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					Essex High School
       2011-2012
   Course Information
           &
     Diploma Guide

             Principal:
            Larry Lenz
        Assistant Principal:
         Mike Daddario

       School Counselor:
        Shannon Bryant
          Grades 10 & 12

       School Counselor:
        Raynell Vesselles
           Grades 9 & 11


         Post Office Box 1006
        833 High School Circle
     Tappahannock, Virginia 22560
            (804) 443-4301
         Fax: (804) 443-4272
         www.essex.k12.va.us



                  1
                     Essex High School School Counseling Program

The Essex High School Counseling Program is designed to promote positive academic,
personal, and career growth. As a part of the comprehensive K-12 School Counseling Program,
the Essex High School program continues to build a foundation for learning based on the
following:
*   Positive attitudes toward school and learning
*   Personal responsibility
*   Respect for self and others
*   Knowledge and skills for employment

The EHS School Counseling Program serves students in grades nine through twelve. Essex
High School has two full-time professional school counselors. Each school counselor has
primary responsibility for students in two grades. During the 2011-2012 school year,
responsibilities will be as follows:
       Ms. Shannon Bryant             Class of 2012 & Class of 2014
                                      Grades 10 &1 2

       Mrs. Raynell Vesselles        Class of 2013 & Class of 2015
                                     Grades 9 & 11
Professional School Counselors remain with the same group of students throughout their high
school career thereby developing a close relationship with individuals and families to best
facilitate personal and academic growth.

Professional School Counselors provide the following services: individual and group
counseling, classroom guidance activities, educational guidance, career and vocational
planning, student advocacy, mediation and crisis intervention. The school counselors also
provide college, career, and financial aid information and resources. Career and college
planning information is disseminated in the form of guidance newsletters. All students have
access to scholarship lists and information about educational programs and camps.

Professional School Counselors will work closely with students and parents to develop a
personal Academic and Career Plan. Students are made aware of graduation requirements and
available opportunities to meet those requirements. Students must earn the required standard
and verified credits unless other wise stated in an individualized educational plan for that
student.

Through an active partnership involving students, parents, and school professional (s), The
Academic and Career Plan is designed to be a working document that maximizes student
achievement by having the students accomplish goals that lead to postsecondary and career
readiness.

Parents are encouraged to contact their child’s counselor (by appointment) to discuss academic,
personal, or career planning concerns. Essex High School is an equal opportunity school and
does not discriminate in its educational programs on the basis of age, disability, gender,
national origin, race, or religion.


                                               2
Graduation Requirements and Diploma Programs:

All students elect to complete the requirements for the Standard Diploma, Standard
Technical Diploma, the Advanced Studies Diploma, and Advanced Technical Diploma
unless they have an Individualized Education Plan. Students will choose a diploma
program early in their high school career. This decision must be made carefully and
reviewed by students, parents, and the school counselor annually.

Project Graduation:

Project Graduation provides remedial instruction and assessment opportunities for
students at risk of not meeting the commonwealth’s diploma requirements. Project
Graduation includes remedial academies during the school year and summer, and
online tutorials to help students master the content needed to pass Standards of
Learning (SOL) tests in reading and Algebra I. See the DOE website: Project Graduation
Academic Year Grants (Superintendent's Memo #174, September 1, 2006).

Verified Credit :

 Students gain verified credits by earning a score of 400 or higher on a Virginia Board of
Education Standards of Learning (SOL) test for a high school subject in which they have
earned a standard credit. The end of course (EOC) SOL tests are: English 11
(Writing/Reading), Ancient World History, Modern World History, World Geography,
US History, Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Earth Science, Biology, and Chemistry.

Substitute Assessments for Verified Credit :

Students may earn verified credits toward graduation by passing substitute
assessments approved by the Board of Education. These assessments include AP tests,
SAT II tests, IB tests, Industry Certifications, and other examinations. See your school
counselor or visit www.pen.k12.va.us for a list.

Promotion Standards:

Grade 10:
Students must have acquired at least 5 high school credits, and have passed English 9.
Grade 11:
Students must have acquired at least 10 high school credits, and have passed English10.
Grade 12:
Students must have acquired at least 15 high school credits, and be enrolled in all of the
courses needed to earn a diploma at the close of the regular school year.



                                            3
Grading Periods:

Essex County Public Schools have nine-week grading periods. There will be four nine-
week grading periods during the school year, two during the first semester and two
during the second semester. In addition to the four report cards, parents should review
the interim reports that will be issued for every student at the mid-point of the grading
period. Parents are encouraged to participate in all scheduled parent/teacher
conferences, and to make appointments for other conferences as needed.
Parent/teacher conferences are held at the end of the grading periods.

Calculation of Grade Point Averages:

A = 94 – 100 B = 87 – 93   C = 78 – 86   D = 70 – 77   F = 69 and below

Students are awarded points for the grades they earn at the close of each school year
according to the following scale: A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1 and F=0. Advanced placement
and college level dual enrollment classes are weighted one additional point: A=5, B=4,
C=3, D=2. Points earned are totaled and then divided by the number of classes
attempted. The resulting figure, rounded to the hundredth will be somewhat
equivalent to an overall letter grade.
The numerical GPAs are then placed in order from highest to lowest to determine
ranking. Official calculations are done at the close of the junior year, mid-year senior
year, and after graduation.


Diploma Seals
Students meeting specific requirements for graduation and demonstrating exemplary
performance may receive diploma seals for recognition. VDOE makes available to local
school divisions the following seals:

Governor's Seal – Awarded to students who complete the requirements for an
Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of "B" or better, and successfully
complete college-level coursework that will earn the student at least nine transferable
college credits in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB),
Cambridge, or dual enrollment courses.

Board of Education Seal – Awarded to students who complete the requirements for a
Standard Diploma or Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of "A"
beginning with the ninth-grade class of 2006-2007 and beyond.




                                            4
Board of Education's Career & Technical Education Seal

Awarded to students who:

      earn a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma and complete a prescribed
       sequence of courses in a career and technical education concentration or
       specialization that they choose and maintain a "B" or better average in those
       courses

      OR pass an examination or an occupational competency assessment in a career
       and technical education concentration or specialization that confers certification
       or occupational competency credential from a recognized industry, trade or
       professional association

      OR acquire a professional license in that career and technical education field
       from the Commonwealth of Virginia.

The Board of Education shall approve all professional licenses and examinations used to
satisfy these requirements.



Board of Education's Advanced Mathematics & Technology Seal

Awarded to students who earn either a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma and
satisfy all of the mathematics requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma (four
units of credit including Algebra II; two verified units of credit) with a "B" average or
better; and either

      pass an examination in a career and technical education field that confers
       certification from a recognized industry, or trade or professional association

      OR acquire a professional license in a career and technical education field from
       the Commonwealth of Virginia

      OR pass an examination approved by the board that confers college-level credit
       in a technology or computer science area.

The Board of Education shall approve all professional licenses and examinations used to
satisfy these requirements.




                                             5
Board of Education's Excellence in Civics Education Seal

Awarded to students who meet each of the following four criteria:

      Satisfy the requirement to earn a Standard Diploma or an Advanced Studies Diploma

      Complete Virginia & United States History and Virginia & United States Government
       courses with a grade of "B" or higher

      Complete 50 hours of voluntary participation in community service or extracurricular
       activities, such as volunteering for a charitable or religious organization that provides
       services to the poor, sick or less fortunate; participating in Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or
       similar youth organizations; participating in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps
       (JROTC); participating in political campaigns, government internships, Boys State, Girls
       State or Model General Assembly; and participating in school-sponsored extracurricular
       activities that have a civics focus. Any student who enlists in the United States military
       prior to graduation will be deemed to have met this community service requirement.

      Have good attendance and no disciplinary infractions as determined by local school
       board policies.

Local school divisions may award other diploma seals or awards for exceptional academic,
CTE, citizenship or other exemplary performance in accordance with criteria defined by the
local school board. The design, production and use of those seals is the responsibility of the
local school boards awarding the seal.


Attendance Policy
Students will not be able to have more than six (6) daily absences from school per
semester unless the absences can be documented by a medical excuse (doctor/dentist),
a legal/court excuse or a death in the family. Absences for things such as general
illness, baby-sitting, hunting, no ride to school, too little sleep, etc., must be included in
the six (6) absence limit. Students who miss more than six (6) days per semester from
school and do not meet the absence policy guidelines will receive a grade of 69 or their
earned grade if it is lower. Any absences exceeding these limits MUST be documented
by a doctor/dentist’s excuse, court excuse or a death in the family excuse. If a student
has a chronic illness such as asthma, we will need information on file in the school office
from a physician or an update on the student health services record in the nurse’s office.
Students must be in class for 168 days in order to receive credit for each course.
Attendance in each class is defined as a minimum of thirty (30) minutes. School related
functions such as field trips, etc. are not counted as absences from class.
To be counted as present for the purpose of receiving attendance awards and for
participation in extra-curricular activities, a student must spend at least half the day in
school. Students present at any time of the day will be counted as present for state
attendance reports.

                                                6
Standard Diploma
Standard Diploma Course Requirements (8 VAC 20-131-50.B)

                       Standard           Standard Credits
                       Credits            Revised            Verified Credits - Effective for
                       Effective with     Standard           ninth graders:
Discipline Area        ninth grade        Diploma
                       classes of 2003-   Effective with     2000-01
                                                                            2003-04 and
                       04 through         ninth graders      through
                                                                            beyond
                       2009-2010          2010-2011          2002-03

English                4                  4                  2              2

Mathematics            3                  3                                 1
Note 1

Laboratory Science     3                  3                                 1
Notes 2 & 6

History & Social       3                  3                                 1
Sciences
Notes 3 & 6

Health & Physical      2                  2
Education

Fine Arts or Career    1
& Technical
Education

Foreign Language,                         2
Fine Arts, or Career
& Technical
Education

Economics and                             1
Personal Finance

Electives              6                  4
Note 4

Student Selected                                             4              1
Test
Note 5

Total                  22                 22                 6              6




                                               7
NOTE 1: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra
and shall include at least three different course selections from among: Algebra I, Geometry,
Algebra II, or other mathematics courses above the level of Algebra II. The Board may approve
additional courses to satisfy this requirement.

NOTE 2: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at
least three different science disciplines from among: earth sciences, biology, chemistry, or
physics or completion of the sequence of science courses required for the International
Baccalaureate Diploma. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.

NOTE 3: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History,
U.S. and Virginia Government, and two courses in either world history or geography or both.
The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.

NOTE 4: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include three years of one
language or two years of two languages.

NOTE 5: A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer science,
technology, career or technical education or other areas as prescribed by the Board in 8 VAC 20-
131-110.


