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					            Dartmouth


 The M.D.-Ph.D. Student Handbook


            2009-2010


The M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth
  The Norris Cotton Cancer Center
     One Medical Center Drive
         603 Rubin Building
       Lebanon, NH 03756
          (603) 653-9958




                                      1
Table of Contents
For 2009-2010
The M.D.-Ph.D. Student Handbook

                                                                    Page Number

Introduction                                                           4
The M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth                                    4
Goals of the M.D.-Ph.D. Physician-Scientist                            5
Expectations of the M.D.-Ph.D. Student at Dartmouth                    5
Academic Performance                                                   5
Obligations of Students in the M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth         6
Proceeding through the M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth                 7
Training Structure                                                     7
    Phase 1: The First Two years                                       7
       Arrival                                                         7
       DMS Years 1 and 2 for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student                    8
    Transition to the Ph.D. Thesis                                     8
    Phase 2: Graduate Work and the Ph.D. Thesis                        8
       Expectations for Students and Thesis Advisors during the
          Ph.D. Training Phase                                         8
       Graduate Program-Specific Requirements                          9
       Graduate Courses                                                9
          M.D.-Ph.D. Graduate Program Requirements                     9
            Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB) Program               9
            The Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine (PEMM) 10
            Thayer School of Engineering (M.D.-Ph.D. Program
              in Biomedical Engineering                                10
            Other Ph.D. Programs                                       11
    Transition to Phase 3                                              11
       Review of Clinical Skills                                       12
    Phase 3: DMS Years 3 and 4 for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student              13
       DMS Year 3                                                      13
       DMS Year 4                                                      14
       Revisions of the Curriculum for the 3rd and 4th Years of DMS    14
          A New M.D.-Ph.D. Clinical Research “Selective” (Required Elective) 14
             Rotation Description                                      14
          Integration of the 4th Year Courses for M.D.-Ph.D. Students’
               Educational Needs                                       15
USMLE Time Limits                                                      15
Advising for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student                                    17
    Class Program Advisor                                              17
Table of Contents
For 2009-2010
The M.D.-Ph.D. Student Handbook

Registration                                                           17


                                                                                  2
Registration as Medical Students                                        17
    DMS Year I Entering Class                                           17
    DMS Years II-IV                                                     18
    Late Registration Fee for Medical Students                          18
    Registration as Doctoral Students                                   18
      The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice   19
      Thayer School of Engineering                                      19
    Registrars                                                          19
International Students                                                  19
Transcripts and Grading Issues                                          20
Training Programs                                                       20
    Laboratory Safety Training Program                                  20
    Professional Ethics Program for First Year Graduate Students        21
Leave of Absence for M.D.-Ph.D. Students                                21
Postdoctoral Fellowships                                                22
Financial Support for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student                            22
Loan Policy for M.D.-Ph.D. Students                                     23
Employment/Research Activities                                          23
Student Billing                                                         23
M.D.-Ph.D. Student Fees                                                 24
    Student Activity Fees                                               24
    Disability Insurance                                                25
Reimbursement of Student Expenses                                       26
M.D.-Ph.D. Social/Professional Activities                               26
Annual Meetings and Enrollment Plans                                    27
M.D.-Ph.D. Admissions Season                                            27
Visiting Day                                                            27
Policy on Student Images                                                27
M.D.-Ph.D. Program Office                                               28




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                                       Dartmouth

                   The M.D.-Ph.D. Student Information Handbook

                     Student Policies for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student

Introduction

Students in the M.D.-Ph.D. Program are governed by rules and regulations established
by Dartmouth College as well as those established by Dartmouth Medical School
(“DMS”). Please note that this handbook does not replace those issued by the graduate
programs in the Arts and Sciences, the Thayer School of Engineering, the Dartmouth
Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice or Dartmouth Medical School. It is
important for M.D.-Ph.D. students to become acquainted with those policies and
procedures contained in the handbooks that relate to their status as a medical student
or as a graduate student. The following information includes some excerpts taken by
those handbooks mentioned above. However, this handbook serves to provide
guidance for M.D.-Ph.D. students as they train in their two academic fields and to alert
them to policies and procedures that govern their status as M.D.-Ph.D. students.

The M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth

The profession of medicine has entered an especially challenging and exciting period
as the health care system undergoes revolutionary changes in its organization and
focus. There is, therefore, an increased need for leaders who can use powerful, newly
developed technical and conceptual tools to diagnose, treat, and prevent illness. One
of the most effective ways to provide leadership on these issues and to advance our
knowledge of health care and the human condition is through an educational program
such as the M.D.-Ph.D. Program.

Dartmouth is committed to training physician-scientists for the 21st Century. Dartmouth
Medical School will meet and exceed educational challenges in training the next
generation of physician-scientists, individuals that will provide excellent patient care,
lead discovery in biomedical disease-oriented research, advocate for basic and
translational biomedical research, and take leadership roles in biomedical research and
the delivery of health care. Training for this career path will be unique and distinct from
the simple combination of the separate M.D. and Ph.D. educational programs. Of equal
importance is the need to maintain flexibility to meet the special needs of individual
students. The program at Dartmouth offers opportunities that are challenging and
rewarding for students who are committed and motivated. This is an era of astounding
discoveries in biomedical research making it an exciting time for pursuing a unique
career.




                                                                                          4
Goals of the M.D.-Ph.D. Physician-Scientist

M.D.-Ph.D. physician-scientists are special individuals with extensive training in both
medicine and in biomedical research. M.D.-Ph.D.s are vital members of the research
community and are uniquely positioned to advance basic and clinical research. Their
goals are to:

   (1) Advance the understanding of health and disease processes at the basic
         research level;
   (2) Mediate the translation of bench top discovery into clinical advances in the
         diagnosis, prevention, or therapy of diseases;
   (3) Ameliorate illness and suffering through patient care, basic and applied
         research; and
   (4) Establish and implement health care policy.

Expectations of the M.D.-Ph.D. Student at Dartmouth

In addition to academic excellence, students in the M.D.-Ph.D. Program are expected to
review and to comply with the following:

• The personal principles and values as well as rules and regulations concerning
Academic and Personal Conduct as described in the Dartmouth Medical School (DMS)
Student Policy Handbook.

• The Dartmouth Medical School Honor System as outlined in the DMS Student Policy
Handbook.

• The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Core Code of Ethical Conduct and Code of
Professional Conduct as described in the DMS Student Policy Handbook.

• The Principle of Community, the Academic Honor Principle and the Student Code of
Conduct as outlined in the Dartmouth Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Handbook. A
student found in violation of the Honor Principle or Code of Conduct forfeits his/her right
to continue at Dartmouth.

