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					Executive Summary




                         Revised Mississippi
                             Curriculum
                           Frameworks for
                    Vocational-Technical Programs




                         Postsecondary
                      EXECUTIVE SUMMARY




                                2004
Executive Summary



                                    Direct inquiries to:

                Director of Bureau of Vocational Instructional Development
                       Office of Vocational and Technical Education
                            Mississippi Department of Education
                                        P.O. Box 771
                                    Jackson, MS 39205
                                  Phone: (601) 359-3940




                                    Published by the:

Office of Vocational and Technical                Research and Curriculum Unit
  Education                                        for Workforce Development
Mississippi Department of Education               Vocational and Technical Education
Jackson, Mississippi                              Mississippi State University
                                                  Mississippi State, Mississippi




                                           2004

The Mississippi Department of Education, Office of Vocational Education and Workforce
Development does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin,
sex, age, or disability in the provision of educational programs and services or
employment opportunities and benefits. The following office has been designated to
handle inquiries and complaints regarding the non-discrimination policies of the
Mississippi Department of Education: Director, Office of Human Resources, Mississippi
Department of Education, 359 North West Street, Suite 359, Jackson, Mississippi,
39201, (601) 359-3511.




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Executive Summary



             REVISED POSTSECONDARY CURRICULUM FRAMEWORKS
                              2004 EDITION
                           EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new
practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and
participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way
people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and
communicate effectively; think creatively, solve problems, and make decisions; and
interact with each other and the technologies in the workplace. Vocational-technical
programs must also adopt these practices in order to provide graduates who can enter
and advance in the changing work world.

The curriculum frameworks in this document reflect these changes in the workplace and
a number of other factors that impact on local vocational-technical programs. Federal
and state legislation calls for articulation between high school and community college
programs, integration of academic and vocational skills, and the development of
sequential courses of study that provide students with the optimum educational path for
achieving successful employment. National skills standards, developed by industry
groups and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and Labor, provide
vocational educators with the expectations of employers across the United States. All
of these factors are reflected in the framework found in this document.

Each postsecondary program of instruction consists of a program description and a
suggested sequence of courses which focus on the development of occupational
competencies. Each vocational-technical course in this sequence has been written
using a common format which includes the following components:

o      Course Name – A common name that will be used by all community/junior
       colleges in reporting students.

o      Course Abbreviation – A common abbreviation that will be used by all
       community/junior colleges in reporting students.

o      Classification – Courses may be classified as:
             Vocational-technical core – A required vocational-technical course for all
              students.
             Vocational-technical elective – An elective vocational-technical course.
             Related academic course – An academic course which provides academic
              skills and knowledge directly related to the program area.
             Academic core – An academic course which is required as part of the
              requirements for an Associate degree.

o      Description – A short narrative which includes the major purpose(s) of the course
       and the recommended number of hours of lecture and laboratory activities to be
       conducted each week during a regular semester.



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Executive Summary



o      Prerequisites – A listing of any courses that must be taken prior to or on
       enrollment in the course.

o      Corequisites – A listing of courses that may be taken while enrolled in the course.

o      Competencies and Suggested Objectives – A listing of the competencies (major
       concepts and performances) and of the suggested student objectives that will
       enable students to demonstrate mastery of these competencies.

The following guidelines were used in developing the programs in this document and
should be considered in compiling and revising course syllabi and daily lesson plans at
the local level:

o      The content of the courses in this document reflects approximately 75 percent of
       the time allocated to each course. The remaining 25 percent of each course
       should be developed at the local district level and may reflect:
             Additional competencies and objectives within the course related to topics
              not found in the State framework, including activities related to specific
              needs of industries in the community college district.
             Activities which develop a higher level of mastery on the existing
              competencies and suggested objectives.
             Activities and instruction related to new technologies and concepts that
              were not prevalent at the time the current framework was
              developed/revised.
             Activities which implement components of the Mississippi Tech Prep
              initiative, including integration of academic and vocational-technical skills
              and coursework, school-to-work transition activities, and articulation of
              secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical programs.
             Individualized learning activities, including worksite learning activities, to
              better prepare individuals in the courses for their chosen occupational
              area.

o      Sequencing of the course within a program is left to the discretion of the local
       district. Naturally, foundation courses related to topics such as safety, tool and
       equipment usage, and other fundamental skills should be taught first. Other
       courses related to specific skill areas and related academics, however, may be
       sequenced to take advantage of seasonal and climatic conditions, resources
       located outside of the school, and other factors.

o      Programs that offer an Associate of Applied Science degree must include a
       minimum 15 semester credit hour academic core. Specific courses to be taken
       within this core are to be determined by the local district. Minimum academic
       core courses are as follows:




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Executive Summary



              3 semester credit hours          Math/Science Elective
              3 semester credit hours          Written Communications Elective
              3 semester credit hours          Oral Communications Elective
              3 semester credit hours          Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
              3 semester credit hours          Social/Behavioral Science Elective

It is recommended that courses in the academic core be spaced out over the entire
length of the program, so that students complete some academic and vocational-
technical courses each semester. Each community/junior college has the discretion to
select the actual courses that are required to meet this academic core requirement.

o      In instances where secondary programs are directly related to community and
       junior college programs, competencies and suggested objectives from the high
       school programs are listed as Baseline Competencies. These competencies and
       objectives reflect skills and knowledge that are directly related to the community
       and junior college vocational-technical program. In adopting the curriculum
       framework, each community and junior college is asked to give assurances that:
              students who can demonstrate mastery of the Baseline Competencies do
               not receive duplicate instruction, and
              students who cannot demonstrate mastery of this content will be given the
               opportunity to do so.

o      The roles of the Baseline Competencies are to:
            Assist community/junior college personnel in developing articulation
             agreements with high schools, and
            Ensure that all community and junior college courses provide a higher
             level of instruction than their secondary counterparts.

o      The Baseline Competencies may be taught as special “Introduction” courses for
       3-6 semester hours of institutional credit which will not count toward Associate
       degree requirements. Community and junior colleges may choose to integrate
       the Baseline Competencies into ongoing courses in lieu of offering the
       “Introduction” courses or may offer the competencies through special projects or
       individualized instruction methods.

o      Technical elective courses have been included to allow community colleges and
       students to customize programs to meet the needs of industries and employers
       in their area.




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Executive Summary



      COMMUNITY/JUNIOR COLLEGE VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL PROGRAMS
                           2004 REVISION

Agricultural and Related Technology
       Agriculture Business and Management Technology Cluster

Allied Health and Related Technology
       Cardiovascular Technology
       Dental Hygiene Technology
       Emergency Medical Technology – Paramedic
       Funeral Service Technology
       Health Information Technology
       Ophthalmic Technology
       Respiratory Therapy

Family and Consumer Sciences
      Clothing and Textiles Services

Trade, Industrial, and Related Technology
      Automotive Vehicles and Accessories Marketing
      Barber/Stylist
      Graphic Design Technology
      Graphics and Print Communications
      Jewelry and Watch Repair Cluster
      Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter Cluster
      Polymer Technology
      Sheet Metal Program




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Executive Summary



                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD .........................................................................................................3

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS AND SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCES ........9

Agricultural and Related Technology
       Agriculture Business and Management Technology Cluster ....................11

Allied Health and Related Technology
       Cardiovascular Technology ......................................................................16
       Dental Hygiene Technology .....................................................................19
       Emergency Medical Technology – Paramedic .........................................23
       Funeral Service Technology .....................................................................27
       Health Information Technology .................................................................30
       Ophthalmic Technology ............................................................................33
       Respiratory Therapy .................................................................................36

Family and Consumer Sciences
      Clothing and Textiles Services .................................................................39

Trade, Industrial, and Related Technology
      Automotive Vehicles and Accessories Marketing .....................................41
      Barber/Stylist ............................................................................................43
      Graphic Design Technology .....................................................................45
      Graphics and Print Communications ........................................................48
      Jewelry and Watch Repair Cluster ...........................................................50
      Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter Cluster ...............................................54
      Polymer Technology .................................................................................60
      Sheet Metal Program ................................................................................65

LISTING OF COURSES......................................................................................69

Agricultural and Related Technology...................................................................71
       Agriculture Business and Management Technology Cluster ....................73

Allied Health and Related Technology ................................................................79
       Cardiovascular Technology ......................................................................81
       Dental Hygiene Technology .....................................................................85
       Emergency Medical Technology – Paramedic .........................................89
       Funeral Service Technology .....................................................................93
       Health Information Technology .................................................................97
       Ophthalmic Technology ..........................................................................102
       Respiratory Therapy ...............................................................................105




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Executive Summary



Family and Consumer Sciences ........................................................................109
      Clothing and Textiles Services ...............................................................111

Trade, Industrial, and Related Technology........................................................115
      Automotive Vehicles and Accessories Marketing ...................................117
      Barber/Stylist ..........................................................................................119
      Graphic Design Technology ...................................................................121
      Graphics and Print Communications ......................................................125
      Jewelry and Watch Repair Cluster .........................................................128
      Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter Cluster .............................................132
      Polymer Technology ...............................................................................137
      Sheet Metal Program ..............................................................................140




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Executive Summary




                       PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

                               AND

                    SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCES




                                9
Executive Summary




                    10
Executive Summary



                             PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

           AGRICULTURE BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY

            PRECISION AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION

Recent developments in entomology, plant pathology, and weed science in conjunction
with advanced technologies such as remote sensing, global positioning, geographic
information systems, and variable rate technology are dynamically influencing
agricultural productivity. In addition, the implementation of these technologies can
greatly improve environmental quality by reducing the volume of agricultural chemicals
applied. The emergence of these technologies has increased the demand for
technically trained workers.

Upon completion of this Associate Degree program, graduates will possess a working
knowledge of these emerging technologies as well as practical hands-on experience in
their application and use.




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Executive Summary



           AGRICULTURE BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY

            PRECISION AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION

                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

     Baseline Competencies for Agriculture Business and Management Technology
                                       Cluster**

                                      FIRST YEAR

 4 sch Applied Principles of Plant                 4 sch Applied Soils – Conservation and
       Production (AGT 1313) or Botany                   Use (AGT 1714)
       I (BIO 1314)                                3 sch Approved Elective****
 3 sch Introduction to Spatial Information         3 sch Social/Behavioral Science
       Systems                                           Elective
       (AGT 1163)                                 3 sch Written Communications Elective
 4 sch GPS Data Collection (AGT 1254)             3 sch Math/Science Elective
 4 sch Survey of Microcomputer                    _____
       Applications (CPT 1324)***                 17 sch
_____
15 sch

                                     SECOND YEAR

 4 sch Geographic Information Systems              4 sch Variable Rate Technology (AGT
       I (AGT 2154)                                      2164)
 4 sch Crop Management Zones (AGT                  4 sch Agricultural Geographic
       2434)                                             Information Systems (AGT 2174)
 3 sch Approved Elective****                       4 sch Remote Sensing (AGT 1354)
 3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective               4 sch Site Specific Pest Management
 3 sch Oral Communications Elective                      (AGT 2474)
_____                                             _____
17 sch                                            16 sch




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Executive Summary



****Approved Electives:

AGT 1111, 1121      Survey of Agriculture Technology I, II, III, and IV
 1131, and 1141
AGT 2363            Crop Production (General)
AGT 2373            Fiber and Oilseed Crops
AGT 2383            Grain Crops
AGT 2413            Weed Control
AGT 2463            Insects and Controls
AGT 291(1-3)        Special Problem in Agriculture Business and Management
AGT 292(1-3)        Supervised Agricultural Experience
CSC 1123            Microcomputer Applications
PHY 2243            Physical Science Survey I
PHY 2253            Physical Science Survey II
WBL 191(1-3),       Work Based Learning (maximum of 6 hours to count toward
 192(1-3),          graduation
 193 (1-3),
 291(1-3),
 292(1-3),
 293(1-3)

*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be
       provided related studies
**     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Agriculture Business and
       Management program. Students who can document mastery of these
       competencies should not receive duplicate instruction. Students who cannot
       demonstrate mastery will be required to do so.
***    Students who are computer literate may substitute a more advanced computer
       course.




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Executive Summary



AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER
          FRAMEWORK OF COURSES AND CONCENTRATIONS

(X=Required Course; E=Elective)                    AGB   AH   FC   PA

AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT COURSES

Agricultural Records                               E     E    E
Agricultural Sales                                 E     E    E
Applied Principles of Animal Production            X     X    X
Applied Principles of Plant Production             X     X    X     X
Applied Soils-Conservation and Use                 X     X    X     X
Human Relations in Agribusiness                    E     E    E
Principles of Agricultural Management              X     X    X
Principles of Agricultural Marketing               X     X    X
Special Problem in Agricultural Business
 and Management                                    E     E    E     E
Survey of Agricultural Technology I, II, III, IV   X     X    X     E

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT COURSES

Applied Agricultural Economics                     X     E    X
Supervised Agricultural Experience                 X     E    E

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSES

Animal Reproduction                                X
Applied Animal Nutrition                           E     X
Beef Production I                                  E     X    E
Beef Production II                                 E     X    E
Fish Management                                    E     E    E
Fitting/Grooming/Judging                           E     E
Forage and Pasture Crops                           E     E
Horse Production                                   E     X
Principles of Meats Processing I                   E
Principles of Meats Processing II                  E
Swine Production                                   E     E

FIELD CROPS COURSES

Agricultural Machinery and Shop Management         E     X    X
Agricultural Structures                            E          E
Crop Production (General)                          E     E    E    E
Fiber and Oilseed Crops                                  X         E
Grain Crops                                                   X    E




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Executive Summary



(X=Required Course; E=Elective)               AGB   AH      FC   PA

Insects and Controls                                X            E
Weed Control                                                X    E

PRECISION AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGY COURSES

Introduction to Spatial Information Systems                      X
GPS Data Collection                                              X
Geographic Information Systems I                                 X
Crop Management Zones                                            X
Variable Rate Technology                                         X
Agricultural Geographic Information Systems                      X
Remote Sensing                                                   X
Site Specific Pest Management                                    X

RELATED VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL COURSES

Forest Surveying                              E
Microcomputer Applications                    X     X       X    E
Water Quality Management                                    E
Applied Business Mathematics                  E             E
Professional Development                      E     E       E
Elementary Surveying                          E
Survey of Microcomputer Applications                             X

RELATED ACADEMIC COURSES
Business Mathematics                          E     E       E
Business Law                                  E     E
General Chemistry Survey (Basic)                        E
Introduction to Computer Concepts             E     E       E
Poultry Production                            E     E       E
Principles of Chemistry I                                   E
Science and Technology                        E     E       E
Vegetable Production                          E     E
Animal Science                                E     E       E
Plant Science                                 E     E       E
Basic Soils                                   E     E       E
Principles of Agricultural Economics          E     E       E
Botany I                                      E     E       E
Principles of Economics (Macroeconomics)      E     E       E
Principles of Accounting I                    E     E       E
Physical Science Survey I                                        E
Physical Science Survey II                                       E
Microcomputer Applications                                       E
Workbased Learning I, II, III, IV, V, VI                         E



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Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                         CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY

The Cardiovascular Technology program trains technologists to operate sophisticated
equipment in assisting physicians with diagnosing and treating patients with cardiac
disease. The technologists are trained to work in a cardiac catheterization laboratory
where they prepare patients for invasive procedures in which a small tube, or catheter,
is inserted through a blood vessel in the leg and up to the heart to determine if a
blockage exists in the coronary arteries. If indicated, the technologists assist the
physician in a balloon angioplasty, a procedure used to open blockages of a blood
vessel. Most cardiovascular technologists work in hospital cardiology departments,
while some work in cardiologists’ offices, cardiac rehabilitation centers, or ambulatory
surgery centers. This curriculum was written to meet the National Health Care Skill
Standards and the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
Standards and Guidelines for the Cardiovascular Technologist.

Academic, workplace, technology, and industry standards are referenced at the end of
each course where applicable. The academic and workplace standards are based on
the SCANS competencies, and the technology standards are based on the National
Educational Technology Standards for Students. The industry standards are taken from
the National Health Care Skill Standards and the Commission on Accreditation of Allied
Health Education Programs Standards and Guidelines for the Cardiovascular
Technologist.




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Executive Summary



                            CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY *

                            SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE

                    Baseline Competencies for Cardiovascular Technology**


                                        FIRST YEAR

           Prerequisite to admission to the program: Anatomy and Physiology I


FALL SEMESTER                                     SPRING SEMESTER

3 sch Social/Behavioral Elective                  4 sch Principles of Chemistry (CHE
4 sch Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO                     1313 and 1311)
       1523 and 1521)                             3 sch Survey of Physics I
3 sch Foundations of Cardiovascular                      (PHY 2113)
       Technology (CVT 1113)                      4 sch Cardiovascular Anatomy and
3 sch Math/Science Elective                              Physiology (CVT 1214)
3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective               3 sch Written Communications
_____                                                    Elective
16 sch                                            3 sch Oral Communications Elective
                                                  _____
                                                  17 sch




                              SUMMER SEMESTER


               4 sch Microbiology (BIO 2924 and 2920)
               2 sch Cardiovascular Pharmacology (CVT 1312)
               3 sch Introduction to Computer Concepts (CSC 1113)
               ____
               9 sch




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Executive Summary



                                     SECOND YEAR


       FALL SEMESTER                                    SPRING SEMESTER

3 sch Invasive Cardiology I (CVT                  3 sch Invasive Cardiology II (CVT
       2413)                                             2423)
3 sch Non-Invasive Cardiology I (CVT              3 sch Non-Invasive Cardiology II
       2613)                                             (CVT 2623)
8 sch Cardiovascular Clinical I (CVT              2 sch Critical Care Applications
       2718)                                             (CVT 2512)
_____                                             8 sch Cardiovascular Clinical II
14 sch                                                   (CVT 2728)
                                                  _____
                                                  16 sch




                                     SUMMER TERM


2 sch Cardiovascular Technology as a Professional (CVT 2812)
6 sch Cardiovascular Clinical III (CVT 2736)
____
8 sch

*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be
       provided related studies.

**     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health program.
       Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
       duplicated instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required
       to do so.




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Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                          DENTAL HYGIENE TECHNOLOGY

The Dental Hygiene Technology Program is a general education and clinical dental
hygiene experience to prepare one for a career in the dental hygiene profession. All
phases of dental hygiene education are covered and practiced by clinical experience.
CPR-Health Care Provider is a prerequisite for the program. The curriculum requires a
minimum of 85 semester hours of study. The program requires 50 hours of dental
hygiene courses, 32-33 academic hours leading to an Associate Degree in Dental
Hygiene, and an additional 3 hour elective. A graduate will be eligible to take the
examination of the National Board of Dental Examiners as well as individual state board
examinations for dental hygiene.

