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					Facts of Peanuts
      From Monday, October 2, 1950, until the final strip appeared on Sunday,
February 13, 2000 -- ironically, the morning after he died -- Schulz gave the world a
total of 17,897 strips: 15,391 daily strips, and 2,506 Sundays.
      Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday comic strip written and illustrated by
Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000 (the day
after Schulz's death), continuing in reruns afterward. The strip is considered to be one
of the most popular and influential in the history of the medium, with 17,897 strips
published in all, making it "arguably the longest story ever told by one human being,"
according to Professor Robert Thompson of Syracuse University. At its peak, Peanuts
ran in over 2,600 newspapers, with a readership of 355 million in 75 countries, and
was translated into 21 languages. It helped to cement the four-panel gag strip as the
standard in the United States, and together with its merchandise earned Schulz more
than $1 billion.
The Debut of Peanuts
     Peanuts had its origin in Li'l Folks, a weekly panel comic that appeared in
Schulz's hometown paper, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, from 1947 to 1950. He first
used the name Charlie Brown for a character there, although he applied the name in
four gags to three different boys and one buried in sand. The series also had a dog that
looked much like Snoopy.
     Schulz wanted to retain the title LI'L FOLKS, but the syndicate worried that this
was too close to a previously copyrighted feature, Tack Knight's LITTLE FOLKS.
UFS production manager Bill Anderson is credited with coming up with PEANUTS,
although he later insisted that he'd been asked to suggest a kid strip title without
actually having SEEN the strip. He delivered a list of 10 names, of which PEANUTS
was one. He later justified this selection on the basis of the popular TV children's
show of the time, THE HOWDY DOODY SHOW, where the young studio
audience would sit in a "peanut gallery."
      "It was the worst title ever thought up for a comic strip," Schulz would insist,
every time he was asked. In a 1987 interview, Schulz said of the title Peanuts: "It's
totally ridiculous, has no meaning, is simply confusing, and has no dignity — and I
think my humor has dignity." The worst part, he feared, was that people confuse
Charlie Brown with the name "Peanuts," and in the early days that was true: Schulz
received letters from fans that read along the lines of, "I love this new strip with
Peanuts and his dog."

      Peanuts premiered on October 2, 1950, in seven newspapers: The Washington Post,
The Chicago Tribune, The Minneapolis Tribune, The Allentown Call-Chronicle, The
Bethlehem Globe-Times, The Denver Post and The Seattle Times. It began as a daily strip;
its first Sunday strip appeared January 6, 1952, in the half page format, which was the only
complete format for the entire life of the Sunday strip.

What is Drawn In Peanuts

      Schulz made the decision to produce all aspects of the strip, from the script to the
finished art and lettering, himself. Thus the strip was able to be presented with a unified
tone, and Schulz was able to employ a minimalistic style.

     Peanuts is remarkable for its deft social commentary, especially compared with other
strips appearing in the 1950s and early 1960s. Schulz did not explicitly address racial and
gender equality issues so much as he assumed them to be self-evident in the first place.
Peppermint Patty's athletic skill and self-confidence is simply taken for granted, for
example, as is Franklin's presence in a racially-integrated school and neighborhood.

     Schulz would throw satirical barbs at any number of topics when he chose. Over the
years he tackled everything from the Vietnam War to school dress codes to the "new
math".

      Peanuts touched on religious themes on many occasions, most notably the classic
television special A Charlie Brown Christmas in 1965, which features the character Linus
van Pelt quoting the King James Version of the Bible (Luke 2:8-14) to explain to Charlie
Brown "what Christmas is all about." (In personal interviews, Schulz mentioned that Linus
represented his spiritual side.)

     Peanuts probably reached its peak in American pop-culture awareness between 1965
and 1980; this period was the heyday of the daily strip, and there were numerous animated
specials and book collections.




Honors
      Peanuts characters featured on the cover of the April 9, 1965 issue of TIME
magazine.
      Peanuts is often regarded as one of the most influential and well-written comic
strips of all time. Schulz received the National Cartoonist Society Humor Comic Strip
Award for Peanuts in 1962, the Elzie Segar Award in 1980, the Reuben Award in 1955
and 1964, and the Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. A Charlie
Brown Christmas won a Peabody Award and an Emmy; Peanuts cartoon specials have
received a total of 2 Peabody Awards and 4 Emmys. For his work on the strip, Charles
Schulz is credited with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and a place in the
William Randolph Hearst Cartoon Hall of Fame. Peanuts was featured on the cover of
Time Magazine on April 9, 1965, with the accompanying article praising the strip as
being "the leader of a refreshing new breed that takes an unprecedented interest in the
basics of life."
     Considered amongst the greatest comic strips of all time, Peanuts was declared
second in a list of the greatest comics of the 20th century commissioned by The Comics
Journal in 1999. Peanuts lost out to George Herriman's Krazy Kat, a strip Schulz admired,
and he accepted the positioning in good grace, to the point of agreeing with the result. In
2002 TV Guide declared Snoopy and Charlie Brown equal 8th in their list of "Top 50
Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time", published to commemorate their 50th
anniversary.

     In 2001, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors renamed the Sonoma County
Airport, located a few miles northwest of Santa Rosa, California, the Charles M. Schulz
Airport in his honor. The airport's logo features Snoopy in goggles and scarf, taking to the
skies on top of his red doghouse. A bronze statue of Charlie Brown and Snoopy stands in
Depot Park in downtown Santa Rosa.

     Over the years, the Peanuts characters have appeared in ads for Dolly Madison snack
cakes, Chex Mix, Bounty, A&W Root Beer, Kraft Foods, and Ford automobiles. Pig-Pen
appeared in a memorable spot for Regina vacuum cleaners.

      They are currently spokespeople in print and television advertisements for the
MetLife insurance company. MetLife usually uses Snoopy in its advertisements as opposed
to other characters: for instance, the MetLife blimps are named "Snoopy One" and
"Snoopy Two" and feature him in his World War I flying ace persona.
     The characters have been featured on Hallmark Cards since 1960, and can be found
adorning clothing, figurines, plush dolls, flags, balloons, posters, Christmas ornaments, and
countless other bits of licensed merchandise.

     The Apollo 10 lunar module was nicknamed "Snoopy" and the command module
"Charlie Brown". While not included in the official mission logo, Charlie Brown and
Snoopy became semi-official mascots for the mission. Charles Schulz drew an original
picture of Charlie Brown in a spacesuit that was hidden aboard the craft to be found by the
astronauts once they were in orbit. This drawing is now on display at the Kennedy Space
Center. Snoopy is the personal safety mascot for NASA astronauts.

     The 1960s pop band, The Royal Guardsmen drew inspiration from Peanuts, and their
single Snoopy vs. The Red Baron reached number two on the charts.

     In the Sixties, Robert L. Short interpreted certain themes and conversations in Peanuts
as being consistent with parts of Christian theology, and used them as illustrations during
his lectures about the gospel, and as source material for several books, as he explained in
his bestselling paperback book, The Gospel According to Peanuts.

      In 1980, Charles Schulz was introduced to artist Tom Everhart during a collaborative
art project. Everhart became fascinated with Schulz's art style and worked Peanuts themed
art into his own work. Schulz encouraged Everhart to continue with his work. Everhart
continues to be the only artist authorized to paint Peanuts characters.

    Giant helium balloons of Charlie Brown and Snoopy have long been a feature in the
annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.

     The characters were licensed for use in 1992 as atmosphere for the national
amusement park chain Cedar Fair. The images of the Peanuts characters are used
frequently, most visibly in several versions of the logo for flagship park, Cedar Point.
Knott's Berry Farm, which was later acquired by Cedar Fair, was the first theme park to
make Snoopy its mascot. Cedar Fair also operated Camp Snoopy, an indoor amusement
park in the Mall of America until the mall took over its operation as of March 2005,
renaming it The Park at MOA, and no longer using the Peanuts characters as its theme.