Electives

      Fine Arts and Career and Technical Education – The Standard, Advanced Studies, and
    Modified Standard Diplomas each contain a requirement for one standard unit of credit in
    Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education. The Standards of Accreditation do not
    require that courses used to satisfy the requirement of Fine Arts or Career and Technical
    Education be approved by the Board.

      Foreign Language—The Advanced Studies Diploma contains a requirement for either
    three years of one foreign language or two years of two languages. In March 1998, the
    Board of Education approved the provision of three years of instruction in American Sign
    Language (ASL) for foreign language credit toward an Advanced Studies Diploma; other
    foreign languages will satisfy this requirement as well. Details of this action are available
    in: Superintendent's Memo, Interpretive, #1, June 12, 1998.




                                                8
Standard Technical Diploma
Beginning with the ninth-grade class of 2010-2011 and beyond, a student may earn a
Standard Technical Diploma. Specific information on the requirements is available in
paragraph C of 8VAC 20-131-50.

Standard Technical Diploma Course Requirements (8 VAC 20-131-50.)
                               Standard Credits –
Discipline Area                Standard Technical         Verified Credits
                               Diploma

English                        4                          2

Mathematics                    3                          1

Laboratory Science             3                          1

History & Social Science       3                          1

Health & Physical Education    2

Fine Arts or Foreign           1
Language

Economics and Personal         1
Finance

CTE                            4

Electives                      1

Student Selected                                          1

Total                          22                         6


Career and Technical Education – The Standard, Advanced Studies, and Modified
Standard Diplomas each contain a requirement for one standard unit of credit in Fine
Arts or Career and Technical Education. The Standards of Accreditation do not require
that courses used to satisfy the requirement of Fine Arts or Career and Technical
Education be approved by the Board.




                                           9
Advanced Diploma

Advanced Studies Diploma Course Requirements (8 VAC 20-131-50.C)
                          Standard            Standard Credits
                          Credits             Revised
                                                                 Verified Credits -
                          Effective with      Advanced Studies
                                                                 Effective with
Discipline Area           ninth grade         Diploma
                                                                 ninth graders in
                          classes of 2003-    Effective with
                                                                 2000-01 and later
                          04 through          ninth graders in
                          2009-2010           2011-2012

English                   4                   4                  2

Mathematics               4                   4                  2
[Note 1]

Laboratory Science        4                   4                  2
[Note 2]

History & Social          4                   4                  2
Sciences
[Note 3]

Foreign Languages         3                   3
[Note 4]

Health & Physical         2                   2
Education

Fine Arts or Career &     1                   1
Technical Education

Economics and                                 1
Personal Finance

Electives                 2                   3

Student Selected Test                                            1
[ Note 5]

Total                     24                  26                 9

NOTE 1: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of
algebra and shall include at least three different course selections from among: Algebra




                                             10
I, Geometry, Algebra II, or other mathematics courses above the level of Algebra II. The
Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.

NOTE 2: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections
from at least three different science disciplines from among: earth sciences, biology,
chemistry, or physics or completion of the sequence of science courses required for the
International Baccalaureate Diploma. The Board may approve additional courses to
satisfy this requirement.

NOTE 3: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia
History, U.S. and Virginia Government, and two courses in either world history or
geography or both. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this
requirement.

NOTE 4: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include three years of one
language or two years of two languages.

NOTE 5: A student may utilize additional tests for earning verified credit in computer
science, technology, career or technical education or other areas as prescribed by the
Board in 8 VAC 20-131-110.

Electives
      Fine Arts and Career and Technical Education – The Standard, Advanced
    Studies, and Modified Standard Diplomas each contain a requirement for one
    standard unit of credit in Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education. The
    Standards of Accreditation do not require that courses used to satisfy the
    requirement of Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education be approved by the
    Board. Therefore, local school officials should use their own judgment in
    determining which courses students take to satisfy the requirement of a unit of
    credit in Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education for the Standard, Advanced
    Studies, and Modified Standard Diplomas.

      Foreign Language—The Advanced Studies Diploma contains a requirement for
    either three years of one foreign language or two years of two languages. In March
    1998, the Board of Education approved the provision of three years of instruction in
    American Sign Language (ASL) for foreign language credit toward an Advanced
    Studies Diploma; other foreign languages will satisfy this requirement as well.
    Details of this action are available in: Superintendent's Memo, Interpretive, #1, June
    12, 1998.




                                            11
Advanced Technical Diploma
Beginning with the ninth-grade class of 2011-2012 and beyond, a student may earn an
Advanced Technical Diploma. Specific information on the requirements is available in
paragraph E of 8VAC 20-131-50.

Advanced Technical Diploma Course Requirements (8 VAC 20-131-50.)
                               Standard Units –
Discipline Area                Advanced Technical        Verified Credits
                               Diploma

English                        4                         2

Mathematics                    4                         2

Laboratory Science             4                         2

History & Social Science       4                         2

Health & Physical Education    2

Foreign Language               3

Fine Arts or CTE               1

Economics and Personal         1
Finance

CTE                            3

Electives

Student Selected                                         1

Total                          26                        9




                                          12
The Modified Standard Diploma is intended for certain students at the secondary level
who have a disability and are unlikely to meet the credit requirements for a Standard
Diploma. Eligibility and participation in the program are determined by the student's
IEP team and the student, when appropriate. Decisions of eligibility and participation
may be made at any point after the student's eighth grade year. Written consent from
parent/guardian must be obtained for a student to choose this diploma program.

The student must:

      be allowed to pursue a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma at any time
    throughout his or her high school career;

     not be excluded from courses and tests required to earn a Standard or Advanced
    Studies Diploma; and

       pass literacy and numeracy competency assessments as prescribed by the Board:

             For students who entered the ninth grade prior to 2000-01, the literacy and
         numeracy competency assessments were the reading and mathematics subtests
         of the LPT.

              For students who entered the ninth grade in 2000-01 and beyond, the
         literacy and numeracy competency assessments are the eighth-grade English
         Reading test and the eighth-grade Mathematics SOL test (Board action –
         November 30, 2000).

              The Board also approved four additional substitute assessments to satisfy
         the literacy and numeric requirements for students pursuing a Modified
         Standard Diploma.




                                           13
Modified Standard Diploma Course Requirements (8 VAC 20-131-50.D)
Discipline Area                                  Standard Credits

English                                          4

Mathematics                                      3
[Note 1]

Laboratory Science                               2
[Note 2]

History & Social Sciences                        2
[Note 3]

Health & Physical Education                      2

Fine Arts or Career & Technical Education        1

Electives                                        6
[Note 4]

Total                                            20

NOTE 1: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include content from
among applications of algebra, geometry, personal finance and statistics in courses that
have been approved by the Board.

NOTE 2: Courses complete shall include content from at least two of the following:
applications of earth science, biology, chemistry, or physics in courses approved by the
Board.

NOTE 3: Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include one unit of credit
in U.S. and Virginia History and one unit of credit in U.S. and Virginia Government in
courses approved by the Board.

NOTE 4: Courses to satisfy this requirement shall include a least two sequential
electives in the same manner required for the Standard Diploma.

Electives
     Sequential Electives – Effective with the graduating class of 2003, students who
    wish to receive a Standard or Modified Standard Diploma must successfully
    complete two sequential electives. On February 5, 2002, the Board of Education
    approved


                                            14
                Sequential electives may be in any discipline as long as the courses are not
            specifically required for graduation.

                Courses used to satisfy the one unit of credit in a fine arts or career and
            technical education course may be used to partially satisfy this requirement.

               For career and technical education electives, check with the Office of
            Career and Technical Education at (804) 225-2051.

                An exploratory course followed by an introductory course may not be
            used to satisfy the requirement.

                An introductory course followed by another level of the same course of
            study may be used.

                Sequential electives do not have to be taken in consecutive years.

          Fine Arts and Career and Technical Education – The Standard, Advanced
        Studies, and Modified Standard Diplomas each contain a requirement for one
        standard unit of credit in Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education. The
        Standards of Accreditation do not require that courses used to satisfy the
        requirement of Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education be approved by the
        Board. Therefore, local school officials should use their own judgment in
        determining which courses students take to satisfy the requirement of a unit of
        credit in Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education for the Standard, Advanced
        Studies, and Modified Standard Diplomas.




.



IEP Diploma

The IEP Diploma is intended for students who have a documented disability and are
unable to meet the requirements for a Standard, Advanced, and Modified Diploma.
Students must meet their IEP objectives in order to earn this diploma.




                                                15
Academic Achievement Awards:

In order to be eligible for any academic achievement awards, students must be enrolled
in at least five classes. No student with an “I” is eligible for an award, including honor
roll or principals list.

       The Honor Roll and Principal’s List is determined based upon nine-week
grades at the end of the grading period.
    The Principal’s List includes all students who earn only “A”s.
    Honor Roll includes all students who earn “A’s and B’s.”
Principal’s List and Honor Roll are not calculated by grade point average.

Graduation honors will be determined in the students’ senior year, and all high school
level and dual enrollment grades (classes that meet the advanced diploma
requirements) earned through the senior year will be taken into consideration. Only
students earning an Advanced Studies Diploma are eligible for the valedictorian and
salutatorian awards. Valedictorian and salutatorian are determined by the grade point
average at the end of the first semester of the senior year.


Early College Scholars Program
The Early College Scholars program allows eligible high school students to earn at least
15 hours of transferable college credit while completing the requirements for an
Advanced Studies Diploma or an Advanced Technical Diploma. The result is a more
productive senior year and a substantial reduction in college tuition. Students earning a
college degree in seven semesters instead of eight can save an average of $5,000 in
expenses.

To qualify for the Early College Scholars program, a student must:
     Have a "B" average or better;

     Be pursuing an Advanced Studies Diploma or an Advanced Technical Diploma;
    and

      Take and complete college-level course work (i.e., Advanced Placement,
    International Baccalaureate, Cambridge, or dual enrollment) that will earn at least
    15 transferable college credits.

Early College Scholars are supported by Virtual Virginia and the Commonwealth
College Course Collaborative. Virtual Virginia provides statewide access to college-
level courses while the Commonwealth College Course Collaborative defines the




                                            16
subjects high school students can complete and receive college degree credit from
participating public and private colleges and universities.

Advanced Placement Program

Advanced Placement (AP) is a program comprising college-level courses and exams
that give advanced, motivated students the opportunity to get ahead by earning
advanced placement and/or credit for college while they are still in high school. There
are many benefits for students who take AP Courses. They have the opportunity to
study interesting and challenging topics, discover new interests, and get a head start on
college. Upon successful completion of an AP course, students at Essex High School
earn a weighted grade (A=5 points, B=4 points, etc.) and one high school credit.
Students are required to take the AP exam for that course and, depending on scores,
earn college credits. College credits are determined by the college.
The examination fee is approximately $90, but students who are in the Free/Reduced
Lunch Program or otherwise qualify are eligible for a discount on the cost of the
examination. Students that sign up to take an AP exam and decide not to take the exam
will be charged a $40 fee.


