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Missouri - Legislative Affairs - NOAA

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									                                      NOAA In Your State
                                                       Missouri

“NOAA's work touches the daily lives of every person in the
United States and in much of the world. Our products and
services are the result of the hard work of NOAA’s
dedicated staff and partner organizations located in
program and research offices throughout the country. The
following is a summary of NOAA programs based in, and
focused on, your state. The entries are listed by statewide,
region, and then by congressional districts and cities or
towns.”
                                   - Dr. Jane Lubchenco
 Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
                                   and NOAA Administrator



Statewide
National Weather Service (NWS)
Automated Surface Observing Systems
Missouri Stations
The Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS) program is a joint effort of the National Weather Service (NWS), the
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Department of Defense (DOD). The ASOS systems serve as the nation's
primary surface weather observing network. ASOS is designed to support weather forecast activities and aviation
operations and, at the same time, support the needs of the meteorological, hydrological, and climatological research
communities. ASOS works non-stop, updating observations every minute, 24 hours a day, every day of the year observing
basic weather elements, such as cloud cover, precipitation, wind, sea level pressure, and conditions, such as rain, snow,
freezing rain, thunderstorm, and fog. There are 18 ASOS stations in Missouri.
http://www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-maps/asos_09/mo_asos.pdf and
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/asos/

National Weather Service (NWS)
Cooperative Observer Program
Missouri Sites
The National Weather Service (NWS) Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) is truly the Nation's weather and climate
observing network of, by and for the people. More than 10,000 volunteers take observations on farms, in urban and
suburban areas, National Parks, seashores, and mountaintops. The data are representative of where people live, work and
play. The COOP was formally created in 1890 under the NWS Organic Act to provide observational meteorological data,
usually consisting of daily maximum and minimum temperatures, snowfall, and 24-hour precipitation totals, required to
define the climate of the United States and to help measure long-term climate changes, and to provide observational
meteorological data in near real-time to support forecast, warning and other public service programs of the NWS. These
and other federal, state and local governments, and private company sectors use the data daily to make billions of dollars
worth of decisions. For example, the energy sector uses COOP data to calculate the Heating and Cooling Degree Days
which are used to determine everyone's energy bill monthly. There are 329 COOP sites in Missouri.
http://www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-maps/coop_09/mo_coop.pdf and
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/coop/

                                                               1
National Weather Service (NWS)
NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards
Missouri Transmitters
NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards (NWR) is a nationwide network of radio stations broadcasting continuous weather
information directly from the nearest National Weather Service office. NWR broadcasts official Weather Service warnings,
watches, forecasts and other hazard information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Working with the Federal Communication
Commission's (FCC) Emergency Alert System, NWR is an "All Hazards" radio network, making it the single source for
comprehensive weather and emergency information. In conjunction with Federal, state, and local emergency managers
and other public officials, NWR also broadcasts warning and post-event information for all types of hazards – including
natural (such as earthquakes or avalanches), environmental (such as chemical releases or oil spills), and public safety
(such as AMBER alerts or 911 Telephone outages). NWR includes 1100 transmitters covering all 50 states, adjacent
coastal waters, and U.S. Territories. There are 34 NWR transmitters in Missouri.
http://www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-maps/nwr_09/mo_nwr.pdf and
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/

MO-4
Joplin
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric
Research (OAR)
Climate Reference Network
Joplin Station
The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is an operational network of climate stations. Data from the USCRN will be
used in operational climate monitoring activities and for placing current climate anomalies into an historical perspective.
NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) manages the USCRN. The USCRN will also provide the United States with
a reference network that contributes to an International network under the auspices of the Global Climate Observing
System (GCOS). NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service and NOAA’s Office of Oceanic
and Atmospheric Research jointly manage USCRN.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/

Kansas City at Pleasant Hill
National Weather Service (NWS)
River Forecast Center
Missouri Basin River Forecast Center
Collocated with the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Pleasant Hill, the Missouri Basin River Forecast Center
(RFC) performs continuous river basin modeling and provides hydrologic forecast and guidance products for rivers and
streams for the U.S. portion of the Missouri River basin from its headwaters in Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana down to
the confluence with the Mississippi River and the U.S. portion of the St. Mary River basin in Montana. These products
include forecasts of river stage and flow, probabilistic river forecasts, reservoir inflow forecasts, water supply forecasts,
spring flood outlooks, and various types of flash flood guidance. RFCs work closely with local water management agencies
as well as state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S.
Geologic Survey, to provide water and flood information for critical decisions.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/ncrfc

National Weather Service (NWS)
Weather Forecast Office
Pleasant Hill WFO
Collocated with the Missouri Basin River Forecast Center on State Highway 5 north of Pleasant Hill, this National Weather
Service Forecast Office (WFO) is staffed around the clock every day, and provides the best possible weather, water, and
climate forecasts and warnings to residents of 37 counties in the northwest third of Missouri, and seven counties in
northeast Kansas. Highly trained forecasters issue warnings and forecasts for events including severe thunderstorms,
tornadoes, winter storms, floods, and heat waves. This essential information is provided to the general public, media,
emergency management and law enforcement officials, the aviation, and marine communities, agricultural interests,
businesses, and others. Information is disseminated in many ways, including through dedicated government channels,
satellite, the Internet, and broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.