Academic Performance

It is our expectation that all M.D.-Ph.D. students will maintain an excellent academic
record. If a student encounters academic difficulty, the student may be placed on
probation and is at risk for being separated from the Program. Further, should the
Council on Student Performance and Conduct request that a student split his/her
academic year in order to improve performance, tuition and stipend support will cease
during that time. The student could be placed on a Leave of Absence from the
Program, and will need to formally petition to be re-instated.

As you know, the Program is fully supported by Dartmouth Medical School and requires
a substantial influx of monies each year. Thus, your performance reflects not only on
your personal record, but also on that of the entire Program. We have every reason to


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expect that M.D.-Ph.D.s will be leaders in their chosen fields, both in the clinic and at
the bench. It is not unreasonable to expect that M.D.-Ph.D. students will be academic
leaders within their class.

Obligations of Students in the M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth

The M.D.-Ph.D. Program is a single, dual-degree program with two training
components: 1) medical school training leading to the M.D. degree; and 2) doctoral
graduate training leading to the Ph.D. degree. Admission to and/or enrollment in the
M.D.-Ph.D. Program do not constitute or imply the option to pursue only one or the
other degree individually. Students who wish to withdraw from one component may not
continue in the other component without approval upon petition; students who are
suspended from one component are automatically suspended from the other
component without approval upon petition.

Only those students who are in good academic standing in both the medical school
training component and the doctoral training component will be considered eligible to
petition to discontinue one component while continuing the other. Such a petition must
be submitted to the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program. The petition will be granted if
approved by the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program; the graduate program in which the
student is enrolled; the Dean of Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences;
and the Committee on Student Performance & Conduct in the Medical School.

There are also budgetary obligations on behalf of the student that will need to be
addressed before a student is approved for discontinuing the doctoral training program.
Specifically stated in the contract letter signed by M.D.-Ph.D. students:

       While enrolled in the Medical School M.D.-Ph.D. students will receive a
   deferment of their tuition. When they have satisfactorily completed their
   graduate program, earning their Ph.D., the deferment of medical school tuition
   will be changed to a full waiver and the waiver will be continued through to the
   completion of the M.D. If the M.D.-Ph.D. student has been enrolled as a medical
   student and drops out of the graduate program before earning the Ph.D., any
   deferred tuition for the Medical School will become due and payable. M.D.-Ph.D.
   students should understand that the School can help them arrange for financial
   aid, if they are eligible, only for the year/courses in which the student is enrolled
   when they drop out of the program. They will need to procure funding
   independently for any prior academic years for which they received a deferment.

On the other hand, if a student is expelled or separated from either component, that
student is automatically dismissed and terminated from the other component and from
the M.D.-Ph.D. Program as a whole.

Issues concerning the academic performance, status and/or conduct of an M.D.-Ph.D.
student relating to study in the Ph.D. component will be addressed and adjudicated first
by the graduate program in which the student is enrolled, and, if necessary, by the
Office of the Dean of Graduate Studies. Please review the Arts & Sciences Student
Handbook at: www.dartmouth.edu/~gradstdy/students/.


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Issues concerning the academic performance, status and/or conduct of an M.D.-Ph.D.
student relating to study in the M.D. component will be addressed and adjudicated by
the Committee on Student Performance & Conduct. Please refer to the DMS Student
Handbook at: http://dms.dartmouth.edu/students/resources

The student who matriculates into the M.D.-Ph.D. Program is obligated to complete the
requirements for both degrees in a timely fashion according to established policies of
Dartmouth Medical School and the Arts and Sciences Graduate Program.

Please refer to your medical school and graduate student handbooks for further
information.

Proceeding through the M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth

The M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth is organized to permit students to achieve the
full potential of both degrees in an efficient and effective manner while also developing
an understanding of the health care system as a whole.

Training Structure

There will be three major phases of training. Broadly stated, students will complete
DMS years 1 and 2, then their Ph.D. graduate training, and finally DMS years 3 and 4.
This is referred to here as a "2-P-2" structure. In somewhat more detail:

Phase
 (1) During the first two years, students will complete Dartmouth Medical School
       years 1 & 2, complete up to three laboratory rotations, and choose their Ph.D.
       graduate program and thesis lab.
 (2) During the Ph.D. thesis phase, students will complete all requirements for their
       Ph.D. thesis program and participate in clinical tutorials.
 (3) Following completion of their thesis work, students will complete Dartmouth
       Medical School years 3 & 4.

Phase 1: The First Two Years

Arrival

When M.D.-Ph.D. students confirm matriculation they will be assigned a Class Program
Advisor. The Class Program Advisor, with help from Ann Coady and assigned M.D.-
Ph.D. students, will provide guidance to the incoming group and assist and advise in
living, administrative, and academic issues.

Students will begin Dartmouth with the start of DMS Year 1 and its orientation which
begins in mid-August. These students will perform their first rotation after their first year
of medical school and their second rotation after the second year of medical school.
They will be expected to enter their thesis laboratory in the fall.



                                                                                            7
DMS Years 1 and 2 for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student

You can access information about the medical school curriculum at:
http://dms.dartmouth.edu/ed_programs/. The second year of medical school needs to
be completed before students enter their graduate Ph.D. thesis phase.

Transition to the Ph.D. Thesis

Prior to entering the Ph.D. thesis phase of the program, all requirements for the first two
years of Dartmouth Medical School and up to three research rotations must be
completed. In addition, students should plan to take USMLE part 1. Students are urged
to pass USMLE part 1 before proceeding with their research. In the unlikely event that a
student fails USMLE part 1, the M.D.-Ph.D. Program Director will meet with the student
to plan appropriate actions. It will be expected that the student will re-take the USMLE
part 1 at the next available date. Failure to pass USMLE part 1 in two tries is grounds
for dismissal from the M.D.-Ph.D. Program.

Phase 2: Graduate Work and the Ph.D. Thesis

Expectations of Students and Thesis Advisors during the Ph.D. Training Phase

Before the M.D.-Ph.D. student commits to a specific laboratory for his/her thesis, the
student and the identified potential thesis advisor must meet with the M.D.-Ph.D.
program Director. The purpose of this meeting is to clarify for the potential thesis
advisor his/her understanding of the structure of the M.D.-Ph.D. program, to discuss in
particular the two critical transition points that flank the Ph.D. training: (1) the transition
between M2 and the Ph.D. phases of training, and (2) the transition between the Ph.D.
and M3 phases of training.

In addition, the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. program must approve each student's
selection of his/her Ph.D. thesis advisor.

The student and the Ph.D. thesis advisor are expected to meet with the director of the
M.D.-Ph.D. program on an annual basis to discuss progress with the thesis research
and to plan appropriately for the Ph.D. defense. In addition, students are expected to
send a copy of their annual program- or department-specific Ph.D. thesis committee
meeting to the M.D.-Ph.D. office.