     Peanuts on Parade has been St. Paul, Minnesota’s tribute to Peanuts. It began in
2000, with the placing of 101 five-foot tall statues of Snoopy throughout the city of Saint
Paul. The statues were later auctioned at the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota.
In 2001, there was "Charlie Brown Around Town," 2002 brought "Looking for Lucy," and
finally, in 2003, "Linus Blankets Saint Paul." The statues were auctioned off at the end of
each summer, so some remain around the city but others have been relocated. Permanent,
bronze statues of the Peanuts characters are also found in Landmark Plaza in downtown
Saint Paul.

    The Peanuts characters have been licensed to Universal Studios Japan (while Peanuts
merchandise in Japan has been licensed by Sanrio, best known for Hello Kitty).

    In New Town Plaza, Sha Tin, Hong Kong, there is a mini theme park dedicated to
Snoopy.

     The Peanuts gang have also appeared in video games, such as Snoopy in a 1984 by
Radarsoft, Snoopy Tennis (Game Boy Color), and in October 2006, Snoopy vs. the Red
Baron by Namco Bandai. Many Peanuts characters have cameos in the latter game,
including Woodstock, Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, Marcie and Sally. In July 2007, the
Peanuts gang also made it onto cell phones in the Snoopy the Flying Ace mobile game by
Namco Networks.




                                                      October 2, 1950
                                                      Peanuts debuts in seven newspapers


                                                      June 1, 1954
                                                      Debut of Linus' security blanket


                                                      January 5, 1956
                                                      Snoopy first walks on two legs


                                                      1958
                                                      Yale University names Schulz Cartoonist of the
  Year.




1960
Hallmark introduces Peanuts greeting cards


1962
Peanuts is named Best Humor Strip of the Year
by the National Cartoonists Society


April 4, 1967
A bird strongly resembling Woodstock debuts


May 18, 1969
Charlie Brown and Snoopy accompany
astronauts into space aboard Apollo X
November 20, 1973
A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving debuts, and wins
an Emmy Award




August 1, 1983
Peanuts Collectors Club debuts, with a 12-page
newsletter


July 1, 1984
Peanuts is now seen in a record -breaking 2,000
newspapers around the world


October 1, 1989
Good Grief, the only authorized biography of
Charles Schulz, is published
                                                         2000
                                                         50th Anniversary of Peanuts


                                                         January 3, 2000
                                                         Charles Schulz bids a fond farewell to all his
                                                         readers in the final daily Peanuts newspaper
                                                         strip


                                                         February 12, 2000
                                                         Charles Schulz dies Saturday evening, of
                                                         complications from colon cancer in Santa Rosa,
                                                         CA. He was 77 years old.


                                                         February 13, 2000
                                                         The final Sunday Peanuts newspaper strip
                                                         appears


                                                         May 27, 2000
                                                         Charles Schulz given Lifetime Achievement
                                                         award by National Cartoonists Society


                                                         June 25, 2000
                                                         The Royal Caribbean Cruise Line's Voyager of
                                                         the Seas embarks on its Peanuts anniversary
                                                         cruise




Q. Who draws the PEANUTS strip today?


A. By the wishes of Mr. Schulz, no new strips are - nor ever will be - drawn & published. There
are new animated specials in development, but the story lines will be based entirely on themes
& dialogue from the strip's history.


The strips still published in your daily newspaper and on our Snoopy.com web site are actually
reprints from the 50 year/17,897 strip history of PEANUTS. The strips' relevance, charm, and
timeliness today are perhaps the most powerful proof of their quality.
In addition, Peanuts achieved considerable success for its television specials, several of
which, including A Charlie Brown Christmas[4] and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown[5]
won or were nominated for Emmy Awards. The holiday specials remain quite popular and
are currently broadcast on ABC in the United States during the appropriate season.


History



The first strip from October 2, 1950.

 [edit] 1950s

While the strip in its early years resembles its later form, there are significant differences.
The art was cleaner, sleeker, and simpler, with thicker lines and short, squat characters. For
example, in these early strips, Charlie Brown's famous round head is closer to the shape of
a football. Most of the kids were initially fairly round-headed.

[edit] 1960s-1970s

One of his most prescient sequences came in 1963 when he added a little boy named "5" to
the cast, whose sisters were named "3" and "4", and whose father had changed their family
name to their ZIP Code, giving in to the way numbers were taking over people's identities.
In 1957, a strip in which Snoopy tossed Linus into the air and boasted that he was the first
dog ever to launch a human, parodied the hype associated with Sputnik 2's launch of
"Laika" the dog into space earlier that year. Another sequence lampooned Little Leagues
and "organized" play, when all the neighborhood kids join snowman-building leagues and
criticize Charlie Brown when he insists on building his own snowmen without leagues or
coaches.

Peanuts did not shy away from cartoon violence. The most obvious example might be
Charlie Brown's annual, futile effort to kick the football while Lucy holds it. At the last
moment, she would pull the ball away just as he was kicking. The off-balance Charlie
would sail into the air and land on his back with a loud thud. There was also the
ever-present threat of Lucy to "slug" someone, especially her brother Linus. Though
violence would happen from time to time, no boy was ever depicted hitting a girl. Schulz
once said, "A girl hitting a boy is funny. A boy hitting a girl is not funny."
Peanuts probably reached its peak in American pop-culture awareness between 1965 and
1980; this period was the heyday of the daily strip, and there were numerous animated
specials and book collections.

[edit] 1980s-1990s

During the 1980s other strips rivaled Peanuts in popularity, most notably Doonesbury,
Garfield, The Far Side, Bloom County, and Calvin and Hobbes. However, Schulz still had
one of the highest circulations in daily newspapers.[9]




Final Sunday strip, which illustrates classic scenes involving several Peanuts
characters.

The daily Peanuts strips were formatted in a four-panel "space saving" format beginning in
the 1950s, with a few very rare eight-panel strips, that still fit into the four-panel mold. In
1975, the panel format was shortened slightly horizontally, and shortly after the lettering
became larger to accommodate the shrinking format. In 1988, Schulz abandoned this strict
format and started using the entire length of the strip, in part to combat the dwindling size
of the comics page, and also to experiment.[citation needed] Most daily Peanuts strips in the 1990s
were three-panel strips.

Schulz continued the strip until he was forced to retire because of health reasons.


Cast of characters

        See also: List of Peanuts characters




The cast in Snoopy World in Hong Kong.
Charlie Brown

The initial cast of Peanuts was small, featuring only Charlie Brown, Shermy, Patty (not to
be confused with Peppermint Patty), and a beagle, Snoopy.

Though the strip did not have a lead character at the onset, it soon began to focus on
Charlie Brown, a character developed from some of the painful experiences of Schulz's
formative years. Charlie Brown's main characteristic is either self-defeating stubbornness
or admirable determined persistence to try his best against all odds: he can never win a
ballgame but continues playing baseball; he can never fly a kite successfully but continues
trying to do so. Though his inferiority complex was evident from the start, in the earliest
strips he also got in his own jabs when verbally sparring with Patty and Shermy. Some
early strips also involved romantic attractions between Charlie Brown and Patty or Violet
(the next major character added to the strip).

As the years went by, Shermy, Violet, and Patty appeared less often and were demoted to
supporting roles (eventually disappearing from the strip by the end of the 1960s/beginning
of the 1970s), while new major characters were introduced. Schroeder, Lucy Van Pelt, and
her brother Linus debuted as very young children — with Schroeder and Linus both in
diapers and pre-verbal. Snoopy, who began as a typical puppy, soon started to verbalize his
thoughts via thought bubbles. Eventually he adopted other human characteristics, such as
walking on his hind legs, reading books, using a typewriter, and participating in sports. He
also grew from a puppy to a full-grown dog.

One recurring theme in the strip is Charlie Brown's Little League baseball team. Charlie
Brown is the manager of the team and, usually, its pitcher, with the other characters of the
strip comprising the rest of the team. Charlie Brown is a terrible pitcher, often giving up
tremendous hits which either knock him off the mound or leave him with only his shorts
on. The team itself is also poor, with only Charlie Brown's dog Snoopy being particularly
competent. Because of this, the team consistently loses. However, while the team is often
referred to as "win-less", it does win at least 10 games over the course of the strip's run,
most of these when Charlie Brown is not playing.[10]




Snoopy as "the World War I flying ace", flying his Sopwith Camel.