                                                              2
Forecasters provide on-site, detailed weather support for critical emergencies, such as wildfires, floods, chemical spills, and
for major recovery efforts such as those following the Greensboro, Kansas, tornado; Hurricane Katrina; and the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attack in New York City. The WFO collects and disseminates precipitation, river, and rainfall data, and
prepares local climatological data. The Warning Coordination Meteorologist actively conducts outreach and educational
programs, which helps build strong working relationships with local partners in emergency management, government, the
media and academic communities. These relationships are invaluable in helping to prepare people to respond appropriately
when threatened by severe weather or other hazards. The WFO operates Automated Surface Observing Stations and the
local Doppler Weather Radar. The radar provides critical information about current weather conditions for the forecasters to
issue tornado warnings or flood and flash flood warnings.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/eax/

MO-5
Kansas City
Acquisition and Grants Office (AGO)
Eastern Acquisition Division
Kansas City Office
The Acquisition and Grants Office provides financial assistance and acquisition services for NOAA by overseeing and
implementing all processes related to contracts and grants. For FY 2010, NOAA issued 2,306 grants, totaling over $1.061
billion, to partner organizations and institutions throughout the United States and our territories.
http://www.ago.noaa.gov/ago/index.cfm and http://www.grants.gov

Office of the Chief Administrative Officer (OCAO)
Eastern Region
Kansas City Office
The Office of the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) provides comprehensive facility construction and lease acquisition
management support services in support of NOAA programs located in the eastern United States, specifically in the areas
of:
 Real estate (lease management, real property acquisitions);
 Construction project planning, design and engineering; and
 Facility project management.
http://www.corporateservices.noaa.gov/ocao/index.html

Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO)
Information Systems Management Office
Systems Support Division
The Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO), Technical Support Branch (TSB) – Kansas City is located in the Federal
Building located in downtown Kansas City. The Kansas City Branch office of the Systems Support Division provides a suite
of IT support services to NOAA’s Corporate and Administrative Services Offices based in Kansas City. These corporate
offices include: Acquisition & Grants Services, Administrative Services, and Workforce Management Services. Our work
includes IT infrastructure design and maintenance, network and server management and administration, desktop
configuration and maintenance, application and system design and implementation, and IT security and
telecommunications.
http://nrc.iso.noaa.gov/index.html

Workforce Management Office (WFMO)
Kansas City Center
Kansas City Office
The Workforce Management Office (WFMO) provides NOAA-wide leadership to workforce management functions including
strategic human capital planning, labor-management, about labor relations, employee relations, performance management,
and incentive awards, executive resources, distance learning, leadership development, training and career development,
and human resources data management and automation initiatives. The Workforce Management Office employees in the
Kansas City Office provide client centric human resources operational support to the National Weather Service.
http://www.wfm.noaa.gov/about_us.html



MO-6

                                                              3
Chillicothe
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric
Research (OAR)
Climate Reference Network
Chillicothe Station
The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is an operational network of climate stations. Data from the USCRN will be
used in operational climate monitoring activities and for placing current climate anomalies into an historical perspective.
NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) manages the USCRN. The USCRN will also provide the United States with
a reference network that contributes to an International network under the auspices of the Global Climate Observing
System (GCOS). NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service and NOAA’s Office of Oceanic
and Atmospheric Research jointly manage USCRN.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/

Kansas City
National Weather Service (NWS)
Central Region Headquarters
Administrative and Support Office
Co-located with the Training Center and the Aviation Weather Center, Central Region Headquarters is the administrative
and support office for the National Weather Service’s 14-state Central Region. Central Region Headquarters provides
guidance and support to 38 Weather Forecast Offices and two River Forecast Centers in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov

National Weather Service (NWS)
Maintenance Logistics and Acquisitions Division
National Reconditioning Center
This national center at the Bannister Federal Complex serves as the primary repair depot and inspection station for all
National Weather Service equipment. In addition, it serves as a warehouse for new stock, repair equipment, and spare
parts.
http://www.oso3.nws.noaa.gov/index.htm

National Weather Service (NWS)
Mission Support
Training Center
The National Weather Service Training Center (NWSTC) provides the majority of the professional and technical training for
NWS personnel. The Center's curriculum includes 36 different courses in meteorology, hydrology, electronics, computer
science, and management. In 1996, more than 1,500 NWS employees from all parts of the country received training. The
NWSTC is responsible for all maintenance training, and its laboratories contain most of the systems that are in operation at
field offices, including the WSR-88D-NEXRAD radar and the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), and the
Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). The training facility also offers summer workshops in
meteorology for educators. Each summer the Center works with the American Meteorological Society and the State
University of New York at Brockport to conduct a separate program for pre-college teachers. Participating educators are
selected from a national panel of applicants to attend the two-week session.
http://www.nwstc.noaa.gov