Dual Enrollment Program

“Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment Between Virginia Public Schools and Community
Colleges”
In the summer of 2008, a revised collaborative agreement entitled the "Virginia Plan for
Dual Enrollment Between Virginia Public Schools and Community Colleges" was
signed. This agreement provides a statewide framework for dual enrollment
arrangements between Virginia public schools and community colleges.

These arrangements may be made at the local level, i.e., between the representatives of
boards of the participating public school and the participating community college
authorized to contract such agreements. They may be formed in three distinct ways:

      First, high school students may be enrolled in the regularly scheduled college
    credit courses with the other students taught at the community college.

      Second, high school students may be enrolled in specially scheduled college
    credit courses conducted exclusively for high school students taught at the high
    school.

     Third, high school students may be enrolled in specially scheduled college credit
    courses conducted exclusively for high school students taught at the community
    college.


                                           17
The revised agreement outlines dual enrollment requirements for student eligibility,
admissions, course eligibility, compliance with accreditation standards, award of
credits, selection of faculty, tuition and fees, and assessment and evaluation. Please
review and use this revised document as a framework within which to engage in
partnerships with community colleges to offer increased opportunities for high school
students to take advanced and/or accelerated courses.

     Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment between Virginia Public Schools and
    Community Colleges

All dual enrollment courses may be counted toward the 15 college credits required for a
student to become an "Early College Scholar." Certain dual enrollment courses may also
qualify as part of the Commonwealth College Course Collaborative. This collaborative,
involving all Virginia two- and four-year colleges and universities except Virginia
Military Institute, provides a set of academic courses that fully transfer as core
requirements and degree credits.

Students must pass the college placement test in order to enroll in the DE classes.

The Dual Enrollment Program with Rappahannock Community College (RCC) will
continue this year. Highly motivated students who are sixteen and older and have
written permission from the principal, college, and school counselor are encouraged to
enroll in electives at RCC and in the dual enrollment courses that are available on and
off-site at EHS and RCC during the school day. Students will earn college and one (1)
high school credit upon the completion of dual enrollment courses.
College-level (course code of 100 or above) dual enrollment classes will have weighted
grades.
Essex High School students can take RCC classes not offered at the high school outside
of the on-site program.

Students must be eligible for enrollment at the college and meet course prerequisites. If students
enroll in courses not offered at the high school, they must provide their own transportation and
pay for their own tuition and texts.




                                                18
Dual Enrollment Program

During the 2011-2012 school year, the on-site dual enrollment program will include:
   Business Management
   Design, Multimedia, &Web Technology

Psychology and Sociology will be offered at Rappahannock Community College.




Please follow the registration process for RCC.
The website for registration is: www.rcc.vccs.edu



                 Virtual Virginia

The Virtual Virginia includes the Virginia Virtual Advanced Placement
School and offers online AP courses. These courses utilize video segments,
audio clips, whiteboard and online discussions, as well as text lesson. All
courses are taught by fully certified teachers in the subject area who are
skilled at teaching in the online environment. Teachers are available via
phone and email. Students must register through the school counselor.

Students will be charged an $80.00 fee for each class
dropped after September 18th .
For the latest information on courses offered, tuition fees, prerequisites,
and registration deadlines, please visit www.virtualvirginia.org. or call 1-
800-246-8736.




                                          19
              Website: www.cbgs.k12.va.us Phone: (804) 443-0267

Focus:          Marine and Environmental Studies

Mission:        The Chesapeake Bay Governor’s School For Marine and Environmental Science
                provides a community of learners with the opportunity to explore connections among the
                environment, math, science, and technology and develops leaders who possess the
                research and technical skills, global perspective, and vision needed to address the
                challenges of a rapidly changing society.

Courses:        Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Advanced Algebra II/Pre–Calculus,
                Trigonometry/Calculus, and Foundations in Science & Environmental Science I & II. All
                courses meet and/or exceed the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) requirements.

Serving:        High ability students from Caroline, Essex, Gloucester, King George, King William,
                King and Queen, Lancaster, Mathews, Middlesex, Northumberland, Richmond County,
                and Westmoreland Public Schools participate.

Sites:          Rappahannock Community College, Warsaw Campus
                Rappahannock Community College, Glenns Campus
                Bowling Green campus in Caroline County

Admissions:     Students who are eligible to attend Chesapeake Bay Governor's School are high ability
                10th, 11th and 12th graders from the participating school divisions. Depending on the
                year of application, students need to have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry,
                and one or two high school credits in science (Earth Science preferred). The applying
                students should have a "B" average for 8th and 9th grade years. They should also have
                scored 85% or higher composite/total score on a standardized achievement and/or ability
                test OR 85% or higher on a math or science quantitative subtest.

Admission is competitive and is based on previous math and science courses, teacher recommendations,
standardized achievement testing, science/math activities, and honors. Selection is determined by each
participating school system.

To apply, rising sophomores should see their counselor and/or the Gifted Education Coordinator and
request an application. Applications are available at the start of the second semester, and the selection
process occurs in early spring.

Interested students who do not meet the above criteria must provide a letter of explanation with the
application.




                                                     20
                                 Guidelines for Course Registration


Students should make their decisions carefully and be certain that they are fulfilling the requirements for
the diploma program they have chosen. If students have not committed to a diploma program, courses
from both programs should be taken.

   Minimum Number of Classes- 9th through 11th graders must take a minimum of six classes with a
    maximum of one study hall and seniors must take at least five classes with a maximum of two study
    halls and/or work release unless they have written permission from the principal.

   Electives- All elective course offerings are contingent upon enrollment and funding availability.
    Students are encouraged to select electives that will prepare them for their future education and/or
    career plans.

   Course Requests- School Counselors will work with students to determine the students’ courses for
    the upcoming school year. The course request form must be signed by a parent/guardian and
    returned to the school by the deadline.

   Add/Drop Guidelines- The school adheres to strict add/drop guidelines. With teacher permission,
    students may add a class during the first two weeks of school. The final day to drop a class is the
    Friday after the first nine-weeks report cards go home, but students cannot exercise that privilege if
    they are only enrolled in the minimum number of classes. Classes can only be added or dropped at
    the request of parents and with the permission of the principal. The principal may request input from
    the student’s teacher and counselor before approving the change.

   VHSL Academic Eligibility- All students participating in Virginia High School League athletics and
    other extra-curricular activities must be enrolled in five or more classes and have passed at least five
    classes during the last semester.

   Work Releases- Work release is only available for seniors and ISEAP/GED students. Work release
    forms must be completed and approved before the second Friday that school is in session. Senior
    must have study hall at the end of the day in order to be granted a work release later in the school
    year. Students will not be dismissed for early release until the proper form is completed and returned
    to the office.

   Office Aides- The students who are utilized as aides must have at least a “C” average in each of their
    classes, have no discipline issue, and complete an application. Once applications are reviewed,
    students will interview with the principal.

   Credit Recovery/Correspondance/Off Campus Courses- Students must request from the principal, in
    writing, permission to take correspondence, online, and off campus classes.




                                                     21
                                      AGRICULTURE

Students can select one of two career pathways after taking the Foundations of
Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resource Systems. The pathways are plant science or
agriculture business.

Foundations of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resource Systems (8006)
                                                               Grade Level: 9 – 12
This class is a one-year, single period, occupational preparation course. The course is
devoted to agricultural mechanics, with emphasis placed on skill development in basic
metals, cold metal work, introduction to arc welding, soldering, plan reading and
sketching and hand woodworking. The remainder of the course emphasizes the
development of competencies in plant sciences, leadership, resource conservation,
horticulture, aquaculture and introduction to small animal care.

Horticulture Sciences (8034)
                                                              Grade Level: 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Foundations of Agriculture (8006)

Students in this class will develop the necessary knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes
for entry-level employment and advancement in areas such as floriculture, landscape
design, greenhouse operation, nursery plant production, and turf management. They
receive instruction in using soil and other plant-growing media and in identifying,
propagating, and growing horticulture plants in the greenhouse and land laboratory.
Instruction is provided in safety practices and leadership development.


Landscaping ( 8036)                                           Grade Levels: 11 -12
Prerequisite: Horticulture Sciences (8034)

In this course, students develop the necessary knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes
for entry-level employment and advancement in areas such as landscape design,
landscape construction, and landscape maintenance. They receive instruction in
sketching and drawing, analyzing a landscape site, designing for function and
aesthetics, identifying and selecting landscape plants, purchasing and installing plants,
and maintaining the landscape by watering, fertilizing, mulching, pruning, and
controlling pests.




                                              22
Agricultural Business Fundamentals (8022)
                                                             Grade Level: 11 – 12
Prerequisite: Foundations of Agriculture (8006)
Students develop the necessary knowledge, skills, habits and attitudes for employment
in off and on-farm agricultural businesses. Where training is available, cooperative
arrangements with local businesses provide occupational experiences for students.
When training centers are not available, simulated experiences may be provided.
Leadership training is provided through the FFA Organization.

Agricultural Business Operations (8024)
                                                             Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: Agriculture Business Fundamentals (8022)
Students develop the necessary knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes for employment
in off and on-farm agricultural businesses. The curriculum emphasizes off-farm
business management. Instruction is provided in agricultural product knowledge,
agricultural mechanics, plant science, and leadership development.

Foundations of Agriculture-Horticulture-Landscaping
Or
Foundations of Agriculture-Agriculture Business III, IV


Leadership (9092)                                            Grade Level: 11- 12

Students develop competencies in identifying individual aptitudes in relation to
effective leadership skills, understanding organizational behavior, using effective
communication in the workplace, handling human resources and organizational
problems, supervising and training employees, resolving conflict, and planning for the
future. Continuing education in leadership is emphasized as well as practical leadership
experiences in cooperation with school and community leaders.




                                            23
                                          ART

Art I (9120)                                                   Grades: 9 – 12

This class is designed to teach students how to communicate through non-verbal
means. Art I covers such topics as art history, the study of the elements and principals
of design. Students will work with a variety of materials and subject matter. Students
of all academic levels may succeed and do well in this class if they have the desire and
determination to do so.



Art II (9130)                                                  Grades: 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Art I

This class continues the study of the elements and principles of design. In this course
students will use more advanced materials and techniques for creating art, as well as a
more in-depth look at Art History.