In the 1960s, the strip began to focus more on Snoopy. Many of the strips from this point
revolve around Snoopy's active, Walter Mitty-like fantasy life, in which he imagined
himself to be a World War I flying ace or a bestselling suspense novelist, to the
bemusement and consternation of the other characters who sometimes wonder what he is
doing but also at times participate. Snoopy eventually took on many more distinct personas
over the course of the strip, notably college student "Joe Cool".

Schulz continued to introduce new characters into the strip, particularly including a
tomboyish, freckle-faced, shorts-and-sandals-wearing girl named Patricia Reichardt, better
known as "Peppermint Patty." "Peppermint" Patty is an assertive, athletic but rather obtuse
girl who shakes up Charlie Brown's world by calling him "Chuck," flirting with him, and
giving him compliments he is not so sure he deserves. She also brings in a new group of
friends (and heads a rival baseball team), including the strip's first black character, Franklin,
a Mexican-Swedish kid named José Peterson, and Peppermint Patty's bookish sidekick
Marcie, who calls Peppermint Patty "Sir" and Charlie Brown "Charles." (Most other
characters call him "Charlie Brown" at all times, except for Eudora, who also calls him
"Charles"; Charlie Brown's sister Sally Brown, who usually calls him "big brother"; and a
minor character named Peggy Jean in the early 1990s who called him "Brownie Charles"
after he could not remember his own name. Also, Snoopy calls his owner, Charlie Brown,
"that round-headed kid.")

Several additional family members of the characters were also introduced: Charlie Brown's
younger sister Sally, who is fixated on Linus; Linus and Lucy Van Pelt's younger brother
Rerun; and Spike, Snoopy's desert-dwelling brother from Needles, California, who was
apparently named for Schulz's own childhood dog.[11] Snoopy also had two other brothers
who made some appearances in the strip.

Other notable characters include: Snoopy's friend Woodstock, a bird whose chirping is
represented in print as hash marks but is nevertheless clearly understood by Snoopy;
Pigpen, the perpetually dirty boy who could raise a cloud of dust on a clean sidewalk or in
a snowstorm; and Frieda, a girl proud of her "naturally curly hair", and who owned a cat
named Faron, much to Snoopy's chagrin. (The way Faron hung over Freida's shoulder
prompted Linus to comment that he was "the world's first boneless cat.")

Peanuts had several recurring characters who were actually absent from view. Some, such
as the Great Pumpkin or the Red Baron, may or may not have been figments of the cast's
imaginations. Others were not imaginary, such as the Little Red-Haired Girl (Charlie
Brown's perennial dream girl who finally appeared in 1998, but only in silhouette), Joe
Shlabotnik (Charlie Brown's baseball hero), World War II (the vicious cat who lives next
door to Snoopy - not to be confused with Frieda's cat, Faron), and Charlie Brown's
unnamed pen pal. After some early anomalies, adult figures never appeared in the strip.

Schulz also added some fantastic elements, sometimes imbuing inanimate objects with
sparks of life. Charlie Brown's nemesis, the Kite-Eating Tree, is one example. Sally
Brown's school building, that expressed thoughts and feelings about the students (and the
general business of being a brick building), is another. Linus' famous "security blanket"
also displayed occasional signs of anthropomorphism.

[edit] Ages of the Peanuts characters

Over the course of their nearly fifty-year run, most of the characters' literal ages do not
change more than two years. An exception are the characters who were newly introduced
as infants, who begin at birth, catch up to the rest of the cast, then stop. Rerun is unique in
that he stopped aging in kindergarten. Linus was first mentioned in the strip where his birth
is announced, on September 19, 1952. He then ages to right around Charlie Brown's age
over the course of the first ten years, during which we see him learn to walk and talk with
the help of Lucy and Charlie Brown. When Linus stops aging he is about a year or so
younger than Charlie Brown. Charlie Brown was four when the strip began and aged over
the next two decades until he settled in as an eight-year-old (after which he is consistently
referred to as eight when any age is given). Sally remains two years younger than her older
brother Charlie Brown, although Charlie Brown was already of school age in the strips
when she was born and seen as a baby.

In one strip, when Lucy declares that by the time a child is five years old, his personality is
already pretty well established, Charlie Brown protests, "But I'm already five! I'm more
than five!"

The characters, however, were not strictly defined by their literal ages. "Were they children
or adults? Or some kind of hybrid?" wrote David Michaelis of Time magazine. Schulz
distinguished his creations by "fusing adult ideas with a world of small children."
Michaelis continues:



“
      Through his characters, "[Schulz] brought... humor to taboo themes such
      as faith, intolerance, depression, loneliness, cruelty and despair. His
      characters were contemplative. They spoke with simplicity and force.

                                                                                           ”
      They made smart observations about literature, art, classical music,
      theology, medicine, psychiatry, sports and the law."


In other words, the cast of Peanuts transcended age and were more broadly human.

Current events were sometimes a subject of the strip over the years. In a 1995 series, Sally
mentions the Classic Comic Strip Characters series of stamps, which were released four
years earlier, and a story about the Vietnam War ran for 10 days in the 1960s. The passage
of time, however, is negligible and incidental in Peanuts.


[edit] Critical acclaim



Cartoon tributes have appeared in other comic strips since Schulz's death in 2000, and are
now displayed at the Charles Schulz Museum.[17] In May 2000, many cartoonists included a
reference to Peanuts in their own strips. Originally planned as a tribute to Schulz's
retirement, after his death that February it became a tribute to his life and career. Similarly,
on October 30, 2005, several comic strips again included references to Peanuts, and
specifically the It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown television special.

The December 1997 issue of The Comics Journal featured an extensive collection of
testimonials to Peanuts. Over forty cartoonists, from mainstream newspaper cartoonists to
underground, independent comic artists, shared reflections on the power and influence of
Schulz's art. Gilbert Hernandez wrote "Peanuts was and still is for me a revelation. It's
mostly from Peanuts where I was inspired to create the village of Palomar in Love and
Rockets. Schulz's characters, the humor, the insight... gush, gush, gush, bow, bow, bow,
grovel, grovel, grovel..." Tom Batiuk wrote "The influence of Charles Schulz on the craft
of cartooning is so pervasive it is almost taken for granted." Batiuk also described the
depth of emotion in Peanuts: "Just beneath the cheerful surface were vulnerabilities and
anxieties that we all experienced, but were reluctant to acknowledge. By sharing those
feelings with us, Schulz showed us a vital aspect of our common humanity, which is, it
seems to me, the ultimate goal of great art." [18]

Schulz was included in the touring exhibition "Masters of American Comics" based on his
achievements in the artform whilst producing the strip. His gag work is hailed as being
"psychologically complex", and his style on the strip is noted as being "perfectly in
keeping with the style of its times."[8]


[edit] Television and film productions

        Main article: List of Peanuts media
A Charlie Brown Christmas was the first Peanuts television special.

