Healthy and Sustainable Food Choices

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					Blue M
         ountains City Cou ncil

Healthy and Sustainable
     Food Choices
                Guidelines for all
         Council managed food services




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                     Partnership betw           rea
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                          and Sydney




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Printed on 100% recycled paper.
Contents
 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5
 Rationale behind these Guidelines                                                                                                                                                                                                                           5
 How far has your food travelled?                                                                                                                                                                                                                            6
 Format of these Guidelines                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  7

 Section 1: Sustainability and Healthy Eating ....................................................................................................................................... 9
 Environment                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              10
 Natural Food                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             11
 Locally Produced                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         14
 Fairtrade and Ethical Foods                                                                                                                                                                                                                              14

 Section 2: Nutrition and Healthy Eating ................................................................................................................................................. 17
 Categorisation of food and drinks                                                                                                                                                                                                                        17
 Green Foods                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              18
 Amber Foods                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              19
 Red Foods                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                20

 Section 3: Food and Drink Classification Table ........................................................................................................................... 21
 How to classify a product                                                                                                                                                                                                                                21
 How can I start to change?                                                                                                                                                                                                                               26

 Section 4: Healthy and Sustainable Food Choices at Functions .................................................................... 27
 External Caterers Menu Checklist                                                                                                                                                                                                                         28
 Healthy food suggestions for external caterers                                                                                                                                                                                                           30

 Section 5: Timeframes and Targets for Implementation of the Guidelines ................................. 35
 1. Sustainability and healthy eating                                                                                                                                                                                                                     35
 2. Nutrition and healthy eating                                                                                                                                                                                                                          36

 Section 6: Tools and Resources .............................................................................................................................................................................. 37
 1. Label Reading Guide for RED Criteria                                                                                                                                                                                                                  37
 2. Annual Monitoring Tool                                                                                                                                                                                                                                39
 3. Examples of alternative healthier food options on Colless product list 2008                                                                                                                                                                           49
 4. Alternative healthier food options available from other distributors                                                                                                                                                                                  50
 5. General healthy food preparation tips                                                                                                                                                                                                                 51
 6. Seasonal Produce Guide                                                                                                                                                                                                                                52
 7. Recipes                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               54

 Section 7: References and Relevant Websites.............................................................................................................................. 59

 Appendix 1: The Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents in Australia................ 61
                                                Introductio n
Blue Mountains City Council recognises the importance of healthy and sustainable food to the
general health and wellbeing of our community and our environment. Blue Mountains City Council
would like to thank Sydney West Area Health Service for the content supplied on nutrition.

These guidelines are a response to the community endorsed City Vision and Map for Action
2000-2025 ‘Towards a more Sustainable Blue Mountains’, which includes the following outcomes:
  • The health and well-being of Blue Mountains people is improved;
  • Blue Mountains people live sustainably in harmony with the environment.

The Council areas that these guidelines cover include:
  • Council-operated leisure centre kiosks and vending machines: Blackheath, Katoomba,
    Lawson, Springwood and Glenbrook.
  • Vending machines at council facilities.
  • The coffee cart at Kids Kingdom (Katoomba Leisure Centre).
  • External catering provided for the Council.
  • CC’s Coffee Cart (Katoomba Administration Building)
  • Any future Council operated food services.

The implementation of these guidelines will be supported by Blue Mountains City Council via the
development of performance measures and targets.


Rationale behind these guidelines
1. Nutrition
There is unequivocal evidence that good nutrition is essential to good health throughout life, and
is especially important for infants and children. Good nutrition throughout the lifespan is a major
factor affecting growth and development, physical and mental health and quality of life.

Poor nutrition contributes to chronic and life threatening diseases such as cardiovascular disease
(including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes, some cancers and obesity. The Blue
Mountains local government area has a population of about 74 000 and it has been found that
47.5% of this population is overweight or obese.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in NSW, 45% of deaths from cardiovascular
disease are estimated to be due to poor nutrition. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in
NSW, nutrition is estimated to contribute to 30 to 40% of cancers. Almost one in four Australians
aged 25 years and over either has diabetes or impaired glucose metabolism. Diet plays an
important role in diabetes management and prevention.