Advanced Art III (9140)                                         Grades: 11- 12
Prerequisite: Art II
Advanced Art IV (9145)                                          Grade: 12
Prerequisite Art III
These sequential classes build on successful completion of earlier art classes. There is an
emphasis on visual problem solving, developing a personal style of expression and
individual projects. Students are expected to exercise an aesthetic judgment and engage
in critiques of their own artwork, as well as that of others. Students will develop and
maintain a portfolio.




                                            24
            BUSINESS & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Principles of Business and Marketing (6115) - 36 weeks

Suggested Grade Level: 9 10
Students discover the roles of business and marketing in the free enterprise system and the
global economy. Basic financial concepts of banking, insurance, credit, inheritance, taxation,
and investments are investigated to provide a strong background as students prepare to make
sound decisions as consumers, wage earners, and citizens. The real-world impact of
technology, effective communication, and interpersonal skills is evident throughout the course.
This course also supports career development skills and explores career options.


Accounting (6320) - 36 weeks

Suggested Grade Level: 10 11 12

Students study the basic principles, concepts, and practices of the accounting cycle for a
service business and a merchandising business. Topics covered include analyzing transactions,
journalizing and posting entries, preparing payroll records and financial statements, and
managing cash systems. Ethics and professional conduct are emphasized. Students learn
fundamental accounting procedures using both manual and electronic systems. The
cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom
instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing
supervision throughout the school year.
Recommended prerequisite(s): Keyboarding course(s) or teacher-approved demonstration and
documentation of touch keyboarding skills


Economics and Personal Finance (6120) - 36 weeks
Suggested Grade Level: 11 12
Students learn how to navigate the financial decisions they must face and to make informed
decisions related to career exploration, budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, taxes,
saving, investing, buying/leasing a vehicle, living independently, and inheritance. Development
of financial literacy skills and an understanding of economic principles will provide the basis for
responsible citizenship and career success. In addition to developing personal finance skills,
students in the 36-week course will also study basic occupational skills and concepts in
preparation for entry-level employment in the field of finance. The course incorporates all
economics and financial literacy objectives included in the Code of Virginia §22.1-200-03B. The
cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom
instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing
supervision throughout the school year.




                                                25
Business Management (6135) - 36 weeks*
Suggested Grade Level: 11 12
Students study basic management concepts and leadership styles as they explore business
ownership, planning, operations, marketing, finance, economics, communications, the global
marketplace, and human relations. Quality concepts, project management, problem solving,
and ethical decision making are an integral part of the course. Student leadership skills may be
enhanced by participation in school-based or virtual enterprises, job shadowing, internships,
cooperative education, and/or the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA). The
cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom
instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing
supervision throughout the school year.

*This is a dual enrollment class. The first semester the students take BUS100; the
second semester BUS200 [from Rappahannock Community College]. They have to pass
the entrance test to RCC to be enrolled and be 16 years old.


Business Law (6131) - 36 weeks*

Suggested Grade Level: 11 12

Students examine the foundations of the American legal system and learn the rights and
responsibilities of citizens. Students gain practical knowledge and life skills by exploring
economic and social concepts related to laws governing business and individuals. Focus areas
include contracts, consumer protection, criminal law, tort law, international law, family/domestic
law, employment law, and careers in the legal profession. The cooperative education method is
available for this course. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job
training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the school year.

*This is a dual enrollment class. The first semester the students take BUS241; the
second semester BUS242 [from Rappahannock Community College]. They have to pass
the entrance test to RCC to be enrolled and be 16 years old.


Computer Applications (6611) - 36 weeks

Suggested Grade Level: 7 8 9 10

Students develop or review correct keyboarding techniques and gain a basic knowledge of
word processing, spreadsheet, database, graphics, and telecommunications applications.
Students demonstrate an understanding of computer concepts through application of
knowledge. Students learn to use software packages and local and worldwide network
communications systems. Grade 8 Computer/Technology Standards of Learning are
incorporated and reinforced in this course.




                                                26
Computer Information Systems (6612) - 36 weeks
Suggested Grade Level: 10 11 12
Prerequisites: 6150 OR 6111

Students apply problem-solving skills to real-life situations through word processing, spreadsheets,
databases, multimedia presentations, and integrated software activities. Students work individually and
in groups to explore computer concepts, operating systems, networks, telecommunications, and
emerging technologies. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students
combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with
continuing supervision throughout the school year.

Recommended prerequisite(s): Keyboarding course(s) or teacher-approved demonstration and
documentation of touch keyboarding skills.



Design, Multimedia, and Web Technologies (6630) - 36 weeks*
Suggested Grade Level: 11 12
Students develop proficiency in creating desktop publications, multimedia presentations/projects, and
Web sites using industry standard application software. Students incorporate principles of layout and
design in completing publications and projects. Students design portfolios that may include business
cards, newsletters, mini-pages, Web pages, multimedia presentations/projects, calendars, and graphics.
The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom instruction
and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the
school year.
Recommended prerequisite(s): Keyboarding course(s) or teacher-approved demonstration and
documentation of touch keyboarding skills

*This is a dual enrollment class. The first semester the students take ITE130; the second
semester ITD110 [from Rappahannock Community College]. They have to pass the
entrance test to RCC to be enrolled and be 16 years old.

Other courses we have offered in the past include:
Advanced CIS, Advanced Accounting, Information Technology Fundamentals

Other courses we would like to offer:
Entrepreneurship Education (9093) - 36 weeks
Suggested Grade Level: 9 10 11 12
This course introduces students to the exciting world of creating, owning, and launching their own
business. Students will learn concepts and techniques for planning an innovative business and living the
entrepreneurial lifestyle. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students
combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with
continuing supervision throughout the school year.

                 FAMILY, CONSUMER & CAREER STUDIES



                                                   27
Individual Development/Nutrition Wellness (8209/8228)
                                                                Grade Level: 9 – 12
Students enrolled in Individual Development focus on encouraging personal potential
of self and others throughout the life span; managing stressful situations; formulating a
plan to achieve career goals; forming healthy, caring relationships with family members
and peers; managing conflict, and choosing responsible ways to express oneself. This
class will also focus on making choices that promote wellness and good health;
analyzing relationships between psychological and social needs and food choices;
choosing foods that promote wellness; obtaining and storing food for self and family;
preparing and serving nutritious meals and snacks; selecting and using equipment for
food preparation; and identifying strategies to promote optimal nutrition and wellness
of society. Teachers highlight the basic skills of math, science, and communication
when appropriate in the content.




Life Planning/Resource Management (8226/8214)
                                                                Grade Level: 10 – 12
Students enrolled in Life Planning focus on developing a life-management plan; caring
for self and others to ensure wellness; building and maintaining strong, constructive
relationships and families; developing strategies for lifelong career planning;
coordinating personal and career responsibilities; and establishing a plan for using
resources. This class will also focus on making informed consumer choices and creating
and maintaining a healthy living environment. Teachers highlight the basic skills of
math, science, and communications when appropriate in the content.


Work and Family Management (8282)
                                                              Grade Level: 10 – 12
This course focuses on consumer education issues related to decision-making skills;
occupational goals related to income, lifestyles and personal goals; individual and
family financial planning; strategies for planning economic security; use of available
resources to make informed purchases; consumer rights and responsibilities; career
development; and careers related to consumer affairs. Teachers will incorporate the
skills of math, science, written and oral communication, and computer applications
when appropriate in the content.

Family Relations/Parenting (8223/8231)                        Grade Level: 11, 12




                                            28
Family Relations will focus on analyzing the significance of the family, nurturing
human development throughout the life span, analyzing factors that build and maintain
healthy family relationships, developing effective communication, dealing with family
stressors and conflicts, managing work and family roles and responsibilities, and
analyzing social forces that influence families across the life span. This class will also
focus on assessing the impact of the parenting role in society; taking responsibility for
individual growth within the parenting role; preparing for a healthy emotional and
physical beginning for parent and child; building positive parent-child relationships;
promoting self-discipline, self-respect, and socially responsible behavior; obtaining
parenting information, support, and assistance; and planning ways that families and
society can share in nurturing children and adolescents.




                                     ENGLISH


                                            29
The basic content of courses is the same in regular and advanced since the SOL test at the end
of grade 11 is the same for all students. The differences lie in the pacing and methods of
presentation of material and in the form of assignments used to evaluate progress. Students are
not allowed to take two English classes at the same time.


English 9 (1132)

This class covers grammar, literature, writing, and oral interpretation. Grammar will
include not only a review of parts of speech, but also methods of developing
paragraphs and longer compositions. Some major literary works studied include
Romeo and Juliet, Fahrenheit 451 and Tangerine. Units covered include those on short
stories and poetry. Compositions (in class writings) are required and vocabulary will be
given weekly. Students must also complete projects complementing the literature and
independent reading. A research project is required.


Advanced English 9 (1131)
Prerequisite: English 8, summer reading assignment and
Teacher recommendation required

This class covers grammar, literature, writing, and oral interpretation. Grammar will
include not only a review of parts of speech, but also methods of developing
paragraphs and longer compositions. Some major literary works studied include
Romeo and Juliet, A Mid Summer Night’s Dream, Fahrenheit 451 and A Separate Peace.
Units covered include those on short stories and poetry. Compositions (in class
writings) are required every two weeks and vocabulary will be given weekly. Students
must also complete projects complementing the literature and independent reading
including one novel project each nine-weeks. Students will submit a critical review or
character analysis for each independent reading. A research project is required. This
class moves at a faster pace than the English 9 class.

English 10 (1142)
Prerequisite: English 9

World literature is studied extensively in this course. This class covers grammar,
literature, writing, and oral interpretation. Students will study grammar to improve
writing skills. Included are a variety of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction
selections. Some major literary works studied include Julius Caesar, Lord of the Flies,
Night, and the Tears of a Tiger series. Compositions (in class writings) are required with
an emphasis on exposition. Vocabulary will be given weekly. Students must also
complete projects complementing the literature and independent reading. A research
project is required.



                                               30
Advanced English 10 (1141)
Prerequisite: English 9, summer reading assignment and
Teacher recommendation required

World literature is studied extensively in this course. This class covers grammar,
literature, writing, and oral interpretation. Students will study grammar to improve
writing skills. Included are a variety of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction
selections. Some major literary works studied include Julius Caesar, Much a Do about
Nothing, Ethan Frome, Lord of the Flies, Great Expectations, and Night. Compositions
(in class writings) are required every two weeks with an emphasis on exposition.
Vocabulary will be given weekly with an emphasis on SAT words. Students must also
complete projects complementing the literature and independent reading which may
include one novel project each nine-week period. A research project is required. This
class moves at a faster pace than the English 10 class.