The vocational-technical courses in the following list are required in the Dental Hygiene
Technology curriculum:
      5 semester credit hours (sch) Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene
      4sch Dental Radiology
      5 sch Clinical Dental Hygiene I
      2 sch Dental Anatomy
      2 sch Head and Neck Anatomy
      3 sch Dental Hygiene Materials
      2 sch Oral Histology and Embryology
      5 sch Clinical Dental Hygiene II
      2 sch Periodontics
      2 sch Dental Pharmacology
      6 sch Clinical Dental Hygiene III
      3 sch Community Dental Health
      2 sch Dental Ethics/Law
      1 sch Dental Hygiene Seminar I
      1 sch Dental Hygiene Seminar II
      1 sch Dental Hygiene Seminar III
      1 sch Dental Hygiene Seminar IV
      3 sch General/Oral Pathology

The following academic courses are required in the Dental Hygiene Technology
curriculum:

       4 sch Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 2514)
       4 sch Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 2524)
       3 sch Math/Science Elective*
       3 sch Written Communications Elective
       3-4 sch Microbiology (BIO 2923 or 2924)
       3 sch Social/Behavioral Science Elective**
       3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
       3 sch Oral Communications Elective



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Executive Summary



       3 sch Principles of Nutrition or Nutrition (HEC 1233 or 1253)
       3 sch General Psychology I (PSY 1513)

* College Algebra is required by national standards.
** Introduction to Sociology I (SOC 2113) is required by national standards.

An additional 3 hour elective should be selected from the following list:

English Composition II (ENG 1113)
Introduction to Chemistry (CHE 1113)
General Chemistry I (CHE 1213)
General Chemistry Laboratory I (CHE 1211)
Introduction to Computer Concepts (CSC 1113)
Fundamentals of Microcomputer Application (CPT 1113)




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Executive Summary



                             DENTAL HYGIENE TECHNOLOGY

                            SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                    Baseline Competencies for Dental Hygiene Technology**

                                        FIRST YEAR

5 sch          Fundamentals of Dental             4 sch       Anatomy and Physiology II
               Hygiene (DHT 1115)                             (BIO 2524)
2 sch          Dental Anatomy (DHT 1212)          5 sch       Clinical Dental Hygiene I
4 sch          Dental Radiology (DHT                          (DHT 1415)
               1314)                              3-4 sch     Microbiology (BIO 2923 or
1 sch          Dental Hygiene Seminar I                       2924)
               (DHT 1911)                         2 sch       Periodontics (DHT 1512)
4 sch          Anatomy and Physiology I           1 sch       Dental Hygiene Seminar II
               (BIO 2514)                                     (DHT 1921)
3 sch          Math/Science Elective***           2 sch       Oral Histology and
_____                                                         Embryology (DHT 1232)
19 sch                                            2 sch       Head and Neck Anatomy
                                                              (DHT 1222)
                                                  _______
                                                  19-20 sch



                                      SUMMER TERM

3 sch          Written Communications Elective
3 sch          Social/Behavior Science Elective ****
3 sch          General Psychology I (PSY 1513)
3 sch          Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
_____
12 sch




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Executive Summary



                                      SECOND YEAR

5 sch          Clinical Dental Hygiene II   6 sch         Clinical Dental Hygiene III
               (DHT 2425)                                 (DHT 2436)
3 sch          Dental Hygiene Materials     3 sch         Community Dental Health
               (DHT 2613)                                 (DHT 2813)
3 sch          General/Oral Pathology       2 sch         Dental Ethics/Law
               (DHT 2233)                                 (DHT 2922)
3 sch          Principles of Nutrition      3 sch         Oral Communications
               (HEC 1233) or Nutrition                    Elective
               (HEC 1253)                   1 sch         Dental Hygiene Seminar
2 sch          Dental Pharmacology                        IV (DHT 2941)
               (DHT 2712)                   3 sch         Elective
1 sch          Dental Hygiene Seminar       _____
               III (DHT 2931)               18 sch
_____
17 sch



*    Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be
     provided related studies.

**   Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health
     program. Students who can document mastery of these competencies
     should not receive duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate
     mastery will be required to do so.

*** College Algebra (MAT 1313) is required by national standards.

**** Introduction to Sociology I (SOC 2113) is required by national standards.

APPROVED ELECTIVES FOR DENTAL HYGIENE TECHNOLOGY:

English Composition II (ENG 1123)
Introduction to Chemistry (CHE 1113)
General Chemistry I (CHE 1213)
General Chemistry Laboratory I (CHE 1211)
Introduction to Computer Concepts (CSC 1113)
Fundamentals of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1113)




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Executive Summary



                               PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                    EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY – PARAMEDIC

Paramedics have fulfilled prescribed requirements by a credentialing agency to practice
the art and science of out-of-hospital medicine in conjunction with medical direction.
Through performance of assessments and providing medical care, their goal is to
prevent and reduce mortality and morbidity due to illness and injury. Paramedics
primarily provide care to emergency patients in an out-of-hospital setting.

Paramedics possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes consistent with the
expectations of the public and the profession. Paramedics recognize that they are an
essential component of the continuum of care and serve as linkages among health
resources.

Paramedics strive to maintain high quality, reasonable cost health care by delivering
patients directly to appropriate facilities. As an advocate for patients, paramedics seek
to be proactive in affecting long-term health care by working in conjunction with other
provider agencies, networks, and organizations. The emerging roles and
responsibilities of the paramedic include public education, health promotion, and
participation in injury and illness prevention programs. As the scope of service
continues to expand, the paramedic will function as a facilitator of access to care, as
well as an initial treatment provider.

Paramedics are responsible and accountable to medical direction, the public, and their
peers. Paramedics recognize the importance of research and actively participate in the
design, development, evaluation, and publication of research. Paramedics seek to take
part in life-long professional development and peer evaluation, and they assume an
active role in professional and community organizations.

The EMT-P training program is a postsecondary program drawing its students from
individuals already possessing a valid EMT-Basic state certification and having
Anatomy and Physiology I with a grade point average of 2.0. Each student must be 18
years or older and possess a high school diploma or GED certificate.

Classroom instruction is comprehensive including a working knowledge of all anatomy,
physiology, and pathophysiological processes as well as competency-based instruction
in assessment and management skills required for treatment of life-threatening
problems in the adult, pediatric, and geriatric patient. Clinical internship requires
participation in care of patients in a hospital emergency department that provides
medical control to ALS providers in the field and, according to availability, CCU, ICU,
labor and delivery suite, operating room, psychiatric ward, pediatric ward, and geriatric
ward. Field internship is done with an ambulance service and/or rescue service
providing advanced life support services to the community.




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Executive Summary



A student successfully completing the program will receive an associate degree from
the college and be eligible to take the National Registry's Exam as an EMT-Paramedic.
For professional accreditation purposes, these academic courses must include the
following:

       3 sch   Social Science/Behavorial Science
       3 sch   Written Communications Elective
       3 sch   Oral Communications Elective
       3 sch   Fine Arts/Humanities Elective
       3 sch   Math/Science Elective (Anatomy and Physiology II satisfies this
               requirement)

This training program is sanctioned by the Mississippi State Board of Health. The
course meets or exceeds those standards established by the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration/U.S. Department of Transportation.

Academic, workplace, technology, and industry standards are referenced at the end of
each course where applicable. The academic and workplace standards are based on
the SCANS competencies, and the technology standards are based on the National
Educational Technology Standards for Students. The EMT-Paramedic standards listed
at the end of each course are based on those required by the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration/U.S. Department of Transportation.




                                            24
Executive Summary



                        SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

  State certified EMT-Basic and Anatomy & Physiology are prerequisities (by state law
                  and national standards) for entrance into this program.

              Baseline Competencies for Emergency Medical Technology **

                                     FIRST YEAR

2 sch Fundamentals of Pre-hospital             5 sch Pre-hospital Cardiology
       Care (EMT 1122)                                (EMT 1825)
5 sch Airway Management and                    3 sch Pre-hospital Pharmacology
       Ventilation (EMT 1315)                         (EMT 1613)
5 sch Patient Assessment                       5 sch Pre-hospital Medical Care
       (EMT 1415)                                     (EMT 2855)
3 sch EMS Clinical Internship I                3 sch EMS Clinical Internship II
       (EMT 1513)                                     (EMT 1523)
4 sch Math/Science Elective ***                3 sch Written Communications Elective
_____                                          _____
19 sch                                         19 sch

                                   SECOND YEAR

4 sch Pre-hospital Trauma                      2 sch Pre-hospital OB/GYN
       (EMT 2714)                                     (EMT 2412)
3 sch Pre-hospital Pediatrics                  3 sch EMS Team Management
       (EMT 2423)                                     (EMT 2913)
2 sch EMS Field Internship I                   3 sch EMS Special Considerations
       (EMT 2552)                                     (EMT 1423)
3 sch Oral Communications                      4 sch EMS Field Internship II
_____                                                 (EMT 2564)
12 sch                                         3 sch Social/Behavioral
                                                      Science Elective
                                               3 sch Fine Arts/Humanities Elective
                                               _____
                                               18 sch




                                          25
Executive Summary



*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be
       provided related studies.

**     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health program.
       Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
       duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required
       to do so.

***    It is suggested that the Math/Science Elective be Anatomy and Physiology II
       (BIO 2524) for this program.

****   Pathophysiology (EMT 1213) may not be taught after July 1, 2005.




                                             26
Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                         FUNERAL SERVICE TECHNOLOGY

The curriculum required for educating prospective funeral service professionals is a
structured series of course experiences. This program is accredited by the American
Board of Funeral Service Education (38 Florida Avenue, Portland, Maine 04103; 207-
878-6530).

The goal of the program is to provide training that prepares students for entry level
positions after graduation and licensure. The curriculum is designed to provide students:
        ethical and professional knowledge in Funeral Service Education.
        exposure to career options available within the Funeral Service field.
        experiences in the application of ethical and professional skills while
          emphasizing aspects of public health.

The Funeral Service Technology program is a two-year program leading to an
Associate of Applied Science degree.

Academic, workplace, technology, and industry standards are referenced at the end of
each course where applicable. The academic and workplace standards are based on
the SCANS competencies, and the technology standards are based on the National
Educational Technology Standards for Students. The industry standards are taken from
the American Board of Funeral Service Education Accreditation Manual.




                                           27
Executive Summary



                            FUNERAL SERVICE TECHNOLOGY
                            SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                    Baseline Competencies for Funeral Service Technology**

                                        FIRST YEAR

     3 sch Mortuary Anatomy I                  3 sch Mortuary Anatomy II
            (FST 1113)                                (FST 1123)
     4 sch Embalming I (FST 1214)              5 sch Embalming II (FST 1225)
     3 sch Funeral Directing (FST 1313)        3 sch Funeral Service Ethics and Law
     3 sch Written Communications                     (FST 1413)
            Elective                           3 sch Restorative Art/Color and
     3 sch Math/Science Elective                      Cosmetics (FST 1523)
     _____                                     3 sch Oral Communications Elective
     16 sch                                    _____
                                               17 sch




                                       SECOND YEAR

3 sch Microbiology (FST 2623)               3 sch Principles of Accounting I
3 sch Pathology (FST 2633)                         (ACC 1213)
3 sch Psychosocial Aspects of Grief         3 sch Funeral Merchandising and
       and Death (FST 2713)                        Management (FST 2323)
3 sch Social/Behavioral Science             1 sch Comprehensive Review
       Elective                                    (FST 2811)
3 sch Related Elective****                  3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
3 sch Science Elective***                   3 sch Elective†
_____                                       3 sch Related Elective****
18 sch                                      _____
                                            16 sch


*       Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be
        provided related studies.

**      Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health program.
        Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
        duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required
        to do so.




                                              28
Executive Summary



***    Science Elective:
       Thanatochemistry (FST 2273)
       Any related Academic Science by permission of instructor

****   Related Elective:
       Any related Vocational or Academic course approved by the instructor
†
       Approved Electives:
       Computer applications course (3 sch) – Vocational or Academic by
       permission of instructor
       Entrepreneurship (MMT 2513)
       Clinical Embalming I-IV (FST 1231, FST 1241, FST 2251, FST 2261)
       Legal Environment of Business (BAD 2413)
       Business Law (FST 2423)




                                          29
Executive Summary



                             PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                      HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The Health Information Technology program is a two-year technical program leading to
an Associate Degree which prepares the individual to work as a technical specialist in
Health Record Systems. When accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of
Allied Health Educational Program (CAAHEP) in cooperation with the American Health
Information Management Association’s Council on Accreditation, the Health Information
Technology program prepares graduates to write the national accreditation examination
for the Registered Health Information Technician.

A total of 69 semester credit hours are required for an Associate Degree in Health
Information Technology. This total includes 48 semester hours of vocational-technical
core courses, 15 semester hours of academic core courses, and 6 semester hours of
academic related courses.




                                          30
Executive Summary



                      HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

                        SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                                       FIRST YEAR


4 sch Health Record Systems                     3 sch Alternate Care Systems
       (HIT 1114)                                      (HIT 2123)
3 sch Medical Terminology                       3 sch Health Care Law and Ethics
       (HIT 1213)                                      (HIT 1323)
1 sch Health Care Delivery Systems              3 sch Pathophysiology I (HIT 1413)
       (HIT 1311)                               3 sch Computers in Health Care
4 sch Anatomy & Physiology I                           (HIT 2913)
       (BIO 2514)                               4 sch Anatomy & Physiology II
3 sch Written Communications                           (BIO 2524)
       Elective                                 3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
3 sch Fundamentals of                           _____
       Microcomputer Applications               19 sch
       (CPT 1113)***
_____
18 sch


                                  SECOND YEAR

4 sch  Coding Systems I (HIT 2614)              4 sch Coding Systems II (HIT 2624)
3 sch  Pathophysiology II (HIT 2423)            3 sch Health Care Supervision (HIT
2 sch  Pharmacology (HIT 2212)                         2713)
3 sch  Professional Practice                    2 sch Performance Improvement
       Experience I (HIT 2513)                         Techniques (HIT 2812)
3 sch Health Statistics (HIT 2133)              3 sch Professional Practice (HIT
3 sch Oral Communications Elective                     Experience II (HIT 2523)
_____                                           2 sch Reimbursement
18 sch                                                 Methodologies (HIT 2632)
                                                3 sch Social/Behavioral Science
                                                       Elective
                                                _____
                                                17 sch




                                           31
Executive Summary



*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be
       provided related studies.

**     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health program.
       Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not
       receive duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery
       will be required to do so.

***    Microcomputer Applications (CSC 1123) may be taken instead of Fundamentals
       of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1113).

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (may be taken in addition to required courses)
    Survey of Health Information Systems (HIT 1123)
    Medical Transcription (HIT 2222)
    Fundamentals of Professional Practice Experience (HIT 1513)




                                             32
Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                            OPHTHALMIC TECHNOLOGY


Ophthalmic Technology is a two-year technical program. Upon successful completion of
the program, the student is awarded the Associate of Applied Science Degree. The
program is comprised of both vocational-technical and academic courses.

Opticianry is defined as “the art and science of optics to compounding, filing, and
adapting of ophthalmic prescriptions, products and accessories.” Opticianry describes
the preparation (making) of ophthalmic lenses, setting them into spectacle frames, and
dispensing (fitting and delivering) them to the wearer. These acts include a large
number of activities or trades, ranging from the mechanical act of lens grinding to the
personal service of the selection, fitting, and adjusting of a pair of glasses to an
individual’s face, selling, and public relations.

Academic, workplace, technology, and industry standards are referenced at the end of
each course where applicable. The academic and workplace standards are based on
the SCANS competencies, and the technology standards are based on the National
Educational Technology Standards for Students. The industry standards are taken from
the Essentials of an Accredited Educational Program for Opticianry.




                                           33
Executive Summary



                           SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*
                    Baseline Competencies for Ophthalmic Technology**


                                      FIRST YEAR


3 sch Ophthalmic Optics I                       3 sch Ophthalmic Optics II
       (OPT 1113)                                      (OPT 1123)
4 sch Optics Laboratory                         4 sch Optics Laboratory Techniques
       Techniques I (OPT 1214)                         II (OPT 1224)
3 sch Laboratory Management and                 3 sch Laboratory Management and
       Inventory Control I                             Inventory Control II
       (OPT 1313)                                      (OPT 1323)
3 sch Written Communications                    3 sch Ophthalmic Dispensing I
       Elective                                        (OPT 1413)
3 sch Social/Behavioral Science                 3 sch Math/Science
       Elective                                        Elective
_____                                           _____
16 sch                                          16 sch


                                    SECOND YEAR


3 sch Ophthalmic Dispensing II                  3 sch Ophthalmic Dispensing III
       (OPT 2423)                                      (OPT 2433)
3 sch Optical Theory and                        3 sch Dispensing Clinic II
       Instrumentation                                 (OPT 2623)
       (OPT 2513)                               3 sch Fundamentals of
3 sch Dispensing Clinic I                              Microcomputer Applications
       (OPT 2613)                                      (CPT 1113) or Introduction to
3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective                    Computer Concepts (CSC 1113)
3 sch Principles of Accounting I                3 sch Oral Communications Elective
       (ACC 1213)                               3 sch Elective*
3 sch Elective***                               _____
_____                                           15 sch
18 sch




                                           34
Executive Summary



                                  SUMMER SEMESTER

6 sch Externship (OPT 2916)
_____
6 sch


*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be
       provided related studies.

**     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health program.
       Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
       duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required
       to do so.

***    Elective must be approved by instructor.




                                             35
Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
                              RESPIRATORY THERAPY

The Respiratory Therapy Program prepares the individual to become a Respiratory
Therapist. Respiratory Therapists, as members of a team of health care professionals,
work to evaluate, treat, and manage patients of all ages with respiratory, cardiac, and
other systemic illnesses. Respiratory Therapists are responsible for airway
management and the setup and monitoring of life support systems. They provide
treatment for heart and lung disorders by administering inhalation treatments, oxygen,
drugs, and other therapeutic modalities.

In addition to performing respiratory care procedures, respiratory therapists are involved
in clinical decision-making (such as patient evaluation, treatment selection, and
assessment of treatment efficacy) and patient education. The scope of practice for
respiratory therapy includes, but is not limited to:
        - acquiring and evaluating clinical data;
        - assessing the cardiopulmonary status of patients;
        - performing and assisting in the performance of prescribed diagnostic studies,
            such as drawing blood samples, performing blood gas analysis, and
            pulmonary function testing;
        - utilizing data to assess the appropriateness of prescribed respiratory care;
        - establishing therapeutic goals for patients with cardiopulmonary disease;
        - participating in the development and modification of respiratory care plans;
        - case management of patients with cardiopulmonary and related diseases;
        - initiating ordered respiratory care, evaluating and monitoring patients’
            responses to such care, modifying the prescribed respiratory therapy and
            cardiopulmonary procedures, and life support endeavors to achieve desired
            therapeutic objectives;
        - initiating and conducting prescribed pulmonary rehabilitation;
        - providing patient, family, and community education;
        - promoting cardiopulmonary wellness, disease prevention, and disease
            management;
        - participating in life support activities as required; and
        - promoting evidence-based medicine; research; and clinical practice
            guidelines.
Respiratory Therapists carry out these duties in a wide variety of clinical settings and
are expected to act in a professional manner and conform to the standards and ethics of
all health care professionals. Professional standards integrated into this curriculum
include the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
Standards and Guidelines for the Profession of Respiratory Care (CoARC/CAAHEP),
the National Health Care Skills Standards, and standards for the National Board for
Respiratory Care (NBRC).