Graduate Program-Specific Requirements

During the Ph.D. thesis phase, the M.D.-Ph.D. student will fulfill the requirements of
their graduate programs for their Ph.D. These specific requirements will be pre-
determined by the individual graduate programs in consultation with the M.D.-Ph.D.
Program and may include participation in seminars, journal clubs, and teaching


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assistantships. Specific requirements will vary between graduate programs. Students
should reasonably expect to complete their research, dissertation, and defense in about
four years. It is expected that students will publish their research findings in high-quality
peer-reviewed journal(s).


Graduate Courses

Requirements of M.D.-Ph.D. students to take graduate school entry-level core courses
are waived, and the DMS1 and DMS2 curriculum will be accepted in lieu. To maximize
research productivity M.D.-Ph.D. students are required to take usually no more than two
higher-level graduate school courses. Limiting courses may not be appropriate for
students in graduate programs such as Chemistry, Computer Science, The Institute for
Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and Psychological and Brain Sciences, which may
require substantial coursework not included in the Dartmouth Medical School curricula.

M.D.-Ph.D. Graduate Program Requirements

Over the past several years, the Ph.D. program requirements for some of the graduate
programs at Dartmouth have been modified to accommodate M.D.-Ph.D. students. The
three Dartmouth graduate programs that have modified their curricula for M.D.-Ph.D.
students include Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB), the Program in Experimental
and Molecular Medicine (PEMM) and the Thayer School of Engineering. Currently,
other Dartmouth graduate programs (including Chemistry, Computer Science,
Psychology and Brain Sciences, as well as The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy
and Clinical Practice) have no differences in requirements between M.D.-Ph.D.
students and Ph.D. students.

       Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB) Program:

       M.D.-Ph.D. students are required to complete two research rotations. The first
       rotation typically occurs in the summer between years one and two of Dartmouth
       Medical School (DMS). The second rotation occurs following DMS year two and
       USMLE Step 1. A thesis lab may be chosen after the second rotation. Once an
       M.D.-Ph.D. student chooses his/her MCB lab, the student will formally become a
       member of the MCB program and will begin working full time on his or her Ph.D.

       The first two years of the DMS curriculum substitute for the MCB core course.
       However, MCB has seven program requirements for M.D.-Ph.D. students to fulfill
       for a Ph.D.: (1) two research rotations (completed before enrolling in the MCB
       Program), (2) two graduate course electives selected from the MCB approved
       course list, (3) an approved ethics course, which does not count as an elective.
       (4) a qualifying exam, (5) attendance at Program functions, (6) a thesis, (7) a
       thesis seminar, and (8) a thesis defense. Program functions include journal club




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       participation (Fall, Winter, Spring), Research-in-Progress seminars (RIPs), and
       program seminars.1

       The Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine (PEMM):

       M.D.-Ph.D. students are required to complete two research rotations. The first
       rotation typically occurs in the summer between years one and two of Dartmouth
       Medical School (DMS). The second rotation takes place after DMS year two and
       USMLE Step 1. A thesis lab may be chosen after the second rotation. Once an
       M.D.-Ph.D. student chooses his/her PEMM lab, the student will formally become
       a member of the PEMM program and will begin working full time on his or her
       Ph.D.

       M.D.-Ph.D. students are exempt from PEMM 101, 102, and 103. Some M.D.
       coursework may be considered equivalent to some PEMM coursework, so M.D.-
       Ph.D. students may be exempted from up to one additional elective PEMM
       course. M.D.-Ph.D. students are responsible for completing all other PEMM
       requirements and will typically take 2-3 PEMM courses beyond their M.D.
       coursework.

       PEMM has additional program requirements for M.D.-Ph.D. students to fulfill for
       a Ph.D.: (1) a qualifying exam, (2) attendance at Program functions, (3) a thesis,
       (4) a thesis seminar, and (5) a thesis defense. Program functions include journal
       club participation, Research-in-Progress seminars (RIPs), and program
       seminars.2

       Thayer School of Engineering (M.D.-Ph.D. Program in Biomedical Engineering):

       M.D.-Ph.D. students will enter the Thayer School after successfully completing
       DMS one and two, as well as taking USMLE Step 1. No formal research
       rotations are required. Candidates will be required to choose a research advisor
       at Thayer during the first two medical school years. Once a M.D.-Ph.D. student
       begins the Ph.D. program at Thayer, the student must be a member of a Thayer
       laboratory for funding to continue. All M.D.-Ph.D. students must be in residence,
       i.e., registered for a full course/research load for a minimum of 6 terms at the
       Thayer School.

       M.D.-Ph.D. candidates work with their special advisory committee3 to make sure
       that all Thayer Ph.D. degree requirements are met. These requirements include
       technical proficiency, technical breadth, specialization, professional competence,
       and original research. (More information is available in the Thayer Guide to
       Programs)

1
  This information is available at: http://dms.dartmouth.edu/mcb/about/mcbrules/MDPHD.php.
2
  This information is available at: http://dms.dartmouth.edu/pemm/
3
  The special advisory committee is assigned to the student upon arrival at Thayer. This
committee is for academic advising and is typically different than the thesis committee. The
committee is composed of the proposed thesis advisor and two other engineering faculty.


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         For M.D.-Ph.D. candidates, the following coursework will typically be required:
         Three (3) courses in applied mathematics and four (4) courses leading to a
         depth of knowledge in an engineering specialty. Medical school coursework may
         not be substituted for any of these seven courses.

         In addition to these seven courses, M.D.-Ph.D. students must participate in the
         following seminars and workshops:

                ENGS 195 (Seminar on Science, Technology, and Society) for 1 term.

                ENGG 196 (Seminar on Applied Science and Technology) for 3 terms.

                ENGG 197 (Ph.D. Professional Workshops) for 1 term.

                ENGG 198 (Research-in-Progress Workshop) annually.

       M.D.-Ph.D. candidates must complete an oral qualifying exam after three terms in
         residence and, subsequently, a thesis proposal defense and defense of the
         actual thesis.4

Other Ph.D. Programs:

       For all other Ph.D. programs, the requirements for M.D.-Ph.D. students are not
         different from those for Ph.D. students. Please consult the appropriate
         department to determine those requirements.



Transition to Phase 3

Students wishing to matriculate must defend their Ph.D. thesis before they enter
their first clinical block.

The ideal time to finish the Ph.D. phase of training is in the spring prior to the June
graduation. This allows the student to join the M3 clinical clerkships in Block 1, near the
end of June. Late June is the optimum time to begin M3, and students are strongly
encouraged to plan carefully so that they can be in a position to begin the first Block.
Block 2, in late August, is the last possible date for matriculating in M3 with the intent of
graduating two years later. Please note that students are strongly discouraged from
beginning in Block 2. Attendance at the clinical orientation for rising DMS 3rd years
that takes place at the end of June is mandatory for all students entering 3rd year. Even
if the student plans to begin in Block 2, s/he is still expected to attend the clinical
orientation at the end of June. Regardless of when s/he plans to join the clinical
clerkships during the 3rd year, the student is expected to discuss his/her plans in
advance with the Assistant Dean for Medical Education (currently Dr. Eric Shirley).