In addition to the strip and numerous books, the Peanuts characters have appeared in
animated form on television numerous times. This started when the Ford Motor Company
licensed the characters in 1961 for a series of black and white television commercials for
the Ford Falcon. The ads were animated by Bill Melendez for Playhouse Pictures, a
cartoon studio that had Ford as a client. Schulz and Melendez became friends, and when
producer Lee Mendelson decided to make a two-minute animated sequence for a TV
documentary called A Boy Named Charlie Brown in 1963, he brought on Melendez for the
project. Before the documentary was completed, the three of them (with help from their
sponsor, the Coca-Cola Company) produced their first half-hour animated special, the
Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning A Charlie Brown Christmas, which was first aired on
the CBS network on December 9 1965.[citation needed]

The animated version of Peanuts differs in some aspects from the strip. In the strip, adult
voices are heard, though conversations are usually only depicted from the children's end.
To translate this aspect to the animated medium, Melendez famously used the sound of a
trombone with a plunger mute opening and closing on the bell to simulate adult "voices".
A more significant deviation from the strip was the treatment of Snoopy. In the strip, the
dog's thoughts are verbalized in thought balloons; in animation, he is typically mute, his
thoughts communicated through growls or laughs (voiced by Bill Melendez), and
pantomime, or by having human characters verbalizing his thoughts for him. These
treatments have both been abandoned temporarily in the past. For example, they
experimented with teacher dialogue in She's a Good Skate, Charlie Brown. The elimination
of Snoopy's "voice" is probably the most controversial aspect of the adaptations, but
Schulz apparently approved of the treatment. (Snoopy's thoughts were conveyed in
voiceover for the first time in animation in the animated version of the Broadway musical
"You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown", and later on occasion in the animated series The
Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show.)[citation needed]

The success of A Charlie Brown Christmas was the impetus for CBS to air many more
prime-time Peanuts specials over the years, beginning with It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie
Brown and Charlie Brown's All-Stars in 1966. In total, more than thirty animated specials
were produced. Until his death in 1976, jazz pianist Vince Guaraldi composed highly
acclaimed musical scores for the specials; in particular, the piece "Linus and Lucy" which
has become popularly known as the signature theme song of the Peanuts franchise.[citation needed]
In addition to Coca-Cola, other companies that sponsored Peanuts specials over the years
included Dolly Madison cakes, Kellogg's, McDonald's, Peter Paul-Cadbury candy bars,
General Mills, and Nabisco.[citation needed]

Schulz, Mendelson, and Melendez also collaborated on four theatrical feature films starring
the characters, the first of which was A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969). Most of these
made use of material from Schulz's strips, which were then adapted, although in other
cases plots were developed around areas where there were minimal strips to reference.
Such was also the case with The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show, a Saturday-morning
TV series which debuted on CBS in 1983 and lasted for three seasons.[citation needed]

By the late-1980s, the specials' popularity had begun to wane, and CBS had sometimes
rejected a few specials. An eight-episode TV miniseries called This is America, Charlie
Brown, for instance, was released during a writer's strike. Eventually, the last Peanuts
specials were released direct-to-video, and no new ones were created until after the year
2000 when ABC obtained the rights to the three fall holiday specials. The Nickelodeon
cable network re-aired the bulk of the specials, as well as The Charlie Brown and Snoopy
Show, for a time in 1997 under the umbrella title You're on Nickelodeon, Charlie Brown.
Eight Peanuts-based specials have been made posthumously. Of these, three are tributes to
Peanuts or other Peanuts specials, and five are completely new specials based on dialogue
from the strips and ideas given to ABC by Schulz before his death. The most recent, He's a
Bully, Charlie Brown, was telecast on ABC on November 20, 2006, following a repeat
broadcast of A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. Airing 41 years after the first special, the
premiere of He's a Bully, Charlie Brown was watched by nearly 10 million viewers,
winning its time slot and beating a Madonna concert special.[1]

Many of the specials and feature films have also been released on various home video
formats over the years. To date, 20 of the specials, the two films A Boy Named Charlie
Brown and Snoopy, Come Home, and the miniseries This Is America, Charlie Brown have
all been released to DVD.

In October of 2007. Warner Home Video acquired the Peanuts catalog from Paramount for
an undisclosed amount of money. They now hold the worldwide distribution rights for all
Peanuts properties including over 50 television specials. Warner has made plans to develop
new special for television as well as the direct to video market, as well as short subjects for
digital distribution.[20]


[edit] Theatrical productions
The Peanuts characters even found their way to the live stage, appearing in the musicals
You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown and Snoopy!!! — The Musical, and in "Snoopy on
Ice", a live Ice Capades-style show aimed primarily at young children, all of which have
had several touring productions over the years.[21]

You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown was originally a successful off-Broadway musical that
ran for four years (1967-1971) in New York City and on tour, with Gary Burghoff as the
original Charlie Brown. An updated revival opened on Broadway in 1999, and by 2002 it
had become the most frequently produced musical in American theatre history.[3] It was
also adapted for television twice, as a live-action NBC special and an animated CBS
special.

Snoopy!!! The Musical was a musical comedy based on the Peanuts comic strip, originally
performed at Lamb's Theatre off-Broadway in 1982. In its 1983 run in London's West End,
it won an Olivier Award. In 1988, it was adapted into an animated TV special. The New
Players Theatre in London staged a revival in 2004 to honor its 21st anniversary, but some
reviewers noted that its "feel good" sentiments had not aged well.[citation needed]


[edit] Record albums

In 1962, Columbia Records issued an album titled Peanuts, with Kaye Ballard and Arthur
Siegel performing (as Lucy and Charlie Brown, respectively) to music composed by Fred
Karlin.

Fantasy Records issued several albums featuring Vince Guaraldi's jazz scores from the
animated specials, including Jazz Impressions of a Boy Named Charlie Brown (1964), A
Charlie Brown Christmas (1965), Oh, Good Grief! (1968), and Charlie Brown's Holiday
Hits (1998). All were later reissued on CD.

Other jazz artists have recorded Peanuts-themed albums, often featuring cover versions of
Guaraldi's compositions. These include Ellis Marsalis, Jr. and Wynton Marsalis (Joe Cool's
Blues, 1995); George Winston (Linus & Lucy, 1996); David Benoit (Here's to You,
Charlie Brown!, 2000); and Cyrus Chestnut (A Charlie Brown Christmas, 2000).

Cast recordings (in both original and revival productions) of the stage musicals You're a
Good Man, Charlie Brown and Snoopy!!! The Musical have been released over the years.

Numerous animated Peanuts specials were adapted into book-and-record sets, issued on the
"Charlie Brown Records" label by Disney Read-Along in the 1970s and '80s.
RCA Victor has released an album of classical piano music ostensibly performed by
Schroeder himself. Titled Schroeder's Greatest Hits, the album contains solo piano works
by Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, and others, performed by John Miller, Ronnie Zito, Ken
Bichel, and Nelly Kokinos.


[edit] Other licensed appearances and merchandise




Snoopy on the side of the MetLife blimp

Over the years, the Peanuts characters have appeared in ads for Dolly Madison snack cakes,
Chex Mix, Bounty, A&W Root Beer, Kraft Foods, and Ford automobiles.[22][23] Pig-Pen
appeared in a memorable spot for Regina vacuum cleaners.[24]

They are currently spokespeople in print and television advertisements for the MetLife
insurance company.[25] MetLife usually uses Snoopy in its advertisements as opposed to
other characters: for instance, the MetLife blimps are named "Snoopy One" and "Snoopy
Two" and feature him in his World War I flying ace persona.[26]

                                                                   [27]
The characters have been featured on Hallmark Cards since 1960, and can be found
adorning clothing, figurines, plush dolls, flags, balloons, posters, Christmas ornaments, and
countless other bits of licensed merchandise.[28][29][30][31][32]

The Apollo 10 lunar module was nicknamed "Snoopy" and the command module "Charlie
Brown".[33] While not included in the official mission logo, Charlie Brown and Snoopy
became semi-official mascots for the mission.[34][35] Charles Schulz drew an original picture
of Charlie Brown in a spacesuit that was hidden aboard the craft to be found by the
astronauts once they were in orbit. This drawing is now on display at the Kennedy Space
                                                                      [36]
Center. Snoopy is the personal safety mascot for NASA astronauts.

The 1960s pop band, The Royal Guardsmen drew inspiration from Peanuts, and their
single Snoopy vs. The Red Baron reached number two on the charts.[37]
In the Sixties, Robert L. Short interpreted certain themes and conversations in Peanuts as
being consistent with parts of Christian theology, and used them as illustrations during his
lectures about the gospel, and as source material for several books, as he explained in his
bestselling paperback book, The Gospel According to Peanuts.