National Weather Service (NWS)
National Centers for Environmental Prediction
Aviation Weather Center
Part of the National Centers for Environment Prediction, the Aviation Weather Center enhances safety by issuing accurate
warnings, forecasts and analysis of hazardous weather for aviation interests. Meteorologists identify existing or imminent
weather hazards to aircraft in flight and create warnings for the aviation community. The Center also originates two-day
forecasts of weather conditions that will effect domestic and international aviation.
http://wwwt.ncep.noaa.gov/



MO-7

                                                             4
Springfield
National Weather Service (NWS)
Weather Forecast Office
Springfield WFO
Located at the Springfield-Branson Regional Airport, this National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (WFO) is
staffed around the clock every day, and provides the best possible weather, water, and climate forecasts and warnings to
residents of southwest Missouri. Highly trained forecasters issue warnings and forecasts for events including severe
thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter storms, floods, and heat waves. This essential information is provided to the general
public, media, emergency management and law enforcement officials, the aviation, and marine communities, agricultural
interests, businesses, and others. Information is disseminated in many ways, including through dedicated government
channels, satellite, the Internet, and broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards. Forecasters provide on-site, detailed
weather support for critical emergencies, such as wildfires, floods, and chemical spills. The WFO collects and disseminates
precipitation, river, and rainfall data, and prepares local climatological data. The Warning Coordination Meteorologist
actively conducts outreach and educational programs, which helps build strong working relationships with local partners in
emergency management, government, the media and academic communities. These relationships are invaluable in helping
to prepare people to respond appropriately when threatened by severe weather or other hazards. The WFO operates
Automated Surface Observing Stations and the local Doppler Weather Radar that provides critical information on current
weather conditions for the forecasters to issue tornado warnings or flood and flash flood warnings.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/sgf

MO-8
Rolla
National Ocean Service (NOS)
National Geodetic Survey
Geodetic Coordinator
Through a cooperative agreement and part of the National Ocean Service (NOS) State Advisor Program, the State
Geodetic Coordinator is a State employee that serves as liaison between NOS and the host state. In this method, NOS
helps guide and assist the State's charting, geodetic and surveying programs through technical transfer. This program also
provides assistance in planning and implementing Geographic/Land Information System (GIS/LIS) projects.
http://http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/ADVISORS/AdvisorsIndex.shtml

Salem
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric
Research (OAR)
Climate Reference Network
Salem Station
The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is an operational network of climate stations. Data from the USCRN will be
used in operational climate monitoring activities and for placing current climate anomalies into an historical perspective.
NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) manages the USCRN. The USCRN will also provide the United States with
a reference network that contributes to an International network under the auspices of the Global Climate Observing
System (GCOS). NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service and NOAA’s Office of Oceanic
and Atmospheric Research jointly manage USCRN.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/

MO-9
Columbia, Boone County
Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
Air Resources Laboratory
Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment
NOAA has several observational sites that support the World Climate Research Programme’s Global Energy and Water
Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). One of NOAA’s GEWEX sites is located near Columbia, MO. GEWEX sites were established
to provide detailed measurements (such as turbulent fluxes of heat, water vapor, momentum, carbon dioxide, air
temperature, and relative humidity) and other information about the physical and biological processes that occur at the
land/surface interface. Observations from these sites are being used to test and improve the current generation of land
surface models that are used for both regional and global climate prediction.
http://www.ceop.net



                                                             5
St. Louis/Western Illinois
National Weather Service (NWS)
Weather Forecast Office
St. Louis WFO
Located at the Missouri Research Park in St. Charles, this National Weather Service Forecast Weather Forecast Office
(WFO) is staffed around the clock every day, and provides the best possible weather, water, and climate forecasts and
warnings to residents of east-central Missouri. Highly trained forecasters issue warnings and forecasts for events including
severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter storms, floods, and heat waves. This essential information is provided to the
general public, media, emergency management and law enforcement officials, the aviation, and marine communities,
agricultural interests, businesses, and others. Information is disseminated in many ways, including through dedicated
government channels, satellite, the Internet, and broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.

Forecasters provide on-site, detailed weather support for critical emergencies, such as wildfires, floods, chemical spills, and
for major recovery efforts such as those following the Greensboro, Kansas, tornado; Hurricane Katrina; and the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attack in New York City. The WFO collects and disseminates precipitation, river, and rainfall data, and
prepares local climatological data. The Warning Coordination Meteorologist actively conducts outreach and educational
programs, which helps build strong working relationships with local partners in emergency management, government, the
media and academic communities. These relationships are invaluable in helping to prepare people to respond appropriately
when threatened by severe weather or other hazards. The WFO operates Automated Surface Observing Stations and the
local Doppler Weather Radar. The radar provides critical information about current weather conditions for the forecasters to
issue tornado warnings or flood and flash flood warnings.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lsx/




                              NOAA’s Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs
                                          http://www.legislative.noaa.gov




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