4
    This information is available at http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/graduate/md/.


                                                                                           11
If the student defends his/her Ph.D. thesis in mid-academic year (after the beginning of
Block 2), the M.D.-Ph.D. Program encourages the PI to allow the student to remain on
as a post-doctoral fellow until the time where the student can matriculate into DMS year
3, with the expectation that the student be productive during this interim period.

If a student wishes to matriculate into DMS year 3 in June, the student and his/her
thesis advisor must discuss the student’s plan with the M.D.-Ph.D. office no later than
January 31 of the same calendar year.
In the final year of the Ph.D. training, students need to schedule a meeting with his/her
thesis committee twice prior to completion of the Ph.D. October is a preferred time for
the first meeting in order to engage the committee with the completion plans. The
second session should be no later than January prior to the June completion or March if
the student intends to defend his/her thesis in August.

Review of Clinical Skills

One of the challenges M.D.-Ph.D. students encounter in the program’s 2-P-2 format is
re-entry from the Ph.D. thesis work to the clinical medical school years. All M.D.-Ph.D.
students at Dartmouth receive instruction in clinical skills during DMS1 and DMS2
through the On Doctoring course and through seeing patients. To assist in the return to
the clinical training phase of the program, prior to entering DMS3, M.D.-Ph.D. students
will undertake a program to refresh their clinical skills, including, interviewing, physical
examination, developing an assessment, and oral and written presentation.

       Specific skills to be reviewed include:

          History taking: Chief Complaint, History of Present Illness, Past Medical
           History, Social History, Family History, Review Of Systems. Some attention
           will also be given to motivational interviewing skills.

          Physical exam skills: vital signs, HEENT (head, ears, eyes, nose, throat),
           cardiac, pulmonary, abdominal, musculoskeletal/extremities, neurological.

          Patient presentations and completing formal written documentation of patient
           encounters, including SOAP notes and longer in-patient notes.




       Clinical services agreeing to participate in the refresher course for M.D.-Ph.D.
       students is shown in the table.

        Service                        Contact Person              Number of slots
                                                                   available for M.D.-
                                                                   Ph.D. students



                                                                                          12
        General Internal Medicine      Roshini Pinto-Powell,       1 or 2
                                       M.D.

        Pediatrics (PICU)              Todd Poret, M.D.            1

        Family Medicine                Cathleen Morrow, M.D.       1 or 2

Alternatively, with permission from the M.D.-Ph.D. program, individual students may
identify a primary practice provider or group not listed above that is able and willing to
provide this experience.

Within the six months before starting his/her clinical rotations, the M.D.-Ph.D. student is
expected to complete 16 hours of mentored clinical time. The student will work with the
M.D.-Ph.D. Program to set up an appropriate refresher experience and identify an
appropriate service and mentor. The student is expected to coordinate with her/his
clinical mentor a regular schedule during which s/he will complete the clinical refresher.
A typical schedule is a regular two-hour block of time, once per week, for eight weeks.
The schedule is flexible and can be modified at the discretion of the student and the
clinical mentor.

Phase 3: DMS Years 3 and 4 for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student

DMS Year 3

The M.D.-Ph.D. student will typically complete all required clinical clerkships in the
DMS3 year. The exception is the student returning in September, who may complete
five of the six clerkships, with the sixth to be completed in DMS4. Required clerkships
are:

      Internal Medicine
      Surgery
      Family Medicine
      Neurology
      Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women’s Health
      Outpatient Medicine
      Psychiatry
      Pediatrics




DMS Year 4

The curriculum for the DMS year 4 M.D.-Ph.D. student includes the remainder of the
required clinical clerkships, as well as the Clinical Investigation Course (see below).

      Any of the eight DMS year 3 clerkships that may have not been completed yet


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      The two additional required DMS4 clerkships
      Sub-internship
      The Feb-March block on
          o Health Society and Physician
          o Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
          o Advanced Medical Sciences
          o Cardiac Life Support

Revisions of the Curriculum for the 3rd and 4th Years of DMS

A New M.D.-Ph.D. Clinical Research “Selective” (Required Elective)

The medical school curriculum of Dartmouth’s M.D.-Ph.D. program should best serve
the needs of M.D.-Ph.D. students while preserving the integrity of the core M.D.
curriculum. A new required clinical rotation has been established to better prepare
M.D.-Ph.D. students for careers as physician-scientists. This new rotation for M.D.-
Ph.D. students will replace the Geriatric and Ambulatory Medicine (GAM) rotation,
typically completed in the DMS year 4. The new rotation consists of working with two to
three physician-scientists in the Department of Medicine to learn how the successful
physician-scientist combines the clinical and research aspects of his/her career.

Rotation Description

The new rotation is required for all M.D.-Ph.D. students and is completed under the
auspices of the Department of Medicine. The main goal is to expose M.D.-Ph.D.
students to translational and clinical research and to augment clinical skills in one or
more medicine subspecialties. Each M.D.-Ph.D. student will be matched with two or
three mentors in the Department of Medicine at DHMC. Mentors will be active in clinical
and/or translational research and will also have clinical duties. Mentors will be selected
based on these criteria and their willingness to include M.D.-Ph.D. students in a variety
of enriching experiences, including IRB, lab meetings, clinical duties and others.
Members of the faculty who volunteer to mentor are expected to help the students with
their professional development. The duration of the clerkship will be four weeks. M.D.-
Ph.D. students will be permitted scheduling flexibility, to complete this clerkship at
various times throughout DMS years 3 and 4. Students will be evaluated through
observations of their clinical skills and techniques as observed by the mentors, as well
as through a written report, that can take the form of a case report, an analysis of the
scientific rationale behind a clinical trial, or possible avenues of using scientific means
to advance clinical knowledge related to a disease. Students must complete the 7 week
medicine clerkship before they can take their selective.



Integration of the 4th Year Courses for M.D.-Ph.D. Students’ Educational Needs

There will be two changes in DMS4 courses specifically for M.D.-Ph.D. students. The
first pertains to the Advanced Medical Sciences (AMS) course taught to all medical
students. Parts of AMS are redundant with the Ph.D. training phase for M.D.-Ph.D.


                                                                                         14
students. M.D.-Ph.D. students will be relieved from the portion of the AMS course that
trains student to critically read scientific manuscripts. This relief amounts to five hours,
allowing the students more time to focus on the M.D.-Ph.D.-specific Clinical
Investigation Course (CIC), offered concurrently during DMS4.