In 1980, Charles Schulz was introduced to artist Tom Everhart during a collaborative art
project.[38] Everhart became fascinated with Schulz's art style and worked Peanuts themed
art into his own work. Schulz encouraged Everhart to continue with his work. Everhart
continues to be the only artist authorized to paint Peanuts characters.[39]

Giant helium balloons of Charlie Brown and Snoopy have long been a feature in the annual
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.

The characters were licensed for use in 1992 as atmosphere for the national amusement
park chain Cedar Fair.[40] The images of the Peanuts characters are used frequently, most
visibly in several versions of the logo for flagship park, Cedar Point. Knott's Berry Farm,
which was later acquired by Cedar Fair, was the first theme park to make Snoopy its
mascot.[citation needed] Cedar Fair also operated Camp Snoopy, an indoor amusement park in the
Mall of America until the mall took over its operation as of March 2005, renaming it The
Park at MOA, and no longer using the Peanuts characters as its theme.[41]

Peanuts on Parade has been St. Paul, Minnesota’s tribute to Peanuts.[42] It began in 2000,
with the placing of 101 five-foot tall statues of Snoopy throughout the city of Saint Paul.
The statues were later auctioned at the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota. In
2001, there was "Charlie Brown Around Town," 2002 brought "Looking for Lucy," and
finally, in 2003, "Linus Blankets Saint Paul."[43] The statues were auctioned off at the end
of each summer, so some remain around the city but others have been relocated. Permanent,
bronze statues of the Peanuts characters are also found in Landmark Plaza in downtown
Saint Paul.[44]

The Peanuts characters have been licensed to Universal Studios Japan (while Peanuts
merchandise in Japan has been licensed by Sanrio, best known for Hello Kitty).[45]

In New Town Plaza, Sha Tin, Hong Kong, there is a mini theme park dedicated to Snoopy.

The Peanuts gang have also appeared in video games, such as Snoopy in a 1984 by
Radarsoft, Snoopy Tennis (Game Boy Color), and in October 2006, Snoopy vs. the Red
Baron by Namco Bandai. Many Peanuts characters have cameos in the latter game,
including Woodstock, Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, Marcie and Sally. In July 2007, the
Peanuts gang also made it onto cell phones in the Snoopy the Flying Ace mobile game by
Namco Networks.




Peanuts-themed pedestrian overpass in Tarzana, Los Angeles, California

Peanuts has also been involved with NASCAR. In 2000, Jeff Gordon drove his #24
Chevrolet with a Snoopy-themed motif at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Two years later,
Tony Stewart drove a #20 Great Pumpkin motif scheme for two races. The first, at Bristol
Motor Speedway, featured a black car with Linus sitting in a pumpkin field. Later, at
Atlanta Motor Speedway, Tony drove an orange car featuring the Peanuts characters
trick-or-treating. Most recently, Bill Elliott drove a #6 Dodge with an A Charlie Brown
Christmas scheme. That car ran at the 2005 NASCAR BUSCH Series race at Memphis
Motorsports Park.


[edit] Books




The first volume of The Complete Peanuts from Fantagraphics Books with cover
design by Seth.
The Peanuts characters have been featured in many books over the years. Some
represented chronological reprints of the newspaper strip, while others were thematic
collections, such as Snoopy's Tennis Book. Some single-story books were produced, such
as Snoopy and the Red Baron. In addition, most of the animated television specials and
feature films were adapted into book form.[citation needed]

Charles Schulz always resisted publication of early Peanuts strips, as they did not reflect
the characters as he eventually developed them.[citation needed] However, in 1997 he began talks
with Fantagraphics Books to have the entire run of the strip, almost 18,000 cartoons,
published chronologically in book form.[citation needed] The first volume in the collection, The
Complete Peanuts: 1950 to 1952, was published in April 2004. Peanuts is in a unique
situation compared to other comics in that archive quality masters of most strips are still
owned by the syndicate.[citation needed] All strips, including Sundays, are in black and white.

PEANUTS 漫畫是全世界最受歡迎的連環漫畫



   《Newsweek》
  根據             ,                             。
            雜誌的統計 PEANUTS 漫畫在全世界有超過 3 億 6 千萬的讀者 PEANUTS
漫畫曾同時以 21 種語言在 75 個國家的報紙上刊行。



  1999 年,美國權威漫畫雜誌《漫畫期刊》(Comic Journal)曾邀請該期刊的編輯和專業
漫畫評論人,票選                  (Top 100 Comics of the Century)
        「20 世紀 100 種最佳英語漫畫」                             。PEANUTS

漫畫名列第二,贏了唐老鴨、狄克崔西、蜘蛛人、小露露等。超人、蝙蝠俠、加菲貓根本

沒在這份名單內。



  1965 年,PEANUTS 漫畫中             登上
                    「那一群長相滑稽的孩子們」 《Time》雜誌封面,PEANUTS
被視為那個時代智慧的具體化身。



   PEANUTS 漫畫創造的語彙「安心毛毯」、「幸福就是一隻溫暖的小狗」等成了美國新
舊世代共通的語言,而且常可在巴氏常用引用語(Bartlett's Familiar Quotations)和韋氏大字典

(Webster' s Dictionary)中找到。

                                                            深受舒茲漫畫影響的漫畫家特魯多
                                                          (Garry Trudeau)曾說,PEANUTS 漫

                                                          畫像是「連

                                                          環漫畫的初次心跳」。鮮明銳利、難
                                                          以預測、走在時代前端。


                                                            1966 年,史努比狗屋失火,慰問信
                                                          如 雪片般飛來。
     1969 年,阿波羅 10 號太空梭的太空人 將指揮艇命名為「查理布朗」、登月小 艇命名為
    「史努比」。史努比成為第一 個上月球的小獵犬。



     1969 年聖誕節,全美有超過一半以上的電視觀眾(約 5 千 5 百萬人)都在收看獲得艾美
    獎最佳動畫的電視特集「查理布朗的聖誕節」(A Charlie Brown Christmas)。長篇動畫「一個

    叫查理布朗的男孩」(A Boy Named CharlieBrown)播映時,更創下了空前的售票紀錄;每

    隔幾小時,就會有 6 千多個父母和小孩在國家表演廳外大排長龍。



     PEANUTS 漫畫的影響力橫跨商業界與文化界,查理布朗和史努比除了被視為大眾文化圖
    騰,也當了汽車與壽險業的代言人。在 60 年代,PEANUTS 漫畫早已透過「授權」概念,

    開發舞台劇、電視、電影、書籍、唱片和各式各樣附屬商品,可說是全球的奇蹟。



     作者查爾斯‧舒茲(Charles Schulz)成為有史以來收入最高、最有影響力的漫畫家。
    他也是唯一讓羅浮宮為之舉辦回顧展的美國連環漫畫家,這樣的地位無人能出其右。



     舒茲先生曾被世界知名作家安伯托.艾可(Umberto Eco)讚揚為「真正的詩人」。



     從 1950 年 10 月到 2000 年初舒茲封筆為止的 50 年間,他每天繪製一篇漫畫,從不間斷。
    2000 年 2 月 12 日,就在最後一則 PEANUTS 漫畫出現在全世界週日報紙上的幾小時前,舒

    茲與世長辭。他總共畫了 18,170 則 PEANUTS 漫畫。

《花生米》是世上最受歡迎的漫畫之一,今年慶祝五十週年。為了紀念這件大事,
                                「
位於佛羅里達州波卡拉頓市的國際卡通藝術博物館正在舉行一項特展。《花生
米》五十週年:查爾斯舒爾茲作品展」於十月二日開幕,將持續展出到 2000 年
一月三十日,內容為漫畫原稿以及《花生米》人物的動畫影片。


第一則《花生米》漫畫出現在 1950 年 10 月 2 日,刊登在美國七家報紙上。舒爾
茲一向立志要做漫畫家,對當年 28 歲的舒爾茲來說,這是興奮的一天。但只有
一個問題。舒爾茲打算把這則漫畫命名為《 小人物》 ,但發行漫畫的聯合特輯聯
              。當時的舒爾茲是個年輕漫畫家,第一次獲得成
盟公司卻決定改名為《花生米 》
名的機會,沒有什麼資格可以抗議。但是他覺得《花生米》這名字使漫畫顯得很
不重要。