English 11 (1152)
Prerequisite: English 10
SOL Test Required

American literature is studied extensively in this course. This class covers grammar,
literature, writing, and oral interpretation. Students will study grammar to improve
writing skills. Included are a variety of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction
selections. Some major literary works studied include The Scarlet Letter, To Kill A
Mockingbird, and A Raisin in the Sun. Compositions (in class writings) are required
with an emphasis on persuasion. Vocabulary will be given weekly. Students must also
complete projects complementing the literature and independent reading. A research
project is required.


Advanced English 11 (1151)
Prerequisite: English 10, summer reading assignment and Teacher recommendation required
SOL Test Required

American literature is studied extensively in this course. This class covers grammar,
literature, writing, and oral interpretation. Students will study grammar to improve
writing skills. Included are a variety of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction
selections. Some major literary works studied include The Scarlet Letter, To Kill A
Mockingbird, My Antonia, Uncle tom’s Cabin, Twelve Angry Men, and A Raisin in the
Sun. Compositions (in class writings) are required with an emphasis on persuasion.
Vocabulary will be given weekly. Students must also complete projects complementing
the literature and independent reading. A research project is required. This class moves
at a faster pace than the English 11 class.



                                            31
Pre Advanced Placement Literature & Composition 11(1195)
Prerequisite: English 10, summer reading assignment and
Teacher recommendation required
SOL Test Required

This course focuses on preparation to meet the challenge of the college-level work
required in Advanced Placement Literature & Composition for 12th grade. A survey of
American as well as World literature with an intensive study of novels, short stories,
poems, and plays is the focus. Independent reading and writing outside of class is
expected. Summer reading assignment is required and may be picked up by the first
week of May.

English 12(1162)
Prerequisite: English 11

A survey of World literature with a focus on British literature is studied in this course.
Included are a variety of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction selections. Some
major literary works studied include Beowulf, Grendel, The Canterbury Tales, Hamlet,
and Frankenstein. Vocabulary will be given weekly. Writing will focus on persuasive
compositions, college application compositions and resumes. A research project is
required.

Advanced English 12 (1161)

Prerequisite: English 11, summer reading assignment and Teacher recommendation required
A survey of World literature with a focus on British literature is studied extensively in
this course. Included are a variety of short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction
selections. Some major literary works studied include Beowulf, Grendel, The
Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, Frankenstein, The Jungle and Heart of Darkness.
Vocabulary will be given weekly. Writing will focus on persuasive compositions,
college application compositions and resumes. A research project is required. This class
moves at a faster pace than the English 12 class.

Advanced Placement Literature & Composition
Prerequisite: Pre AP English 11, summer reading assignment and Teacher recommendation
required

Senior Advanced Placement Literature & Composition is a course designed to allow
secondary students, who are capable and willing, to attempt reading and writing on
works typically found in the sophomore year of the college curriculum. As a survey of
World Literature, this course will include not only a study of major literary works of
each historical period, but also a study of the economical, moral, social environment
which produced the literature. Critical analysis of the structure and genre of literature
will be accompanied by compositions of critical analysis, explication, and persuasion.


                                            32
Library research and extensive reading of complete works are required. This is a
writing intensive course. This course will prepare students for the National Advanced
Placement Literature & Composition exam in May.

Creative Writing (1171)                                             Grade Level: 10 – 12
Prerequisite: English 9

This course is a workshop where students write and share their work, as well as a place
to receive and give criticism to improve writing skills. Membership in the class means
automatic membership in the Society for the Preservation of the Imagination which
sponsors and judges contests throughout the year.

Yearbook/Journalism (1220)
Prerequisite: Application and Recommendation                Grade Level: 10 –12

Students in this course spend the majority of the year preparing the school yearbook.
Topics presented include layout, copywriting, creative design, basic photography,
business management, advertising, journalism and desktop publishing. Upon
completion of the annual yearbook, students will engage in the production of other
school-based publications. In addition, throughout the year the students will contribute
school articles and information to local media.


                             FOREIGN LANGUAGES


Prerequisite: Students should earn a “C” average or better in English before beginning to study
a foreign language at the high school level. Also, students should earn a “C” average or better in
a level of foreign language before moving to the next level.


French I (5110)                                             Grade level: 9 – 12

This class is recommended for the college-bound, as well as the career-minded student.
Students begin to develop skills necessary to understand and speak the language.
There will be daily work in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; and students will
be quizzed weekly. Additional teaching methods used include frequent class exercises
using the tape recorder, reading passages in the language, and creating short dialogues
like the models in the textbook. Importance is placed on becoming acquainted with
countries where the language is spoken. Students will study relevant vocabulary and
culture, and Paris will be studied in depth.




                                                33
French II (5120)                                        Grade Level: 9 – 12
Prerequisite: French I

In this course, students refine listening and speaking skills by hearing a variety of
voices of both genders and all ages. These skills are further refined through retaining
more complex combinations of words and by continuing to use the language daily in
classroom communications. Reading, writing, and attention to cultural studies are
continued in more depth. Specifically, students will explore in further detail various
regions in France.


French III (5130)                                       Grade Level: 10 – 12
Prerequisite: French II

In this class, students are able to understand more complex materials with listening
skills and to communicate more complex ideas in speaking skills. They make nearly
exclusive use of the language when communicating within the classroom. Reading and
writing skills continue to be developed. In cultural studies, students turn their attention
to French-speaking countries in Europe and Africa. In addition to daily homework
assignments, Students can expect oral presentations.


French IV (5140)                                        Grade Levels: 10 – 12
Prerequisite: French III

This class is recommended for students interested in developing increased proficiency
in the language. The students begin to understand formal presentations and normally
paced conversations with native speakers. The students communicate complex ideas
and information, making nearly an exclusive use of the language in the classroom.
Reading texts may include current media, essays, short stories, poems, plays and other
materials, with emphasis on cultural appreciation through literature style, art, and
music. Students begin the third-year text. Students can expect oral presentations.



Spanish I (5510)                                        Grade level: 9 – 12

This class is recommended for the college-bound, as well as the career-minded student.
Students begin to develop skills necessary to understand and speak the language.
There will be daily work in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Frequent class
exercises using the tape recorder, reading passages in the language, and creating short
dialogues like the models in the textbook are additional teaching methods used.



                                            34
Importance is placed on becoming acquainted with the geography of countries where
the language is spoken. In addition to daily homework and classroom assignments,
students must submit during each grading period a notebook and a current event topic.
Other projects will be assigned as necessary.


Spanish II (5520)                                            Grade Level: 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Spanish I

In this course, students refine listening and speaking skills by hearing a variety of
voices of both sexes and all ages. This is further refined through retaining more
complex combinations of words and by continuing to use the language daily in
classroom communications. Reading, writing, and attention to cultural studies are
continued in more depth. In addition to daily homework and class work assignments,
students must turn in a current event and a class notebook during the grading period.


Spanish III (5530)                                           Grade Level: 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Spanish II

In this class, students are able to understand more complex materials with listening
skills and to communicate more complex ideas in speaking skills. They make nearly
exclusive use of the language when communicating within the classroom. Reading and
writing skills continue to be developed. In cultural studies the students turn their
attentions to major contributions in the humanities and physical and social sciences, as
well as significant historical and political developments. Daily homework and
classroom assignments are continued, as well as reports, current events, and a
notebook.

Spanish IV (5540)                                            Grade Level: 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Spanish III

This class is recommended for students interested in developing increased proficiency
in the language. The students begin to understand formal presentations and normally
paced conversations with native speakers. The students communicate complex ideas
and information, making nearly an exclusive use of the language in the classroom.
Reading texts may include current media, essays, short stories, poems, plays and other
materials, with emphasis on cultural appreciation through literature style, art, and
music. They study the classic novel Don Quixote. The history of the countries speaking
the language is covered through reading, teacher lecture, and videos.

                 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


                                           35
Health and Physical Education 9 (7300)                         Grade Level: 9

Proficiency in all areas of fitness is explored in this class. Students will perform
rhythmic activities, tumbling, track and field, wrestling, volleyball and basketball.
Health instruction includes alcohol and other drugs, consumer health, disease
prevention and control, first aid, personal health, growth and wellness.


Driver Education and Physical Education 10 (7405/7415)         Grade Level: 10
Prerequisite: Health & P.E. 9

Proficiency in all areas of fitness is explored in this class. Students will perform
rhythmic activities, tumbling, tennis, outdoor education, golf, bowling, and team sports.
Driver education is part of the course and offers students the opportunity to develop
knowledge and skills in the safe operation of a motor vehicle. The program is divided
into two parts - 36 hours of classroom instruction and 14 hours of behind the wheel
instruction. Classroom instruction covers a basic knowledge of road and automobile
safety. The behind-the-wheel program covers practical driving and skills necessary to
implement knowledge acquired in the classroom. There is a fee charged for behind-the-
wheel instruction.

Advanced Physical Education I (7640)                           Grade Level: 11, 12
Advanced Physical Education II (7650)
Prerequisite: P.E. 10

This class builds on the concept of fitness and wellness using weight training, flexibility,
and conditioning as its major components. The emphasis will be placed on
incorporating a healthy lifestyle into daily living by developing muscle strength and
endurance. Students will be expected to perform a well-balanced fitness routine on a
recommended basis.




                                 MATHEMATICS



                                             36
Algebra I (3130)                                              Grade Level: 9
SOL Test Required

This course covers properties of real numbers. Students will study positive and
negative numbers, polynomials, and rational expressions. Solving equations, factoring,
graphing in the coordinate plane, and systems of equations are other topics covered.
Emphasis is placed on using all the above concepts to solve mathematical problems.
Daily assignments are required. A graphing calculator is used throughout the course.



Geometry (3143)                                               Grade Level: 9 – 12
SOL Test Required
Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra I: Part II

This class is designed to develop proficiency with geometric skills and to apply the
understanding to real life situations. Emphasis is on application of theorems to
practical situations in math and logical reasoning. A graphing calculator is used
throughout the course. Students should demonstrate competence in Algebra I before
taking this course.


Algebra II (3135)                                             Grade Level: 9 – 12
SOL Test Required
Prerequisite: Geometry

This class is a study of polynomials, equations, and inequalities with rational and
irrational numbers. Also included are studies of functions, algebraic fractions, radicals
and exponents, real, and imaginary numbers, and analytic geometry. A graphing
calculator is used throughout the course. Students should demonstrate competence in
Algebra I and Geometry before taking this course.




Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry (3138)                        Grade Level: 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II




                                                37
Students in this course study trigonometry and circular functions. Statistical and
algebraic concepts are integrated. Higher degree equations and work with logarithmic,
trigonometric functions and matrices are emphasized.


