns and provide them with a level of guidance
and supervision that encourages successful completion of the internship. The staff
provide appropriate professional role models and engage in actions that promote the
interns’ acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies consistent with the
program’s training goals.

Interns consistently characterize the relationship between themselves and staff as respectful and
collegial. They rate relationships with staff as one of the best parts of the internship (See
Appendix N for comments of former interns and results of survey conducted in the summer of
2009). Interns are treated from the beginning of their experience as both competent and highly
qualified, and are treated by staff both within and outside of Student Affairs as fully-functioning
professionals. Staff are very responsive to and respectful of interns; they maintain an open door
policy, described more fully in the next paragraph, and are genuinely interested in interns‟
development and welfare.

X      What mechanisms are in place to ensure that staff:

X Are accessible?

The organizational culture at Personal Counseling and Testing is open, supportive, collegial, and
professional, yet low-key. Interns are viewed as respected and integral members of the Personal
Counseling and Testing and Career Development Center teams. Senior staff have an open door
policy under which interns are invited to seek consultation from any staff member who is not
with a client. Staff are highly accessible on both an informal (e.g. brief conversations, casual
discussions) and formal (supervision, training seminars) basis. Case consultation and staff
meetings are scheduled so that everyone can attend, which enhances interns‟ contact with staff
who may not be serving as supervisors. A senior staff member is required to be in the suite while
interns are seeing clients. If an intern‟s supervisor is going to be out of the office during a
regularly scheduled supervision time, the supervisor either reschedules that session or arranges
with another supervisor to provide back-up supervision.

X Support successful completion of the internship?

Shortly after each semester begins, interns and their supervisors identify professional goals that
are formalized into a learning contract. At the mid-semester point, supervision pairs exchange
informal feedback on intern progress and satisfaction on an array of supervisory variables, and
repeat this process at the end of each supervisory rotation through the exchange of formal written
evaluations that are reviewed by the Training Director. The Training Director meets with the
intern cohort weekly for consultation on training needs, and facilitates periodic meetings of

                                                 63
intern supervisors where perceptions and recommendations for each intern‟s progress are
exchanged. A larger Training Committee meets every other week, addressing coordination of
training objectives and other issues in the internship. Interns have a standing representation on
this committee. Former interns are often asked to return to present seminars to current interns,
which evidences the fact that staff see them as professionals and experts in the field. This models
to our current interns our support for and value of UST pre-doctorally trained interns as
professionals in the field.

X Are appropriate role models for the program?

Mentoring and the quality of supervision received are consistently rated among the greatest
strengths of our training program (see, Appendix N, comments section). Senior staff at Personal
Counseling and Testing value and reflect training in the generalist tradition. Table 2c and
accompanying staff CVs (Appendix M) fully describe the activities of our staff, who remain
active in the profession through teaching, supervising, attending professional conferences,
presenting at conferences, keeping abreast of current developments in the field, etc.. All
supervising psychology staff are licensed psychologists who conduct therapy and each attends
national, regional or local conferences on an annual basis to maintain their knowledge in the
field. All supervising career specialists (one of whom is also a licensed psychologist) are
likewise active in a variety of professional organizations. As we are a small staff and our culture
is one of sharing our resources, we provide positive role-modeling by sharing with interns what
we know, what we have, and what we have learned through our continuing education and
professional development. Interns have access to a shared computer directory on which we keep
copies of Power Point presentations and handouts we have used in professional presentations.
We subscribe to relevant professional journals (e.g., Professional Psychology: Research and
Practice; Journal of Counseling Psychology) and share this material with interns on a regular
basis, which helps to enhance interns‟ knowledge and skills in our competency areas.

Interns choose supervisors from the senior staff for their experience and appropriateness as role
models. Supervisors consult with the Training Director and one another on a regular basis and
interns formally evaluate their supervisors at the end of each semester. The Training Director
receives these evaluations in order to remain informed about any concerns expressed about
interns‟ supervision experiences. The Training Director also has an informal opportunity to hear
about potential problems with supervisors during weekly meetings with interns.

X Promote acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies?

See previous two paragraphs above. Interns receive two hours per week of supervision for
individual therapy clients, two hours per month of individual supervision for their career clients,
two hours per week of group case consultation, one hour per month of career case consultation,
two hours per month of psychiatric case consultation, one hour per week of group supervision for
their supervision of practicum students, two hours per month of group supervision of group
counseling, and two hours per month of group supervision for consultation/outreach. Interns‟
offices are equipped with Logitech web cameras that allow trainees and supervisors to review
sessions for skill implementation and development. Interns also attend a weekly seminar series
(many of which are taught by senior staff psychologists) on a variety of topics (see Appendix J).


                                                 64
Interns are given the opportunity to regularly evaluate their supervisors‟ performance on
informal and formal bases.

3. Describe how the program shows respect for cultural and individual diversity among
their interns by treating them in accord with the principles contained in Domain A,
Section 5 of this document. You may reference information already provided in this
self-study, include Appendix and page #.

Consistent with Personal Counseling and Testing‟s commitment to supporting diversity on our
campus, we honor the unique contributions interns bring to our center (e.g. culturally, ethnically,
experientially) and are enriched and enhanced by the depth and breadth of knowledge that occurs
through multicultural interactions. Domains B (pps. 16-17) and D (pps. 59-60) highlight our
training in cultural and individual diversity, and the positive intern-staff relationships (Appendix
N, comments section, pps. 520-529) speak to our commitment as a staff to open, positive, and
respectful behaviors. During orientation, staff and interns introduce themselves to each other
through a cultural lens and each individual supervision rotation begins with semi-structured,
mutual sharing of culture between the intern and supervisor. Interns and staff regularly engage
together in diversity learning and sharing in our weekly case consultation meetings, and interns
are required to make formal diversity presentations. See Domain D pps. 57-60 and Appendix B
p. 275 for more specific information. University policies relevant to non-discrimination are
found at the following web links: http://www.stthomas.edu/hr/policies/manual/default.html and
http://www.stthomas.edu/hr/policies/manual/files/sexualHarassment.pdf

4. At the time of admission, the program provides interns with written policies and
procedures regarding program requirements and expectations for interns’ performance
and continuance in the program and procedures for the termination of students.