                                                                                                      5
    2. Sustainability
    Making healthy food choices goes beyond good nutrition. The choices we make about what we
    eat impacts on our health, our communities, our air, water and climate.

    Food production, packaging, transport and waste have a significant environmental impact in
    Australia. It contributes to:
       • 26% of Australia’s greenhouse pollution;
       • 47% of Australia’s water use;
       • 60% of Australia’s eco-footprint.

    Globally sourced foods have increased by 26% in recent years in Australia. The further the distance
    our food travels the greater the environmental impact; some of the common foods that have
    travelled a long way include:
          Kiwifruit from Italy – shipping distance (not including land transport) 17, 471 km
          Corn from Thailand – 9390 km
          Limes from Tahiti – 6120 km
          Smoked salmon from Norway – 22, 429 km
          Bananas from The Philippines – 7 313 km
          Grapes from Brazil – 13 803 km
          Garlic from China – 9 572 km
          Oranges from California – 12 056 km
          Avocados from New Zealand – 2287 km

    By choosing sustainable foods and minimising food wastage in Council’s services we can have a
    positive impact on our local and global environment and our health.


    How far has your food travelled?

       Norway
       Smoked salmon
       22,429km


      Italy                                    China
      Kiwifruit                                Garlic
      17,471km                                 9,572km
                                                                            California
                                                                            Oranges
                                                                            12,056km
                                    Thailand
                                    Corn
                                    9,390km
                                               The Philippines
                                               Bananas
                                               7,313km
                                                                            Tahiti
                                                                            Limes        Brazil
                                                                            6,120km      Grapes
                                                                                         13,803km




                                                                 New Zealand
                                                                 Avocados
                                                                 2,287km
    Table adapted from
    Sydney Food Fairness Alliance

6
Format of these guidelines
These Healthy and Sustainable Food Guidelines are divided into two main sections:

1. Sustainability and healthy eating
2. Nutrition and healthy eating
The Australian Dietary Guidelines (2003) were developed to promote healthy eating and lifestyle
patterns to support good health and wellbeing. There are separate dietary guidelines for children,
adolescents and adults (Appendix 1). Food variety is the key to healthy eating. These guidelines
are reflective of The Australian Dietary Guidelines.

The nutrition component of the Blue Mountains City Council Healthy and Sustainable Food
Guidelines is based on the Healthier Food and Drink Choices for Staff, Visitors in NSW Health
Facilities and A Better Choice- Healthy Food & Drink Supply Strategy for Queensland Health
Facilities, the Cancer Council’s Workplace Healthy Catering and the Heart Foundation’s Healthier
Catering Guidelines 2003.

Foods and drinks have been classified into three categories based on their nutritional value.
The three categories are GREEN, AMBER and RED.




                                                                                                     7
Sus                    ction ng 1:
   taina            Se
        bility and healthy eati
 Healthy food choices means sustainable food choices…
 Making healthy food choices goes beyond good nutrition. The choices we make about what we
 eat impacts on our health, our communities, our air, water and climate.

  Reviewing menus to become healthier is the perfect opportunity to make bold decisions to
  support and promote sustainable healthy food in our community. When ordering supplies or
  menu planning, think about the amount of water and energy required to make and transport
  the product and its ingredients, how far the ingredients have travelled, whether the producers
  have been treated fairly, whether the ingredients are processed or altered, how much
  packaging is involved…

  Aim for continuous improvement! Even the smallest changes can make a difference and you
  will be appreciated for your efforts.

 Some of the current issues of concern around food that could be addressed when making healthy
 and sustainable food choices include:


        Environment: farming practices, water use, soil depletion and erosion, energy
        emissions, chemical use and runoff.


        Natural Food: pesticide and agrochemical use, nutrition and long term health.

        Locally Produced: global trade displacing small family farmers, transportation
        costs (both $ and environmental costs), loss of freshness and nutrients through transporting
        food long distances.


        FairTrade Food: ensuring equitable treatment of disadvantaged producers and workers.