Pre-Calculus (3162)                                          Grade Level: 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

The goal of this course is to lay the groundwork for further study of mathematics at the
college level. A graphing calculator will be an integral component of the course.
Students must demonstrate competence in Algebra II before taking this course.


Calculus - AB (3177)                                         Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus

This college-level course is intended to prepare students for college and the Advanced
Placement Examination offered by the College Board. This course is intended for
students who desire a challenge in mathematics. A graphing calculator will be an
integral component of the course. Students must demonstrate competence in Pre-
Calculus and Trigonometry before taking this course.

Algebra, Functions, and Data Analysis/AFD (3134)
Prerequisite: Algebra I                                      Grades Level: 11-12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the standards for
Algebra I. Within the context of mathematical modeling and data analysis, students will
study functions and their behaviors, systems of inequalities, probability, experimental
design and implementation, and analysis of data. Data will be generated by practical
applications arising from science, business, and finance. Students will solve problems
that require the formulation of linear, quadratic, exponential, or logarithmic equations
or a system of equations.

Computer Mathematics (3184)                                  Grade Level: 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course is an introductory level course in Computer Programming. The first part of
the course will be using structured BASIC to develop practical programs. The second
part of the course will be using Visual Basic to develop application software. This
course stresses logical thinking. The work is done primarily in class, on computer.
Students should complete Algebra I before enrolling in this course.
                                       MUSIC


                                           38
Advanced Band (9234)
Pre-requisite: Must play an insturment                         Grade Level: 9-12

This class is open to students who demonstrate musical proficiency on a band
instrument (woodwind, brass, or percussion). Required activities include winter and
spring performances as well as participation in the marching band, which includes a
two-week preparatory “band-camp” during the summer, after-school rehearsals, and
performances at all home basketball and football games and parades. As a performance
class, attendance at all of the previously mentioned events is factored in the student’s
grade.

Select Chorus (9285)                                           Grade Level: 9-12

This class is open to students who demonstrate musical proficiency in vocal techniques.
Students must have prior experience in middle and/or high school choral programs.
Required activities include winter and spring performances, workshops, and festivals
located both at the school and outside locations. As a performance class, attendance at
all of the previously mentioned events is factored in the student’s grade.

Music Theory (9225)                                            Grades Level: 9- 12

Music Theory is designed to develop a student’s ability to recognize understand and
describe the basic process and materials used in music. Emphasis is on basic
components in the creation of what is heard or presented in a musical score. Students
will be required to read, notate, compose, perform, and listen to music of varied periods
and cultures. Aural, analytical and compositional skills will be emphasized using both
listening and written exercises. Music history, the relationship of the history of music to
the other arts, historical perspective of music, and world events will also be stressed
throughout the year. This also includes the study of basic compositional techniques and
an exploration of career possibilities in music.

Beginning Guitar (9245)                                        Grade Level: 9-12

This course is open to students who have an interest in learning beginning guitar
techniques and basic music theory. Group and one-on-one instructional techniques are
used. School-owned instruments are available.




                                         SCIENCE


                                            39
Earth & Space Science (4210)                                  Grade Level: 9
SOL Test Required
Earth-Space Science is a course dealing with the topics of geology, meteorology,
oceanography, astronomy, conservation, and the environment. The course is divided
into lecture-demonstration periods, study periods, and laboratory work periods. The
course attempts to show the students the relationships between themselves and Earth
processes and the universe.

Advanced Earth & Space Science (4211)                   Grade Level: 9
SOL Test Required
This is a rigorous course dealing with the topics of geology, meteorology,
oceanography, astronomy, and environmental science. The course is divided into
lecture/discussion periods and laboratory work periods. The course requires students
to develop an understanding of how Earth processes impact human activities and vice
versa, Earth’s history and the history of the universe.

Biology I (4310)                                               Grade Level: 10
SOL Test Required
Prerequisite: Earth Science
This is an introductory course into the study of living organisms. Students will survey
the plant, animal, and microorganism kingdoms, exploring the anatomical and
behavioral adaptations which allow certain organisms to survive. After completion of
the class, students should appreciate well the vast scope of the history of life on earth.

Advanced Biology I (4311)                                Grade Level: 10
SOL Test Required
Prerequisite: Earth Science
This is an advanced course in biological sciences. Although the core content of this
course is the same as that of Biology I, the grading system will be more stringent, and
the expectations for quality learning will be much higher. Advanced Biology students
will complete extra projects, assignments, and enrichment activities that are not
required in Biology I.




Environmental Science (4340)                                   Grade Level: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Biology I



                                            40
This course is an introductory level study in general ecology. It is designed to help the
student understand environmental principles, the consequences of human activities,
and the impact of these activities on the earth. All students who will make future
environmental decisions through their vote and through their actions as citizens will
benefit from this class.


Chemistry (4410)                                              Grade Level: 10 - 12
SOL Test Required
Prerequisite: Biology I & Algebra II (or co-requisite)
The content and purpose of this course is to not only give students an introduction to
the study of chemistry, but also to give students the knowledge necessary to excel on
the SOL test required by the state. The curriculum of this course is demanding and
paced in such a way that all SOL objectives are completed and reviewed prior to the
spring test. Class attendance, strong math aptitude, and good study skills are required
to satisfactorily complete this course. Students should successfully complete Algebra II
before beginning this course.

Marine Biology (4320)                                         Grade Level: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Biology I
An advanced lab and field science designed for students interested in ecology, wildlife
biology, and aquatic habitats. Students will explore the Ecology of marine life, with
emphasis on the local ecosystems of the Rappahannock River, Chesapeake Bay, and
Mid-Atlantic Coast. They will study environmental conditions and learn how these
influence marine organisms. Students will discover ways that different marine
organisms interact with one another. Students will conduct many mandatory field
studies, some requiring physical outdoor work.

Anatomy & Physiology (4330)                                  Grade Level: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Biology I
This is a rigorous course in human biology designed for students considering a future
in a medical or other health profession. The focus is on human anatomy and
physiology, cell biology, genetics, and human disease. Animal dissection is a part of
this class.

Physics I (4510)                                             Grade Level: 11, 12
Prerequisite or co-requisite: Pre-calculus
This course explores the behavior of our physical world through analysis of motion
using force, energy, and momentum concepts, followed by a study of electricity and
magnetism, light, sound, and wave behavior. The necessary mathematics is reviewed
in class and is used to support the more challenging conceptual understanding that will
be developed.
AP Biology                                                         Grade Level: 12
Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry and AP Application


                                            41
AP biology is designed as a rigorous academic course. Students who successfully pass
the AP biology exam will earn college credits. This college level course is offered to
students who have completed high school biology and chemistry. This course will use
a college level textbook and maintain college level expectations for all students enrolled.
The three areas of concentration for this course are Molecules and Cells, Heredity and
Evolution, and Organisms and Populations. Students who successfully complete this
course will gain a conceptual understanding of science as a process, evolution, energy
transfer, continuity and change, relationship to structure and function, regulation,
interdependence in nature, and science, technology and society. There is a laboratory
component to the course and students will be expected to complete some assignments
online.




                                SOCIAL STUDIES


World Geography (2217)                                         Grades Level: 9-11
SOL Test Required
 Geography is the study of people, places, and resources. Students will explore the five
themes of geography-location, place, region, movement, and human-environmental
interaction. Physical and cultural geography of each continent will be discussed using
various types of maps. Students will also compare economic and government systems
and the impact of resources on development. Elements of culture like language,
religion, art, and architecture will be examined for each region of the world. Students
will also discuss problems like natural disasters, poverty, and rapid urbanization. An
emphasis will be placed on interdependence and cooperation between regions of the
world.


Ancient World History and Geography (2341)                      Grade Level: 9
SOL Test Required
This course is designed to increase the student’s knowledge of the beginnings of
mankind to 1500 A. D. It will trace the physical and cultural development of mankind.
Special emphasis will be placed on analyzing the influence of geography, government,
religion, literature and wars on the different civilizations. Using texts, documents,
maps, diagrams, and charts, students will develop an historical and geographic
comprehension of cultures. Students are required to do several written and oral reports
and independent research projects comparing and contrasting aspects of the major
civilizations.



                                            42
Modern World History and Geography (2342)                    Grade Level: 10
SOL Test Required
This course focuses on the study of the modern world from 1600 A.D. Students’
understanding of the relationships of history, geography, economic and political events
will be emphasized. Using texts, maps and charts, students will develop a
comprehension of the history of different cultures and how this history has become part
of American culture. Spatial concepts of geography will be connected to the
chronological development of nations and people.


Virginia and United States History (2360)                     Grade Level: 11
SOL Test Required
This course is a study of the founding and development of the United States through
the examination of major events, people, issues, and policies. The principles in major
documents such as the declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Virginia
Statute of Religious Freedom are examined and related to life in modern times. Skills
are developed in the areas of interpreting charts, and graphs, as well as learning the
mechanics of developing a research project on a topic of the students’ choice.

AP United States History (2319)                         Grade Level: 11
SOL Test Required
Prerequisite: AP application
This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making
demands upon them equivalent to those made by first-year college courses. It is
designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary
to deal critically with problems and issues in American History. Students will learn to
evaluate historical materials for relevance to a problem, reliability, and importance.
Methods of instruction include movies, lectures, essays, reading, book critiques,
research papers, and role modeling. Owing to the nature of the course, only students
who desire an academic challenge in a pre-college history class should consider it.

Virginia and United States Government (2440)                    Grade Level: 12
This class consists of an in-depth study of our Democratic Republic and its interactions
and relations with foreign governments. It takes an extensive look at the Constitution,
its history, its changes, and each of the three branches of government which it
establishes- the executive, legislative, and judicial. Additional focus is placed on the
current issues that affect our country in its domestic and foreign affairs, as well as
criminal law, political parties, and state and local governments. Independent research
projects of various sizes and oral presentations are required for completion of this
course. Several Socratic Seminars may be held throughout the year dealing with major
political questions and current issues.

Sociology (2500)                                             Grade Level: 11, 12



                                           43
This course is a subject about how people act, react, and interact in their everyday lives,
as well as under unusual circumstances. Students will learn how research on groups of
varying sizes is conducted to help predict behavior, as well as studying adolescence, the
adult and elderly, death and dying, social inequality, and marriage and family. The
class requires several research projects such as developing one’s family tree, conducting
community observations, and studying a particular social problem through current
events. Several Socratic Seminars are held throughout the year concerning major social
issues.

A.P. Government and Politics (2445)                                           Grade Level: 12
Pre-requisite: AP application
This College Board Advanced Placement course is taught as a college course to prepare seniors
to take the AP examination and potentially earn college credit. Students will develop an
analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course includes both
the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples.
Students will become familiar with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that
constitute U.S. politics. This course is for highly motivated students who are ready for college
coursework. Students should also have a genuine interest in government and politics.