        《花生米》可一點也不渺小,反而是有史以來 刊登最久、最
如今五十年過去了,
受歡迎的漫畫之一。目前全球有兩千六百家報紙刊載《花生米》,世界各地有數
百萬的讀者喜歡看史努比的英雄行徑,也同情查理布朗沒完沒了的困境。


讀者們用芬蘭語、義大利語和中文等不同語言,咒罵露西又在查理 布朗踢足球
的時候把球搶走。讀者問道:奈勒斯有沒有丟掉毛毯的一天?派蒂會不會說服瑪
西別再稱她為「先生」?《花生米》的角色各有獨特而令人難忘的性格,因此贏
得了許多死忠的迷哥迷姊。


舒爾茲在位於北加州的工作室裡編寫《花生米》漫畫,並親自畫線 條、塗墨、
寫上字母。許多人很好奇他的點子從何而來。有些靈感來自他的個人經驗。查爾
斯舒爾茲和查理布朗一樣,曾經為一個紅髮女孩心碎。和史努比與派蒂一樣,舒
爾茲也喜歡溜冰刀。他也和 史努比及謝勒德一樣欣賞藝術和音樂。舒爾茲年輕
時,在明尼蘇達州聖保羅市的藝術指導學校教書,當時他有個好朋友,名字叫
做——沒錯——查理布朗。


                     「有時我凝視工 作室的窗外好
然而舒爾茲的靈感也不是一直都這麼順。他曾說:
    ,
幾個小時 想擠出個好點子……你很難讓人相信凝視窗外時其實是在做一天中最
困難的工作。事實上,有好幾次我坐在這兒思考,所以是真的在工作,可是聽到
開門聲時卻迅速抓起紙筆,趕快畫點東西,免得人家以為我在打混。」


整個二十世紀後半,舒爾茲一直呈現出他的想法,以《花生米》漫畫娛樂世人。
無論舒爾茲是如何完成他的漫畫,史努比迷們始終感到滿意,而且一直要得更
多。(本文摘錄自「時代新鮮人」創刊二號)


感謝編輯這麼多年來對我的信任,以及廣大讀者對我的關愛和支持,查理布朗、
史努比、露西…我將會永遠記得你們。───舒茲最後告別信


                    ,1922 年出生於美國明尼蘇達州,今年二月十二日
查理.舒茲(Charles Schelz)
因結腸癌辭 世,享年七十七歲。1950 年開始創作史努比系列漫畫,五十年來史
努比、查理.布朗等故事人 物的觸角,已延伸至全球七十五個國家,透過二十
一種翻譯本刊登在二千六百家報紙上, 以 及三億本漫畫和五十部卡通,估計每
天陪伴三億五千萬讀者一同歡笑。

早期舒茲在創作史努比漫畫時,大概不會想到日後史努比會登陸月球、「幸福就
是一隻溫暖的 小狗」會引起成千上百類似的格言,以及「安全毯」會成為美國
話的一部份。他筆下的史努比 漫畫,內容非關殺伐、非關諷刺,任何身邊發生
的故事都可能是他的創作題材,幽默詼諧中帶 有激勵人心的「運動家精神」以
及小孩眼中的人性缺點。


舒茲一生創作不輟,曾兩度獲得漫畫藝術最高殊榮「魯班獎」,一九七八年被選
為「年度國際 漫畫家」,一九九○年得到法國文藝勳章,史努比漫畫被公認為過
去近半個世紀以來最賣座的 漫畫作品,舒茲本人也因漫畫與周邊商品的龐大商
機,多次打進「富比士」(Forbes)雜誌年 收入最高藝人榜單,成為史上最富有
的漫畫家;而日前舒茲所居住的聖塔羅沙市,計畫在市立 公園內安置史努比和
查理布朗的銅像,做為對舒茲永遠的紀念。




Schulz's drawings were first published by Robert Ripley in his Ripley's Believe It or Not!.
His first regular cartoons, Li'l Folks, were published from 1947 to 1950 by the St. Paul
Pioneer Press; he first used the name Charlie Brown for a character there, although he
applied the name in four gags to three different boys and one buried in sand. The series
also had a dog that looked much like Snoopy. In 1948, Schulz sold a cartoon to the
Saturday Evening Post; the first of seventeen single-panel cartoons by Schulz that would
be published there. In 1948, Schulz tried to have Li'l Folks syndicated through the
Newspaper Enterprise Association. Schulz would have been an independent contractor for
the syndicate, unheard of in the 1940s, but the deal fell through. Li'l Folks was dropped in
January, 1950.

Later that year, Schulz approached the United Feature Syndicate with his best strips from
Li'l Folks, and Peanuts made its first appearance on October 2, 1950. The strip became one
of the most popular comic strips of all time. He also had a short-lived sports-oriented
comic strip called It's Only a Game (1957 – 1959), but abandoned it due to the demands
of the successful Peanuts. From 1956 to 1965 he also contributed a single-panel strip
("Young Pillars") featuring teenagers to Youth, a publication associated with the Church of
God (Anderson).
Some of the Peanuts gang

Charlie Brown, the principal character for Peanuts, was named after a co-worker at the Art
Instruction Schools; he drew much of his inspiration, however, from his own life:

      Like Charlie Brown, Schulz's father was a barber and his mother a housewife.
      Schulz had a dog when he was a boy. Unlike Snoopy the beagle, it was a
       pointer. Eventually, it was revealed that Snoopy had a desert-dwelling brother
       named Spike.
      Spike's residence, outside of Needles, California, was likely influenced by the
       few years (1928 – 1930) that the Schulz family lived there; they had moved to
       Needles to join other family members who had relocated from Minnesota to
       tend to an ill cousin.[3]
      Schulz was also shy and withdrawn.
      Schulz's "Little Red-Haired Girl" was Donna Johnson, an Art Instruction
       Schools accountant with whom he had a relationship. She rejected his
       marriage proposal, but remained a friend for the rest of his life.
      Linus and Shermy were both named for good friends of his (Linus Maurer and
       Sherman Plepler, respectively).
      Lucy was inspired by Joyce Halverson, his first wife.
      Peppermint Patty was inspired by Patricia Swanson, one of his cousins on his
       mother's side.[4]

Schulz moved briefly to Colorado Springs, Colorado. He painted a wall in that home for
his daughter Meredith, featuring Patty, Charlie Brown and Snoopy. The wall was removed
in 2001 and donated to the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, California. The
restored artwork by Schulz is printed in the paperback edition of Chip Kidd's book Peanuts:
The Art of Charles M. Schulz.

Schulz's family returned to Minneapolis and stayed until 1958. They then moved to
Sebastopol, California, where Schulz built his first studio. It was here that Schulz was
interviewed for the unaired television documentary A Boy Named Charlie Brown. Some of
the footage was eventually used in a later documentary titled Charlie Brown and Charles
Schulz. The original documentary is available on DVD from The Charles M. Schulz
Museum.
Schulz's father died while visiting him in 1966, the same year his Sebastopol studio burned
down. By 1969, Schulz had moved to Santa Rosa, California, where he lived and worked
for more than 30 years.

Schulz had a long association with ice sports, as both figure skating and ice hockey
featured prominently in his cartoons. In Santa Rosa, he was the owner of the Redwood
Empire Ice Arena, which opened in 1969. Schulz's daughter Amy served as a model for the
skating rink in the 1980 television special She's a Good Skate, Charlie Brown. Schulz also
was very active in Senior Ice Hockey tournaments; in 1975, he formed Snoopy's Senior
World Hockey Tournament at his Redwood Empire Ice Arena, and in 1981, Schulz was
awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy for outstanding service to the sport of hockey in the
United States. In 1998, he hosted the 1st ever Over 75 Hockey Tournament (although
goalies could be younger - 60). In 2001, Saint Paul renamed The Highland Park Ice Arena
the "Charles Schulz Arena" in his honor.