The CIC (PHARM 602) has been offered since 2007 and has been popular with the
M.D.-Ph.D. students. The purpose of the CIC is to serve as a final point of integration
between the Ph.D. and M.D. curricula. It also introduces the students to more in-depth
knowledge about the design and execution of clinical research and clinical trials. This
course will be offered over a 7-week period in February and March of the 4th year.
Therefore this course will overlap with HSP, CPT, AMS, and ACLS courses, and will not
exceed 3 hours of class time per week (total of 21 hours of class time.) It is possible
that this course could be opened to other (non-M.D.-Ph.D.) students; if so, the
enrollment should be capped at 10 individuals.

USMLE Time Limits
http://www.usmle.org/General_Information/general_information_bulletin.html

It is a requirement for medical licensure that you complete the three steps of the United
States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE). Each State’s Medical Board
administers medical licensure and the requirements for licensure therefore vary from
state to state. There is a general time limit of seven years for the completion of the
three USMLE steps. The USMLE does recommend exceptions to the time limit for
M.D.-Ph.D. students (see below). However, it is only a recommendation and each state
will have their own requirements. You can locate state requirements on the USMLE
web site.

TIME LIMITS FOR PASSING USMLE
Posted December 13, 2004

In the United States and its territories, the individual medical licensing authorities (state
medical boards) of the various jurisdictions grant a license to practice medicine. Each
medical licensing authority sets its own rules and regulations and requires passing an
examination that demonstrates qualification for licensure.

Although the USMLE program places no limitation on the time period to complete the
Step examination sequence, the program recommends to medical licensing authorities
that they require the dates of passing the Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3 examinations to
occur within a seven-year period.

For purposes of medical licensure in the United States, any time limit to complete the
USMLE is established by the state medical boards. Most, but not all, use the
recommended seven years as the time limit for completion of the full USMLE sequence.
While medical schools may require students to pass one or more Steps for
advancement and/or graduation, students should understand the implications for
licensure. For states that establish a time limit for completion of all three Steps, the
“clock” starts running on the date the first Step or Step Component is passed or, in


                                                                                           15
some cases, on the date of the first attempt at any Step. General information regarding
state-specific requirements for licensure can be obtained from the Federation of State
Medical Boards (www.fsmb.org). For definitive information, students should contact
directly the jurisdiction in which they intend to seek licensure.

Special Notice for M.D-Ph.D. Candidates: The common pathway for M.D.-Ph.D.
students involves completion of the first two years of medical school and then moving to
graduate school studies and research for a three- or four-year period. Following
completion of Ph.D. course work and all or most of their research project, these
students return to complete their two clinical years, thus completing the medical degree
in seven to nine years after first matriculating.

The USMLE program recognizes that the recommended seven-year time limit may
pose problems for medical licensure for some students pursuing a combined degree
(i.e., M.D.-Ph.D.). It is for this reason that the USMLE program recommends to
licensing jurisdictions that they be willing to consider exceptions to the seven-year limit
for M.D.-Ph.D. students who meet certain narrow requirements. The recommended
requirements are as follows:
• The candidate is working toward both degrees in an institution or program accredited
   by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) and regional university
   accrediting body and is a student in good standing, enrolled in the institution or
   program.
• The Ph.D. studies should be in a field of biological sciences tested in the Step 1
   content. These fields include but are not necessarily limited to anatomy,
   biochemistry, physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, pathology, genetics,
   neuroscience, and molecular biology. Fields explicitly not included are business,
   economics, ethics, history and other fields not directly related to biological science.
• Candidates seeking an exception to the seven-year rule should be required to
   present a verifiable and rational explanation for the fact that he or she was unable to
   meet the seven-year limit. Although these explanations will vary considerably, each
   licensing jurisdiction will need to decide on its own which explanation justifies an
   exception.

Students who pursue both degrees should understand that while many states'
regulations provide specific exceptions to the seven-year rule for dual degree
candidates, others do not. Students pursuing a dual degree are advised to check the
state-specific requirements for licensure listed by the Federation of State Medical
Boards (www.fsmb.org.)

http://www.usmle.org/copyright.htm

Advising for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student

Class Program Advisor

All newly arriving M.D.-Ph.D. students will be assigned a single Program Advisor for
their first year of training. This individual will be a faculty member who has extensive
knowledge of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program, the Medical School, and the various graduate


                                                                                           16
programs. The Class Program Advisor will serve as a focal point for the first year class
students to go to for programmatic advice. S/he will meet several times throughout the
year with all the M.D.-Ph.D. students, both as a group and individually. With the
assistance of the M.D.-Ph.D. program administrators, the Class Program Advisor will
assist the students in choosing lab rotations.


Registration

M.D.-Ph.D. students register with either the 1) Dartmouth Medical School; 2) Office of
Arts and Sciences Graduate Studies; 3) The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and
Clinical Practice; or 3) Thayer School of Engineering.

Registration as Medical Students

Registration at DMS consists of two separate activities and is required of every student
prior to, and at the beginning, of each school term during designated times. The first of
the two activities involves the actual selection of the term coursework and methods
differ from class to class. The second activity is called “Registration Check-In" and
validates course selections and allows the student to begin the term. The check-in
process is done through the WEB. In order to be eligible for registration check-in, all
students must have their term bill and DA$H accounts in order, as well as have their
Dick's House files and necessary immunizations completed. Prior to registration check-
in, "holds" are placed on the files of any student who has not cleared any outstanding
obligation, as noted, and registration check-in may not be completed until the "hold" is
released. Students are not considered "enrolled" until they have completed the check-in
process. Students who are not "enrolled" are not eligible for malpractice insurance,
course registration, loan deferment and other services afforded to registered/enrolled
students. Completion of check-in allows Financial Aid to be disbursed.

DMS Year I Entering Class

Registration check-in for newly entering students is explained during orientation week
and is completed via the WEB during approximately the first week of classes. The
staff of the Registrar’s office processes the actual selection and registration of each
student into the Year 1 courses. Registration check-in takes place for approximately
the first week of each of the three Year 1 terms.

Entering students normally receive a summer mailing from the DMS Student Affairs
Office that outlines all of the orientation week activities. At Orientation, students will
learn about the registration and check-in procedure, receive Dartmouth College and
DHMC identification cards, and have individual photographs taken for a class
composite called the “Face Sheet” which is distributed to faculty and administrative
offices. This “Face Sheet” is reconfigured each year through Year 4 at DMS. This is
also the time when students can register their cars; receive mailbox assignments,
and other important class schedule information. The mandatory orientation is a full
and rewarding introduction to the all aspects of DMS life including course work.


                                                                                             17
DMS Years II-IV

Registration and check-in for Year 2 students is the same as that for Year 1. The staff
of the Registrar’s office processes course registration and registration check-in takes
place via the WEB for approximately the first week of classes. The Registrar’s staff
prior to the start of classes will distribute instructions for the WEB registration check-
in in August and in January.