Graduates of the Respiratory Therapy program are eligible to sit for the NBRC Entry
Level Exam. Upon successful completion of the entry level exam, graduates will be
eligible to sit for the NBRC Advanced Practitioners Exam.



                                            36
Executive Summary



                          SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
                Baseline Competencies for Respiratory Care Practitioner**

Prerequisites:    Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1514 or 2514)
Pre/Corequisites: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 1524 or 2524)


                                       FIRST YEAR

4 sch     Math/Science Elective†                  3 sch Written Communications Elective
3 sch     Cardiopulmonary Anatomy                 6 sch Clinical Practice I (RCT 1516)
          and Physiology (RCT 1313)               3 sch Respiratory Care Pharmacology
3 sch     Patient Assessment and                        (RCT 1613)
          Planning (RCT 1223)                     6 sch Respiratory Care Practitioner I
4 sch     Respiratory Care Science                      (RCT 1416)
          (RCT 1214)
_____                                             _____
14 sch                                            18 sch

                                     SUMMER TERM

               4 sch Clinical Practice II (RCT 1524)
               4 sch Respiratory Care Practitioner II (RCT 1424)
               2 sch Pulmonary Function Testing (RCT 1322)
               3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
               _____
               13 sch

                                     SECOND YEAR
3 sch     Oral Communications Elective      3 sch          Behavioral/Social Science Elective
3 sch     Respiratory Care Practitioner III 2 sch          Respiratory Care Seminar
          (RCT 2434)                                       (RCT 2712)
3 sch     Cardiopulmonary Pathology         6 sch          Clinical Practice IV (RCT 2546)
          (RCT 2333)                        3 sch          Neonatal/Pediatrics Management
4 sch     Clinical Practice III                            (RCT 2613)
          (RCT 2534)

______                                            _____
14 sch                                            14 sch


*   Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be provided
    related studies.




                                             37
Executive Summary



** Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Allied Health program.
   Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
   duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required to
   do so.

† APPROVED MATH/SCIENCE ELECTIVES
  College Algebra (MAT 1313)
  Fundamentals of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1113)
  Principles of Chemistry I (CHE 1314)
  Principles of Chemistry II (CHE 1324)
  General Chemistry I (CHE 1214)
  Microbiology (BIO 2924)

TECHINCAL ELECTIVES (May be taken in addition to required courses)
  Medical Terminology (MET 1113)
  Medical Office Terminology I (MET 1613)
  Respiratory Care Practicum [RCT 111 (1-3)]




                                          38
Executive Summary



                                PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                         CLOTHING AND TEXTILES SERVICES

This program prepares individuals for entry-level occupations in clothing and textiles
services including, but not limited to, construction; fabric, fabric design, and fabric care;
pattern design; principles of clothing construction and selection; fitting and alterations of
ready-to-wear garments; custom tailoring; clothing maintenance; home furnishings; and
textiles testing. This program meets the National Standards for Family and Consumer
Sciences - Textiles and Apparel.




                                             39
Executive Summary



                         CLOTHING AND TEXTILES SERVICES

                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*
               Baseline Competencies for Clothing and Textiles Services**

                                       FIRST YEAR


4 sch      Garment Construction                   3 sch    Alterations (CTV 1123)
           (CTV 1114)                             4 sch    Tailoring (CTV 1134)
3 sch      Equipment Use and Care                 3 sch    Fashion Design (CTV 1143)
           (CTV 1213)                             3 sch    Home Furnishings
3 sch      Textiles (CTV 1223)                             (CTV 1413)
3 sch      Fabric and Accessory Design            2 sch    Elective***
           (CTV 1233)                             _____
3 sch      Modeling and Grooming                  15 sch
           (CTV 1313)
_____
16 sch


*   Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be provided
    related studies.

** Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Clothing and Textile Services
   program. Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not
   receive duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be
   required to do so.

*** Electives:
    Supervised Work Experience in Clothing and Textiles Services [CTV 292(1-6)]
    Special Problem in Clothing and Textiles Services [CTV 291(1-3)]
    Work-Based Learning WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3), WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3),
       WBL 292(1-3), and WBL 293(1-3)




                                             40
Executive Summary



                               PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

              AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES MARKETING

Automotive Vehicles and Accessories Marketing includes theory, laboratory, shop work,
and other specialized learning experiences relative to receiving, stocking, selling, and
shipping merchandise in the automotive aftermarket. Included is the study of
mathematical procedures related to business operation, engine theory and operation,
automotive systems, the use of office machines, auto parts store management,
customer relations, and computer-based instruction.

Specific training will enable the student to ascertain the correct part required by the
customer, advise the customer according to the description given, read various catalogs
to determine the stock number and price, measure engine parts, mix paint, display
merchandise, determine correct interchange parts, accept telephone orders, and take
inventory.

Instruction emphasizes distribution of parts and services within the automotive
aftermarket in establishments such as distributors, jobbers, retail part stores, specialty
shops, car dealers, independent garages, fleet garages, and service stations.

Automotive Vehicles and Accessories Marketing is a one-year certificate program
designed to prepare automotive parts salespersons for entry-level positions in
automotive parts marketing.




                                             41
Executive Summary



              AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES MARKETING

                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                                       FIRST YEAR

2 sch Orientation and Safety                6 sch Catalog Information Systems
       Procedures (AAV 1112)                       (AAV 1316)
6 sch Operational Procedures (AAV           2 sch Merchandising (AAV 1322)
       1126)                                4 sch Internal Operations (AAV
4 sch Automotive Systems I (AAV                    1414)
       1214)                                4 sch Internal Sales (AAV 1424)
4 sch Automotive Systems II (AAV            _____
       1224)                                16 sch
_____
16 sch


                                      Summer Term

1-6 sch Supervised Work Experience in Automotive Vehicles and Accessories
        Marketing [AAV 192(1-6)]
OR
Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3), WBL 193(1-3),
      WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), WBL 293(1-3)]
_____
1-6 sch



*Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be provided
related studies.




                                             42
Executive Summary



                               PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                                   BARBER/STYLIST

This postsecondary instructional program prepares individuals to cut, color, perm,
shampoo, and style hair. Students are also instructed on the proper techniques in facial
massaging and shaving. Special attention is given to hygiene, safety, skin, scalp
diseases, and equipment sterilization. Included is the study of sales, business
management, laws governing the profession of barbering, and customer relationships.
Instruction qualifies students for the State Barber Board certification examination.

                             PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Mississippi laws governing the profession of barbering require completion of not less
than 1500 hours of study at a barbering school approved by the State Board of Barber
Examiners to become qualified to receive a certificate of registration to practice
barbering. The academic requirements may be satisfied by successfully completing
three semesters of study and documentation of a High School diploma or GED.
Students must have also satisfactorily passed The Ability to Benefit Exam (TABE). A
total of 48 semester credit hours is included in the Barber/Stylist program.

The curriculum for Barber/Stylist is based upon data as collected from curricula guides,
State Board documents, input from the business community, and a revision team. The
listing of tasks from these sources served as baseline data for the development of this
curriculum. The task list used in this curriculum is based upon the following
assumptions:

1.     In all areas, appropriate theory, safety, and support instruction will be provided
       for each task. It is essential that all instruction include use of the appropriate
       equipment needed to accomplish certain tasks. It is also assumed that each
       student has received instruction to locate and use current reference materials
       from publications which present manufacturers’ recommended or required
       specifications and procedures for doing the various tasks.
2.     The individual program should have written and detailed evaluation standards for
       ach task covered in the curriculum. Learning progress of students should be
       monitored and evaluated against these stated standards. A system should be in
       place which informs all students of their progress throughout the program.
3.     It is recognized that individual courses will differ across the technical programs.
       The development of appropriate learning activities and tests will be the
       responsibility of the individual program.
4.     These standards require that tasks contained in the list be included in the
       program to validate that the program is meeting the needs of the business
       community.




                                            43
Executive Summary



                                   BARBERING/STYLIST

                           SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*


              First Semester                                 Second Semester

8 sch    Basic Practices in Barbering             8 sch    Fundamental Practices in
         (BAV 1118)                                        Barbering II (BAV 1318)
8 sch    Fundamental Practices in                 8 sch    Intermediate Practices in
         Barbering I (BAV 1218)                            Barbering I (BAV 1418)
_____                                             _____
16 sch                                            16 sch


                                      Third Semester

               8 sch Intermediate Practices in Barbering II (BAV 1518)
               8 sch Advanced Practices in Barbering (BAV 1618)
               _____
               16 sch

*Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be provided
related studies.


NOTE: The ratio of lab hours to lecture hours for Barber/Stylist is 3 to 1.




                                             44
Executive Summary



                             PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                         GRAPHIC DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

The Graphic Design Technology curriculum is a two-year program of study designed to
prepare the student for entry-level employment and advancement in the field of graphic
design. Students receive instruction in the design and execution of illustrations,
typography, layouts, color theory, industry specific production, rendering, digital
imaging, logo design, and creative principles necessary for publication design, mass
distribution, and other forms of visual communications.

Graphic Design is a two-year program of study which requires 64 semester hours. The
Associate of Applied Science degree is earned upon the successful completion of the
Graphic Design Technology curriculum.




                                          45
Executive Summary



                    GRAPHIC DESIGN TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                                   FIRST YEAR
3 sch Graphic Design and Production I    3 sch Graphic Design and Production II
       (CAT 1113)                               (CAT 1123)
3 sch Fundamentals of Graphic            3 sch Design II (ART 1423)
       Computers (CAT 1213)              3 sch Drawing II (ART 1323)
3 sch Design I (ART 1413)                3 sch Math/Science Elective
3 sch Drawing I (ART 1313)               3 sch Elective**
3 sch Written Communications Elective    3 sch Advertising (MMT 1323)
______                                   ______
15 sch                                   18 sch

                                  SECOND YEAR
3 sch Social/Behavioral Science Elective 3 sch Advanced Advertising Design (CAT
3 sch Basic Advertising Design (CAT             2323)
       2313)                             4 sch Practical Advertising Techniques
3 sch Elective**                                (CAT 2334)
3 sch Rendering Techniques (CAT 2413) 3 sch Graphic Design Studio (CAT 2133)
3 sch Oral Communications Elective       3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
                                         3 sch Elective**
______                                   ______
15 sch                                   16 sch



*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be
       provided related studies.

**     ELECTIVES:
       Supervised Work Experience in Graphic Design Technology [CAT 292(1-6)]
       Work Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3), WBL
              193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), WBL 293(1-3)]
       Special Project in Graphic Design Technology [CAT 291(1-6)]
       Special Project in Graphic Design Technology II [CAT 293(1-6)]
       Figure Drawing I (ART 2353)
       Painting I (ART 2513)
       Painting II (ART 2522)
       Painting III (Watercolor) (ART 2533)
       Ceramics I (ART 2613)
       Ceramics II (ART 2623)
       Art History I (ART 2713)
       Art History II (ART 2723)
       Special Studio (ART 2913)



                                             46
Executive Summary



       Desktop Publishing (BOT 2133)
       Keyboard Speed Building (BOT 1102)
       Professional Development (BOT 1213)
       Marketing I (MMT 1113)
       Engineering Drawing I (GRA 1112)
       Beginning Photography (JOU 2513)
       Advanced Photography (JOU 2523)
       Beginning Photography (ART 1383)
       Advanced Photography (ART 1393)
       Typography (CAT 1143)
       History of Graphic Design (CAT 1133)
       Web Graphic Production (WDT 2263/CAT 2263)
       Web Design Applications (WDT 1414) [Upon release from Developmental Draft]

Other approved related technical course or academic course




                                         47
Executive Summary



                     GRAPHICS AND PRINT COMMUNICATIONS

                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

This nine-month certificate program prepares the student to enter the graphic arts field.
Students will learn industry terminology, history, and theory. They will develop
fundamental process skills in operations related to graphics and print design, paste-up
and layout, film assembly, plate making, press operations, and binding and finishing.
The program requires successful completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours of
vocational-technical courses to receive a Graphics and Print Communications
certificate.




                                            48
Executive Summary



                       GRAPHICS AND PRINT COMMUNICATIONS

                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

            Baseline Competencies for Graphics and Print Communications**

                                       FIRST YEAR

2 sch Overview of Graphics and Print              4 sch  Graphic Design II (GPV 1424)
       Communications GPV 1212)                   2 sch  Digital Printing II (GPV 1752)
4 sch Pasteup and Layout (GPV 1314)               3 sch  Press Operations II (GPV 1723)
4 sch Graphic Design I (GPV 1414)                 4 sch Binding and Finishing Operations
4 sch Digital Printing I (GPV 1744)                     GPV 1814)
2 sch Press Operations I GPV 1712)                3 sch Technical Elective
_____                                             _____
16 sch                                            16 sch

Technical Electives:

3-sch      Press Operations III (GPV 1733)
1-3 sch    Special Project in Graphics and Print Communications [GPV 191(1-3)]
1-3 sch    Supervised Work Experience in Graphics and Print Communications [GPV
           192(1-3)]
3 sch      Commercial Art Elective
1-3 sch    Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3),
           WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), and WBL 293(1-3)]




*      Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be
       provided related studies.

**     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Graphics and Print
       Communications program. Students who can document mastery of these
       competencies should not receive duplicate instruction. Students who cannot
       demonstrate mastery will be required to do so.




                                             49
Executive Summary



                               PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                    JEWELRY DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND REPAIR

This is an instructional program that prepares individuals to design, fabricate, and repair
jewelry articles such as rings, brooches, pendants, bracelets, and lockets, Included is
instruction on model making, casting, engraving, polishing, stone settings, fitting rings,
and soldering broken parts; reshaping and restyling old jewelry; and using special
jeweler’s hand tools and machines.

The Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair program is designed to be taught in a
practical “hands-on” laboratory environment with emphasis on individualized instruction.
The program begins with a “common core” of skills which is shared with the Watch
Repair program and focuses on the development of fundamental skills common to both
areas. Students who complete this program are eligible to receive a vocational
certificate in Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair.




                                            50
Executive Summary



                        JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIR CLUSTER

              OPTION A: JEWELRY DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND REPAIR

                           SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*


                                         FIRST YEAR

4 sch      Fundamentals of Watch and                4 sch    Jewelry Repair I (WJV 1244)
           Jewelry Repair (WJV 1114)
4 sch      Basic Jewelry Repair (WJV                4 sch    Jewelry Repair II (WJV 1254)
           1224)
4 sch      Jewelry Casting and Design               4 sch    Jewelry Repair III (WJV 1264)
           (WJV 1234)
_____                                               _____
12 sch                                              12 sch


4 sch      Stone Setting (WJV 1274)
4 sch      Advanced Stone Setting (WJV
           1284)
_____
8 sch

*        Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be
         provided related studies.

         Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3); WBL 192(1-3); WBL
         193(1-3); WBL 291(1-3); WBL 292(1-3); WBL 293(1-3)] are available as free
         electives to students meeting program requirements.




                                               51
Executive Summary



                               PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                                    WATCH REPAIR

Watch Repair is an instructional program that prepares individuals to maintain
and repair mechanical as well as quartz watches by using diagnostic and other test
equipment. These repairs include disassembling; removing and replacing parts; balance
staffing; and cleaning, oiling, and adjusting, to include water testing. Some minor repairs
performed are replacing bands, crystals, and crowns, and other minor adjustments. The
student will learn to use various bench and hand tools such as lathes, staking tools,
loupes, truing calipers, timing machines, pallet warmers, and other grinding, drilling, and
polishing tools.

The Watch Repair program is designed to be taught in a practical “hands-on” laboratory
environment with an emphasis on individualized instruction. The program begins with a
“common core” of skills which is shared with the Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and
Repair program and focuses on the development of the fundamental skills common to
both areas. Students who complete this course are eligible to receive a vocational
certificate in Watch Repair.




                                            52
Executive Summary



                        JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIR CLUSTER

                                OPTION B: WATCH REPAIR

                           SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                                         FIRST YEAR


4 sch      Fundamentals of Watch and                  4 sch    Basic Quartz Analog (WJV
           Jewelry Repair (WJV 1114)                           1144)
4 sch      Mechanical Watch I (WJV 1124)              4 sch    Watch Repair (WJV 1154)
4 sch      Mechanical Watch II (WJV 1134)             4 sch    Advanced Watch Repair I (WJV
                                                               1164)
_____                                                 _____
12 sch                                                12 sch


4 sch      Advanced Watch Repair II (WJV
           1174)
4 sch      Advanced Watch Repair III (WJV
           1184)
_____
8 sch


*        Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be
         provided related studies.

         Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3); WBL 192(1-3); WBL
         193(1-3); WBL 291(1-3); WBL 292(1-3); WBL 293(1-3)] are available as free
         electives to students meeting program requirements.




                                               53
Executive Summary



                                PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                    PLUMBER AND PIPEFITTER/STEAMFITTER CLUSTER

The Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter program includes a basic core of courses
designed to prepare a student for a variety of entry-level positions through selection of a
concentration in one of the following areas: plumbing or pipefitting. This document was
developed with the use of the competencies and objectives as prepared by the National
Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), along with applicable
national, state, and local codes.

Upon successful completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours of required courses,
the student will be eligible to receive a certificate in either plumbing or pipefitting. An
associate degree program in plumbing is also available.




                                              54
Executive Summary



                     PLUMBER AND PIPEFITTER/STEAMFITTER
                    FRAMEWORK OF COURSES AND PROGRAMS

                                                AREAS OF CONCENTRATION (AOC)

COURSES                                        Plumbing          Plumber Pipefitting
                                          (Certificate Option)   (AAS Option)
Vocational-Technical Core
Fundamentals of Plumbing/Pipefitting               X                 X          X
Blueprint Reading for Piping Trades                X                 X          X
Low Pressure Boilers                               X                 X          X

Pipefitting Courses
Tacking, Brazing, and Burning                      E                 X          X
Sketching                                          E                 X          X
Basic Pipe Fabrication                                                          X
Pipe Specifications and Systems                                                 X
Advanced Pipefitting Lab                                                        X
Rigging and Signaling                              E                 X          X
Steel Ship Building and Marine Construction                                     E
Special Project in Pipefitting                                                  E
Supervised Work Experience in Pipefitting                                       E

Plumbing Courses
Piping Level/Transit                               X                 X
Drainage and Sewer Systems                         X                 X          E
Heating Devices                                    X                 X
Gas Piping                                         X                 X
Domestic Systems                                   X                 X          E
Plumbing Fixtures Lab                              X                 X          E
Back Flow Cross Connection                         X                 X
Advanced Plumbing Lab                              X                 X
Special Project in Plumbing                        E                 X
Supervised Work Experience in Plumbing             E                 E

Related Vocational-Technical Courses
Construction Materials                                               E
Cost Estimating                                                      X
Work-Based Learning                                E                 E          E

Related Academic Courses
Legal Environment of Business I                                      X

Note: X - required course; E - elective




                                          55
Executive Summary



                PLUMBER AND PIPEFITTER/STEAMFITTER CLUSTER
                          PIPEFITTING CONCENTRATION
                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*
              Baseline Competencies for Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter**

                                       CERTIFICATE

                                        FIRST YEAR
3 sch       Fundamentals of                   2 sch         Pipe Specifications and Systems
            Plumbing/Pipefitting                            (PPV 1432)
            (PPV/PCT 1113)                         2 sch    Rigging and Signaling
3 sch       Tacking, Brazing, and Burning                   (PPV/PCT 1812)
            (PPV/PCT 1213)                         6 sch    Vocational-Technical
3 sch       Blueprint Reading for Piping                    Electives***
            Trades                                 6 sch    Advanced Pipefitting Lab
            (PPV/PCT 1313)                                  (PPV 1456)
3 sch       Sketching (PPV/PCT 1323)
1 sch       Pressure Boilers                       ______
            (PPV/PCT 1411)                         16 sch
3 sch       Basic Pipe Fabrication
            (PPV 1423)
_____
16 sch



*
     Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be provided
     related studies.
**
     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Building Trades program.
     Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
     duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required to
     do so.

*** VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
    3 sch   Steel Ship Building and Marine Construction (PPV 1823)
    1-3 sch Special Project in Pipefitting [PPV 291(1-3)]
    1-6 sch Supervised Work Experience in Pipefitting [PPV 292(1-6)]
    2 sch   Domestic Systems (PPV/PCT 1712)
    3 sch   Drainage and Sewer Systems (PPV/PCT 1513)
    2 sch   Plumbing Fixtures Lab (PPVPCT 1722)
    1-3 sch Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [(WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-
            3), WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), and WBL 293(1-3)]




                                              56
Executive Summary



                PLUMBER AND PIPEFITTER/STEAMFITTER CLUSTER
                           PLUMBING CONCENTRATION
                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*
              Baseline Competencies for Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter**

                                       CERTIFICATE
                                       FIRST YEAR

3 sch        Fundamentals of Plumbing/             1 sch    Pressure Boilers
             Pipefitting (PPV/PCT 1113)                     (PPV/PCT 1411)
3 sch        Drainage and Sewer Systems            5 sch    Vocational-Technical
             (PPV/PCT 1513)                                 Electives***
2 sch        Plumbing Fixtures Lab                 3 sch    Blueprint Reading for Piping
             (PPV/PCT 1722)                                 Trades
2 sch        Back Flow Cross Connection                     (PPV/PCT 1313)
             (PPV/PCT 1732)                        3 sch    Piping Level/Transit
2 sch        Gas Piping                                     (PPV/PCT 1443)
             (PPV/PCT 1622)                        3 sch    Advanced Plumbing Lab
2 sch        Heating Devices                                (PPV/PCT 1743)
             (PPV/PCT 1612)                        _____
2 sch        Domestic Systems                      15 sch
             (PPV/PCT 1712)
_____
16 sch

*
     Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be provided
     related studies.
**
     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Building Trades program.
     Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
     duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required to
     do so.

*** VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
    3 sch   Sketching (PPV/PCT 1323)
    3 sch   Tacking, Brazing, and Burning (PPV/PCT 1213)
    2 sch   Rigging and Signaling (PPV/PCT 1812)
    1-3 sch Special Project in Plumbing [PPV/PCT 191(1-3)]
    1-6 sch Supervised Work Experience in Plumbing [PPV/PCT 192(1-6)]
    1-3 sch Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3),
            WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), and WBL 293(1-3)]




                                              57
Executive Summary



                                PLUMBING TECHNOLOGY
                          SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*
                    Baseline Competencies for Plumbing Technology**

                             ASSOCIATE DEGREE
                                 FIRST YEAR
3 sch Fundamentals of                  1 sch Pressure Boilers (PPV/PCT 1411)
       Plumbing/Pipefitting            2 sch Gas Piping (PPV/PCT 1622)
       (PPV/PCT 1113)                  2 sch Plumbling Fixtures Lab
3 sch Drainage and Sewer                      (PPV PPV/1722)
       Systems (PPV/PCT 1513)          2 sch Back Flow Cross
2 sch Heating Devices (PPV/PCT 1612)          Connection (PPV/PCT 1732)
2 sch Domestic Systems (PPV/PCT 1712) 3 sch Tacking, Brazing, and Burning
3 sch Construction Materials                  (PPV/PCT 1213)
       (DDT 1213)                      3 sch Oral Communications
3 sch Written Communications                  Elective
       Elective                        3 sch Humanities/Fine Arts
_____                                         Elective
16 sch                                 _____
                                       16 sch


                                   SECOND YEAR
3 sch Blueprint Reading for Piping       3 sch Advanced Plumbing Lab
       Trades (PPV/PCT 1313)                    (PPV/PCT 1743)
3 sch Sketching (PPV/PCT 1323)           3 sch Cost Estimating (DDT 2243)
3 sch Piping Level/Transit               2 sch Rigging and Signaling
       (PPV/PCT 1443)                           (PPV/PCT 1812)
4 sch Special Project in Plumbing        3 sch Legal Environment of Business I
       [PPV/PCT 191(1-3)]                        (BAD 2413)
3 sch Social/Behavioral Science Elective 3 sch Technical Elective
_____                                    3 sch Math/Science Elective
16 sch                                   _____
                                         17 sch


*   Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be provided
    related studies.

** Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Building Trades program.
   Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
   duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required to
   do so.




                                             58
Executive Summary



*** VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

   3 sch       Construction Materials (DDT 1213)
   1-6 sch     Supervised Work Experience in Plumbing [PPV/PCT 192(1-6)]
   1-3 sch     Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3),
               WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), and WBL 293(1-3)]




                                            59
Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                            POLYMER TECHNOLOGY
                    (Program CIP: 15.0607 B Plastics Technology)

The Polymer Technology program provides classroom and laboratory instruction in
plastics materials and processes. Included are polymer properties, quality control
procedures, and operation and troubleshooting of various types of plastics processing
equipment.

Students who complete the two-year AAS program are eligible to receive the Associate
of Applied Science Degree in Polymer Technology. The graduates of the AAS program
may qualify as technicians or supervisors of processes in the plastics industry.
Graduates may expect to enter the plastics manufacturing business in production,
maintenance, and technical areas. Employment opportunities include setup technician,
process engineer technician, lead person, supervisor, molding and quality control
technician, plastics engineering technician, maintenance coordinator, and research and
development technician.

Students of the Polymer Technology Program completing the Certificate Option may
receive a Certificate of Polymer Technology. Employment opportunities for graduates
of the Certificate Option may include skilled operators, material handlers, and mold
setters.




                                          60
Executive Summary



                      SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                     CERTIFICATE IN POLYMER TECHNOLOGY*

                                      FIRST YEAR

First Semester                                   Second Semester

3 sch      Introduction to Plastics              3 sch     Plastics Tooling Construction
           Materials and Processing                        Principles (PLT 2213)
           (PLT 1213)                            3 sch     Process Control for Injection
3 sch      Injection Molding I (PLT 1313)                  Molding (PLT 1333)
5 sch      Power Machinery I                     3 sch     Polymer Material Properties
           (MST 1115)                                      (PLT 1223)
2 sch      Trends in Manufacturing (PLT          3 sch     Technical Elective**
           1112)                                 _____
_____                                            12 sch
13 sch

                                     SECOND YEAR

First Semester                                   Second Semester

3 sch      Plastics Extrusion (PLT 2413)         4 sch     Troubleshooting Plastics
4 sch      Injection Molding II                            Processes (PLT 2514)
           (PLT 2324)                            4 sch     Computer Numerical Control
3 sch      Technical Elective**                            Operations I (MST 2714)
3 sch      Technical Elective**                  4 sch     Plastics Quality Control
_____                                                      (PLT 2614)
13 sch                                           3 sch     Technical Elective**
                                                 _____
                                                 15 sch

*    Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be provided
     related studies.




                                            61
Executive Summary



**Technical Electives

4 sch          DC Circuits (EET 1114)
3 sch          AC Circuits (EET 1123)
3 sch          Fundamental of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1113) or any other
               Technical Computer Course
3 sch          Introduction to Computer Concepts (CSC 1113)
3 sch          Blow Molding/Thermoforming (PLT 2713)
3 sch          Blueprint Reading (MST 1413)
3 sch          Science and Technology (ATE 1113)
4 sch          Fundamentals of Drafting (DDT 1114)
3 sch          Human Resource Management (MMT 2233)
3 sch          Industrial Hydraulics (ROT 1213)
3 sch          Fundamentals of Robotics (ROT 1113)
5 sch          Power Machinery II (MST 1125)
3 sch          Principles of CAD (DDT 1313)
1-3 sch        Special Problem in Plastics Technology [PLT (291(1-3)]
1-6 sch        Supervised Work Experience in Plastics Technology [PLT 292(1-6)]
1-3 sch        Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and IV [WBL 191(1-3), WBL
                   192(1-3), WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), WBL 293(1-3)]




                                          62
Executive Summary



                   SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
          ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN POLYMER TECHNOLOGY*

                                      FIRST YEAR

First Semester                                   Second Semester

3 sch      Introduction to Plastics              3 sch     Plastics Tooling Construction
           Materials and Processing                        Principles (PLT 2213)
           (PLT 1213)                            3 sch     Process Control for Injection
3 sch      Injection Molding I (PLT 1313)                  Molding (PLT 1333)
5 sch      Power Machinery I                     3 sch     Polymer Material Properties
           (MST 1115)                                      (PLT 1223)
2 sch      Trends in Manufacturing (PLT          3 sch     Technical Elective**
           1112)                                 3 sch     Written Communications
3 sch      Math/Science Elective                           Elective
_____                                            _____
16 sch                                           15 sch

                                     SECOND YEAR

First Semester                                   Second Semester

3 sch      Plastics Extrusion (PLT 2413)         4 sch     Troubleshooting Plastics
4 sch      Injection Molding II                            Processes (PLT 2514)
           (PLT 2324)                            4 sch     Computer Numerical Control
3 sch      Technical Elective**                            Operations I (MST 2714)
3 sch      Social/Behavioral Science             4 sch     Plastics Quality Control
           Elective                                        (PLT 2614)
3 sch      Humanities/Fine Arts Elective         3 sch     Technical Elective**
_____                                            3 sch     Oral Communications Elective
16 sch                                           _____
                                                 18 sch

*    Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc. will be provided
     related studies.




                                            63
Executive Summary



**Technical Electives

4 sch          DC Circuits (EET 1114)
3 sch          AC Circuits (EET 1123)
3 sch          Fundamental of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1113) or any other
               Technical Computer Course
3 sch          Introduction to Computer Concepts (CSC 1113)
3 sch          Blow Molding/Thermoforming (PLT 2713)
3 sch          Blueprint Reading (MST 1413)
3 sch          Science and Technology (ATE 1113)
4 sch          Fundamentals of Drafting (DDT 1114)
3 sch          Human Resource Management (MMT 2233)
3 sch          Industrial Hydraulics (ROT 1213)
3 sch          Fundamentals of Robotics (ROT 1113)
5 sch          Power Machinery II (MST 1125)
3 sch          Principles of CAD (DDT 1313)
1-3 sch        Special Problem in Plastics Technology [PLT (291(1-3)]
1-6 sch        Supervised Work Experience in Plastics Technology [PLT 292(1-6)]
1-3 sch        Work-Based Learning [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3), WBL 193(1-3),
               WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), WBL 293(1-3)]




                                          64
Executive Summary



                              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

                              SHEET METAL PROGRAM

The Sheet Metal instructional program prepares individuals to lay out, fabricate, erect or
install, and maintain items made of steel, copper, stainless steel, and aluminum using
hand tools and machines such as cornice brakes, forming rolls, and squaring shears.
Instruction in sheet metal work can be placed in two basic categories: (1) Building
Trades Sheet Metal Work and (2) Precision Sheet Metal Work.

The building trades sheet metal workers construct and install various types of ducts
which are connected to form systems through which air is passed. These systems are
referred to as heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. They are needed in
homes, stores, apartments, offices, schools, hotels, shops, airplanes, and trains.
Building trades sheet metal workers make and install gutters, downspouts, blow pipes,
and industrial exhaust systems and construct metal roofs and metal buildings.

Precision or production sheet metal workers employed in industry produce parts used in
various types of products and equipment for aircraft, missiles, electronics,
communications, data processing, computers, defense, military, photography,
radiography, restaurants, food processing, air handling, laboratories, appliances,
spaceships, shipbuilding, sign manufacturing, and transportation.

This curriculum was developed by utilizing the competencies and objectives for the
sheet metal industry as established by the National Center for Construction Education
and Research, (NCCER).

Upon the successful completion of the minimum of 33 semester hours of required
college credit, the student will be eligible for a Certificate in Sheet Metal.

Upon completion of the required 66 semester hours in the Sheet Metal program the
student will be eligible for an Associate of Applied Science Degree.




                                            65
Executive Summary



                                SHEET METAL PROGRAM

                           SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*

                                     CERTIFICATE
                         Baseline Competencies for Sheet Metal**

                                        FIRST YEAR

2 sch       Orientation and Shop Safety               6 sch      Methods of Layout II
            (SMT 1112)                                           (SMT 1326)
2 sch       Measurement (SMT 1212)                    4 sch      Hand Processes II
5 sch       Methods of Layout I                                  (SMT 1424)
            (SMT 1315)                                3 sch      Technical ElectiveH
4 sch       Hand Processes I (SMT 1414)               4 sch      Machine Processes I
3 sch       Sheet Metal Welding                                  (SMT 2514)
            (SMT 1613)                                ______
______                                                17 sch
16 sch

*
     Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be provided
     related studies.
**
     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Metal Trades program.
     Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
     duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required to
     do so.
H
     TECHNICAL ELECTIVES:

4 sch       Fundamentals of Drafting (DDT 1114)
3 sch       Descriptive Geometry (DDT 1153)
3 sch       Principles of CAD (DDT 1313)
3 sch       Cost Estimating (DDT 2243)
1-3 sch     Special Project in Sheet Metal [SMT 291(1-3)]
1-3 sch     Supervised Work Experience in Sheet Metal [SMT 292(1-3)]
1-3 sch     Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3),
            WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), WBL 293(1-3)]




                                              66
Executive Summary



                              SHEET METAL PROGRAM

                          SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE*
                    Baseline Competencies for Sheet Metal Program**

                                ASSOCIATE DEGREE

                                     FIRST YEAR

2 sch      Orientation and Shop Safety            6 sch    Methods of Layout II
           (SMT 1112)                                      (SMT 1326)
2 sch      Measurement (SMT 1212)                 4 sch    Hand Processes II
5 sch      Methods of Layout I                             (SMT 1424)
           (SMT 1315)                             3 sch    Math/Science Elective
4 sch      Hand Processes I (SMT 1414)            3 sch    Sheet Metal Welding
3 sch      Written Communications                          (SMT 1613)
           Elective                               ______
______                                            16 sch
16 sch

                                   SECOND YEAR

4 sch      Machine Processes I                    3 sch    Humanities/Fine Arts
           (SMT 2514)                                      Elective
3 sch      Technical Elective ***                 3 sch    Plans and Specifications II
3 sch      Oral Communications Elective                    (SMT 2223)
3 sch      Plans and Specifications I             4 sch    Machine Processes II
           (SMT 2213)                                      (SMT 2524)
4 sch      Methods of Layout III (SMT             4 sch    Advanced Sheet Metal
           2324)                                           Welding (SMT 2614)
______                                            3 sch    Social/Behavioral Science
17 sch                                                     Elective
                                                  ______
                                                  17 sch




                                          67
Executive Summary



*    Students who lack entry level skills in math, English, science, etc., will be provided
     related studies.
**
     Baseline competencies are taken from the high school Metal Trades program.
     Students who can document mastery of these competencies should not receive
     duplicate instruction. Students who cannot demonstrate mastery will be required to
     do so.

*** TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

3 sch       Fundamentals of Microcomputers (CPT 1113)
4 sch       Fundamentals of Drafting (DDT 1114)
3 sch       Descriptive Geometry (DDT 1153)
3 sch       Principles of CAD (DDT 1313)
3 sch       Intermediate CAD (DDT 1323)
3 sch       Cost Estimating (DDT 2243)
1-3 sch     Special Project in Sheet Metal [SMT 291(1-3)]
1-3 sch     Supervised Work Experience in Sheet Metal [SMT 292(1-3)]
1-3 sch     Work-Based Learning I, II, III, IV, V, and VI [WBL 191(1-3), WBL 192(1-3),
            WBL 193(1-3), WBL 291(1-3), WBL 292(1-3), WBL 293(1-3)]




                                              68
Executive Summary




                    LISTING OF COURSES




                            69
Executive Summary




                    70
Executive Summary




                    AGRICULTURAL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY
                Agriculture Business and Management Technology Cluster




                                          71
Executive Summary




                    72
Executive Summary



     AGRICULTURE BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER

                                              
                                              
Course Name: Introduction to Spatial Information Systems
Course Abbreviation: AGT 1163
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: This course provides an overview of spatial information concepts and the
tools of spatial information systems (GPS, GIS, VRT, & remote sensing). Students will
recognize the impact of spatial information technology on our lives currently and in the
future. They will research potential career opportunities as they relate to the emerging
technologies and the basic concepts under which spatial information functions. (3 sch:
3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: GPS Data Collection
Course Abbreviation: AGT 1254
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: A course to introduce the student to the general principles of Global
Positioning Systems, their use, and realized and potential value in agriculture. Students
will learn to acquire, import and export, and use geo-referenced data. The student will
also be able to perform basic troubleshooting, grasp the concepts of spatial variability,
and interpret different map projections. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Basic computer applications literacy skills
                                         
Course Name: Remote Sensing
Course Abbreviation: AGT 1354
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: This course provides an overview of remote sensing technologies for
agricultural operations. The course will emphasize basic concepts, satellite-based,
airborne, and ground-based sensing methods. Digital image interpretation and analysis
will be a major component. The student will understand how remote sensing is used
with spatial information and variable-rate technologies for precision agricultural
management. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Geographic Information Systems I
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2154
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)




                                            73
Executive Summary



Description: This course is an overview of applications of Geographic Information
Systems. Commercial software is used to cover user interface, views, themes, tables,
and layouts. Basic functions of building, editing, querying, and spatial analysis of layers
and databases will be reviewed. Hands-on exercises will encompass several
disciplines and will include mobile GIS applications. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Survey of Microcomputer Applications. (CPT 1324), College Algebra
(MAT1313), and/or Consent of Instructor
                                          
Course Name: Variable Rate Technology
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2164
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: An introductory course on basic principles of variable rate technology
(site-specific technology, precision farming technology). This course will provide
instruction on the importance of variable rate technology; data collection techniques for
variable rate applications; development of prescription application maps; and
components; and calibration, installation, and troubleshooting of variable rate
equipment. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: GPS Data Collection (AGT 1254,), Geographic Information Systems
(AGT 2154), Spatial Information Systems (AGT 1163), and College Algebra (MAT1313)
                                          