X     Describe when interns receive the program’s written policies as described
       above, and how the program ensures that interns understand those
       policies.

Interns receive a copy of the Training Manual (which includes policies and procedures regarding
program requirements, including conditions of termination – see Appendix B Sections III and
IV, and Section V, p. 254-270) during their orientation and the Training Director reviews these
written policies with them during the second and third weeks of internship. Specific information
about evaluations of each of the 5 basic core competency areas (Appendix B Training Manual,
Section IV, pps. 208-221) is additionally covered in orientation meetings with the supervisors of
group, supervision and consultation/outreach competency areas and in 1:1 meetings with
personal and career counseling supervisors, who are chosen at the end of the third week of
orientation. Career Development and Personal Counseling supervisors meet and review policies
and evaluation procedures with their supervisees in their first supervision sessions, which take
place the week immediately following orientation. Evaluation of the overarching competency
areas (crisis intervention, professional and ethical behavior, psychological assessment, and
multiculturalism and diversity skills) is embedded in each of the 5 core evaluation forms. Interns
are informed that they will be evaluated a minimum of 4 times throughout the year: twice with
formal written evaluations and twice with informal (verbal) evaluations at mid-semester. The
Training Director uses information from the formal written evaluations to write summary letters,
                                                 65
which are sent to the Director of Training of their respective doctoral institutions. A copy of
these letters is reviewed with each intern in a meeting with the Director of Training, and
individual supervisors‟ evaluations of interns are discussed with them in individual meetings.
The formal written evaluations address progress made in terms of psychological knowledge,
skills and competencies in individual assessment, case conceptualizations and therapeutic
interventions, and supervision, group and consultation/outreach skills. In reality, interns are
evaluated more frequently, as supervisors routinely review the interns‟ learning contracts with
them to assess whether individual goals and objectives are being met. Twice each semester,
supervising staff hold meetings to review and discuss interns‟ progress. Interns are not present at
these meetings but are advised when they are scheduled.

If it is determined that an intern needs remedial work based on the supervisor discussion, the
appropriate supervisor(s) will be designated to convey the information to the intern during the
formal evaluation review and discussion. Supervisors would also remind interns about due
process procedures at this time. To date, no intern has disputed his or her assessment, nor has any
required implementation of our Due Process procedures (Appendix P). Any minor disagreements
have been handled by personal discussion and formation of suggested steps for improvement. In
no instance has an intern been terminated from the internship.

X      Policies and procedures regarding program requirements, including
       conditions of termination, are provided in the following document(s) (e.g.,
       Intern Handbook): Intern Handbook Appendix B Section IV, p. 193-251 and Section
       V, p. 254-270; Appendix P Due Process Policy and Grievance Procedures, page # 542-
       550) (add additional appendices/page numbers as needed for different
       documents).

Interns receive, at least semiannually, written feedback on the extent to which they are
meeting these requirements and performance expectations. The feedback should
address the intern’s performance and progress in terms of professional conduct and
psychological knowledge, skills and competencies in the areas of psychological
assessment, intervention, and consultation. Such feedback should include:

       (a) Timely written notification of all problems that have been noted and the
           opportunity to discuss them;

       (b) Guidance regarding steps to remediate all problems (if remediable); and

       (c) Substantive written feedback on the extent to which corrective actions are or
       are not successful in addressing the issues of concern.

X      Describe in detail how your procedures and timeline for providing written
       feedback to interns meets all provisions of Domain E.4(a-c), above:

As noted previously, interns‟ individual counseling, career counseling, group counseling,
provision of supervision, and consultation/outreach are informally evaluated mid-way through
each of the individual and group supervisory rotations and formally at the end of each.
Procedures and timelines for remediation of deficiencies are detailed in the Training Manual
                                                66
under the headings The Comprehensive Evaluation of Student-Trainee Competence in
Professional Psychology Programs (Appendix B Training Manual, Section IV, p. 204-207),
Psychology Internship Program Policy on Intern Evaluation, Grievances, and Management of
Problematic Performance or Conduct (Appendix B Training Manual, Section V, p. 257-263) and
UST Grievance Process (Appendix B Training Manual, Section V, p. 268).

X     The program’s evaluation policy and procedures, including items E.4(a-c)
      above, can be found in the self-study according to the table below:

              Program Document                  Page # of Policy             Page # of Self-Study
        Policies on Intern Evaluation,      Training Manual pps 257-       257-270
        Grievances, and Management of       270
        Problematic Performance or
        Conduct
        The Comprehensive Evaluation        Appendix B: Training           204-207
        of Student-Trainee Competence       Manual, pps 204-207
        in Professional Psychology
        Programs
        Personal Counseling Supervisor‟s    Appendix B: Training           208-210
        Assessment of Intern Progress       Manual, pp. 208-210
        Career Counseling Supervisor‟s      Appendix B: Training           211-212
        Assessment of Intern Progress       Manual, p. 211-212
        Group Supervisor‟s Assessment       Appendix B: Training           213-216
        of Intern Progress                  Manual, p. 213-216
        Supervision Supervisor‟s            Appendix B: Training           217-219
        Assessment of Intern Progress       Manual, p. 4.217-219
        Consultation Supervisor‟s           Appendix B: Training           220-221
        Assessment of Intern Progress       Manual, p. 4.220-221

5. The program should issue a certificate of internship completion to interns successfully
completing their training program.