The first full-scale biography of Schulz, Schulz and Peanuts: A Biography, by David
Michaelis, was released in October 2007. The book has been heavily criticized by the
Schulz family, while Michaelis maintains that there is "no question" his work is accurate.[5]
However, fellow artist Bill Watterson (creator of Calvin & Hobbes) feels that the
biography does justice to Schulz's legacy, while giving insight into the emotional impetus
of the creation of the strips.[6]

Peanuts ran for nearly 50 years without interruption and appeared in more than 2,600
newspapers in 75 countries. In November 1999 Schulz suffered a stroke, and later it was
discovered that he had colon cancer that had metastasized to his stomach. Because of the
chemotherapy and the fact he could not read or see clearly, he announced his retirement on
December 14, 1999. This was difficult for Schulz, and he was quoted as saying to Al
Roker on The Today Show, "I never dreamed that this would happen to me. I always had
the feeling that I would stay with the strip until I was in my early eighties, or something
like that. But all of sudden it's gone. I did not take it away. This has been taken away from
me."

Schulz died in Santa Rosa of complications from colon cancer at 9:45 p.m. on February 12,
2000, at age 77. He was interred in Pleasant Hills Cemetery in Sebastopol.

The last original strip ran the day after his death. In it, a statement was included from
Schulz that his family wished for the strip to end when he was no longer able to produce it.
Schulz had previously predicted that the strip would outlive him, with his reason being that
comic strips are usually drawn weeks before their publication. As part of his will, Schulz
had requested that the Peanuts characters remain as authentic as possible and that no new
comic strips based on them be drawn. United Features has legal ownership of the strip, but
his wishes have been honored, although reruns of the strip are still being syndicated to
newspapers. New television specials have also been produced since Schulz's death, but the
stories are based on previous strips.

Schulz had been asked if, for his final Peanuts strip, Charlie Brown would finally get to
kick that football after so many decades. His response: "Oh, no! Definitely not! I couldn't
have Charlie Brown kick that football; that would be a terrible disservice to him after
nearly half a century."

He was honored on May 27, 2000, by cartoonists of 42 comic strips paying homage to him
and Peanuts

3) THE DAILY COMIC STRIP


    3.1) When did Peanuts begin?


The first daily strip appeared on October 2, 1950, in seven
newspapers: The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune,
The Minneapolis Star/Tribune, The Allentown Call-Chronicle, The
Bethlehem Globe-Times, The Denver Post, and The Seattle Times.


No matter where you live (in the United States), your nearest
public or university library should have at least one of those
newspapers in its microfilm department. Zoom back to 1950, and
you'll be able to see that first strip in all its glory.


The Sunday strip did not begin until January 1952; until then,
Peanuts was a six-day effort. Some newspapers also treated it
rather cruelly during the first several years; the uniform, four-
panel format made it possible to run the strip horizontally or
vertically, or in a squarish box. Frequently, those papers
running the strip vertically would squash the panels on top of
each other, to cram the whole thing into a space much too small.
By the mid-50s, once the strip had really caught on, this
practice (thankfully) stopped.
  3.2) How did the strip get its name?


By the late 1940s, Schulz had achieved modest local success
in the St. Paul Pioneer Press with his "two tier," strip,
LI'L FOLKS. (See question 2.3.) He naturally brought this
along to New York when he attempted to broaden his appeal via
a syndicate. The folks at United Features eventually took on
the strip but then, in their infinite wisdom, played around
with the concept a bit; at one point, according to an interview
Schulz granted Gary Groth in the January 1992 issue of Nemo,
the syndicate folks even toyed with the idea of combining
"little kid humor" and "teen humor" in the top and bottom
halves, respectively, of the original two-tier format. But
eventually the decision was made to go just with "the little
kid thing," and in a more traditionally four-panel format
(marketed as a "space-saving strip," because it could be used
horizontally or vertically, according to a newspaper editor's whim).


Schulz wanted to retain the title LI'L FOLKS, but the syndicate
worried that this was too close to a previously copyrighted
feature, Tack Knight's LITTLE FOLKS. UFS production manager
Bill Anderson is credited with coming up with PEANUTS, although
he later insisted that he'd been asked to suggest a kid strip
title without actually having SEEN the strip. He delivered a
list of 10 names, of which PEANUTS was one. He later justified
this selection on the basis of the popular TV children's show
of the time, THE HOWDY DOODY SHOW, where the young studio
audience would sit in a "peanut gallery."

"It was the worst title ever thought up for a comic strip,"
Schulz would insist, every time he was asked. He thought
the title "confusing," with "no dignity."


"I don't even like the word," he'd say. The worst part,
he feared, was that people confuse Charlie Brown with the
name "Peanuts," and in the early days that was true: Schulz
received letters from fans that read along the lines of,
"I love this new strip with Peanuts and his dog."
Fortunately, such confusion didn't linger long.



  3.3) How many Peanuts strips did Charles Schulz produce?


From Monday, October 2, 1950, until the final strip appeared on
Sunday, February 13, 2000 -- ironically, the morning after he
died -- Schulz gave the world a total of 17,897 strips: 15,391
daily strips, and 2,506 Sundays.


This takes into account leap years, the fact that Sunday strips
did not begin until January 1952, and the single vacation that
Schulz took, from November 27 through December 31, 1997 (inclusive).


Quite an accomplishment.


And let me be more emphatic: Since Schulz's death, and on
important anniversaries -- such as the 40th anniversary of
the first broadcast of "A Charlie Brown Christmas," celebrated
in December 2005 -- countless media outlets have repeated the
claim that Schulz produced "more than 18,000 Peanuts strips."
This is wrong, wrong, WRONG, as is the even worse statement
that the total number of strips is 18,250. The latter number
seems to have been started by the obituary on Schulz that ran
in The New York Times; it's simply 50 years multiplied by 365
days per year ... which overlooks nagging little details like
leap years and the other issues cited in the second paragraph
above. (Frankly, I'd have thought better of The New York Times.)
Unfortunately, the Times generally is regarded as an
unimpeachable source, so anybody writing a new article, by using
the NYT obit as a reference, further propogates that incorrect total.


Even Lee Mendelson's "A Charlie Brown Christmas: The Making
of a Tradition" fluffs this fact; that book cites the even
more unusual (but equally incorrect) number 18,170 as the
total number of strips.
Fortunately, the tide of misinformation is starting to turn.
United Media's official snoopy.com Web site, the Schulz Museum
Web site, the Fantagraphics "Complete Peanuts" books and
David Michaelis' 2007 biography of Charles Schulz all cite
the correct total of 17,897. As time moves along, we hope that
these sources will be used more frequently, thus (eventually)
burying the other incorrect figures.


With luck, anyway!



  3.4) Into which languages has Peanuts been translated?


At its peak, Peanuts was published in 2,600 newspapers around
the world, and of course many of these countries collected strips
in books just as in the United States. Going both by information
from United Media and what we've learned from curious and
enthusiastic fans such as Jennifer Prystasz, here's a list
of languages that we know have been used. (If you have evidence
of any others, please let me know!)


Bulgarian
Chinese
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Finnish
French
German
Greek
Hebrew
Hungarian
Icelandic
Italian
Japanese
Korean
Latin
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese
Russian
Spanish
Swedish
Thai
Turkish
Welsh



   3.5) Have all the newspaper strips been reprinted in
               books?


No ... although the news gets better every six months, thanks
to Fantagraphics' ongoing release of new volumes of "The Complete
Peanuts."
The number of strips that haven't been seen since original publication
now grows smaller every year, and one day in the not-too-distant future,
we'll honestly be able to change the first word answer to this section.
But not yet...


And it remains fascinating to consider how many strips had remained
unseen prior to Fantagraphics' entry. In spite of all the books of
reprinted strips that had been published since 1952, there still
were roughly 2,500 strips which hadn't ever seen the light of day,
since their original newspaper appearance. And yes, that's quite a few!
To get an idea of how many that is, consider that -- as of July 1, 1995
-- Schulz had published 16,296 strips. 2,500 is roughly 15% of that number!