Course Name: Agricultural Geographic Information Systems
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2174
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: This course reviews several agricultural Geographic Information
Systems, including the use of spatial data and spatial analysis for record keeping,
modeling, and management of an agronomic ecosystem. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Survey of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1324), College Algebra
(MAT 1313), Geographic Information Systems I (AGT 2154), or Consent of Instructor
                                          
Course Name: Crop Management Zones
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2434
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: The focus of this course will be on the identification and management of
production zones within crop fields. This course will provide students a working
knowledge of geospatial tools and remote imaging techniques to identify regions of
distinction within a field, and methods to develop management strategies to maximize
economic gains for cropping systems. The course will introduce the use of various
decision support tools available for crop management, including geographic information
systems and crop models. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Applied Principles of Plant Production (AGT 1314) or Botany I (BIO
1314), and Applied Soils – Conservation and Use (AGT 1714)




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                                          
Course Name: Site Specific Pest Management
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2474
Classification: AOC Core (Precision Agriculture Technology)
Description: This course provides instruction and training in conventional and site
specific techniques used in control of agricultural pests including insects, diseases, and
weeds. Students will use pest management techniques and tools including spatial
information systems to evaluate impact of pest injury and costs associated with control.
Students will learn how variable rate technologies are applied in the field for site specific
pest management (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab).
Prerequisites: GPS Data Collection (AGT 1254), Geographic Information Systems I
(AGT 2154), Crop Management Zones (AGT 2434), Applied Principles of Plant Product
(AGT 1313) or Botany I (BIO 1314); or consent of instructor.
                                          
Course Name: Applied Principles of Plant Production
Course Abbreviation: AGT 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (All areas of concentration)
Description: A course to provide information related to the growth, nutrition, and
general culture of agricultural and horticultural crops. Includes instruction on
photosynthesis and transpiration, plant nutrition, pest control, and reproduction. (3 sch:
2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab) [Note: Plant Science (AGR 1313) or Botany I (BIO 1313) may be
substituted for this course.]
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Applied Soils-Conservation and Use
Course Abbreviation: AGT 1714
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (All areas of concentration)
Description: A course to introduce the student to the general principles of soil
conservation and safe use. Includes instruction in the soil formation process, properties
of soils, soil texture, and soil management for optimum safe use. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture,
2 hr. lab) [Note: Basic Soils (AGR 2314) may be substituted for this course.]
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Survey of Agricultural Technology I, II, III, IV
Course Abbreviation: AGT 1111, AGT 1121, AGT 1131, AGT 1141
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Agribusiness, Animal Husbandry, and Field
Crops concentrations), Vocational-Technical Elective (Precision Agriculture
concentration)
Description: A course to provide opportunities for students to gain knowledge,
practice, and study in agricultural technology. Includes lectures and seminars on
current agricultural topics including government programs and policies, current
technological trends and practices, international agriculture, agricultural leadership and
employment opportunities, etc. (1 sch: 1 hr. lecture; may be repeated for a maximum
of 4 sch)
Prerequisites: None




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                                         
Course Name: Crop Production (General)
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2363
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (All areas of concentration)
Description: This course is a study of crop production techniques including tillage and
planting, pest control, and physical marketing practices for crops in Mississippi. (3 sch:
2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Applied Principles of Plant Production (AGT 1313) or Botany (BIO
1314)
                                         
Course Name: Fiber and Oilseed Crops
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2373
Classification: AOC Core (Field Crops concentration), Vocational-Technical Elective
(Precision Agriculture concentration)
Description: This course is a study of crop production techniques including tillage and
planting, pest control, and physical marketing practices for cotton and rice. (3 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Applied Principles of Plant Production (AGT 1313) or Botany (BIO
1314)
                                         
Course Name: Grain Crops
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2383
Classification: AOC Core (Field Crops), Vocational-Technical Elective (Agribusiness
Management, Animal Husbandry, Precision Agriculture)
Description: This course is a study of grain production techniques including tillage,
planting, pest control, and physical marketing practices for grain crops in Mississippi.
(Crops included are corn or maize, rice wheat, and milo). (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: Applied Principles of Plant Production (AGT 1313) or Botany (BIO 1314)
                                         
Course Name: Weed Control
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2413
Classification: AOC Core (Field Crops), Vocational-Technical Elective (Precision
Agriculture)
Description: A course to provide students with information and skills for controlling
plant pests in agricultural crops. Includes instruction in the use and application of
chemicals for weed control. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Applied Principles of Plant Production (AGT 1313)
                                         
Course Name: Insects and Controls
Course Abbreviation: AGT 2463
Classification: AOC Core (Field Crops), Vocational-Technical Elective (Precision
Agriculture)
Description: A course to provide instruction and training in techniques of control of
insect pests. Includes instruction in the safe and proper use of chemical and other
control methods. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)


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Prerequisites: Applied Principles of Plant Production (AGT 1313) or Botany (BIO
1314)
                                        
Course Name: Special Problem in Agricultural Business and Management
Course Abbreviation: AGT 291(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (All areas of concentration)
Description: A course to provide students with an opportunity to utilize skills and
knowledge gained in other Agricultural Business and Management courses. The
instructor and student work closely together to select a topic and establish criteria for
completion of the project. (1-3 sch: 2-6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing in Agricultural Business and Management
Technology or instructor approval
                                        
Course Name: Supervised Agricultural Experience
Course Abbreviation: AGT 292(1-3)
Classification: AOC Core (Agribusiness Management), Vocational-Technical Elective
(Field Crops, Animal Husbandry, Precision Agriculture)
Description: This internship course provides actual work experience in an agriculture
business under the direction of the employer and the instructor. (1-6 sch: 3-18 hr.
externship)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing in Agricultural Business and Management
Technology or instructor approval




                                            77
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                    ALLIED HEALTH AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY
                             Cardiovascular Technology
                             Dental Hygiene Technology
                      Emergency Medial Technology – Paramedic
                             Funeral Service Technology
                            Health Information Technology
                               Ophthalmic Technology
                                 Respiratory Therapy




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                          CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY

                                           
Course Name: Foundations of Cardiovascular Technology
Course Abbreviation: CVT 1113
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental
elements in cardiovascular technology, including terminology, important to the delivery
of health care in a safe, efficient, and professional manner. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr.
lab)
Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1513) and Anatomy and Physiology Lab
I (BIO 1511)
                                           
Course Name: Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology
Course Abbreviation: CVT 1214
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of anatomy and physiology in relation to the practice of
cardiovascular technology. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Foundations of Cardiovascular Technology (CVT 1113)
                                           
Course Name: Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Course Abbreviation: CVT 1312
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to provide the students with the
pharmacology needed to function in clinical experiences. This includes
classifications of medications, modes of action, indications, contraindications,
and their effect on cardiac output and its determinates. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Foundations of Cardiovascular Technology (CVT 1113) and
Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology (CVT 1214)
                                           
Course Name: Invasive Cardiology I
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Introduces the students to the specific procedures performed in the
cardiac catheterization laboratory and the use of the resulting data for patient diagnosis.
Additional topics include aseptic techniques, sterilization, patient assessment,
radiography, pharmacology, cardiac wave forms, coronary artery anatomy, equipment
and tools utilized in cardiac catheterization, hemodynamic data and analysis, right and
left heart caths, and complications and treatment of cardiac catheterization. (3 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Foundations of Cardiovascular Technology (CVT 1113),
Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology (CVT 1214), and Cardiovascular
Pharmacology (CVT 1312)




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                                           
Course Name: Invasive Cardiology II
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2423
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to tie together cardiac diseases as well as to
continue teaching the students classifications and the use of equipment and techniques
used in invasive cardiology. An in-depth presentation of various cardiac diseases
including coronary artery disease, angina, myocardial infarction, heart failure, valve
diseases, cardiomyopathies, pericardial disorders, arrhythmias, congenital anomalies,
and repair procedures is used. Additionally students will learn the various calculations
performed in the cath lab including cardiac outputs, vascular resistance, valve areas,
and shunts. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Invasive Cardiology I (CVT 2413)
                                           
Course Name: Critical Care Application
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2512
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to familiarize students with characteristics
of critically ill cardiopulmonary patients and specific needs of such patients in
relation to their particular illness. Patient case studies will be presented for student
discussion and will address the specific diagnostic and therapeutic modalities available
to the cardiovascular patient for palliative and corrective results. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Invasive Cardiology I (CVT 2413), Non-Invasive Cardiology I (CVT
2613), and Cardiovascular Clinical I (CVT 2718)
                                           
Course Name: Non-Invasive Cardiology I
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An introduction to non-invasive cardiology and those tests
performed in this area. In addition, normal and abnormal heart rhythm and
patient safety is presented along with stress tests, Holter monitoring and an
introduction in echocardiography. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Foundations of Cardiovascular Technology (CVT 1113),
Cardiovascular Anatomy & Physiology (CVT 1214), and Cardiovascular Pharmacology
(CVT 1312)
                                           
Course Name: Non-Invasive Cardiology II
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2623
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core




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Description: This course is designed to be a continuation of Non-Invasive
Cardiology I. More in-depth study is completed in the area of non-invasive
cardiac testing and a greater view of echocardiography is presented. A firm didactic
foundation of echocardiography will be presented with provisions available for further
study of this complex technique including 2-D, M-Mode, continuous, pulse wave and
color Doppler techniques. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Non-Invasive Cardiology I (CVT 2613)
                                            
Course Name: Cardiovascular Clinical I
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2718
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Patient assessment and care plan formation are presented in the
hospital environment. Clinical experience in all procedures performed in the
cardiovascular laboratories, including use of equipment, performing tests, and patient
care as it relates to the cardiovascular areas with emphasis on cardiac catheterization,
ECG, stress testing, Holter monitoring, and introduction to echocardiography. (8 sch:
24 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Foundations of Cardiovascular Technology (CVT 1113), Cardiovascular
Anatomy and Physiology (CVT 1214), and Cardiovascular Pharmacology (CVT 1312)
                                            
Course Name: Cardiovascular Clinical II
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2728
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed for students to gain more in-depth clinical
experience in invasive cardiology including pre and post cath activities, cardiovascular
techniques, hemodynamic monitoring, intra-aortic balloon pump, and cardiac output
measurements. Clinical practice in the cardiac catheterization lab includes circulating,
scrubbing, recoding, and manipulating the imaging equipment during both diagnosis
and interventional cateterization procedures. (8 sch: 24 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Cardiovascular Clinical I (CVT 2718)
                                            
Course Name: Cardiovascular Clinical III
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2736
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Designed for students to gain additional clinical experience and
polish their skills in the cath lab performing all duties involved in diagnostic and
interventional cases. (6 sch: 18 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Cardiovascular Clinical II (CVT 2728)




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                                         
Course Name: Cardiovascular Technology as a Professional
Course Abbreviation: CVT 2812
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: The professional relationship of the cardiovascular technologist to the
other health professionals is presented, along with a basic format for research. Resume
preparation and interview skills are also discussed. Students will also present case
studies and receive instruction and testing in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS).
(2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Corequisites: Cardiovascular Clinic III (CVT 2736)




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                           DENTAL HYGIENE TECHNOLOGY

                                           
Course Name: Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1115
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide the dental hygiene student with the fundamental
knowledge and skills necessary for interaction with clients. The lecture portion will
focus on the history, philosophy, and theories relevant to the profession of dental
hygiene. Lecture highlights will include discussion of the latest health care settings,
trends, and approaches to comprehensive care. The preclinical portion will provide the
student with opportunities for the development of psychomotor skills and opportunities
for interaction with clients, which will provide emphasis on trust, care, and responsibility
as part of becoming a professional. (5 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                           
Course Name: Dental Anatomy
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1212
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of the morphological characteristics of the teeth and supporting
structures. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None

Course Name: Head and Neck Anatomy
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1222
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A detailed study of skeletal, muscular, vascular, and neural features of the
face, head, and neck. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Oral Histology and Embryology
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1232
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: The microscopic structure and development of types of cells, tissues, and
organs of the human body. Also given is a survey of the elements of embryology
emphasizing the area of the head and neck, as related to the development of the dental
arches, salivary glands, buccal mucosa, pharynx, and tongue. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Pre/Corequisites: Dental Anatomy (DHT 1212) and Head and Neck Anatomy (DHT
1222)




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                                         
Course Name: Dental Radiology
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1314
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course involves a broad scope of study of radiology and its use by
the dentist as a diagnostic aid. Also covered are techniques for making radiographs
with safety for hygienist and patient, the processing and mounting of exposed film and
their interpretation, and study of anatomical landmarks evident in periapical films. (4
sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Clinical Dental Hygiene I
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1415
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: The student will apply the principles and techniques learned from previous
didactic and preclinical experiences. (5 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 12 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene (DHT 1115)
                                         
Course Name: Periodontics
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1512
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An in-depth study of the supporting structures of the teeth is covered in
this course. Also included is a clinical and theoretical understanding of their conditions
in good health as well as their reaction to bacterial invasion in disease of varying
etiology. The theory of clinical application to the management of the advanced
periodontal patient to maintain a healthy and functional dental prosthesis is also studied.
(2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Pre/Corequisites: Oral Histology and Embryology (DHT 1232) and Dental Anatomy
(DHT 1212)
                                         
Course Name: Dental Hygiene Seminar I
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1911
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides the student with the opportunity to discuss managing
dental office emergencies and professional development. (1 sch: 1 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Dental Hygiene Seminar II
Course Abbreviation: DHT 1921
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides the student with the opportunity to discuss patient
care and treatment plans and professional development. (1 sch: 1 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Dental Hygiene Seminar I (DHT 1911)




                                            86
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                                          
Course Name: General/Oral Pathology
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2233
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of the etiology and symptomatology of the pathological conditions
affecting the head and neck with emphasis on the oral cavity. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Dental Anatomy (DHT 1212), Head and Neck Anatomy (DHT 1222),
Oral Histology and Embryology (DHT 1232)
                                          
Course Name: Clinical Dental Hygiene II
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2425
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Continuation of the principles and techniques involved in the practice of
dental hygiene. Emphasis will be on theoretical background needed to provide
advanced clinical skills. Clinical experiences will focus on treatment of clients with
moderate to advanced periodontal disease. (5 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 12 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Periodontics (DHT 1512) and Clinical Dental Hygiene I (DHT 1415)
                                          
Course Name: Clinical Dental Hygiene III
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2436
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A culmination of practice and the clinical procedures and theoretical
knowledge needed to provide preventive, interceptive, and definitive dental hygiene
treatment. (6 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 12 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Clinical Dental Hygiene II (DHT 2425)
                                          
Course Name: Dental Hygiene Materials
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Study of materials used in dentistry, their physical and chemical
properties, and proper manipulation as used in the operatory and laboratory. (3 sch: 2
hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Dental Pharmacology
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2712
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course gives a basic introduction to drug actions, their mechanisms,
and the reactions of the body to these drugs. Special emphasis is given to the drugs
used in the modern dental office including emergency procedures. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None




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                                         
Course Name: Community Dental Health
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2813
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides an introduction to preventive dentistry as
administered on federal, state, and local levels through official and voluntary health
agencies. Supervised field experience gives an opportunity to observe and participate
in some phases of community and school dental health programs. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture,
3 hr. clinical)
Corequisites: Clinical Dental Hygiene III (DHT 2436)
                                         
Course Name: Dental Ethics/Law
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2922
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Focus on the ethical and legal aspects of providing dental health care. (2
sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Dental Hygiene Seminar III
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2931
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides the student with the opportunity to discuss dental
disciplines and professional development. (1 sch: 1 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Dental Hygiene Seminar II (DHT 1921)
                                         
Course Name: Dental Hygiene Seminar IV
Course Abbreviation: DHT 2941
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides the student the opportunity to discuss the written
registry exam, the clinical simulation exam format, and professional development. (1
sch: 1 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Dental Hygiene Seminar III (DHT 2931)




                                           88
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                    EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY – PARAMEDIC

                                           
Course Name: Fundamental of Pre-hospital Care
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1122
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course introduces the student to the EMS systems, roles and
responsibilities of the paramedic, well-being of the paramedic, illness and injury
prevention, medical/legal issues, ethical issues, therapeutic communications, and life
span development. This course was formerly taught as Preparatory (EMT 1122). (2
sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Corequisite: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 2524)
                                           
Course Name: Pathophysiology
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1213
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides information on abnormal functions of illness and
disease processes in the human body. This course may not be taught after July 1,
2005. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Corequisite: Fundamentals of Pre-hospital Care (EMT 1122)
                                           
Course Name: Airway Management and Ventilation
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1315
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide the student with the essential knowledge to attain
a airway and manage the respiratory system using advanced techniques. (5 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Corequisites: Fundamentals of Pre-hospital Care (EMT 1122) and Anatomy and
Physiology II (BIO 2524)
                                           
Course Name: Patient Assessment
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1415
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will teach comprehensive history taking and physical exam
techniques. (5 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Corequisites: Fundamentals of Pre-hospital Care (EMT 1122) and Anatomy and
Physiology II (BIO 2524)
                                           
Course Name: EMS Special Considerations
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1423
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide a comprehensive overview of providing care for
the patient with special needs. This course was formerly taught as Special
Considerations. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses



                                           89
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                                         
Course Name: EMS Clinical Internship I
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1513
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide clinical training on the skills and knowledge
obtained in the classroom. This will be a supervised activity carried out in the clinical
and field setting at approved sites. This course was formerly taught as Clinical
Internship I (EMT 1513). (3 sch: 9 hr. clinical)
Corequisites: Fundamentals of Pre-hospital Care (EMT 1122), Airway Management
and Ventilation (EMT 1315), and Patient Assessment (EMT 1415)
                                         
Course Name: EMS Clinical Internship II
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1523
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide clinical training on the skills and knowledge
obtained in classroom. This will be a supervised activity carried out in the clinical and
field setting at approved site. This course was formerly taught as Clinical Internship II
(EMT 1523). (3 sch: 9 hr. clinical)
Prerequisite: EMS Clinical Internship I (EMT 1513)
                                         
Course Name: Pre-hospital Pharmacology
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will teach comprehensive pharmodynamics and
pharmacokinetics. This course was formerly taught as Pharmacology (EMT 1613). (3
sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses
                                         
Course Name: Pre-hospital Cardiology
Course Abbreviation: EMT 1825
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This class will teach a comprehensive approach to the care of patients
with acute and complex cardiovascular compromise. This course is a combination of
the courses formerly taught as Acute Cardiology (EMT 1814) and Advanced Cardiology
(EMT 2824). (5 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses
                                         
Course Name: Pre-hospital OB/GYN
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2412
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide a detailed understanding of the anatomic
structures, physiology, and pathophysiology encountered when providing care in
gynecological and obstetrical emergencies. The course called Maternal/Child
Emergencies (EMT 1435) was divided into {re-hospital OB/GYN (EMT2412) and Pre-
hospital Pediatrics (EMT 2423). (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses


                                           90
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                                          
Course Name: Pre-hospital Pediatrics
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2423
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide a detailed understanding of the anatomic
structures, physiology, and pathophysiology encountered when providing care in
pediatric emergencies. The course called Maternal/Child Emergencies (EMT 1435) was
divided into Pre-hospital OB/GYN (EMT 2412) and Pre-hospital Pediatrics (EMT 2423).
(3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses
                                          
Course Name: EMS Field Internship I
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2552
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide clinical training in the skills and knowledge
obtained in the classroom. These will be supervised activities carried out in the out-of-
hospital field setting at approved sites with an approved preceptor. This course was
formerly called Field Internship I. (2 sch: 6 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses
                                          
Course Name: EMS Field Internship II
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2564
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide advanced clinical training in the skills and
knowledge obtained in the classroom with an emphasis on leadership skills. These will
be supervised activities carried out in the out-of-hospital field setting at approved sites
with an approved preceptor. (4 sch: 12 hr. clinical)
Prerequisite: EMS Field Internship I (EMT 2552)
                                          
Course Name: Pre-hospital Trauma
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2714
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will provide advanced instruction in the integration of
pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression
and implement a treatment plan for a suspected trauma patient. This course is a
combination of the courses formerly taught as Trauma I (EMT 1714) and Trauma II
(EMT 2724). (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses
                                          
Course Name: Pre-hospital Medical Care
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2855
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core




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Executive Summary



Description: This course will provide a detailed understanding of the anatomic
structures, physiology, and pathophysiology encountered when providing care in
medical emergencies involving pulmonary, allergy and anaphylaxis, gastroenterology,
renal urology, and hematology. This course is a combination of the courses formerly
taught as Medical Emergencies I (EMT 2834) and Medical Emergencies II (EMT 2845).
(5 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses
                                         
Course Name: EMS Team Management
Course Abbreviation: EMT 2913
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course teaches the leadership skills necessary to manage complex
situations including patient care, management of the hazardous and crime scene,
supervision, mentoring, and leading other personnel. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: All first semester courses




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Executive Summary



                        FUNERAL SERVICE TECHNOLOGY

                                         
Course Name: Mortuary Anatomy I
Course Abbreviation: FST 1113
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of human anatomical structure with orientation to the embalming
process. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Mortuary Anatomy II
Course Abbreviation: FST 1123
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Continuation of Mortuary Anatomy I, including all remaining body systems.
Major emphasis is on circulatory system. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Mortuary Anatomy I (FST 1113)
                                            
Course Name: Embalming I
Course Abbreviation: FST 1214
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Basic orientation to embalming. Included are the terminology, safety
procedures, and ethical protocols in preparation of human remains, physical and
chemical changes in the dying process, and a study of the chemical compositions of
embalming fluid. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisite: Mortuary Anatomy I (FST 1113)
                                         
Course Name: Embalming II
Course Abbreviation: FST 1225
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of FST 1214 with emphasis placed on the
principles and techniques of embalming. Topics covered include linear and anatomical
guides, case analyses, handling special case problems, formulating chemical solutions,
a complete analysis of the circulatory system, an explanation of the equipment used in
the embalming process, and methods of injection and drainage. (5 sch: 3 hr. lecture,
2 hr. lab, 3 hr. clinical).
Pre/corequisites: Mortuary Anatomy I (FST 1113), Mortuary Anatomy II (FST 1123),
and Embalming I (FST 1214)
                                         
Course Name: Clinical Embalming I
Course Abbreviation: FST 1231
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Practically apply the theoretical principles taught in the Funeral Service
Technology curriculum in the funeral establishment/commercial mortuary. (1 sch: 3 hr.
clinical)
Pre/corequisites: Embalming I (FST 1214) or by permission of instructor



                                          93
Executive Summary



                                           
Course Name: Clinical Embalming II
Course Abbreviation: FST 1241
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Practically apply the theoretical principles taught in the embalming
curriculum. (1 sch: 3 hr. clinical)
Pre/corequisites: Embalming I ( FST 1214), Clinical Embalming I (FST 1231), and
Embalming II (FST 1225)
                                           
Course Name: Funeral Directing
Course Abbreviation: FST 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of the total funeral service environment, including history, duties,
responsibilities, ethical obligations, and communication skills. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Funeral Service Ethics and Law
Course Abbreviation: FST 1413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Comprehensive review of the ethical and legal aspects involved in funeral
service. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Restorative Art/Color and Cosmetics
Course Abbreviation: FST 1523
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An in-depth study of anatomical modeling, including familiarization with
instruments, materials, and techniques of rebuilding human features. Study of color
theory and application of restorative techniques in the funeral setting, which includes
cosmetics and hair treatment. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab). This course is a
combination of the previous courses Restorative Art (FST 1513) and Color and
Cosmetics (FST 2523).
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Clinical Embalming III
Course Abbreviation: FST 2251
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Practically apply the theoretical principles taught in Funeral Service
Technology curriculum in the funeral establishment/commercial mortuary. (1 sch: 3 hr.
clinical)
Pre/corequisites: Clinical Embalming I (FST 1231) Clinical Embalming II (FST 1241),
and Embalming I (FST 1214)




                                           94
Executive Summary



                                          
Course Name: Clinical Embalming IV
Course Abbreviation: FST 2261
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Practically apply the theoretical principles taught in the Funeral Service
Technology curriculum in the funeral establishment/commercial mortuary. (1sch: 3 hr.
clinical)
Pre/corequisites: Clinical Embalming I (FST 1231), Clinical Embalming II (FST 1241),
Clinical Embalming III (FST 2251), and Embalming II (FST 1225)
                                          
Course Name: Thanatochemistry
Course Abbreviation: FST 2273
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A survey of the principles of general, organic, biological, and embalming
chemistry as they relate to the embalming process. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Embalming I (FST 1214)
                                          
Course Name: Funeral Merchandising and Management
Course Abbreviation: FST 2323
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Study of merchandising and management procedures necessary to
operate a successful funeral practice. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Funeral Directing (FST 1313)
                                          
Course Name: Business Law
Course Abbreviation: FST 2423
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Designed to introduce the student to the bodies of law and the judicial
system as applied to day-to-day operations of a funeral home. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Color and Cosmetics
Course Abbreviation: FST 2523
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A continuation of Restorative Art. Study of color theory and application of
restorative techniques in the funeral setting, which includes cosmetics and hair
treatment. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab). May not be taught after July 1, 2005.
Prerequisites: Restorative Art/Color and Cosmetics (FST 1523)
                                          
Course Name: Microbiology
Course Abbreviation: FST 2623
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Designed to present the basic principles of microbiology and prevention
of the spread of microorganisms as related to the embalming procedure and protection
of the public health. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture). This course was previously part of
Microbiology/Pathology (FST 2613).


                                           95
Executive Summary



Pre/corequisites: Mortuary Anatomy I (FST 1113)
                                       
Course Name: Pathology
Course Abbreviation: FST 2633
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Designed to present the nature and cause of diseases. (3 sch: 3 hr.
lecture).This course was previously part of Microbiology/Pathology (FST 2613).
Pre/corequisites: Mortuary Anatomy I (FST 1113), Microbiology (FST 2623)
                                       
Course Name: Psychosocial Aspects of Grief and Death
Course Abbreviation: FST 2713
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of various social groups and their relationships to the funeral,
death, and disposition. Includes psychological aspects of emotions with emphasis on
counseling techniques and grief resolution. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture). This course was
formerly called Psychosocial Counseling in Funeral Service.
Prerequisites: None
                                       
Course Name: Comprehensive Review
Course Abbreviation: FST 2811
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Review of the entire curriculum, culminating with an exam designed to
prepare students for the National Board or various State Board examinations. (1 sch:
1 hr. lecture).
Prerequisites: To be taken during the final semester of coursework. Student must
have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better.




                                          96
Executive Summary



                      HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Course Name: Health Record Systems
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1114
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an introduction to health record systems including an
overview of the current healthcare environment; admissions procedures; record content,
analysis, and use; retention requirements; and numbering and filing systems. This
course was previously called Health Record Systems I. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr.
lab)
Prerequisite: Admission to the HIT Program
                                          
Course Name: Survey of Health Information Systems
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1123
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course presents an overview of automated information systems
used in various settings in the health care delivery system. It includes basic computer
concepts, terminology, and privacy/security issues which affect access to and use of
patient information. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Alternate Care Systems (HIT 2123) and Computers in Health Care (HIT
2913)
                                          
Course Name: Medical Terminology
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1213
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of medical language relating to the various body
systems including diseases, procedures, clinical specialties, and abbreviations. In
addition to term definitions, emphasis is placed on correct spelling and pronunciation.
(3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: None
                                          
Course Name: Health Care Delivery Systems
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1311
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an introduction to the United States health care delivery
system with emphasis on the changing role of health care providers, hospitals and other
facilities, and governmental agencies. (1 sch: 1 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: Admission to the HIT program
                                          
Course Name: Health Care Law and Ethics
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1323
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of the principles of law as applied to health
information systems with emphasis on health records, release of information,
confidentiality, consents, and authorizations. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)




                                          97
Executive Summary



Prerequisites: Health Record Systems (HIT 1114) and Health Care Delivery Systems
(HIT 1311)
                                            
Course Name: Pathophysiology I
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course covers structural and functional changes caused by disease
in tissues and organs, clinical manifestations, and principles of treatment with emphasis
on general concepts and diseases affecting the body as a whole. This course was
formerly called Disease I. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Medical Terminology (HIT 1213) and Anatomy and Physiology I
(BIO 2514)
                                            
Course Name: Fundamentals of Professional Practice Experience
Course Abbreviation: HIT 1513
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: In this course, students get an introduction to health care settings by
rotating through health information management areas in hospitals and other health
facilities for application of principles and procedural practice to attain competency.
Specific content is dependent on placement in curriculum and site availability.
(3 sch: 9 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Alternate Care Systems (HIT 2123) and Medical Terminology (HIT
1213)
                                            
Course Name: Alternate Care Systems
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2123
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of health record systems in alternative settings;
cancer program records; medical staff organization; and regulatory, accreditation and
licensure standards. This course was previously called Health Record Systems II.
(3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Health Record Systems (HIT 1114), Medical Terminology (HIT 1213),
and Health Care Delivery Systems (HIT 1311)
                                            
Course Name: Health Statistics
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2133
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes sources and use of health data, definitions of
statistical terms, and computation of commonly used rates and percentages used by
health care facilities. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Alternate Care Systems (HIT 2123)




                                           98
Executive Summary



                                          
Course Name: Pharmacology
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2212
Classification: Vocational-Technical Course
Description: This course is designed to develop understanding of pharmacy therapy
available for clinical management of patient care. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Medical Terminology (HIT 1213)
                                          
Course Name: Medical Transcription
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2222
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course covers concepts in computerized medical transcription in
health care facilities with emphasis on content of various medical reports and
application of medical transcription standards in a hospital medical transcription center.
(2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Medical Terminology (HIT 1213), Fundamentals of Microcomputer
Applications (CPT 1113) or Microcomputer Applications (CSC 1123), Anatomy and
Physiology I (BIO 2514), and Pathophysiology I (HIT 1413)
                                          
Course Name: Pathophysiology II
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2423
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology I with emphasis on
conditions relating to specific body systems, manifestations, and principles of treatment.
This course was previously called Disease II. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Pathophysiology I (HIT 1413) and Anatomy and Physiology II
(BIO 2524)
                                          
Course Name: Professional Practice Experience I
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2513
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: In this course, students rotate through health information management
areas in hospitals and other health facilities for application of principles and procedural
practice to attain competency. Specific content is dependent on placement in
curriculum and site availability. (3 sch: 9 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Alternate Care Systems (HIT 2123) and Medical Terminology (HIT
1213)
                                          
Course Name: Professional Practice Experience II
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2523
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: In this course, students rotate through health information management
areas in hospitals and other health facilities for application of principles and procedural
practice to attain competency. Specific content is dependent on placement in
curriculum and site availability. (3 sch: 9 hr. clinical)



                                            99
Executive Summary



Prerequisites: Professional Practice Experience I (HIT 2513) and Coding Systems I
(HIT 2614)
                                         
Course Name: Coding Systems I
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2614
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes principles of coding and classification systems with
emphasis on ICD-9-CM including lab applications and practice. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2
hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Medical Terminology (HIT 1213), Health Record Systems (HIT 1114),
Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 2524), and Pathophysiology I (HIT 1413)
                                         
Course Name: Coding Systems II
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2624
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of the study of principles of ICD-9-CM
coding; introduction to coding with the Health Care Financing Administration’s Common
Procedural Coding System (HCPCS) with emphasis on Current Procedural Coding
(CPT); and review of current reimbursement mechanisms. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: Pathophysiology II (HIT 2423), Coding Systems I (HIT 2614), and
Pharmacology (HIT 2212)
                                         
Course Name: Reimbursement Methodologies
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2632
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is design to identify the uses of coded data and health
information in reimbursement and payment systems appropriate to all health care
settings and managed care. (2 sch: 2 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Pathophysiology II (HIT 2423), Pharmacology (HIT 2212), and Coding
Systems I (HIT 2614)
                                         
Course Name: Health Care Supervision
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2713
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes basic principles of management and supervision
with emphasis on the health information setting. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Alternate Care Systems (HIT 2123) and Health Statistics (HIT 2133)
                                         
Course Name: Performance Improvement Techniques
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2812
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core




                                         100
Executive Summary



Description: This course covers principles of performance improvement techniques in
health care facilities; trends in utilization and risk management; and the use of quality
monitors in the health information department. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Alternate Care Systems (HIT 2123) and Health Statistics (HIT 2133)
                                            
Course Name: Computers in Health Care
Course Abbreviation: HIT 2913
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an overview of computer use in health care facilities with
emphasis on applications for health information services, including the electronic
medical record. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Microcomputer Applications (CPT 1113) or
Microcomputer Applications (CSC 1123)




                                           101
Executive Summary



                            OPHTHALMIC TECHNOLOGY

                                           
Course Name: Ophthalmic Optics I
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1113
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of basic principles of light. Topics covered include
anatomy and physiology of the eye, visual conditions of the human eye, and appropriate
lens to correct these conditions. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: None
                                           
Course Name: Ophthalmic Optics II
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1123
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Ophthalmic Optics I. Topics include the
theory of optical instruments, positive and negative cylinders, prisms, vertex distance,
and frame selection. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Pre/corequisite: Ophthalmic Optics I (OPT 1113)
                                           
Course Name: Optics Laboratory Techniques I
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1214
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will introduce the student to all basic equipment necessary to
process the lens through the surface operation. Emphasis will be placed on basic safety
and on how to prepare, operate, and maintain equipment. (4 sch: 8 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisite: Ophthalmic Optics I (OPT 1113), Laboratory Management and
Inventory Control I (OPT 1313)
                                           
Course Name: Optics Laboratory Techniques II
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1224
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Optics Laboratory Techniques I.
Emphasis will be placed on lens inspection, cutting and edging, heat treatment, lens
insertion, inspection, and tinting. (4 sch: 8 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisite: Ophthalmic Optics II (OPT 1123), Laboratory Management and
Inventory Control II (OPT 1323), Ophthalmic Dispensing I (OPT 1413), Optics
Laboratory Techniques I (OPT 1214)
                                           
Course Name: Laboratory Management and Inventory Control I
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core




                                          102
Executive Summary



Description: This course will serve as an introduction to supplies and materials used in
the ophthalmic laboratories and an introduction to mathematical optical calculations.
Laboratory safety procedures will be discussed. Laboratory inventory and management
skills will be demonstrated using computer software. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: None
                                          
Course Name: Laboratory Management and Inventory Control II
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1323
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Laboratory Management and Inventory
Control I. Emphasis of this course will be on small business management concepts as
related to an optical business. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: Laboratory Management and Inventory Control I (OPT 1313)
                                          
Course Name: Ophthalmic Dispensing I
Course Abbreviation: OPT 1413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a foundation course that will serve as a lecture introduction
to ophthalmic dispensing and related areas. Topics include frame parts, selection, lens
positioning and insertion, frame fitting, and progressive lenses. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: Ophthalmic Optics I (OPT 1113)
                                          
Course Name: Ophthalmic Dispensing II
Course Abbreviation: OPT 2423
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an introduction to prescription analysis and interpretation.
Various types of Rx’s will be discussed, as to what types of lens and frames should be
considered for the final product. Emphasis will be placed on the effect of the Rx as
related to the patient’s needs and wants. Tints, thickness factor, cosmetic
considerations, and the overall utility of the final product will be discussed. Business
communication skills will also be introduced. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: Ophthalmic Dispensing I (OPT 1413)
                                          
Course Name: Ophthalmic Dispensing III
Course Abbreviation: OPT 2433
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Ophthalmic Dispensing II. Emphasis will
be placed on the more advanced and unusual prescription related to ophthalmic
dispensing and on sales techniques. Topics to improve the ophthalmic dispenser’s
relationship with fellow opticians, optometrists, ophthalmologists, wholesalers,
manufacturers, and employees will be discussed. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: Ophthalmic Dispensing II (OPT 2423)




                                           103
Executive Summary



                                           
Course Name: Optical Theory and Instrumentation
Course Abbreviation: OPT 2513
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an in-depth look into the basic theoretical principles of
optical theory, as related to lenses, fitting problems, and instrumentation. Such topics as
reflection, refraction, magnification, and object-location will be discussed. (3 sch: 3 hr.
lecture)
Prerequisite: Ophthalmic Optics I (OPT 1113)
                                           
Course Name: Dispensing Clinic I
Course Abbreviation: OPT 2613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an on-campus clinical experience, operated by the
Ophthalmic Dispensing students. Practical clinical procedures will be practiced and
proficiency demonstrated. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisites: Ophthalmic Dispensing II (OPT 2423), Optical Theory and
Instrumentation (OPT 2513)
                                           
Course Name: Dispensing Clinic II
Course Abbreviation: OPT 2623
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Dispensing Clinic I. Continuous
evaluations will be done to study the clinic operation in terms of its efficiency and
effectiveness of operations. Additional adjustments and delivery will be done. Emphasis
will be placed on developed cases of special Rx’s and pediatric dispensing. Advanced
projects, such as multifocal lens fitting, will be completed. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisites: Ophthalmic Dispensing III (OPT 2433) and Dispensing Clinic I (OPT
2613)
                                           
Course Name: Externship
Course Abbreviation: OPT 2916
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will be conducted off-campus at a clinical location. The
student will be under the direct supervision of the manager or clinical director.
Evaluations will be completed by the instructors and off-campus clinical participants.
This course should be taken during final summer semester. (6 sch: 18 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Ophthalmic Technology courses




                                            104
Executive Summary



                               RESPIRATORY THERAPY

                                          
Course Name: Respiratory Care Practicum
Course Abbreviation: RCT 111(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course is designed to provide the student with extended
observational time with limited participation in respiratory care modalities. The student
gains knowledge of health care providers and of the respiratory care practitioner’s role.
This is an elective course for the first year students. (1-3 sch: 3-9 hr. clinical)
                                          
Course Name: Respiratory Care Science
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1214
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to introduce the student respiratory care therapist
to fundamental elements important to the delivery of health care in a safe, efficient, and
professional manner. (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Pre/Corequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1514 or 2514) and Anatomy and
Physiology II (BIO 1524 or 2524)
                                          