X      A copy of the certificate of internship completion is provided on Page #
       Appendix Q, page 551 and meets the requirements set forth by Implementing
       Regulation C-6(a).

In all matters relevant to the evaluation of interns’ performance, programs must adhere
to their institution’s regulations and local, state, and federal statutes regarding due
process and fair treatment of interns.

X      Briefly discuss how this is accomplished:

Interns are informed in writing of the University of St. Thomas Grievance procedures in their
Training Manuals and these policies are discussed with the Training Director during orientation.

6. Each program will be responsible for keeping information and records of all formal
complaints and grievances against the program, of which it is aware, filed against the
                                               67
program and/or against individuals associated with the program since its last
accreditation site visit. The Commission on Accreditation will examine programs’
records of student complaints as part of its periodic review of programs (site visit).

X       Review Implementing Regulations C-3 and C-12.

N/A     Provide a brief list of any intern complaints or grievances received by, or
        known to, the internship since the program’s last accreditation site visit.
        Full records should be available for on-site review by site visitors.

There have been no intern complaints or grievances received by, or known to the internship since
the program‟s last accreditation site visit.

X       Indicate where and how this confidential information is stored (or would be
        stored, if no complaints have been filed).

Information and records of all formal complaints and grievances filed against the program or
individuals in the program would be kept at least until the next site visit. In accordance with
standard University practices and state law, grievance files may be kept separately in the Human
Resources Department and final action on a grievance would be a matter of public record. The
Training Director would maintain a separate grievance file on site that would be accessible to the
trainee. This file would be stored in a secure, locked file cabinet separate from the personnel file
(i.e., hiring documentation) and the training file (i.e., training evaluations, etc.). At the time of
resolution of the case all documents would be placed in a sealed envelope labeled for authorized
personnel only and would be stored in the personnel file, separate from the training file. If
documents were to be shared during any meeting, the Training Director would collect documents
at the meeting end and shred them. Staff would be told that they would not be permitted to keep
their own personal records of the grievance documentation.

In addition, in accordance with Implementing Regulation C-12, the Training Director would
keep a separate log of complaints/grievances that would not identify either the complainant or
the party against whom the complaint was filed. Entries on the log would include: 1) the date the
complaint/grievance was filed; 2) what, if any, action was taken; and 3) the governance level at
which the complaint/grievance had been or would be adjudicated. This document would be
included in the next self-study and shared with site visitors. Copies of all grievance documents
would be provided to site visitors at their request.

X     (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain E issues in
      your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the last
      review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
      reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
      summary of those issues here in the narrative):

There were no Domain E issues noted in our program‟s last decision letter and there have been
no Domain E correspondences.

                ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain E
                                                 68
Provide relevant personnel policies, appropriate sections of procedure manuals or other
documentation on conflict, problem or grievance resolution, due process, etc. If your
program has existing documents (e.g., a detailed personnel handbook, procedure
manual, etc.), please append it and refer to the sections in which the requested
information can be located.

Provide sample copies of intern evaluation forms or documents, training contracts,
etc.

    Domain F: Program Self-Assessment and Quality Enhancement
  The program demonstrates a commitment to excellence through self-study, which
  assures that its goals and objectives are met, enhances the quality of professional
 education and training obtained by its interns and training staff, and contributes to the
                        fulfillment of its host institution’s mission.

1. The program, with appropriate involvement from its interns, engages in regular,
ongoing self-studies that address:

X      Describe how the internship appropriately involves interns in the
       program’s regular, ongoing self-studies:

There are a variety of ways in which interns are given opportunity to participate in ongoing
evaluation of the internship experience. The program regularly considers feedback and discusses
potential program changes at regular, every-other-week training committee meetings. The
following describe the many methods of including interns:
1.     Intern Orientation Evaluation: Interns complete a written evaluation of their orientation
       experience (selected years‟ summaries are included in Appendix T) and at the end of
       orientation interns meet with the training director to discuss their orientation experience.
       Changes for future years are sometimes made or additional training is provided if a
       particular content area was not adequately presented (e.g. this year we provided
       additional training in crisis intervention based on interns‟ expressed interest).
2.     Intern Evaluation of the Experience: Interns complete this global evaluation of their
       experience (Appendix R) yearly, and as a result of this self study process, we will begin
       having interns do this semi-annually. The data is circulated to the training committee and
       discussed at training committee meetings.
3.     Intern Seminar Evaluations: Interns complete evaluations after each seminar.
       Additionally, at the end of the year interns meet with the Training Directors of both UST
       and the University of Minnesota counseling center to discuss the seminar series. Changes
       to the series are made based in intern feedback (e.g. topic was not relevant, presenter was
       poor).
4.     Intern Evaluations of Supervisors: Interns complete evaluations of all their supervisory
       experiences and these evaluations are reviewed by the Training Director. If there are
       concerns about a particular supervisor, these would be addressed by the Training Director
       or the center Director.