Course selection for Year 3 takes place via a lottery system directed by the Office of
Clinical Education. Year 3 students may access the website for elective choices after
the Year 3 Clerkship Lottery is completed.
Registration for Year 4 electives and sub-internships opens in mid-March
(approximately) prior to the start of Year 4. Students may use this web-based system
to select and change established elective choices at DMS and some regional sites.
Elective selections are forwarded to each elective coordinator for final approval. Final
approval to enroll in the elective comes from the department sponsoring the elective
directly to the student.

Late Registration Fee for Medical Students
A medical student who fails to complete the check in process at the start of each term
during the designated time will be assessed a $25.00 late fee which will automatically
be applied to the student's bill.

Registration as Doctoral Students

All graduate students must check-in on the first day of each term. Use a computer
located on campus and point your Web browser to:
http://www.dartmouth.edu/bannerstudent/. This process requires the on-line
verification/update of the student’s address and an enrollment commitment (check-in)
for the term. The check-in process indicates for each students holds that may have
been placed on registration due to failure to settle the tuition bill or DA$H account, or
meet certain other College requirements. If holds exist, information is provided to
indicate where and how to remove the holds.

The check-in process is available each term on the day before classes begin. Doctoral
students are required to complete the check-in process (including clearance of any
holds by 4 p.m. on the second day of class for the term. A $50.00 charge will be made
for check-in after this time. Students who are obliged to check-in late may petition the
Graduate Registrar for waiver of this charge for good and sufficient reason. Any
student scheduled to be in residence that has not completed the check-in procedure ten
calendar days after the term begins is subject to administrative withdrawal from college
immediately thereafter.

The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice




                                                                                             18
Doctoral students in The Dartmouth Institute will receive a student informational
package at the beginning of the summer. This packet contains important information
for enrollment in the DIHPCP program. Doctoral students work with their advisors and
the chair of the DIHPCP Ph.D. program to determine their academic courses for each
term. Before the end of the fall term and winter term, students are notified by The
Dartmouth Institute Registrar that they must sign onto the Banner student website to
pre-register for the next term.

Thayer School of Engineering

Registration for Thayer School students is required at the beginning of each term.
Thayer is on the same academic calendar as Arts and Sciences Graduate Studies and
the undergraduate school. Students go through the Web check-in process and on line
course selection prior to the start of term to make their course selections. New
students will receive a summer mailing that includes information on orientation, check-
in, and course selection.

Please refer to the appropriate student handbook for each program for further details on
registration issues.

Registrars

Joan Monahan--DMS Registrar: 603-650-2248
Gary Hutchins--Arts and Sciences Registrar: 603-646-2107
Wanda Kenison—Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice:
603-653-0819.
Daryl Laware--Thayer School Registrar: 603-646-3801

International Students

International M.D.-Ph.D. students will receive information and materials from the
Dartmouth Medical School Admissions Office about the process for enrolling at
Dartmouth shortly after receiving their admissions acceptance letter. Internationals
students will receive an e-mail from the Office of Visa & Immigration (OVIS) at
Dartmouth, with a link to a secure on-line form that must be completed and submitted
on-line by the admitted student. The student must attach to the on-line form a scanned
copy of his or her passport ID page, and any required evidence of personal financial
documentation, if not fully funded by Dartmouth College. It is recommended that
students complete this form and return it as soon as possible in order to start the visa
application process. If you have any questions, please contact Robin V. Catmur,
Director, Office of Visa & Immigration Services (e-mail: robin.v.catmur@dartmouth.edu
or telephone 603-646-3474).

Address/Location:

      Office of Visa & Immigration Services
      44 North College St., Suite 6202
      Dartmouth College


                                                                                       19
      Hanover, NH 03755
      (fax: 603-646-1616)

Transcripts and Grading Issues

M.D.-Ph.D. students have two separate transcripts, one for medical school and one for
their graduate program. The status of "Joint on Leave" was created to identify M.D.-
Ph.D. students pursuing their course of study at their other school during a particular
academic year. The status of JOL provides explanation of the large gaps of time spent
between the two training programs. This status of "JOL" also expedites the billing
process as well since it will be apparent which school should be billing the student.

Please refer to the appropriate handbook for grading issues as they differ between
the medical school and your graduate program.

Training Programs

Laboratory Safety Training Program for M.D.-Ph.D. Students in the Ph.D. Phase

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have standards that
regulate the use of hazardous materials in teaching and research laboratories.
Important among these requirements are standards related to the use of potential
hazardous chemicals and blood borne pathogens. Blood borne pathogens include
viruses such as Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) and the Human
Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). HBV is recognized as being the most common
laboratory-acquired infection among persons handling human blood and body fluids.
Fortunately, a very effective and safe vaccine exists against HBV.

To help ensure students' safety and ensure compliance with OSHA standards, a
mandatory laboratory safety training program is scheduled at the beginning of fall term
for all new incoming biomedical graduate students. The Arts and Sciences Graduate
Office along with the Environmental Health and Safety Office organize this.


Professional Ethics Program for First Year Graduate Students

The Graduate Studies Office, in collaboration with the Ethics Institute at Dartmouth, has
developed an institution-wide training program in the basics of professional ethics. This
program is a requirement for all first-year Arts and Sciences graduate students. The
Graduate Ethics Program has four components: an opening session during orientation,
a graduate student ethics survey, and four small group discussions addressing focal
topics during the first year of graduate school.

More information on the full Graduate Ethics Program will be provided at orientation.

Please note: All Arts and Sciences first year graduate students must complete the
Graduate Ethics Survey once they arrive on campus (and have a Dartmouth e-mail
account). The ethics survey asks that you read Sources: Their Use and


                                                                                        20
Acknowledgement and the Honor Principle and Code of Conduct. Once you have read
both documents, please complete the survey indicating that you have read and
understand both documents. Each student accepts Dartmouth’s Honor Principle and
Code of Conduct upon registering as an Arts and Sciences graduate student. A
student found in violation of the Honor Principle or Code of Conduct forfeits his/her right
to continue at Dartmouth. Please go to
http://www.dartmouth.edu/~gradstdy/grdethics.html to complete the survey.


Leave of Absence for M.D.-Ph.D. Students

M.D.-Ph.D. students are eligible to petition for a leave of absence during medical school
and graduate course work years. Leaves of absence are granted based on the policies
of the Medical School and the Arts and Sciences Graduate School. A student is
required to notify the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program in writing requesting a leave.
Permission must be granted by the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program in consultation
with the Associate Dean for Medical Education and the Dean of Graduate Studies. The
student's record and future plans are reviewed at that time to determine whether a
leave is in the best interest of the student, the medical school, and the Arts and
Sciences Graduate Program. Leaves of absence are usually granted for a maximum
duration of one year. A request for renewal of a leave of absence beyond a year must
also be addressed to the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program. Students considering
taking a leave of absence should consider the financial implications of the leave, such
as tuition, DMS financial loans, deferment, and regulations governing loans, liability
insurance and health insurance. Students also need to be informed about USMLE time
limits (see page ). The student must be aware that while on a leave he/she is not
considered an enrolled student. Student stipends are suspended during the leave
period.