DE Psychology (2509)/                                           Grade Level: 12
This is a college-level program offered for high-ability seniors requiring extensive
reading and outside projects.
The college course equivalents are PSY 201-202 and SOC 201-202. The psychology
courses examine human and animal behavior, relating experimental studies to practical
problems. Included are topics such as sensation/perception, learning memory,
motivation, emotion, stress development, intelligence, personality, psychopathology,
therapy, and social psychology.

Sociology at RCC (2900)                                         Grade Level: 12
 The sociology courses introduce basic concepts and methods of sociology. They
present significant research and theory in areas such as socialization, group dynamics,
gender roles, minority group relations, stratification, deviance, culture, community
studies, population, social change, and the social institutions: family, education,
religion, political system, and economic system.

Students must pass the RCC placement test, complete application and forms.
Students are responsible for providing their own transportation.
Students are responsible for requesting transcripts to be sent to Essex High School.
Visit www.rcc.vcccs.edu for registration and course information.
                                SPECIAL EDUCATION




                                                 44
Reading & Language Arts (7822)                           Grade Level: 9 – 12
The reading portion of this class is designed to provide individualized instruction to aid
students in the following areas: word-recognition, utilization of context clues, sentence
structure development, essential spelling and dictionary skills, pleasure reading, and
comprehension skills. This class is also designed to provide individualized instruction
in the development of communication skills, especially the basic skills of listening,
speaking, writing, and reading. Vocabulary development is an important component of
the class. Emphasis is placed on survival skills in reading, and life skills are stressed.
This class may also covers a variety of short stories and a novel in literature, vocabulary
development, word recognition, context clues, and writing skills. Students learn
methods of developing and writing paragraphs and longer compositions. Grammar
emphasizes sentence structure, capitalization and punctuation

Math (7823)                                             Grade Level: 9 – 12
This class is designed to provide individualized and small group instruction for
students on their math levels. It stresses the development of math concepts and
computational skills in addition,, subtraction, multiplication, division, problem-solving,
place value, money, paychecks, simple geometry, fractions, decimals, percents, and
measurements. Independent living skills are stressed.

Social Studies (7824)                                   Grade Level: 9 – 12
This class provides instruction on the development of the United States through the
examination of major events, people, issues and policies. This course is designed to
improve the students’ knowledge of U.S. and Virginia history, geography, and
government. Major skills emphasized include map and globe skills, chart and graph
interpretation, as well as thinking skills. The SOLs for U.S. history and government will
be covered over a four-year span.

Earth & Space Science (7827)                          Grade Level: 9 – 10
This introductory course covers the topics of Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography,
Astronomy, Conservation, and the Environment. It attempts to show the students the
relationships between themselves and their surroundings.

Biology (7827)                                          Grade Level: 11 – 12
This is an introductory course in the study of living organisms, the Earth, and its
environment. Through a wide variety of learning activities, students will develop an
understanding of the processes that make life on Earth possible; and the relationships
between living things and their surroundings.

Instructional Assistance (7864)                       Grade Level: 9 – 12
Instructional Assistance is a learning support program. The focus is on study and
organizational skills. Students must keep a planner and write assignments in the
planner. Students will focus on learning how to become more organized and



                                            45
independent. Students will have the option to utilize the computer lab to improve
reading and math skills. Students will be graded on performance and will receive an
elective credit.

Vocational Education (7826)                             Grade Level: 9 – 12
This class provides instruction to help students learn basic work skills for everyday
living in such tasks as banking, completing job applications, interviewing for jobs,
reading classified ads, and using the telephone properly. This class identifies a wide
range of job opportunities and aids students in making appropriate career choices.
Students become competent in economic self-sufficiency. They will demonstrate the
knowledge necessary to obtain and manage living quarters.

 Independent Living Skills(7896)                    Grade Level: 9-12
This class provides a variety of basic life skills instruction in order to live more
independently within our society. Students will practice hands on experiences such as
washing clothes, going to a laundry mat, cooking, following a recipe, reading maps,
using a phone/phonebook, performing calls to obtain information, mailing letters/bills,
typing, keyboarding, and computer skills.




                     NORTHERN NECK TECHNICAL CENTER
                       P.O. BOX 787, WARSAW, VA 22572
                     PHONE: (804) 333-4940 FAX: (804) 333-0538
                          (www.northernnecktech.org)


                                           46
Colonial Beach . Essex . Lancaster . Northumberland . Rappahannock . Washington & Lee


The Northern Neck Technical Center (NNTC) is a secondary school offering technical
courses to students in the five school districts in the Northern Neck and one in the
Middle Peninsula. Students attend classes in block periods. The first block runs from
9:00 to 11:30 a.m. The second block is from 12:00 to 2:30 p.m.

Classes are offered with a two-year completion certification with the exception of
Nursing Assistant and Electrical, which are one-year courses.
Students in Cosmetology and Nursing Assistant courses are required to take the State
board for licensure upon completion of the classes. Our Nursing Assistant and Marine
Technology students receive college and high school credit upon completion of these
dual enrollment courses.

All completers are required to take an industry certification test for a verified credit.
Please complete the Admission Packet and return it to your school counselor. When we
receive the completed packet from your home school, we will submit it to our guidance
counselor for review. Our goal is to have all admissions processed and reported to your
home school by May 21, 2011. NNCT welcome students and their parents who may
want to meet with the Principal and tour our facility.

Northern Neck Technical Center (NNTC) Applications are available in the Guidance
office.

Students interested in the Nurse Aide program MUST complete:
    NNTC application
    NNTC nursing application
    Two (2) teachers recommendations forms




                     NORTHERN NECK TECHNICAL CENTER
                       P.O. BOX 787, WARSAW, VA 22572
                     PHONE: (804) 333-4940 FAX: (804) 333-0538
                          (www.northernnecktech.org)


                                           47
 Colonial Beach . Essex . Lancaster . Northumberland . Rappahannock . Washington & Lee

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE

Our application process has been developed to provide a plan so that each students and
each participating school district has the information needed to register for courses at
the Northern Neck Technical Center. Each year we evaluate the application process. In
our effort to make the process accessible and valid, we solicit information from each
participating school district. This data will be used to continue to improve and
streamline our current application.

1. Student completes Admission Application to Northern Neck Technical Center and
reviews it with the School Counselor at his/her home school. To be considered
complete, the application must provide the student’s first and             second choice of
technical program.
2. The School Counselor attaches the student profile to the application and
         submits it to the Northern Neck Technical Center.
3. If the student receives special services:
        a) Student’s I.E.P. Case Manager must sign the course request portion of the
        application.
        b) A copy of the Current Level of Performance and Accommodations must
        accompany the application and competencies check list must be included.
4. Completed applications are sent to the Northern Neck Technical Center.
        All applications must be received by May 21, 2011.
5. Each of the participating schools is allotted four slots per class. If the school
does not apply for these four slots, they will be appropriated to another school
district.
6. Students will be notified of their application status by their School Counselor
        at that time alternative placement may be discussed.
7. Home schools will work with their students and parents to ensure proper
        placement is achieved.




                NORTHERN NECK TECHNICAL CENTER COURSES

 A Northern Neck Technical Center Application must be completed and submitted by all
   students enrolling in the following program by May 20, 2011.


                                              48
 All students must be 16 years old on or before December 1st of the current school year to
  enroll in a NNTC program of studies .Students receive 3 credits for each class.
 Website: www.northernnecktech.org
 No new entries will be allowed in the program after September 16, 2011.




Automotive Body I (8679)                                          Grade Level: 11
Automotive Body II (8680)                                         Grade Level: 12
The Collision Repair Technology course is designed to give training in automobile body
repair, body construction, all types of collision repair including frame and wheel
alignment, body panel repair and replacement, MIG welding, brazing, spot repairing
and estimating.

Repairpersons must be able to analyze correctly all types of body damage and restore
vehicles to their original appearances. This is a two-year program, but students may
return for a third year through special arrangements.

Automotive Technology I (8710)                             Grade Level: 11
Automotive Technology II (8711)                            Grade Level: 12
The Auto Technology program is designed to provide a thorough knowledge of the
mechanics of the modern automobile and all its supporting systems, to develop an
individual’s mechanical ability, and develop interest in an automotive repair and
service career. The curriculum is designed primarily for persons who seek full-time
employment in the automotive maintenance and general repair field immediately upon
completion of the two-year program. The course will develop the student’s skills in the
use of the most modern automotive repair tools and equipment.

For one to advance successfully in this program of study, a thorough understanding of
the automobile, its basic operating principles, mechanical aptitude, and manual
dexterity are required.

The curriculum follows the standards of A.S.E. (National Institute for Automotive
Service Excellence) and includes: engine performance, use of diagnostic equipment, the
theory of computer-controlled automotive systems, electronic systems, and VA State
inspections.




Carpentry I/Residential Construction (8515)                   Grade Level: 11
Carpentry II/Residential Construction (8516)                  Grade Level: 12
This group of instructional programs prepares students to erect, install, maintain, and
repair buildings, and other structures using materials such as metal, wood, stone, brick,


                                               49
glass, concrete and composition substances. Students develop skills in estimating costs;
cutting, fastening, and fitting various materials; using hand and power tools; and
following technical specifications and blueprints.

Computer Systems Technology I (8622)                          Grade Level: 11
This course is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience
in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter
employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field.
A task analysis of current industry standards and occupational analysis was used in the
development of the content standards.

Instruction includes, but is not limited to, safety, networking, networking terminology
and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, OSI models, Ethernet, Token Ring,
Fiber Distributed Interface, TCP/IP Addressing Protocol, Dynamic Routing, Routing,
and the Network Administrator's role and function. Particular emphasis is given to the
use of decision-making and problem solving techniques in applying science,
mathematics, communication, and social studies concepts to solve networking
problems.

In addition, instruction and training are provided in the proper care, maintenance and
use of networking software, tools and equipment, and all local, state and federal safety,
building and environmental codes and regulations.

Computer Systems Technology II (8623)                         Grade Level: 12
This course includes the study of computer hardware, software, functions, and
limitations of computer systems; and exposes students to the techniques used in
programming and system development. The students learn how to disassemble and
reassemble the PC, with emphasis on replacement and upgrading components.
Students are provided classroom and laboratory experience in Networking technology.

Instruction includes networking terminology, protocols, standards, cabling, routers and
network standards. Upon completion of this course, students may take the A+
Examination leading to A+ Certification.