                                                69
5.     Evaluation of the Training Director: Interns complete evaluations of the Training
       Director which are reviewed by the Training Director. If there are any concerns, the
       Training Director consults with the Director of Personal Counseling and Testing.
6.     Intern input during intern selection: Interns participate in all aspects of selection of the
       next year‟s intern group. One intern serves on the selection committee (participates fully
       in the reading, interviewing and ranking process), and the remaining interns participate in
       mini-interviews, completing impression summaries that assist the committee in ranking.
       Feedback about current intern‟s experiences during selection is gathered and changes to
       the current system are made if deemed relevant.
7.     Ongoing feedback: Interns meet individually twice a year with the Training Director.
       Feedback about intern experience and the internship is solicited at each of those
       meetings. The Training Director meets weekly with interns for an informal “check in”.
       The training committee meets every other week and includes an intern as a committee
       member each semester.
8.     End of the semester and end of the year feedback: Interns meet as a group with the
       Training Director at the end of first semester and again at the end of the year to provide
       information about their experience. Interns meet individually with the Training Director
       to complete an exit interview focused on their internship experience.

Interns also provide feedback to the training committee about the APA self-study and are invited
to write and/or edit sections as their interest or schedules permit. They have access to counseling
center data (POAMS outcome data) and depending on interests, may analyze data regarding the
effectiveness of Counseling Center services.

X      Discuss how the program evaluates, through self-study, the following:

      (a) Its expectations for the quantity and quality of the intern’s preparation and
          performance (prior to the initiation of any training activities)

Our internship selection process is comprehensive. The first stage of evaluation includes review
of all written materials. A select group of candidates are invited to interview based on paper
rankings and training committee discussions. Our interview aims to identify individuals who
possess strong credentials from their graduate programs, genuine interest in our core competency
areas, a warm and engaging personal style, and the ability to self-reflect as consistent with our
guidelines around personal self-disclosure. Incoming interns are required to have accrued a
minimum of 1,000 hours of practicum experience, at least 300 of which have been individual
therapy hours.

“Goodness of fit” drives our decision-making around who to rank and where to rank them on our
list of candidates. Several staff members and an intern participate in the paper review of interns,
and senior staff Personal Counseling and Testing, Career Development Center supervisors, and
interns are involved in interviewing. The final group making ranking decisions includes all
members of the training committee and the intern representative on that committee. Annual
surveys conducted by APPIC and ACCTA inform the training director about national trends
regarding the selection criteria and this information is used as relevant. The following minimum
qualifications must be met in order for applicants to be considered for the internship program:


                                                70
1.      Current enrollment in a doctoral program in clinical or counseling psychology
2.      Successful completion of comprehensive examinations
3.      A minimum number of 300 hours of supervised direct individual therapy hours
4.      A minimum number of 1,000 hours of AAPI Grand Total Practicum Hours
5.      Experience, training, or clearly delineated interest in working within a college or
        university setting and/or working with college or university-aged populations
6.      Dissertation proposal approved by the start of internship
7.      Approval for internship by academic training director

In addition to the minimum qualifications listed above, preference is given to applicants who
demonstrate the following desired qualifications:

1.      Strong interest and clear commitment to university counseling center work including
        personal and career counseling and supervision of practicum students
2.      Interest in outreach activities that support the counseling center‟s role in a university
        setting
3.      Excellent oral and written communication skills
4.      A warm and collaborative interpersonal style
5.      Desire to work in a collegial manner and to manage multiple role relationships that
        occur in the university training setting
6.      An appreciation for and experience working with diverse students
7.      An ability to self-reflect and the ability to use self-reflection to further one‟s clinical
        work

Prior to the initiation of any training activities, all incoming interns complete self-assessment of
skills in each of our core competency areas. These data are used by individual and group
supervisors to assist interns in setting their learning contracts and also help shape the seminar
schedule for the year. Expectations, goals, objectives and expected performance for completion
of the internship are fully delineated in the training manual (Appendix B, section III) and
reviewed with interns during their orientation.

X     How does the program evaluate this? Provide detailed response here, and
      summarize in table below.

      (b) Its effectiveness in achieving goals and objectives in terms of outcome data
          (i.e., while interns are in the program and after completion, and including the
          interns’ views regarding the quality of training experiences and the program);

The University of St. Thomas's Pre-doctoral Internship in Professional Psychology is committed
to continuous quality improvement of its training program. Multiple sources of evaluation data
are gathered, synthesized and utilized to improve training. We review and evaluate our program,
including goals and objectives annually on a formal basis, and frequently on an informal basis.
Examples of the latter include weekly intern check-in meetings with the Director of Training,
casual conversations and suggestions to supervising staff and directors, etc. Examples of the
former include scheduled individual meetings each semester with the Director of Training,
Supervisor Evaluation forms (Appendix B, Section IV, pps. 208-225), Former Intern Surveys
(Appendix N) and Intern Evaluation of the Experience documents (Appendix R). Section 1c,
                                                  71
below, lists other formal ways the program evaluates itself.

Extensive use is made of written evaluation instruments. The following activities are evaluated
using written assessment instruments: orientation, individual supervision, supervision of groups,
supervision of supervision, consultation/outreach supervision, evaluation of internship
experience, evaluation of the training director, weekly intern seminars, case file management,
and intern interviewee follow-up surveys. Copies of all evaluation instruments can be found in
Appendix B, Section IV.

Mean scores are calculated for the evaluations of experiences and distributed among training
committee members. Results are discussed and recommendations made for improvements.
Examples of improvements made over the past seven years as a direct result of feedback include:
             Improved training in crisis and critical incident counseling.
             Change in model for consultation/outreach seminar
             Changes in structure of groups program
             Addition of several additional training seminars on topics of diversity,
              psychological assessment and psychological interventions.
             Revision of outcome measures for career competency area and updating of
              outcome measures for personal counseling and consultation/outreach competency
              areas
             Revision of our commitment to diversity and multiculturalism both in training
              program and in counseling agency following intentional examination and
              discussion of mission statements.
             Revision of training manual.
             Creation of a training manual for practicum students.
             Production of “Quick Clip” streaming videos for our website highlighting
              strengths of the internship program thus increasing our visibility on a national
              level.
             Purchase of Logitech webcams.
             Addition of peer consultation option for interns.