Course Name: Patient Assessment and Planning
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1223
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a fundamental approach to subjective and objective
evaluation, assessment, and care plan formation for the individual needs of the patient.
It is an introduction to cardiopulmonary diseases including etiology, pathophysiology,
complications, occurrences, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prevention. (3 sch: 2
hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Pre/Corequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1514 or 2514) and Anatomy and
Physiology II (BIO 1524 or 2524)
                                          
Course Name: Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of cardiopulmonary physiology in relation to the
practice of respiratory care. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Pre/Corequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1514 or BIO 2514) and Anatomy
and Physiology II (BIO 1524 or BIO 2524)
                                          
Course Name: Pulmonary Function Testing (PFT)
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1322
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an introduction to pulmonary function technique and testing
equipment. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Pre/Corequisites: Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (RCT 1313), or instructor
approval


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                                          
Course Name: Respiratory Care Practitioner I
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1416
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of respiratory treatments and equipment design and
operation related to non-critical care procedures. (6 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 8 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1514 or BIO 2514)
                                          
Course Name: Respiratory Care Practitioner II
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1424
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Respiratory Care Practitioner It is a study
of the management of respiratory failure, including mechanical ventilation, pulmonary
rehabilitation, and home care (4 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Respiratory Care Practitioner I (RCT 1416)
                                          
Course Name: Clinical Practice I
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1516
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Patient assessment, performance of respiratory care procedures, and
care plan formation are practiced in the hospital environment. A procedural guide is
utilized to evaluate student competencies and performance of respiratory care
procedures. (6 sch: 18 hr. clinical)
Pre/Corequisites: Respiratory Care Science (RCT 1214), Patient Assessment and
Planning (RCT 1223), Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (RCT 1313), and
Respiratory Care Practitioner I (RCT 1516)
                                          
Course Name: Clinical Practice II
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1524
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: In this course, students rotate through various respiratory care
subspecialty areas for evaluation of competency and performance of respiratory care
procedures. (4 sch: 12 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Clinical Practice I (RCT 1516)
                                          
Course Name: Respiratory Care Pharmacology
Course Abbreviation: RCT 1613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to the pharmacology
related to cardiopulmonary disorders. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Pre/Corequisites: Respiratory Care Science (RCT 1214), Cardiopulmonary Anatomy
and Physiology (RCT 1313) and Patient Assessment and Planning (RCT 1223)




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                                          
Course Name: Cardiopulmonary Pathology
Course Abbreviation: RCT 2333
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. It includes
etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostics and treatment of various cardiopulmonary
diseases incorporating clinical practice guidelines and therapist driven protocols. Case
studies and/or clinical simulations will be utilized to enforce learning and evaluate
progress. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisites: Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (RCT 1313)
                                          
Course Name: Respiratory Care Practitioner III
Course Abbreviation: RCT 2434
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an advanced study of respiratory care in the critical care
setting. Topics include nonconventional modes of mechanical ventilation,
hemodynamics, special procedures, and advanced cardiac life support. (4 sch: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Respiratory Care Practitioner II (RCT 1424)
                                          
Course Name: Clinical Practice III
Course Abbreviation: RCT 2534
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: In this course, students rotate through various clinical areas for evaluation
of competency and performance of respiratory care procedures. (4 sch: 12 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Clinical Practice II (RCT 1523)
                                          
Course Name: Clinical Practice IV
Course Abbreviation: RCT 2546
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a continuation of Clinical Practice III. In this course,
students rotate through respiratory care areas. A procedural guide is utilized to evaluate
student competency and performance. (6 sch: 18 hr. clinical)
Prerequisites: Clinical Practice I (RCT 1516), Clinical Practice II (RCT 1524), and
Clinical Practice III (RCT 2534)
                                          
Course Name: Neonatal/Pedatrics Management
Course Abbreviation: RCT 2613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of fetal development and the transition to
extrauterine environment. It Includes the most common cardiopulmonary disorders,
neonatal and pediatric disease processes, and the modes of treatment. (3 sch: 3 hr.
lecture)
Pre/Corequisite: Respiratory Care Practitioner III (RCT 2434), Clinical Practice IV
(RCT 2546)



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                                         
Course Name: Respiratory Care Seminar
Course Abbreviation: RCT 2712
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to integrate the essential elements of respiratory
care practice through the use of care plans, case studies, and clinical simulations in a
laboratory environment. Students develop an analytical approach to problem solving.
Critical thinking is emphasized. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Respiratory Care Practitioner III (RCT 2434)




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                    FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
                       Clothing and Textiles Services




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                         CLOTHING AND TEXTILES SERVICES

                                          
Course Name: Garment Construction
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1114
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An application of principles, techniques, and skills with emphasis on
working with problem fabrics (plaids, stripes, velvets, and other pile problem fabrics and
design) and on fitting and construction of garments for men, women, and children, and
for different figure types. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Alterations
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1123
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Recognition of problems in garment fitting in relation to grain line, figure,
and fashion; and techniques to fitting and solving fitting problems through alterations by
hand and on the machine. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Garment Construction (CTV 1114)
                                          
Course Name: Tailoring
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1134
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Application of tailoring techniques and skills in the construction of
garments using various fabrics. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Garment Construction (CTV 1114)
                                          
Course Name: Fashion Design
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1143
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course focuses on creating original garment design starting with the
most basic and progressing towards the most complex. Emphasis is placed on the
recognition of the history of fashion, basic silhouettes, lines, styles, and detail in design
and garment construction. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisites: Garment Construction (CTV 1114) and Alterations (CTV 1123)
                                          
Course Name: Equipment Use and Care
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1213
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Use and care of equipment in production, instructions in the use and care
of all equipment basic to garment construction, safety practices, and proper storage.
Emphasis is on the use of industrial sewing and computerized equipment. (3 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None




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                                         
Course Name: Textiles
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1223
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Relationship of raw materials, construction, and finish to quality and cost
of textiles. Also considered are the identification of fibers, yarns, weave, colorants
(dyeing and printing), and fabrics; selection of appropriate fabrics for various uses; and
wearing quality and care required for textiles. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Fabric and Accessory Design
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1233
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is a study of fabric decoration, textiles, and accessory
design. Emphasis is placed on printing and dyeing techniques and garment
embellishments. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Modeling and Grooming
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Basic concepts of modeling through exercise, grooming, poise, walking,
facial expression, makeup, and photography. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Home Furnishings
Course Abbreviation: CTV 1413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Principles and elements of design related to the selection and
arrangement of furniture; use of fabrics, accessories,and wall and window treatments;
and other facets of interior designs. Drapery making and construction of home
furnishing goods are also included. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Garment Construction (CTV 1114)
                                         
Course Name: Special Problems in Clothing and Textiles Services
Course Abbreviation: CTV 291(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A course designed to provide the student with practical application of
skills and knowledge gained in other vocational-technical courses. The instructor works
closely with the student to insure that the selection of a project will enhance the
student=s learning experience. (1-3 sch: 2-6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor




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                                        
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Clothing and Textiles Services
Course Abbreviation: CTV 292(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A course which is a cooperative program between industry and education
and is designed to integrate the student's technical studies with industrial experience.
Variable credit is awarded on the basis of one semester hour per 45 industrial contact
hours. (1-6 sch: 3-18 hr. externship)
Pre/corequisites: Garment Construction (CTV 1114), Tailoring (CTV 1134),
Alterations (CTV 1123), Equipment Use and Care (CTV 1213), Textiles (CTV 1223),
and Home Furnishings (CTV 1413)




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                    TRADE, INDUSTRIAL, AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY
                       Automotive Vehicles and Accessories Marketing
                                        Barber/Stylist
                                Graphic Design Technology
                             Graphics and Print Communications
                              Jewelry and Watch Repair Cluster
                          Plumber and Pipefitter/Steamfitter Cluster
                                    Polymer Technology
                                    Sheet Metal Program




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              AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES MARKETING

                                           
Course Name: Orientation and Safety Procedures
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1112
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An orientation to the history of accessories marketing, job opportunities,
and the physical structure of the industry. Safety procedures including OSHA and EPA
regulations, proper use of hand and power tools, shop hazards, and legal
responsibilities are discussed and implemented throughout this course. (2 sch: 2 hr.
lecture)
Prerequisite: None
                                           
Course Name: Operational Procedures
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1126
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Everyday operations in the auto parts business, including proper business
procedures, customer service, and sales procedures. (6 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Automotive Systems I
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1214
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Function and identification of the power train, including engine,
transmission, drive line, and axles. (4 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                           
Course Name: Automotive Systems II
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1224
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Function and identification of automotive systems, including brake
systems, cooling systems, electrical systems, heating and air conditioning systems, and
suspension systems. (4 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                           
Course Name: Catalog Information Systems
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1316
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Hard copy, microfiche, and computerized catalogs. Also included are the
writing of invoices, interpreting price sheets, and calculating discounts. (6 sch: 3 hr.
lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Merchandising
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1322
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core


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Description: General parts store layout to include merchandise displays and parts bin
layout. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                            
Course Name: Internal Operations
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1414
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Daily operations of a parts store including shipping and receiving, stocking
and storing merchandise, counter operations, and physical inventory. (4 sch: 1 hr.
lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                            
Course Name: Internal Sales
Course Abbreviation: AAV 1424
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Sales skills using hard copy and computerized cataloging and pricing.
(4 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                            
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Automotive Vehicles and Accessories
Marketing
Course Abbreviation: AAV 192(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A cooperative program between the industry and education that is
designed to integrate the student’s technical studies with technical experience. (1-6 sch
variable: 3-18 hr. externship)
Prerequisites: None




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                                  BARBER/STYLIST

                                          
Course Name: Basic Practices in Barbering
Course Abbreviation: BAV 1118
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Basic practices including orientation, safety, and practical experiences in
handling tools and hair cutting. Practices are done independently with supervision. (8
sch: 2 hr. lecture, 18 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Fundamental Practices in Barbering I
Course Abbreviation: BAV 1218
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Fundamental practices in styling, shampooing, blow drying, perm rolling,
and perm processing. Practices are done independently with supervision. (8 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 18 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Fundamental Practices in Barbering II
Course Abbreviation: BAV 1318
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Sanitation, sterilization, prevention and control of contamination and
decontamination in the workplace, hygiene and good grooming, hair analysis, and the
application of a chemical hair relaxer and style. Practices are done independently with
supervision. (8 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 18 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Intermediate Practices in Barbering I
Course Abbreviation: BAV 1418
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Theory of colors, classifications of hair color, color preparation and
applications, and treatment of damaged hair. Practices are done independently with
supervision. (8 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 18 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Intermediate Practices in Barbering II
Course Abbreviation: BAV 1518
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Additional study of the structure and function of the skin, common skin
disorders, and scalp and hair disorders. Practices are included in providing facial
massages, rendering plain facials, and barbering services previously introduced. (8 sch:
2 hr. lecture, 18 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Basic Practices in Barbering (BAV 1118) and Fundamental Practices in
Barbering I (BAV 1218)



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                                       
Course Name: Advanced Practices in Barbering
Course Abbreviation: BAV 1618
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Mustache and beard trimming. Also includes business management and
business law applicable to barber/styling shop management. (8 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 18 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: Fundamental Practices in Barbering II (BAV 1318) and Intermediate
Practices in Barbering I (BAV 1418)




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                          GRAPHIC DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

                                        
Course Name: Graphic Design and Production I
Course Abbreviation: CAT 1113
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An introduction to the skills of design, typography, and the fundamentals
needed of the graphic artist. The course will provide selected experiences involving
design, simple renderings, printing processes, industry specifications, and print
production formats for mass distribution. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                        
Course Name: Graphic Design and Production II
Course Abbreviation: CAT 1123
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A continuation of Graphic Design and Production I with concentration on
color printing, mechanical processes, color separations, screens, cropping, and scaling
photographs/artwork for reproduction with continued emphasis on design, typography,
assembly, and binding. The course will utilize both traditional and computer techniques.
(3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Production I (CAT 1113)
                                        
Course Name: History of Graphic Design
Course Abbreviation: CAT 1133
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Evolution of graphic communications from prehistoric times through
present day. (3 sch: 3 hr. lecture)
Prerequisite: None
                                        
Course Name: Typography
Course Abbreviation: CAT 1143
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A comparison of traditional uses of typography with those of a more
contemporary approach. This is an in-depth exploration of type in relation to meaning
and form with a refined application of drawing skills before final output on the computer.
(3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None




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                                        
Course Name: Typography
Course Abbreviation: CAT 1143
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A comparison of traditional uses of typography with those of a more
contemporary approach. This is an in-depth exploration of type in relation to meaning
and form with a refined application of drawing skills before final output on the computer.
(3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                        
Course Name: Graphic Design Studio
Course Abbreviation: CAT 2133
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A concentrated study in graphic design specifically related to regional
industry needs. Emphasis will be placed on projects according to industry needs.
(3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                        
Course Name: Web Graphic Production
Course Abbreviation: WDT 2263/CAT 2263
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: An in-depth study of producing and utilizing graphic elements designed for
Internet or web application. Emphasis is placed equally on aesthetics, technical
requirements, and principles of interactive design. The course will provide a
concentrated study related to color management, typography, graphic development and
manipulation, digital imaging, and creating dynamic web experiences. The focus is on
the production and manipulation of individual elements and is recommended as a
supplement to a web design application course or previous experience. (3 sch: 1 hr.
lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Web Design Applications (WDT 1414) and Web Development Concepts
(WDT 1123), or by consent of instructor
                                        
Course Name: Basic Advertising Design
Course Abbreviation: CAT 2313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Concepts and methodology related to the graphic design industry utilizing
current software and related hardware. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Production I (CAT 1113), Fundamentals of Graphic
Computers (CAT 1213), or by consent of instructor
                                        
Course Name: Advanced Advertising Design
Course Abbreviation: CAT 2323
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core




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Description: A continuation of Basic Advertising Design with emphasis on graphic
computers to develop and produce advanced graphic design projects. This course
utilizes equipment and software used in industry. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Basic Advertising Design (CAT 2313) or by consent of instructor
                                           
Course Name: Practical Advertising Techniques
Course Abbreviation: CAT 2334
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Performance skills needed for productive employment in the graphic
design field. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Basic Advertising Design (CAT 2313) or by consent of instructor
                                           
Course Name: Rendering Techniques
Course Abbreviation: CAT 2413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of various illustration and rendering techniques with emphasis on
rendering in markers and color pencils. The student will learn professional methods of
illustration and visual production for mass distribution using electronic, mechanical, and
traditional art techniques. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                           
Course Name: Special Project in Graphic Design Technology
Course Abbreviation: CAT 291(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Practical applications of skills and knowledge gained in other Graphic
Design Technology courses. The instructor works closely with the student to ensure
that selection of a special project enhances the student's learning experiences. (1-6
sch: 45 contact hours per sch)
Prerequisite: Completion of one semester of coursework in the Graphic Design
Technology program.
                                           
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Graphic Design Technology
Course Abbreviation: CAT 292(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course is a cooperative program between industry and education and
is designed to integrate the student's technical studies with industrial experience.
Variable credit is awarded on the basis of one semester hour per 45 industrial contact
hours. (1-6 sch: 3-18 hr. externship)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and the completion of two semesters of coursework
in the Graphic Design Technology program.
                                           
Course Name: Special Project in Graphic Design Technology II
Course Abbreviation: CAT 293(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective




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Description: Practical applications of skills and knowledge gained in other Graphic
Design Technology courses. The instructor works closely with the student to ensure
that selection of a special project enhances the student's learning experiences.
(1-6 sch: 45 contact hours per sch)
Prerequisite: Completion of one semester of coursework in Graphic Design
Technology program.




                                          124
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                    GRAPHICS AND PRINT COMMUNICATIONS

                                          
Course Name: Overview of Graphics and Print Communications
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1212
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an overview of the graphic arts. Students will study the
major historical events and copyright restrictions. An overview of the general safety
practices, measurements, and printing processes is included. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2
hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Pasteup and Layout
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1314
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes production techniques for preparing copy for
reproduction. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Pasteup and Layout
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1314
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes production techniques for preparing copy for
reproduction. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Graphic Design II
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1424
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is advanced graphic design. Basic skills learned in Graphic
Design I will be used to create more complex layouts with closer tolerances and broader
use of colors. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Graphic Design I (GPV 1414)
                                          
Course Name: Press Operations I
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1712
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an introduction to press operations with emphasis on
safety practices, fundamental setup and operational procedures, and cleanup of offset
presses and duplicators. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Press Operations II
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1723
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core



                                          125
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Description: This course is a continuation of Press Operations I with emphasis on 2-
color printing operations, maintenance and troubleshooting, and new trends and
technologies in printing. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Press Operations I (GPV 1712)
                                         
Course Name: Press Operations III
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1733
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course is a continuation of GPV 1712 and GPV 1723 with emphasis
on multi-color printing. (3 sch: 6 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisites: Press Operations II (GPV 1723)
                                         
Course Name: Digital Printing I
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1744
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course will introduce the student to the digital printing process.
Emphasis will be placed on the characteristics and special capabilities of digital printing
equipment as well as its limitations. . (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Digital Printing II
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1752
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A study of the xerographic process and its impact on the design and use
of modern digital printing equipment. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Binding and Finishing Operations
Course Abbreviation: GPV 1814
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes instruction and practice in binding and finishing
techniques including folding, padding, drilling, and stitching. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Special Project in Graphics and Print Communications
Course Abbreviation: GPV 191(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course provides students with practical application of skills and
knowledge related to a specific instructor-approved topic. Instructor and student work
closely together in planning and conducting the project. (1-3 sch: 2-6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor




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                                        
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Graphics and Print Communications
Course Abbreviation: GPV 192(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A supervised on-site work experience in which the student works under
the supervision of industry and community college personnel. Competencies and
objectives for this course are determined by a mutual agreement between the student,
employer, and teacher. (1-3 sch: 3-9 hr. internship)
Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor




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                     JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIR CLUSTER

                                         .
Course Name: Fundamentals of Watch and Jewelry Repair
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1114
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course includes a basic background and history of jewelry, as well as
the modern watch. The course also includes tool making, use of various measuring
instruments and gauges, use of torch for soldering as well as for heat treatment, filing
brass projects to measurement, safety practices, and sharpening of turning gravers.
Also included are polishing and cleaning jewelry, watch bands, take-in repairs, adjusting
watch bands, engraving, and some battery installations. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: None
                                          
Course Name: Basic Jewelry Repair
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1224
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)
Description: This course includes silver soldering rings using the torch to any size
larger or smaller without the solder joint showing any imperfections. It also includes
putting bright, ripple, hammered, Florentine, and satin finishes on rings. The student
must successfully demonstrate knowledge of jewelry process, terms, nomenclature, and
basic precautions to stones. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Watch and Jewelry Repair (WJV 1114)
                                          