                                                                                                       9
             Environment
     Since European settlement of Australia around 100 million hectares (ha) of forest and woodland
     have been cleared, mostly for agricultural production, and land continues to be cleared for
     agriculture. Around 456 million ha, or 59% of land in Australia, is used for agriculture, making it the
     dominant form of land use. Agriculture is also the largest consumer of water in Australia.

     To produce a single 150g serve of meat can take over 200 litres of water. The same steak creates
     5kg of greenhouse pollution, including emissions from haulage, storage and packaging. All food
     carries some ‘embodied’ energy and water. That means the amount of energy and water that
     goes into producing it. The more processed or refined a product is the more embodied energy it
     contains.


      Some common foods with high embodied energy are:

                 • Potato chips or any snack food with aluminium-lined packaging.

                 • Freeze-dried instant coffee.

                 • Any over-packaged foods such as individually wrapped lollies or biscuits.




      What is the best environmental choice?
                 • Locally produced food.

                 • Unprocessed or minimally processed foods.

                 • Avoid fish grown in fish farms (aquaculture) especially carnivorous fish (such as
                   prawns, salmon, snapper, barramundi and tuna).

                 • Fresh fruit and vegetables rather than dried or canned.

                 • Dried beans that you soak and cook rather than canned.

                 • Unbleached flours rather than bleached.

                 • Choose pasture or grass-fed beef instead of grain-fed.

                 • Choose local seafood. The best choices include King George whiting, Australian
                   salmon, leatherjacket, garfish, mullet, flathead, calamari, octopus, farmed blue
                   mussels, yellowfin bream, blue swimmer crabs, western rock lobster, wild-caught
                   mulloway and yellowtail kingfish and farmed Sydney rock oysters.

                 • Bulk food with minimal and recyclable packaging.

                 • Organic or biodynamic foods.

                 • Not Genetically Modified foods.




10
         Natural Food
There is increasing recognition of the health and environmental benefits of organic food. When our
food is organic it is produced in an organic farming system without the use of synthetic chemicals
or genetically modified organisms. Emphasis is placed on a holistic farm management approach.
Organic systems generally recognise that our health is directly connected to the health of the food
we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil.

About 300 different pesticides are registered in Australia for use on fruit and vegetable crops.
The use of synthetic chemicals, Genetically Modified Organisms antibiotics, anti-microbials and
hormones are prohibited in organic food production. Where animals are treated with veterinary
chemicals, they are not allowed to be sold as organic. Similarly the use of synthetic chemicals as
preservatives, colourings and antioxidants are prohibited in the processing of organic foods.

Exposure to pesticides can occur directly from occupational, agricultural and household use, and
indirectly through the diet. Studies suggest that pesticides may be related to various diseases,
including cancers, as well as having neurological, mental and reproductive effects. Children may be
more susceptible to the effects of pesticides due to increased exposure via food and breast milk,
underdeveloped detoxification pathways, and longer life expectancy in which to develop diseases
with long latency periods.

Why choose organic?
  • It may taste better and be superior in vitamin, mineral and nutrient content.
  • Conventional agricultural spraying can lead to a variety of health issues including low birth
    weight, birth defects, abnormal neurological development and reproductive problems.
  • Compared to soils on conventional farms, organically farmed soils have been shown to have:
     •   Less nitrogen leaching;
     •   Better nutrient holding ability;
     •   More efficient biological nutrient cycling;
     •   Less runoff and erosion.
  • Pesticides and other chemicals widely used in conventional farming contaminate
    groundwater and rivers and pollute sources of drinking water.
  • Chemical pesticides are routinely used in conventional farming and residues can be present
    in non-organic food.
  • Genetically Modified Organisms are not allowed under the strict organic certification standards.
  • Most organic farms are still independently owned family farms.




                                                                                                      11
     Genetically Modified (GM) Foods
     Genetically modified (GM) foods are foods made from genetically modified organisms (GMO) that
     have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering. GM foods were first put on the market in
     the early 1990s. The most common modified foods are derived from plants: soybean, corn, canola,
     and cotton seed oil. Controversies surrounding GM foods and crops commonly focus on food
     production, human and environmental safety, labelling and consumer choice, intellectual property
     rights, ethics, food security, poverty reduction and environmental conservation.