Additionally, comparison of intern pre-assessments of skills and post-assessment of skills ratings
routinely demonstrate interns‟ growth across the training year. Client satisfaction surveys and
outreach evaluations of interns also demonstrate that interns are reaching expected goals of
internship.

X      All programs must provide detailed PROXIMAL and DISTAL aggregate
       outcome data that is related to your program’s stated educational model,
       philosophy, goals, objectives, and competencies. Such data should be
       provided for interns as they progress through the program (proximal data)
       and for graduates of the program (distal data). There should be a clear
       connection between the stated goals/objectives/competencies that were
       outlined in Domain B, the method of evaluation the program uses to
       determine whether these are being achieved (e.g., intern evaluation forms),
       and the detailed outcome data.


                                                72
           o Examples of proximal competency-based outcomes are measures
             obtained while the intern is in the program, such as intern mid-point,
             end-of-year and end of training program evaluations, and their
             consistency with your program’s stated objectives and
             competencies.

           o Examples of distal goal-related outcomes are measures obtained
             after the intern has completed the program; such as the type of initial
             and subsequent employment, professional roles and activities, and
             their consistency with your program's training mission and goals
             (e.g., licensure, attending a postdoctoral residency, employment in
             the practice area, etc).

       These data may be supplied in a table, in text, and/or in a flowchart.
       Outcome data should be supplied in the appendices, aggregated in a
       manner that is useful in looking at program effectiveness (i.e., by intern
       cohort).

X      Discuss what data are available to demonstrate achievement of Domain B
       goals/objectives/competencies:

Summary data in Excel Spreadsheet format for Personal, Career and Group counseling
evaluations, Supervision evaluations, and Consultation/outreach evaluations over the past seven
cohorts is included in Appendix S, pps. 564-595. One hundred percent of the ratings on these
evaluations meet our expected competency levels, and most significantly exceed it. Pre and Post
Skill Assessment data is found in Appendix S, pps. 596-632, and demonstrate significant
achievement of competencies across the past seven cohorts. To cite a few specific examples, pre-
post self-assessment scores yielded a 29.9% increase in interns‟ ability to formulate treatment
plans; 40.1% increase in ability to administer and interpret formal career assessments; 39.3%
increase in ability to use the MMPI-2; 60.9% increase in skills required to develop a
psychotherapy or psycho-educational group; 38.3% increase in ability to assist supervisees with
case conceptualizations and treatment goals for counseling; 72.4% increase in development of
consultation/outreach contracts; 20.7% increase in adherence to APA ethical codes and agency
standards; and 28.8% increase in knowledge of crisis intervention procedures. With regard to
working with special populations, interns reported a 20.6% increase in their ability to work with
students of color, 21% increase in ability to work with GLBT students; 28.7% increase in ability
to work with international students; and 30.6% increase in ability to work with learning disabled
students.

A web-based survey of 21 former interns was conducted this year using Zoomerang, and we are
proud to say that our response rate was 100%. Both the survey and the tabulation of results can
be found in Appendix N, pages 516-529. Outcome data suggest former interns are very satisfied
with their internship experience. Ninety-five percent rated their overall training experience as
Outstanding or Very Good, with 81% rating it as Outstanding. Former interns were asked to rate
the quality of the training they received in nine core aspects of the training program. Most of the
former interns rated the following aspects of their training as Excellent or Above Average:
Supervision (100%), Personal Counseling (95%), Professional Ethics (91%), Career Counseling
                                                73
(81%), Consultation (72%), Crisis intervention (71%), and Diversity Awareness (67%). All
former interns (100%) would recommend our program to a graduate student considering our site.
Ninety percent of former interns stated that the internship fostered the development of their
professional identity “A Great Deal” or “Quite a Bit.”

Former interns were asked to rate their level of agreement with the goals of the training program.
One hundred percent of former interns agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “The
internship assisted my development into a competent, confident, ethical psychologist who is able
to empower my clients and colleagues.” All agreed or strongly agreed that they were able to
integrate the knowledge acquired through formal academic training and practice, and apply this
in an intensive clinical experience. Ninety-six percent of former interns agreed or strongly agreed
that the internship provided a comprehensive, sequential experience that prepared them for the
role of entry level or junior psychologist. All former interns agreed or strongly agreed that the
internship assisted their development as a balanced professional, with a respect for lifelong
learning and the ability to contribute professionally to the field of psychology. Finally, ninety-
one percent of former interns agreed or strongly agreed that the internship provided them the
opportunity to participate extensively in all operational phases of a counseling center, to develop
programs, and to participate in evaluation.

Qualitative comments included statements about many perceived strengths of the training
program, with the primary strength noted being that of supervision received. Many interns noted
that supervision focused on their development as a professional, but included personal support
and was conducted in a manner that allowed them to feel safe and encouraged. Former interns
noted that they appreciated that the staff worked well together and fostered a sense of belonging
to a team. Interns describe their relationship between themselves and the staff as positive, safe,
collegial, and cohesive. The relationships between interns and staff were seen as a priority and
interns appreciated that a strength-based approach was used in supervision. They noticed that
building relationships was a priority among the staff and that the staff was dedicated to training
the interns. One former intern stated that “the wonderful people are the program‟s greatest
strength.” Former interns noted many other strengths of the program. Many reported that they
were pleased with their training in many areas, including individual therapy, providing
supervision to practicum students, consultation, crisis work, ethical awareness, case consultation,
assessment training, and peer supervision. One intern stated that they were happy to work with
other departments on campus whereas another was pleased with being able to videotape sessions.
One former intern reported appreciating the “diverse training experience that provides
preparation for psychological work in a variety of settings.” Others echoed this sentiment, stating
that they had a variety of opportunities that prepared them for many different career paths. They
stated that the broad, thorough training they received helped them to feel prepared for their
careers. Others noted that they appreciated the balance of didactic training, opportunity to
provide supervision, and strong relationships with other departments on campus.