4.3) What is the origin of Charlie Brown's name?


Charles Schulz met the original Charlie Brown at an art class at
the Bureau of Engraving in Minneapolis. They remained friends
over the years, and it was only natural that Schulz would tell
Brown of his fledgling plan to market a comic strip with a
central character who struggled with life, and tried to do well.
Schulz named the central character after the round-faced Brown,
who had a remarkable resemblance to his namesake.


Brown eventually served as program director at the Hennepin
County Juvenile Detention Center, where he was credited with
helping troubled young people, and going out of his way to show
he cared about them.


Brown died of cancer on December 5, 1983. He had never married,
and lived alone in the Minneapolis suburb of Minnetonka.


Umberto Eco described 'Peanuts' in an introduction of a book:

"These children affect us because they're monsters. They are the monstrous,
infantile reductions of all the neuroses of modern citizens of the industrial
civilization."


Snoopy and aviation




Insignia for US Air Force 3C2X1 Tech Control

Following the disastrous Apollo I fire, Snoopy became the official mascot of
aerospace safety, testing and the rebuilding of the Apollo Program, due to his refusal
to accept defeat and his "'outside the doghouse' way of looking at things." A series of
Snoopy-in-Space ("Astrobeagle") products arrived with this campaign, and originals
are still prized.

The Apollo 10 lunar module was nicknamed "Snoopy" and the command module
"Charlie Brown". While not included in the official mission logo, Charlie Brown and
Snoopy became semi-official mascots for the mission, as seen here [8] and here.
Schulz also drew some special mission-related artwork for NASA , and several
regular strips related to the mission; one showing Snoopy enroute to the moon atop
his doghouse with a fishbowl on his head for a space helmet; one where Snoopy is on
the moon beating everyone else there, including "that stupid cat that lives next door";
one where Snoopy is returning to Earth, and explains to the audience, "You can tell
I'm headed back because I'm pointed the other way"; and one where Charlie Brown
consoles Snoopy about how the spacecraft named after him was left in lunar orbit.

The Silver Snoopy is a special NASA honor, in the form of a sterling silver pin with a
engraving of Snoopy in a spacesuit helmet. It is given by an astronaut to someone
who works in the space program that has gone above and beyond in pursuit of quality
and safety.[9]

A series of postage stamps featuring Snoopy as a World War I flying ace was released
on May 17, 2001 in Santa Rosa, California.

Snoopy, piloting his "Sopwith Camel" (i.e. his doghouse), is featured in the logo of
Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport.

Snoopy is the US Air Force Technical Control mascot. He can be seen on the Tech
Control emblem holding an old analog patch cord above his head as he walks on
water.

During the Gulf War Snoopy appeared as nose art on several aircraft. He remains a
popular image in air forces that still allow crews to customize the appearance of their
planes.

Snoopy is the name of a U.S. Air Force B-58 Hustler bomber modified to test a radar
system. [10]

Snoopy is the name of the primary research vehicle of Check-Six.com.

The black-and-white communications helmets that are worn as part of NASA
spacesuits, carrying radio earphones and microphones, are universally known as
"Snoopy caps," due to the resemblance of the white center and black outer sections to
Snoopy's head.

In 1966, the "Ace" was immortalized in song by the Royal Guardsmen with their hit,
Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron. This was followed in 1967 by Snoopy's Christmas, in
which the two foes temporarily set aside their differences for a Christmas toast, as per
the Christmas Truces that occurred during World War I. Snoopy's Christmas continues
to be played as a holiday favorite on most "oldie" radio stations. Two additional songs
were released by the Guardsmen in 1968 during the Presidential election, "Snoopy for
President", in which Snoopy's bid for the nomination of the Beagle party is tipped in
his favor by the Red Baron, and "Down Behind the Lines", which does not mention
Snoopy specifically but describes the attempts of a World War I pilot to fly his
damaged Sopwith Camel back to friendly territory.

Snoopy One and Snoopy Two are two airships owned and operated by MetLife and
provide aerial coverage of American sporting events.




Linus Van Pelt inspired the term "security blanket" with his classic pose.




Security blanket

                                  From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

A security blanket is any familiar object whose presence provides comfort or security to its
owner, such as the literal blankets often favored by small children. It is a comfort object
and is also known as a "security object." The phrase "security blanket" was popularized in
the Peanuts comic strip created by Charles M. Schulz, who gave such a blanket to his
character Linus van Pelt. A popular name for a security blanket is "blanky" (sometimes
"banky"). Another term is "wubby", which was popularized by the 1983 film Mr. Mom.
But it took some time for Peanuts to be accepted by Schulz's peers. The cartoonists' old guard

was confused by a strip that avoided boffo, had punch lines like "sigh," and presented as

"funny" a world built on unquenchable melancholy and failure (Charlie Brown), self-delusion

(Snoopy, Linus), and genius reduced to feckless absurdity (Schroeder and his toy piano).

Meanwhile, Schulz's style was not like anyone else's at the time. Bill Watterson, creator of

Calvin and Hobbes, summed it up neatly: He "distilled each subject to its barest essence, and

drew it straight on or in side view, in simple outlines"; it was "the expressiveness within the
simplicity" that "made Schulz's artwork so forceful."


It was not until 1956 that Schulz won his first Reuben award for cartoonist of the year—way

too long a wait, in his eyes. Even after that, Beetle Bailey creator Mort Walker was confused

by how fanciful Schulz was, and could only ask, of Snoopy's WWI flying ace delusions, "Where
did he get the helmet?"


Clearly, Peanuts was not child's entertainment, though it starred children. Schulz was always

uncomfortable with kids but drew them "because they were what sold." The brilliant comic

typing of his cast and their complicated—but iconically rendered—relationship to the pains of

human social life allowed hip and square from ages 8 to 80 to love Peanuts. By 1957, 65 of

Schulz's original strips had appeared in a Rhode Island Museum of Design exhibit alongside
Picasso. A Yale monthly named him humorist of the year.


Perhaps it was inevitable, then, that a backlash would take place: It's difficult for anyone born

this side of a million Snoopy pillowcases to remember, but in the 1960s, Peanuts' early

devotees turned on it. Film critic Richard Schickel lamented Peanuts' change from "the

private preserve of the cultural in-group into a firmly established, national fad." Schulz

received flattering attention from the Democratic National Committee seeking his support for

Adlai Stevenson's run for president in 1956; it dubbed the dubious Schulz "the youngest
existentialist."


Throughout his biography, Michaelis underscores the misery this staggeringly successful

American pop culture phenomenon captured in his comic strip. His most vivid summation: "In

Peanuts, the game was always lost, the football always snatched away … the kite was not just

stuck in a tree, it was eaten by it; the pitcher did not just give up a line drive, he was stripped
bare by it, exposed."


The Peanuts merchandising machine and the treacle of A Charlie Brown Christmas allow

Peanuts to be remembered as something sweeter, kinder, and more lovable than it truly was.

The cognitive dissonance represented by the mass-merchandising success of this prickly,

often despairing, sour, and snide work might have been worth more thought in a book of this
scope than Michaelis gives it.
There were very rare moments of soft cheese in Peanuts' piquancy. For example, Lucy
hugging Snoopy and declaring "Happiness is a warm puppy."


That moment turned into a pioneering "book," composed of "Happiness is … " messages with

accompanying drawings by Schulz, that became the No. 1 "nonfiction" work of 1963, and a

prime mover in the Peanuts merchandising empire. Michaelis is sharp on that empire, and he

shows Schulz willingly turning a blind eye to union-busting franchisee J.P. Stevens, a textile
company.


In the strip, Schulz would mock both merchandising and himself. When Lucy tried a second

time to snatch Snoopy's warmth for her own happiness, he growled back, "My mother didn't

raise me to be a heating pad!" Schulz himself said it best: "Anybody who says Peanuts is cute

is just crazy." But he also enabled the merchandising machine that means so many
Americans hear Peanuts and see a grinning Snoopy wishing a young girl happy birthday.

				
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