     GM organisms are very much an unknown quantity, and it is impossible to anticipate all potential
     effects on human health and the environment. The risks of new technologies and their implications
     for human health and the environment can only really be assessed after they have been in use for
     many years.

     There are two sources of GM food in Australia, locally grown and imported.

     Local: In mid 2008 there are two GM food crops approved for growing in Australia, GM cotton and
     GM canola. GM cottonseed oil is used extensively in Australian fast food outlets, and GM cotton
     plant by-products are used for animal feed. GM canola will enter the food chain as oil for human
     consumption and probably in by-product form (“canola cake”) for animal feed.

     Imported: The Federal Government, via Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ), has
     approved the sale of the following imported GM food items, either whole or as processed ingre-
     dients: soy, corn, potato, sugar beet, canola, cotton, and several food processing enzymes of GM
     origin. These GM products may be found in food for human consumption and in animal feed.

     The Labelling of GM Food in Australia
     In July 2000 Australian and NZ Health Ministers resolved to require the labelling of GM foods;
     these resolutions became law in December 2001. There are exemptions to labeling however, which
     include:
       • highly refined food (eg. sugars or oils);
       • processing aids and food additives (eg. refined soy lecithin);
       • flavours in small amounts;
       • food prepared at the point of sale (e.g. fast food outlets and restaurants);
       • food containing up to 1% of GM material - “where its presence is unintended”;
       • eggs, meat and milk from animals that have been fed GM feed.


      How to avoid chemical/pesticides in food
                • Purchase organic food and ingredients.

                • Wash and peel fruit and vegetables.




12
 Where to buy organic
            Organic Federation of Australia www.ofa.org.au

            Organic Food Directory www.organicfooddirectory.com.au

            Blue Mountains Food Coop 02 4782 5890

            The Green Pages (directory of suppliers of all types of organic food)
            www.thegreenpages.com.au

            Blackheath Growers Market – Blackheath Community Centre
            2nd Sunday each month, growers@blackcastleevents.com.au

            Coles Katoomba & Winmalee

            Bakehouse on Wentworth, Blackheath – 4787 7255

            Penrith Organic Health 4722 6363 www.penrithorganichealth.com.au

            Organic Vending (snacks and vending machine items)
            1300 782 063 www.organicvending.com.au

            Eco Barn (local organic food distributor) 4739 0529 www.ecobarn.com.au

            The Organic Meat Company (02) 9258 8333 www.theorganicmeatcompany.com.au

            Whole Kids (organic snacks and drinks for kids)
            (03) 9421 6898 www.wholekids.com.au

            Abundant Organics 1300 558 312 www.abundantorganics.com.au



 More information about GM Foods
            • GreenPeace True Food Guide www.truefood.org.au

            • Blue Mountains Food Co-op Eating Naturally and Avoiding GM Foods
              Information Guide www.bluemtnsfood.asn.au


Certified Organic – What to look for

Australian Certified Organic       AUSTRALIAN       Bio-dynamic Research
                                  CERTIFIED
www.australianorganic.com.au      ORGANIC          Institute www.demeter.org.au

NASAA – National Association for Sustainable                  Aus-Qual Ltd
Agriculture Australia – www.nasaa.com.au                      www.ausqual.com.au

Organic Food Chain                                            Safe Food Production Qld
www.organicfoodchain.com.au                                   www.safefood.qld.gov.au

Tasmanian Organic-dynamic Producers
03 6381 2004



                                                                                         13
             Locally Produced
     The ‘food mile’ is a measure of the distance food travels from where it is grown or raised to where
     it is purchased by the consumer. Increasingly in Australia, supermarket shelves are stocked with
     imported food and food products that have been hauled thousands of kilometres.

     In general, the greater the distance food has travelled from paddock to plate, the greater the
     transport pollution and the greater the impact on the health of people, the land and global climate.

     Some of the impacts of ‘globally sourced food’ include:

     Environmental: air and road transport consumes large quantities of fuel and energy and releases
     greenhouse gases which contribute to global climate change. Packaging and processing to
     support long distance travel.

     Health: long distance transport increases the time from farm to fork and can reduce nutrition of
     food.