Comments about areas for continued growth in the internship are also summarized. When asked
about their perceptions of the limitations of the internship, 4 individuals (20%) rated training in
Group counseling as Below Average. Former interns noted in their comments about this that they
would have enjoyed more opportunities to run groups but noted anecdotally to the Training
Director in exit interviews that in the University of St. Thomas population it can be difficult to
find a significant number of students who can choose to commit the time required for group

                                                74
meetings. As noted above, data from interns‟ pre-post assessments on their group skills
demonstrated a 60.9% increase in their perceived competence in skills required to develop a
group and interns also reported a 53.5% increase in their competence with group theories. When
rating clinical assessment training, two individuals (10%) stated this was Below Average.
However pre-post data yielded a 40.1% increase in interns‟ self-reported ability to administer
and interpret formal career assessments and a 39.3% increase in their ability to use the MMPI-2,
the center‟s most common forms of assessment. Some interns stated that they would have liked
to tailor their experience to their specific interests, such as completing more assessments or
working with fewer career clients. Other interns mentioned that they would have benefited from
more training to supervise practicum students and that additional communication between the
practicum supervisor and the supervisor of supervision would help the interns provide
supervision. Others wanted more health benefits, or a more simplified way of logging hours.

Outreach Evaluations (by both participants and staff observers) are included in each intern‟s
training folder as well as practicum student supervisees‟ evaluations of interns as supervisors.
Intern Evaluation of the Experience including narrative comments are found in Appendix R and
Former Intern Survey is found in Appendix N. Client Satisfaction Surveys (see Appendix B, pps.
367-368 for sample), and POAMS outcome data are kept separately on a secure Personal
Counseling and Testing server and are given to individual therapists and interns for review.

X      Page # for proximal aggregate data in appendices: Appendices R pp. 552- 563
       and S, pps. 564-632.

X     Page # for distal aggregate data in appendices: Appendix N, pps. 516-529,
      Appendix A, pps. 109-112 list the settings in which former interns have obtained
      employment upon completing their internships.

X     A copy of the evaluation of the program that is completed by interns is
      provided on Page # Appendix R, pps. 552- 563

      (c) Its procedures to maintain current achievements or to make changes as
          necessary;

X     How does the program evaluate its achievements and make necessary
      changes? Provide detailed response here, and summarize in table below.

The training committee reviews the quantitative and qualitative data (including interns‟
evaluations of orientation (Appendix T), interns‟ evaluations of their experiences (Appendix R),
and pre-post data (Appendix S)) each year and decides whether to make improvements to the
internship training experiences based on this review. Periodically, surveys are conducted to
address particular questions about the program, such as a Career survey conducted in 2006
(Appendix V) aimed at determining whether or not to continue this portion of our training. We
also conduct and review former intern surveys (Appendix N). We survey intern candidates after
their interviews (Appendix U) for impressions of our process and suggested changes for the
future.



                                               75
As a result of evaluation processes for our group counseling component (traditionally an area
where interns have expressed less satisfaction with their group counseling opportunities) we have
attempted several structural changes aimed at increasing opportunities for group leadership. We
changed our model from intern choice of counseling group offering to offering designated
groups from which interns could then select. We also determined that chances of successfully
filling a group during fall semester could be enhanced by starting the marketing process
immediately after interns‟ arrival on campus, thus ensuring that potential members would have
information about the groups at the start of first semester. Participation in the Career
Development Center‟s summer job-search support group and the REAL program‟s Both Feet In
support group for incoming students of color was changed from optional to required summer
intern activity. Finally, we designated senior staff members to be “point persons” for each of the
counseling groups offered in an effort to facilitate interns‟ comfort level during fall semester.

      (d) Its goals, objectives, and outcome data relevant thereto, in relation to local,
         regional, state/provincial, and national standards of professional practice and
         changes in the knowledge base of the profession.

All training staff are actively involved in current standards of practice and we are members of
professional organizations (see Appendix M for staff vitas). We are a member of the Association
of Counseling Center Training Agencies (ACCTA), the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral
and Internship Centers (APPIC), and The Association of College and University Counseling
Center Directors (AUCCCD). Dr. Armstrong and Dr. Rockett have held leadership positions in
ACCTA and AUCCCD, respectively, and routinely attend these conferences to stay current on
national standards of professional practice. Additionally, Dr. Armstrong has co-authored a
chapter on religious and spiritual counseling competencies for the Handbook of Multicultural
Counseling Competencies, which is scheduled for publication August 11, 2010.

X     Include here information regarding how the program has responded to
      previous feedback from the CoA since the last accreditation review.
      Although this information has been requested at the end of each domain,
      please provide a brief summary here to demonstrate the self-assessment
      aspect of addressing these issues.

There were no Domain F issues noted since our last accreditation.