Please refer to the DMS Student Policy Handbook and the Arts and Sciences Graduate
Student Handbook for further information.


Postdoctoral Fellowships

If an M.D.-Ph.D. student completes their thesis in the middle of an academic year, they
may wish to ask their department/thesis advisor about the possibility of working as a
postdoctoral fellow for the remainder of that academic year. Thus, the student could
then begin DMS Year II or DMS Year III at the beginning of an academic year. This is
particularly true for entering DMS Year III and participation in the clerkship lottery. It is
important to go through the match with the rest of the third year class.

Financial Support for the M.D.-Ph.D. Student

To allow students to make appropriate judgments and actions in pursuing their
academic program, provisions have been made for financial support for students whose
commitment to academic work extends to the completion of the M.D.-Ph.D. degrees at
Dartmouth. The academic departments offer qualified students: 1) a remission of their


                                                                                           21
tuition fees and 2) stipends during their graduate work. The medical school offers tuition
deferment (which upon satisfactory completion of the dual degree program will become
a full waiver) for every student in the program while she/he is enrolled in the medical
curriculum. In addition, stipend support for all four years of medical school is available.
M.D.-Ph.D. students will receive funding as long as the student remains in good
academic standing.

All M.D.-Ph.D. students will be asked to sign a contractual letter of agreement. This
program carriers concessions about the school's tuition and obligations on the part of
the M.D.-Ph.D. student. The essential points in the agreement are:

       While enrolled in the Medical School M.D.-Ph.D. students will receive a
       deferment of their tuition. When they have satisfactorily completed their
       graduate program, earning their Ph.D., the deferment of medical school
       tuition will be changed to a full waiver and the waiver will be continued
       through to the completion of the M.D. If the M.D.-Ph.D. student has been
       enrolled as a medical student and drops out of the graduate program
       before earning the Ph.D., any deferred tuition for the Medical School will
       become due and payable. M.D.-Ph.D. students should understand that
       the School can help them arrange for financial aid, if they are eligible, only
       for the year/courses in which the student is enrolled when they drop out of
       the program. They will need to procure funding independently for any
       prior academic years for which they received a deferment.

       During the time the M.D.-Ph.D. student is enrolled in the graduate
       program, working towards the Ph.D., they will receive the standard
       graduate student stipend and a full scholarship to cover the cost of their
       tuition.

A copy of this agreement will be kept in the DMS Fiscal Office and in the
administrative office of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program.

It is important to keep in mind that if an M.D.-Ph.D. student is to receive stipend support
from the Medical School or the Arts and Sciences graduate program, they need to be a
registered student.

Loan Policy for M.D.-Ph.D. Students

Dartmouth provides full financial support for all M.D.-Ph.D. students during their tenure
in the Program. This includes a tuition deferment/waiver while in medical school, and
stipends in both medical and graduate school. The important goal of this support is to
permit the students to leave the Program with both degrees and no debt, thus allowing
them to pursue their professional interests without concern for financial burdens. Thus,
it is not expected that M.D.-Ph.D. students will incur loans while at Dartmouth.

However, in a few instances, there may be a need for a student to receive additional
funds to cover expenses for extenuating circumstances. Should this be the case, the
student needs to contact the M.D.-Ph.D. office to discuss the problem and the need. If


                                                                                         22
the office deems that the student’s needs cannot be met by other strategies, then the
student can apply a) the DMS Financial Aid Office or b) to the Financial Aid office at
Dartmouth College, through the Office of Graduate Studies, to obtain a loan. The M.D.-
Ph.D. Program will be informed of the amount and duration of the loan. It is stressed
that this route will be pursued only under unusual conditions, and is not encouraged.

Employment/Research Activities

Graduate students who are fully supported (a full tuition scholarship and a full stipend)
cannot normally receive additional payment from Dartmouth College for services
rendered and cannot normally accept employment outside the College while enrolled.
Exceptions may be granted in cases of unique academic or professional benefit or
financial hardship. Any exception will normally not exceed 8 hours per week and must
have the written approval of the graduate student's advisor, department chair or
Graduate Program Committee, and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

There is no stated policy for medical students who wish to take on part-time
employment or to engage in research activities once they have received their Ph.D.
However, there is concern that the medical school curriculum takes enormous time and
effort and it is essential that our students be successful in their academic careers at
Dartmouth. Therefore, M.D.-Ph.D. students enrolled in the medical school curriculum
will need to notify the Assistant Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program and request
permission for these activities.

Student Billing

When M.D.-Ph.D. students are enrolled as graduate students, and have questions
concerning their expenses contact the Student Accounts Office in 103 McNutt, 646-
2438.

When enrolled as medial students, contact Karen Ricard, DMS Fiscal Office, 1 Rope
Ferry Road, 650-1227.

M.D.-Ph.D. Student Fees

The fees listed below are not all inclusive for M.D/Ph.D. students. Additional fees will
be required during the time you are at Dartmouth.

Student Activity Fee

Dartmouth Medical School has an annual student activity fee of $120/year per student.
The revenue generated from this fee is used to fund activities associated with DMS
Student Government and student organizations. The fee will be charged to students in
the following categories: M.D., M.D.-Ph.D.*, TDI*, M.D./MBA*, students on a leave of
absence/research leave who remain on campus and those students on a
decompressed schedule. Those students on a leave of absence/research leave who
are not on campus will not be charged an activity fee for that year. Each student will be
charged the student activity fee on his/her Fall term bill.


                                                                                           23
*Special Note for students enrolled in combined degree programs at Dartmouth:

M.D.-Ph.D.: The M.D.-Ph.D. students will be assessed an annual student activity fee of
$120 when registered as medical students, and a $75 student activity fee when
registered as graduate students. When M.D.-Ph.D. students are enrolled as graduate
students in the Arts & Sciences, they will also be charged $50 for 2009-2010 for the
graduate student activity fee.

The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice (TDI): All TDI students
(MS, MPH, Ph.D. & Post doc) will be assessed an annual student activity fee of $50.
TDI will help subsidize the activity fees with appropriate funds to the DMS Student
Government ($75) and the Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Council ($50). TDI
students are encouraged to participate in programming sponsored by both schools.