Course Name: Jewelry Casting and Design
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1234
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)
Description: This course includes instruction in hand carving wax patterns, spruing,
casting, burnout cycle, bombing, electro stripping, rubber molds, and wax injection.
This course includes training in manufacturing of all types of jewelry. (4 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Basic Jewelry Repair (WJV 1224)
                                           
Course Name: Jewelry Repair I
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1244
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)
Description: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to use the torch
for soldering heads on rings, chains, and wire fabrication. The student will be able to
use the flex shaft to set various stones. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Jewelry Casting and Design (WJV 1234)
                                          
Course Name: Jewelry Repair II
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1254
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)




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Description: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to solder chains,
jump rings, and all chain repairs. The student will be able to re-tip old prongs and
replace broken prongs, make rock salt nuggets, charcoal nuggets, solder bails on large
items, engrave, test carat of gold, and make all general and minor repairs that come in
over the counter from live work. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Jewelry Repair I (WJV 1244)
                                          
Course Name: Jewelry Repair III
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1264
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)
Description: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to successfully
demonstrate the ability to completely build from round wires, square wore, and flat stock
finished articles to size rings and proper drilling of small holes for delicate soldering.
The student will also be able to take in live work from over the counter and properly
repair all the various types of everyday repairs. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Jewelry Repair II (WJV 1254)
                                          
Course Name: Stone Setting
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1274
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)
Description: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to successfully set
stones level in cluster and multi-head rings using bearing burrs and hart burrs, setting
burrs, and gravers. The student will repair all live work and understand take-in
procedures. Upon job completion, all stones must be bright, level, and secure. (4 sch: 2
hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Jewelry Repair II (WJV 1254)
                                          
Course Name: Advanced Stone Setting
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1284
Classification: AOC Core (Jewelry Design, Fabrication, and Repair)
Description: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to successfully
set stones level and secure in bar setting, bezel setting, channel setting, tube setting,
gypsy setting, and multi-head setting (free form). The student will be able to take in
jewelry repairs using proper take-in procedures, repair carat gold jewelry as assigned,
and wait on customers using professional practices. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Stone Setting (WJV 1274)
                                          
Course Name: Mechanical Watch I
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1124
Classification: AOC Core (Watch Repair)




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Description: This course includes identifying watch tools and the proper use and care
of those tools. The course includes limited lathe work as it relates to sharpening of
turning gravers. Students will learn to handle tools and watch parts with care using
safety precautions. This course also includes disassembling, identifying watch parts
along with the functions of those parts, and reassembling watches. Developing hand
skills, proper use of eyewear, and adjusting the workstation is necessary in the course.
(4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Watch and Jewelry Repair (WJV 1114)
                                           
Course Name: Mechanical Watch II
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1134
Classification: AOC Core (Watch Repair)
Description: This course concentrates on the disassembly and reassembly process
with emphasis on regular, calendar, automatics, and small ladies’ watches as relate to
servicing. The student is introduced to removing and replacing a balance staff, and
basic moving removing and replacing parts. Also included is how to professionally
clean and service all types of watches. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Mechanical Watch I (WJV 1124)
                                           
Course Name: Basic Quartz Analog
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1144
Classification: AOC Core (Watch Repair)
Description: This course introduces the student to the quartz watch and how the
technology differs from the regular mechanical and other electric timepieces. The
student will learn to test circuits and coils, along with other electrical components with
safety in mind; to remove and replace parts; to properly clean and service a quartz
watch; and to create retro-fitting for quartz watches. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Mechanical Watch II (WJV 1134)
                                           
Course Name: Watch Repair
Course abbreviation: WJV 1154
Classification: AOC Core (Watch Repair)
Description: This course includes removing and replacing balance staffs of pocket
watches, regular wrist watches, small lady’s watches, and truing and poising those
balance/crowns, fitting crystals, tightening cannon pinions of various types,
straightening hairsprings, setting up the escapement, troubleshooting, and problem
solving techniques. Professional dress, professional skills, professional
communications, and professional attitude are encouraged, with emphasis of future
employment. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Basic Quartz Analog (WJV 1144)




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                                           
Course Name: Advanced Watch Repair I
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1164
Classification: AOC Core (Watch Repair)
Description: This course includes cleaning and service of all types of watches as well
as troubleshooting and problem solving techniques. It requires the students to be
confident and increase speed and accuracy. Also included is major balance assembly
repair such as staffing, truing, and poising with emphasis on special tools and their
uses. This course should prepare the student to exhibit good habits, professional
practices, and conduct conducive to watch and jewelry industry. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4
hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Watch Repair (WJV 1154)
                                           
Course Name: Advanced Watch Repair II
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1174
Description: This course includes cleaning and servicing watches of various types and
special features, such as chronometers, chronographs, etc. It requires less assistance
from the instructor with speed and accuracy. It requires moderate intensity and
concentration. The student is challenged to all types of repair such as crystal fitting,
roller jewel setting, balance staffing, truing, poising and escapement setting, and any
other type repair one might encounter with minimum advice from the instructor. (4 sch: 2
hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisite: Advanced Watch Repair I (WJV 1164)
                                           
Course Name: Advanced Watch Repair III
Course Abbreviation: WJV 1184
Classification: AOC Core (Watch Repair)
Description: This course requires the student to be more accurate in troubleshooting
and problem solving. It includes waterproofing, using innovative techniques as well as
those found in the market place. Personal appearance becomes more important as it
relates to the interview process. The student must have good customer relations, good
professional practices, and degree of initiative, as well as extrapolative ability in
relationship to any watch. The student must be able to clean and service three or more
watches in one cleaning basket to insure production methods. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr.
lab)
Prerequisite: Advanced Watch Repair (WJV 1174)




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Executive Summary



                    PLUMBER AND PIPEFITTER/STEAMFITTER CLUSTER

                                           
Course Name: Fundamentals of Plumbing/Pipefitting
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1113
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Plumbing and Pipefitting)
Description: Job safety and health, including first aid. Also, occupational hazards and
the scope of the OSHA law. Includes pipefitting and plumbing fittings, valves, hangers,
and general trade fitting identification. Included are screwed, welded, flanged, soldered,
brazed, glued, compression, and flared fittings. Identification and use of pipefitting and
plumbing tools used in today’s piping industry. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Blueprint Reading for Piping Trades
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Pipefitting and Plumbing)
Description: An in-depth understanding of blueprint reading. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Pressure Boilers
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1411
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Pipefitting and Plumbing)
Description: Introduction to safe operation of pressure boilers for heating, steam
production, and water heating. (1 sch: 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Tacking, Brazing, and Burning
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1213
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing Associate Degree and Pipefitting) and Vocational-
Technical Elective (Plumbing Certificate)
Description: Striking an arc, tacking metal together, setting up an oxyacetylene torch
and burning, brazing and soldering, and cutting straight and bevel angles on flat steel
and pipe. Safety procedures will be covered and emphasized. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Sketching
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1323
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing Associate Degree and Pipefitting) and Vocational-
Technical Elective (Plumbing Certificate)
Description: Sketching, measuring, and recording required information to supplement
oral descriptions and organize ideas to include individual piping components. (3 sch: 1
hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None



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                                            
Course Name: Basic Pipe Fabrication
Course Abbreviation: PPV 1423
Classification: AOC Core (Pipefitting)
Description: Use of pipefitting tools and equipment, different ways of cutting and fitting
pipes, methods of calculating pipe fittings, and various types of fit-ups for different types
of pipe. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Pipe Specifications and Systems
Course Abbreviation: PPV 1432
Classification: AOC Core (Pipefitting)
Description: Different metals used in making pipe; their sizes, weights, and strengths;
and how they are manufactured. The pipe systems on ships and industrial plants are
studied. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Advanced Pipefitting Lab
Course Abbreviation: PPV 1456
Classification: AOC Core (Pipefitting)
Description: Advanced pipefitting layout, fabrication, and testing of piping systems. (6
sch: 2 hr. lecture, 8 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Rigging and Signaling
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1812
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing Associate Degree and Pipefitting) and Vocational-
Technical Elective (Plumbing Certificate)
Description: Basic use of hand signals, rigging, and equipment. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2
hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Steel Ship Building and Marine Construction
Course Abbreviation: PPV 1823
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (Pipefitting)
Description: Structure of a ship and abbreviation of parts and sections of ships. Also,
various types of piping systems, including both building and marine pipefitting systems.
(3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Special Project in Pipefitting
Course Abbreviation: PPV 291(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (Pipefitting)
Description: Practical application of skills and knowledge gained in other technical
courses. The instructor works closely with the student to insure that the selection of a
project will enhance the student’s learning experience. (1-3 sch: 2-6 hr. lab)


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Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor
                                           
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Pipefitting
Course Abbreviation: PPV 292(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (Pipefitting)
Description: A cooperative program between industry and education and is designed
to integrate the student’s studies with industrial experience. Variable credit is awarded
on the basis of semester hour per 45 industrial contact hours. (1-6 sch: 3-18 hr.
externship)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
                                           
Course Name: Piping Level/Transit
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1443
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing)
Description: Applications of the leveling instruments, shooting elevations, and grading
pipes. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Drainage and Sewer Systems
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1513
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing) and Vocational-Technical Elective (Pipefitting)
Description: Information and practical aspects of drainage and disposal systems and
the International Plumbing Code. Included are the installation of the drainage system in
a residential unit covering health aspects and the disposal of poisonous gases arising
from the discharge of traps. Instruction is provided on elements of disposal systems,
including sewer, septic tanks, tank size calculations, maintenance causes, and removal
of sewer obstructions. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Heating Devices
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1612
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing)
Description: Information on local codes for installing and repairing water heaters, force
air units, and floor furnaces. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Gas Piping
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1622
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing)
Description: Information on standard gas codes. The safe installation of gas
appliances and gas lines, according to codes, will be included. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: None




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                                         
Course Name: Domestic Systems
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1712
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing) and Vocational-Technical Elective (Pipefitting)
Description: Information on the installation of a hot water system according to the unit
fixture system. Also information on sizing and installation of a potable cold water
system. (2 sch: 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Plumbing Fixtures Lab
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1722
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing) and Vocational-Technical Elective (Pipefitting)
Description: Information on the installation of the rough-in and finish fixtures used in
the plumbing construction according to Southern Standard Plumbing Code. (2 sch: 4 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Back Flow Cross Connection
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1732
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing)
Description: Information on the different types of back flow devices, and the installation
and testing of the devices. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Advanced Plumbing Lab
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 1743
Classification: AOC Core (Plumbing)
Description: Additional study in the area of advanced plumbing in the commercial area.
(3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                         
Course Name: Special Project in Plumbing
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 191(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (Plumbing)
Description: Practical application of skills and knowledge gained in other technical
courses. The instructor works closely with the student to insure that the selection of a
project will enhance the student’s learning experience. (1-3 sch: 2-6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor
                                         
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Plumbing
Course Abbreviation: PPV/PCT 192(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective (Plumbing)




                                           135
Executive Summary



Description: This course is a cooperative program between industry and education and
is designed to integrate the student’s studies with industrial experience. Variable credit
is awarded on the basis of semester hour per 45 industrial contact hours. (1-6 sch: 3-18
hr. externship)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor




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Executive Summary



                                POLYMER TECHNOLOGY

                                           
Course Name: Trends in Manufacturing
Course Abbreviation: PLT 1112
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: During this course, students will cover topics including trends in industrial
organizational structure, plastics machining, welding, stamping, and casting. Special
emphasis will be given to recent developments such as robots, numerical control,
industrial computer applications, and CAD/CAM as applied to the plastics industry (2
sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Introduction to Plastics Materials and Processing
Course Abbreviation: PLT 1213
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to the world of plastics.
Topics include the history of plastics; basic polymer chemistry; identification of plastics,
thermoset, and thermoplastics uses, applications, and manufacturing processes; and
health and safety considerations of plastics. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Polymer Material Properties
Course Abbreviation: PLT 1223
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Topics included are atomic structure, periodic table, elements, electrons
and shell structure, bonds and bonding, hydrocarbons, polymers, copolymers,
molecular structure, polymerization, thermoset resins, thermoplastic resins, additives,
and polymer physical properties. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Injection Molding
Course Abbreviation: PLT 1313
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides lecture and hands-on experiences in the injection
molding process. Areas covered are safety, machine identification, setup procedures,
operation, troubleshooting, and machine adjustment. Students are introduced to
computer monitoring of the molding process as a quality control method to increase
productivity. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Pre/corequisites: Introduction to Plastics Materials and Processing (PLT 1213) or
consent of instructor.




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                                            
Course Name: Process Control for Injection Molding
Course Abbreviation: PLT 1333
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Topics include variables affecting the injection molding process,
controlling the structure of molded parts, measures for control of the molding process,
operation of automatic process control systems, and problem solving using automatic
process control systems. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Injection Molding I (PLT 1313)
                                            
Course Name: Plastics Tooling Construction Principles
Course Abbreviation: PLT 2213
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Covers construction methods necessary to build tooling for injection
molding and blow molding. Includes an introduction to extrusion dies and thermoforming
tools. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                            
Course Name: Injection Molding II
Course Abbreviation: PLT 2324
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is an extension of Injection Molding I (PLT 1313). Subjects
include insert molding and accessory equipment associated with injection molding such
as drying and pneumatic conveying. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Injection Molding I (PLT 1313)
                                            
Course Name: Plastics Extrusion
Course Abbreviation: PLT 2413
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course describes the operating principles of an extruder with
emphasis on profile, tubing, and sheet and film extrusion. Also covered are the setup,
operation, troubleshooting, and safety aspects of extruder systems. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture,
2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Introduction to Plastics Materials and Processing (PLT 1213) or consent
of instructor.
                                            
Course Name: Troubleshooting Plastic Processes
Course Abbreviation: PLT 2514
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course is designed to train plastics technicians in process diagnosis
and corrective action. Minor repair procedures of plastics processing equipment is
included. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Injection Molding II (PLT 2324) and Plastics Extrusion (PLT 2413)




                                           138
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                                          
Course Name: Plastics Quality Control
Course Abbreviation: PLT 2614
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: This course provides the skills necessary to read and interpret blueprints
for inspection purposes of plastic parts. Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing and
hands-on setup using modern inspection tools and gages are emphasized. Use of
statistical analysis for process control will be introduced. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Injection Molding II (PLT 2324) and Plastics Extrusion (PLT 2413) or
consent of instructor.
                                          
Course Name: Blow Molding/Thermoforming
Course Abbreviation: PLT 2713
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course is designed to introduce blow molding and thermoforming
processes. Areas covered include safety, troubleshooting, setup procedures, machine
operations, machine adjustments, and tooling. During the lab portion of the course,
students learn to set up and operate the blow molding and thermoforming equipment to
produce defect-free parts. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Special Problem in Plastics Technology
Course Abbreviation: PLT 291(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A course designed to provide the student with practical application of skills
and knowledge gained in other Polymer Technology courses. The instructor works
closely with the student to insure that the selection of a project will enhance the
student's learning experience. (1-3 sch: 2-6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Minimum of 12 sch Polymer Technology related courses or consent of
instructor.
                                          
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Plastics Technology
Course Abbreviation: PLT 292(1-6)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: This course is a cooperative program between industry and education and
is designed to integrate the student's technical studies with industrial experience.
Variable credit is awarded on the basis of 1 semester hour per 45 contact hours.
(1-6 sch variable: 3-18 hr. externship)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing in Polymer Technology or consent of instructor.




                                             139
Executive Summary



                                SHEET METAL PROGRAM

                                           
Course Name: Orientation and Shop Safety
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1112
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: An overview of the occupations in the sheet metal industry and personal
and shop safety practices of the sheet metal industry. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Measurement
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1212
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Selection and use of measuring tools and basic mathematics pertaining
to the sheet metal industry. (2 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Methods of Layout I
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1315
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Layout and development of various sheet metal problems using the
principles of parallel line and triangulation development. (5 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Pre/Corequisites: Measurement (SMT 1212)
                                           
Course Name: Methods of Layout II
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1326
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A continuation of Methods of Layout I to include radial line layout and
architectural/roofing sheet metal and specialty sheet metal. (6 sch: 3 hr. lecture, 6 hr.
lab)
Prerequisites: Methods of Layout I (SMT 1315)
                                           
Course Name: Hand Processes I
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1414
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Selection and use of hand tools in the sheet metal trade. (4 sch: 2 hr.
lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                           
Course Name: Hand Processes II
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1424
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: A continuation of Hand Processes I that includes the selection and
correct and safe use of the specialty hand and power tools of the sheet metal trade. (4
sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Hand Processes I (SMT 1414)


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Executive Summary



                                          
Course Name: Sheet Metal Welding
Course Abbreviation: SMT 1613
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Selection and use of welding machines such as manual metal arc, gas
metal arc welding (GMAW), oxyacetylene, shielded metal arc (SMAW), and plasma arc
cutting (PAC) as used in the sheet metal trade. (3 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Plans and Specifications I
Course Abbreviation: SMT 2213
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Associate Degree)
Description: Terms and definitions used in reading blueprints and specifications. Basic
sketching, drawing, and dimensioning of objects will be covered. Also, specifications of
blueprints and building codes will be covered. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Plans and Specifications II
Course Abbreviation: SMT 2223
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Associate Degree)
Description: Continuation of Plans and Specifications I with emphasis placed on
reading and interpreting blueprints and performing calculations. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 2
hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Plans and Specifications I (SMT 2213)
                                          
Course Name: Methods of Layout III
Course Abbreviation: SMT 2324
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Associate Degree)
Description: A continuation of Methods of Layout II with the use of CNC cutting
methods for various layout of sheet metal projects. (4 sch: 1 hr. lecture, 6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Methods of Layout II (SMT 1326)
                                          
Course Name: Machine Processes I
Course Abbreviation: SMT 2514
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core
Description: Selection and the safe use of hand-and-foot operated machines of the
sheet metal trade. (3 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: None
                                          
Course Name: Machine Processes II
Course Abbreviation: SMT 2524
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Associate Degree)
Description: A continuation of Machine Processes I that includes the use of power-
operated machines of the sheet metal trade. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Machine Processes I (SMT 2514)



                                           141
Executive Summary



                                           
Course Name: Advanced Sheet Metal Welding
Course Abbreviation: SMT 2614
Classification: Vocational-Technical Core (Associate Degree)
Description: Advanced sheet metal welding using various welding machines,
processes, and techniques. (4 sch: 2 hr. lecture, 4 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Sheet Metal Welding (SMT 1613)
                                           
Course Name: Special Project in Sheet Metal
Course Abbreviation: SMT 291(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: Provides the student with practical application of skills and knowledge
gained in other technical courses. The instructor works closely with the student to insure
that the selection of a project will enhance the student's learning experience. (1-3 sch:
2-6 hr. lab)
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor
                                           
Course Name: Supervised Work Experience in Sheet Metal
Course Abbreviation: SMT 292(1-3)
Classification: Vocational-Technical Elective
Description: A course which is a cooperative program between industry and education
and is designed to integrate the student's technical studies with industrial experience.
Variable credit is awarded on the basis of one semester hour per 45 industrial contact
hours. ( 1-3 sch: 3-9 hr. externship)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor




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