X      Summarize your detailed responses above within the table below:

Evaluation topic                   Mechanisms for evaluation            If applicable, identify
                                   by program                           the Appendix
                                                                        location for summary
                                                                        data (not blank
                                                                        evaluation forms)
Quantity and quality of the        All applicants must:                 Tables 2 and 3, pps. 85-
intern’s preparation and                                                92
performance (prior to the          Be enrolled in APA –accredited
initiation of any training         counseling or clinical psychology
activities)                        academic programs
                                               76
                               Have successfully completed
                               comprehensive examinations,
                               have experience or clearly
                               delineated interest in working
                               with college or university
                               populations

                               Have adequate clinical experience
                               to function effectively in our
                               setting (300 hours direct therapy
                               service, 1,000 hours supervised
                               practica experience)

                               In addition:
                               Intern skills self-assessments are
                               completed to assist in determining
                               training goals for the year.
Interns’ views regarding the   Written feedback regarding all     Information kept in
quality of the training        aspects of the training program    intern training files and
experiences and the            provided twice yearly              Appendix S, pp. 552-563
program.
                               Orientation evaluations              Appendix T, pp. 633-637

                               Verbal feedback provided
                               continuously throughout the year

                               Former Intern Survey                 Appendix N, pp. 516-
                                                                    529
                               Seminar Evaluations

                               Career Center Survey of Former       Appendix V, pps. 648-
                               Interns                              650
Maintenance of current         Bi-weekly training committee         n/a
achievements or make           meetings
changes as necessary
Goals, objectives, and         Training Director‟s involvement      n/a
outcomes in relation to        in ACCTA, APA, APPIC
national standards of
professional practice.         All professional staff participate
                               in ongoing professional education
                               and activities
Long-term planning             Training needs discussed at          n/a
                               Training Committee meetings,
                               Personal Counseling and Career
                               Development staff meetings, and
                               Personal Counseling staff retreats
                                           77
Table 4 is provided on pps. 93-94.        Table 5 is provided on pps. 95-98.

2. X Describe the program’s resources and/or opportunities to enhance the quality of
its training and supervision staff through continued professional development.

Training and supervision are activities that are highly valued by both the University and the
division of Student Affairs. It is expected that all staff are life-long learners and remain current in
their professions. Staff are granted permission to participate in training opportunities in
consultation with their direct supervisors, and each training staff member receives $1,200 per
year for professional development activities. Additional monies have occasionally been made
available for staff members needing to travel for trainings and meetings related to their function
within the counseling center (e.g. the Director of Training has attended and delivered
presentations at two APPIC conferences since the last site visit). The Director of Personal
Counseling and Testing regularly attends the AUCCCD conference and the Training Director
regularly attends the ACCTA conference. The Director of the Career Development Center
routinely attends the American College Personnel Association annual conference. Supervising
staff are invited to attend an annual all-day supervision seminar and annual all-day multicultural
awareness and skills seminar that is jointly planned by APA-accredited internship sites in
Minnesota. Additionally, all staff are invited to attend regularly scheduled professional
development offerings hosted by Student Affairs departments on issues of diversity and
multiculturalism. Staff members share articles and knowledge gained through attendance at
professional conferences at counseling staff meetings. Funds are also available to purchase
professional books and videotapes. Staff memberships in national organizations, such as (APA,
ACPA, ACCTA, AUCCCD) as well as local memberships (MPA, MCPA) are fully supported by
the University. All dues, Minnesota Board of Psychology licensure fees, and subscriptions to
professional journals are paid through the Personal Counseling and Testing and Career
Development Center budgets.

3. X Describe how the program and its host institution demonstrate that they value and
recognize the importance of internship training and of the staff’s training and
supervisory efforts and demonstrate this value in tangible ways.

As described fully in Domain C, Personal Counseling and Testing and Career Development
Center are provided with sufficient resources to maintain and enhance the internship program.
Both the Division of Student Affairs and Personal Counseling and Testing and Career
Development Center departments have repeatedly demonstrated their high regard for the training
program. Despite several reductions in departmental budgets over the past seven years, intern
stipends have increased during that time and resources have been allocated to purchase Logitech
webcams, carpeting, paint, and office chairs for each intern office. We have renovated our
conference room (where interns meet for seminars) and equipped this room with a computer and
new office chairs. We have also been able to update our library video and print materials
substantially. Senior staff salaries are consistent with local market averages. Despite challenging
economic times the university has been able to provide consistent annual salary increases.




                                                  78
X       (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain F issues in
       your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the
       last review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
       reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
       summary of those issues here in the narrative):

There were no Domain F issues noted since our last accreditation.


              ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain F
Provide documentation of self-evaluative activities, including copies of program,
supervisor, and intern evaluation forms.

Provide data demonstrating assessment of intern competency or knowledge, and any
other methods of assessing attainment of intern and program training goals and
objectives.

All accredited programs must provide proximal and distal aggregate outcome data.
Applicant programs are expected to provide proximal outcome data on interns’
progression through the program; if the program does not yet have distal data it should
adhere to the principles of Implementing Regulation D1-1 in justifying outcomes.

                              Domain G: Public Disclosure
    The program demonstrates its commitment to public disclosure by providing written
     materials and other communications that appropriately represent it to the relevant
                                        publics.

1. The program is described accurately and completely in documents that are available
to current interns, prospective interns, and other “publics.” The descriptions of the
program should include:

        (a) Its goals, objectives, and training model; its selection procedures and
            requirements for completion; its training staff, interns, facilities and other
            resources; and its administrative policies and procedures; and


X       How does the program inform its applicants and the public about its
        admission criteria, application and selection processes, its training model
        and mission (values, training goals, objectives, etc), its requirements for
        completion, its resources, its administrative policies and procedures, and
        its accreditation status?

The UST Personal Counseling and Career Development Center pre-doctoral internship provides
materials in a web-based format to the public and particularly to prospective and current interns.
The materials are updated regularly and accurately reflect the current staff and training program.
It also includes a statement of internship goals, training model, and facilities. Accreditation status
is indicated as well. In addition, the UST pre-doctoral internship is listed in the APPIC directory.
                                                 79
During orientation, new interns receive a copy of the Training Manual, which includes all
Counseling Center policies and procedures. Each section is reviewed and discussed prior to the
delivery of any direct services.