Cosmetology I (8527)                                          Grade Level: 11
Cosmetology II (8528)                                         Grade Level: 12
Cosmetology is a two-year course. It provides training in manicuring, shampooing,
permanent waving, facials, massages, scalp treatment, hair cutting, chemical relaxing
and styling. A student who satisfactorily completes the two years of study in
cosmetology at the center qualifies to take the State Board Examination to become a
licensed cosmetologist.




                                            50
This course is restricted to eleventh and twelfth graders who should be ready to take
the state board exam just after graduation from high school.

Culinary Arts I (8275)                                         Grade Level: 11
Culinary Arts II (8276/8277)                                   Grade Level: 12
The Culinary Arts course is designed to prepare students for entering employment in
food service occupations. The training program is particularly valuable because a major
portion of the student's skill is acquired through actual cooking, study in the use and
care of equipment, food standards and proper sanitation procedures including public
health aspects of food handling. It is a two-year program. Students may take a third
year with emphasis on catering.

Electricity (8533)                                              Grade Level: 11
Electricity (8544)                                              Grade Level: 12
With the growth of housing and industry, more appliances and electrical equipment are
showing up in the environment and there has become a need for electricians and
technicians to install, repair, and maintain these commodities. Residential wiring is the
basis for all these areas that involve the transportation and use of electricity. This career
can be continued in Community college or a job training program offered by many
large industries.

The program focuses first and foremost on safety. Other areas the students will explore
are:




          -in of boxes and cables


                                        communications skills

Technical Drawing and Design (8492)                                  Grade Level: 11
Prerequisite: Geometry
In this foundation course students learn the basic language of technical design, and they
design, sketch, and make technical drawings, models, or prototypes of real design
problems. Students use computers, calculators, descriptive geometry, and established
standards to solve design problems in product design, technical illustration, assembly,
patent, and engineering design. This course is followed by Architectural
Drawing/Design. It is especially recommended for future engineering and architecture
students.




                                             51
Architectural Drawing/Design (8437)                           Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: Technical Drawing/Design
Students learn the principles of architecture and increase understanding of working
drawings and construction techniques learned in the prerequisite course. Experiences
include residential and commercial building designs, rendering, model making,
structural details, and community planning. Students use computer-aided drawing and
design (CADD) equipment and established standards or codes to prepare models for
presentation. The course provides information helpful to the future architect, interior
designer, or home builder.


Nurse Aide (8362)                                             Grade Level: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Nursing Application and 2 Teacher Recommendations
This is a college level course with dual enrollment at Rappahannock Community
College. Nursing Assistant is a one-year program designed to help a student learn basic
knowledge and develop skills necessary to become a nursing aide. In health care
facilities, this work generally consists of bathing patients, tracking and recording vital
signs and other duties that enable nurses to devote more time to work requiring
professional and technical training.

This program consists of theory and practice in the classroom setting, and clinical
experience in the local nursing homes and hospitals. At the completion of this program,
students will be eligible to take the State Board of Nurse's Aide Examination. This
examination consists of both a written and manual test. Successful completion allows
the student to be placed on the State Registry for Certified Nurse's Aides.


Emergency Medical Technician I (8333)                  Grade Level: 11
Emergency Medical Technician II (8334)                 Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: 2 Teacher Recommendations

This two-year program prepares students to perform as emergency medical technicians.
Students are prepared to determine nature and extent of illness or injury take vital signs
and establish priority of emergency care. Students will participate in extricating
patients from entrapment; use prescribed techniques and equipment, report
observations both verbally and in writing about care of patients at the scene and en-
route to the hospital. Program completers will be eligible to take the State Certification
Exam administered by the Virginia State Office of EMS. CPR Certification is a required
component of the program.
Students must maintain a “C” average in order to be eligible to take the state exam.
Students must be a senior unless he/she is a member of a local rescue squad or fire
department.




                                            52
GED / ISAEP
The GED (General Education Development) class is an alternative education program
for students who are at least sixteen years old, and who are lacking credits needed to
graduate with their class. Students must meet GED qualifying test requirements in
order to take the GED exam. Test scores in each of the five testing areas must be a
minimum of 450, totaling 2250 points.

The ISAEP (Individual Student Alternative Education Plan) is an educational program
established to serve and assist students who appear unlikely to complete a traditional
high school program. It provides the opportunity to earn a modified high school
diploma and to gain training, employability skills, and vocational experience to enter
the work force.
Culinary Arts, Nurse Aide, Emergency Medical Technician, Engineering
Drawing/Design and Architectural Drawing/Design are dual enrolled with RCC.

Students who pass the RCC placement and successfully complete these classes will receive
community college credit and one high school credit for each course.




Course Registration Form                                             Date:




                                           53
Essex High School

Student Name:

Current Grade:                                Student Number:

Name of Parent or Guardian:

Telephone Number:


Diploma Program: (Circle One)                 Standard          Advanced Studies              IEP          Modified

Courses Requested:                                                                                     Code #

1.                                                                                                     #

2.                                                                                                     #

3.                                                                                                     #

4.                                                                                                     #

5.                                                                                                     #

6.                                                                                                     #

7.                                                                                                     #

Please list two alternate classes that you would like to take in the case of scheduling conflicts. List them in the order
of preference. A remedial class will be added if your test scores show a need.


1.                                                                                                     #

2.                                                                                                     #


Parent/Guardian(s):

Please check the courses above. If this schedule meets with your approval, please sign below and
return this form to your child’s guidance counselor the day after the scheduling meeting.
Signature:                                                                   Date:
                                              ESSEX HIGH SCHOOL
                                               FINE ARTS OFFERED



                                                           54
        Art I                                                Advanced Band
        Art II                                               Chorus
        Advanced Art III                                     Guitar
        Advanced IV                                          Music Theory

         CTE/VOCATIONAL COMPLETERS/SEQUENTIAL ELECTIVES/ PRACTICAL ARTS

AGRICULTURE
3 of the following:
Foundations of Agricultural, Food, and Natural Resource Systems
Agricultural Business Operations                              Agricultural Business Fundamentals
Horticulture Sciences                                          Landscaping
Leadership

BUSINESS
2 of the following:
        Computer Applications                                Principles of Business Management
        Computer Information Systems                         Business Marketing
        Information Technology Fundamentals                  DE Business Management
        DE Design, Multimedia &Web Technology                Economics & Personal Finance


FAMILY, CONSUMER AND CAREER STUDIES
2 of the following:
        Individual Development/Nutrition & Wellness
        Life Planning/Resource Management
        Parenting/Family Relations
        Work & Family




                                  PROGRAMS OFFERED AT
                           THE NORTHERN NECK TECHNICAL CENTER


        Auto Service Technology (2 years)            Cosmetology (2 years)
        Carpentry (2 years)                          Nursing Aide I (1 year)
        Auto Body Technology (2 years)               Culinary Arts (2 years)
        Electricity (2 years)                        Computer Systems Technology (2 years)
        Emergency Medical Technician (2 years)       Architectural Drawing (2 years)




AP Course Registration Form                                                 Date:




                                                55
Essex High School



Student Name:
                   First                       Middle                  Last                        Suffix (Jr., III, etc.)

Current Grade:                       Birth Date:                       Student Number:

Name of Parent or Guardian:

Mailing Address:
                           Number & Street or P.O. Box


                           City                                                 State              Zip Code

Home Phone #:                                                     Parent’s Work Phone #:



AP Course Information

   Students receiving an advanced studies diploma will earn a governor’s seal if they complete one AP or one
    college-level dual enrollment course and maintain a “B” or better average.
   Recommendations for placement in an AP class will be made based on the following criteria:
             1.     PSAT scores with guidelines indicated by the College Board.
             2.     Academic performance in preceding classes in the content area of the AP course.
             3.     Teacher assessments.
   All AP students will be required to complete summer assignments prior to opening day of the school year.
   All students are expected to take the AP exam.
   All students enrolled in a Virtual Virginia Course must take the AP exam.


Please check the course(s) in which you plan to enroll for the 2011-2012 school year.

AP Course(s)                                                          Code #
    AP English Literature & Composition (12)                         1195
    AP US History (11)                                               2319
    AP Government (12)                                               2445
    AP Biology (12)                                                  4370
    Pre-AP English Literature(11)                                    1153
    Virtual Virginia ___________________                ____________________



Please check the courses above. If this scheduling request meets with your approval, sign below and return this form
to the guidance office on or before May 31, 2011.

Student’s Signature:                                                                       Date:

Parent/Guardian’s Signature:                                                               Date:

Teacher’s Signature: ______________________________________________________Date:_________________


                 GOVERNOR’S EARLY COLLEGE SCHOLARS AGREEMENT


                                                          56
The responsibilities of each party are outlined herein and the corresponding signature assures
acceptance of responsibility of each party.
The student agrees to:
        • Earn an Advanced Studies Diploma or an Advanced Technical Diploma with a Governor’s
            Seal. To receive a Governor’s seal, students must:
                          Complete the requirements for the Advanced Studies Diploma or the
                         Advanced Technical Diploma;
                          Earn a “B” average or higher; and
                           
                          Successfully complete college-level coursework that will earn the student
                              at least nine transferable college credits in Advanced Placement (AP),
                              International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge, or dual enrollment courses.
        • Earn at least 15 transferable college credits while enrolled in high school. College credits
            toward completion of this Agreement will be considered earned by:
                          Completing dual enrollment/dual credit courses and earning a “C” or better
                              in the courses
                          Completing advanced placement courses i.e., AP, IB or Cambridge and
                                       • Scoring a “3” or higher on the AP examinations or
                                       • Scoring a “4” or higher on any form of the IB examinations or
                                       • Scoring a “D” or better on the Cambridge examinations
                          Earning college credits by passing College Level Examination Program
                              (CLEP) examinations
                          Completing college-level courses and documenting credit awarded
        • Apply and be accepted to a college or university

_____________________________________ ______________________
Student Signature                              Date
The parent/guardian agrees to:
       • Support and monitor student’s academic work and progress in school, particularly as it relates
            to fulfillment of the requirements for the Governor’s Early College Scholars Agreement.
I understand that the actual number of transferable college credits awarded depends on the criteria of
the admitting college or university.

______________________________________ _____________________
Parent/Guardian Signature                       Date

The high school agrees to:
       • Provide the student opportunities to access college-level courses and/or advanced placement
           courses needed to fulfill this agreement.
       • Provide the counseling services needed to fulfill the requirements of the Governor’s Early
           College Scholars Agreement, including assisting students in developing a program of study.
       • Provide the Virginia Department of Education with data regarding participation and completion
           of the Governor’s Early College Scholars program.
________________________________________ ____________________
High School Principal Signature                         Date

________________________________________ ___________________
High School Guidance Counselor                         Date




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