M.D./MBA: All students enrolled in the M.D./MBA will be assessed the following annual
student activity fee:
Year 1 M.D./MBA Program: Full Tuck Student Activity Fee (currently $300) and partial
DMS Student Activity Fee ($20) = $320
Year 2 M.D./MBA Program: Half Tuck Student Activity Fee (currently $150) and full
DMS Student Activity Fee (currently $120) = $270

Due to the unique position held as M.D.-Ph.D., TDI and M.D./MBA students, the
Administration feels that it is important for students in combined programs at Dartmouth
to have continual access to services and information regardless of whether they are
registered at DMS, Arts & Sciences, TDI, or Tuck.

Disability Insurance

With the increased awareness of health risk in the medical profession associated with,
for example, exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus,
DMS has implemented a group disability insurance program (hereafter referred to as
“disability insurance”) for medical students.

The stipulation for this group policy with the AMA-Sponsored Med Plus Advantage
Program is that all students must participate in order to qualify for the low cost
premiums. The DMS Student Government has regularly approved to accept this
stipulation of 100 percent student participation in order to attain the low cost group rate.
Each student will be charged the appropriate annual premium on his/her Fall term
student bill.

Any student enrolled in a dual degree program at Dartmouth (e.g., M.D.-Ph.D.*,
M.D./MBA, M.D./MPH) or on a leave of absence remains covered by this plan providing
the annual premium is paid. As long as a position is reserved for the student at the
medical school and they do not have to reapply to return to classes, they can continue
on the plan. If a student separates from the medical school, however, the coverage
would be terminated.
At the beginning of each academic year students will be provided with a Group Benefits


                                                                                          24
Booklet that describes their benefits. Questions regarding this program should be
directed to:

Cresson W. Holden
Gallagher Benefit Services, Inc.
50 Braintree Hill Office Park, Suite 310
Braintree, MA 02184-8754
781-794-1110
cresson_holden@ajg.com

*M.D.-Ph.D. students will automatically be assessed the annual disability insurance
premium when registered as graduate students unless written notification is provided to
the Assistant Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program to discontinue coverage during this
time.

Please note that the disability insurance policy has Pre-Existing Conditions and
Limitations and, therefore, the M.D.-Ph.D. Program staff strongly counsels its students
to retain this insurance throughout their academic careers at Dartmouth regardless of
status. If students don’t consistently maintain their disability insurance coverage they
will be subject to a new 12-month period of pre-existing conditions limitation.

According to current policy terms and conditions as outlined in the disability insurance
policy described by the program administrator, (insurance broker), “Pre-existing
Conditions Limitations” is defined as:

     Pre-existing condition means an injury or illness which was diagnosed or treated
     within the 12 months prior to the effective date of your insurance. No benefits will
     be paid for loss which starts within 12 months of the effective date of your
     insurance and which is caused by a Pre-existing Condition. A Claim for benefits for
     loss starting after 12 months from the effective date of your insurance will not be
     reduced or denied on the ground that it is caused by a Pre-existing Condition.

Reimbursement of Student Expenses

Students are required to contact Ann Coady, Assistant Director for the M.D.-Ph.D.
Program, prior to incurring any expenses that they may wish to receive reimbursement.

M.D.-Ph.D. Social/Professional Activities




                                                                                           25
Social activities are an essential component of the student experience at Dartmouth,
and they serve as a venue for building the intellectual connections among the students
and faculty. These activities provide opportunities to increase the students’ didactic
knowledge of science and to learn about the personal and professional career choices
of physician-scientists. These activities also foster interactions among our students,
allowing them to stay connected during the various phases of their training while at
Dartmouth, and after they leave. These social activities include:

Annual Retreat

This takes place over a two-day period. There are two or three guest speakers, both
from within and outside of Dartmouth, as well as poster and podium presentations by
the students on their research. Additional sessions are devoted to choosing a
residency, which are presented by both graduating students and faculty. An important
component of the Retreat is some unscheduled time so that students and faculty can
interact in a casual and informal environment.

Annual Spring Dinner / Medical Grand Rounds

This event is hosted by the M.D.-Ph.D. Program and is held in conjunction with the
Department of Medicine’s Grand Rounds, which takes place on the following day. The
students select and host the guest speaker, and the Department of Medicine co-
sponsors the invitee along with the M.D.-Ph.D. Program.

Student Chalk Talks

These are usually scheduled in the evenings, when students gather, without faculty, for
informal presentations of their research. This encourages a free exchange among the
students where they comment on each other’s work and suggest new approaches.



Annual Meetings and Enrollment Plans

During the spring term, the Director of the M.D.-Ph.D. Program will meet with individual
M.D.-Ph.D. students along with his or her faculty advisor. This session reviews how the
student is progressing through the program, provides advice, and evaluates their future
plans. At this time each student will provide the M.D.-Ph.D. Office with an enrollment
plan outlining their future progress to complete both degrees. The plan reflects for each
academic year when the student will be registered as a medical or graduate student. If
the enrollment plans changes, the student must alert the M.D.-Ph.D. Office. Changes
will then be forwarded to the appropriate offices on campus. This notification does not
take the place of registration. Students will need to register with his/her doctoral
program registrars.

M.D.-Ph.D. Admissions Season




                                                                                      26
The admissions season for inviting applicants to interview with the M.D.-Ph.D. Program
begins in October and ends in March. M.D.-Ph.D. students are asked to volunteer to
host applicants through this season whenever it is possible for them. Luncheons are
also scheduled for applicants to meet with students who are currently in the program.
M.D.-Ph.D. students play an important roll in the process of attracting new students into
the program and are urged to participate.

Visiting Day

During the month of May, the DMS Admissions Office invites prospective students back
to campus for an Open House to give them further opportunity to explore Dartmouth
and what it has to offer them. The M.D.-Ph.D. Programs invites current students to
participate in this event.

Policy on Student Images

DMS or its representatives may film or record students or the programs in which they
participate to assist in teaching, research, service and public information activities. The
images (i.e. photographs, videotapes or other forms) and interviews may appear in
printed or electronic media or on the web, with or without identification and also become
part of the DMS archive for future use as authorized. If at any time you do not want to
be filmed or interviewed or to have such materials distributed, please contact the DMS
Office of Student Affairs.




                              M.D.-Ph.D. Program Office

Constance E. Brinckerhoff, Ph.D.          James D. Gorham, M.D., Ph.D.
Director                                  Associate Director
M.D.-Ph.D. Program                               M.D.-Ph.D. Program
Nathan Smith Professor of Medicine               Associate Professor of Pathology
and of Biochemistry                       and of Microbiology and Immunology


                            Ann M. Coady
                            Assistant Director
                            M.D.-Ph.D. Program

                            Ann.M.Coady@Dartmouth.edu



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            Office hours: Monday - Thursday, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.



Mailing Address:

The M.D.-Ph.D. Program at Dartmouth
The Norris Cotton Cancer Center
One Medical Center Drive
603 Rubin
Lebanon, NH 03756

Office:
603-653-9958

Web site address:
http://www.dartmouth/edu/dms/M.D.Ph.D./




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