The UST internship has been fully accredited by the American Psychological Association since
1995. Accreditation status is included on the website and in the APPIC directory. Both Personal
Counseling and Testing and the Career Development Center are accredited by the International
Association of Counseling Services, Inc (IACS). This accreditation is also listed on the website.

X      Indicate the program’s web address, if it has one:

http://www.stthomas.edu/psychinternship/

X     List all program documents (brochures, recruiting practices, program
      advertisements, web pages, etc.) available to current and prospective
      residents and place them in a labeled appendix. Reference these
      documents here:

                      List Public Documents                         Location in Self Study
                                                                   (Appendix and Page #)
       Pre-doctoral Internship Home Page
       (b) I                                                       Appendix A, p. 98
        Welcome from the Director of Training
           t                                                       Appendix A, p. 99
        University and Community, About Personal
           s                                                       Appendix A, p. 112-115
       Counseling and the Career Development Center, About
       St. Thomas, About the Twin Cities, About the
           s
       University and Surrounding Community
           t
        Training Program and its Philosophy, Core
           a                                                       Appendix A, p.100- 105
       Competency Areas, Special Opportunities, Supervision
           t
       andu  Evaluation, Training and Service Activities
        Training Facilities, Training Staff
           s                                                       Appendix A, p.105-
                                                                   108
          w
       Application Procedure, Stipend and Benefits                 Appendix A, p.115-117
          i
       FAQs                                                        Appendix A, p.117
          t
       Past Intern Video Interviews
          h                                                        Appendix A, p. 108-109
       Videos Detailing the Program                                Appendix A, p.99-101, 103,
           b                                                       108-109, 114-115
           b) its status with regard to accreditation, including the specific program
           covered by that status, and the name, address, and telephone number [202-
           336-5979] of the Commission on Accreditation. The program should make
           available to intern applicants and other appropriate publics such reports or
           other materials as they pertain to the program’s accreditation status.

X   Reference where (i.e., page number, visual location) in each applicable
    document the program’s accreditation status and CoA contact information
    can be verified by reviewers:
                                                80
The Program‟s accreditation status is found on the Application Procedures Page on our website
(Appendix A, page 116)

X     (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain G issues in
      your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the last
      review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
      reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
      summary of those issues here in the narrative):

There were no Domain G issues noted in our program‟s last decision letter or in other
correspondence since the last review.

                 ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REMINDER – Domain G

Provide copies of program public materials (flyers, brochures, posters, listings in
directories, etc.) and program handbooks and materials, as appropriate, as well as
public materials on your host or sponsor institution.

If any of the above materials are available online, provide the (working) web links.

                  Domain H: Relationship with Accrediting Body
    The internship program demonstrates its commitment to the accreditation process by
    fulfilling its responsibilities to the accrediting body from which its accredited status is
                                                granted.

1. The internship abides by the accrediting body’s published policies and procedures as
they pertain to its recognition as an accredited internship site.

X        Since your program’s last application for renewal of accreditation (if
         applicable), have there been instances of program departure from the
         accreditation GandP? If so, please explain.

There have been no departures from the accreditation GandP since our last application for
renewal of accreditation.

2. The internship informs the accrediting body in a timely manner of changes in its
environment, plans, resources, or operations that could alter the internship’s quality.

X        Review Implementing Regulation C-19.

X      Since the program’s last site visit (if applicable) have there been any
        changes in your, or your sponsor institution’s, mission or resources, or in
        your training program’s processes or practices, or other issues that have
        influenced the quality of the training program, the training staff, or the
        interns’ training experiences? If so, describe them.

                                                81
There have been no major changes in our mission, processes and practices or other issues that
have influenced the quality of the training program, the training staff, or the interns‟ training
experiences since the last self study. Minor program changes (e.g. topic and/or presenter
additions to seminar series; changes to format of career services offered) have been discussed in
other parts of this self-study.

X      Provide any correspondence with CoA in appendices. Page(s) #: Appendix
       O, pps. 530-541

2003 Site Visit Report Response: March 30, 2003
Letter regarding clarification of Father Dease‟s response letter: May 7, 2003
2004 Annual Report letter: June 28, 2004
Letter regarding Patricia Stankovich: Sept. 9, 2005
Letter regarding Patricia Stankovich: August 20, 2007
Letter from Susan Zlotlow re: 8/20/07 letter: December 13, 2007

X      Does your program or its host institution have any plans that might
       substantially change the nature, function or mission of your internship
       program in the foreseeable future? Describe these plans and their
       potential consequences to your program’s accreditation status.

We have no plans for substantial change in the nature, function or mission of our internship in
the foreseeable future. As noted in Domain B p. 38, it is our intent to eventually organize our
training around the foundational and functional competencies which are outlined as core
competencies in the Assessment of Competency Benchmarks Workgroup (2007) document. We
also plan to develop evaluation forms for interns‟ assessment battery write-ups and supervision
papers.

3. The internship is in good standing with the accrediting body in terms of payment of
fees associated with the maintenance of its accredited status.

X      Describe the program’s status with regard to financial responsibility to the
       accrediting body.

The UST pre-doctoral internship is in good standing and is current in its payment of fees for
accreditation. We have paid all fees in a timely fashion since our last site visit.

X      (IF CURRENTLY ACCREDITED): If the CoA noted any Domain H issues in
       your program’s last decision letter or in other correspondence since the
       last review, please indicate those here and provide a response (you may
       reference correspondence in the appendices as necessary, but provide a
       summary of those issues here in the narrative):

There were no Domain H issues noted in our last decision letter or in other correspondence since
the last review.


                                                82

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:8/8/2011
language:English
pages:82