     Social: Australians have little say in the farming practices of other countries, the levels and types of
     pesticide used and the wages and conditions of workers.


      How to reduce food miles
                  • Buy produce that thrives in our own region.

                  • Use local suppliers - read the labels or ask where produce has come from.

                  • Avoid air freight. Tell your suppliers that you want food with ‘country of origin’
                    clearly identified on the label.

                  • Serve whatever is in season - when it is at its freshest and tastiest, and also at the
                    best price.

                  • Source your food from community food options: local farmers’ markets,
                    community gardens, food co-operatives.



             Fairtrade and Ethical Foods
     Fair Trade is a trading partnership that seeks greater equity in international trade. It contributes
     to sustainable development by offering better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of,
     disadvantaged producers and workers.

     Fair Trade organisations are engaged in supporting producers in awareness raising and in
     campaigning for changes in the rules and practices of conventional international trade.

     Fair Trade’s strategic intent is:
        • To work with marginalized producers and workers in order to help them move from a position
          of vulnerability to security and economic self-sufficiency;
        • To empower producers and workers as stakeholders in their own organisations;
        • To play an active role in the global arena to achieve greater equity in international trade.




14
What to look for
Fairtrade Labelling Organisation (FLO) is the leading standard setting and certification organisation
for labelled Fairtrade. Products carry the Fair-Trade certification mark as the independent
consumer guarantee that producers in the developing world get a better deal.

Fairtrade criteria requires sustainable farming techniques, and offer a higher price for organic
products. Moreover, Fairtrade premiums are often used to train producers in organic and
sustainable techniques. FLO has adopted strict environmental standards and guidelines
expressly forbidding use of GMOs.


 Where to find Fair-trade products
            Fairtrade Association of Australia www.fta.org.au

            Fairtrade Labelling Organisation www.fairtrade.net




                                                                                                       15
                                                                  2:
           Nutr                                           Sectioning
               ition and healthy eat
Categorisation of food and drinks

        Green Category
These food and drinks are healthy choices. They should always be available and actively
encouraged and promoted at all times.



        Amber Category
These foods and drinks should be chosen carefully. They should not dominate the menu and large
serve sizes should be avoided.



        Red Category
These foods and drinks need to be limited at all times.




   GREEN FOODS & DRINKS
   Fill the menu. Healthy choices


   AMBER FOODS & DRINKS
   Choose Carefully. Limit serve size


   RED FOODS & DRINKS
   Limit at all times




                                                                                                 17
              Green Foods
     The foods and drinks in the green category are the healthy choices. They should be available at all
     times and be included as a key part of the daily menu. These foods and drinks are excellent sources
     of important nutrients, contain less saturated fat, added sugar and/or salt and help avoid excess
     energy intake (kilojoules). Green foods are generally fresh foods that have had minimal processing
     and will generally be easy to meet the ‘Sustainability and Healthy Eating’ food criteria (see section 1).



     Food Type             Examples
     Breads                All types of breads: multigrain, wholemeal, rye, hi-fibre white breads or rolls,
                           burritos, English muffins, focaccia, lavash, Lebanese, pita, raisin/fruit bread,
                           tortillas and Turkish breads. Plain corn and rice cakes, crispbreads.
     Cereal foods          All plain rice, pasta, noodles, polenta, couscous and buckwheat.
     Breakfast cereals     Wholegrain breakfast cereal that is high in fibre and low in salt and added
                           sugar (e.g. wheat biscuits, cereal flakes with a variety of grains, bran, un-
                           toasted muesli, porridge).
     Fruit                 All fresh and frozen fruits.
                           Plain dried fruits (e.g. sultanas).
                           Fruit canned in natural juice or water with no added sugar.
     Vegetables            All fresh, frozen, and canned varieties.
     Legumes               All forms of dried and prepared beans and peas. Examples include baked
                           beans, red kidney beans, soy beans, lentils, chick-peas, split peas, bean
                           curd, or tofu.
     Dairy products        Low - or reduced-fat plain and flavoured milks.
                           Low - or reduced-fat plain and flavoured yoghurts.
                           Diet plain and flavoured yoghurts.
                           Low - or reduced fat-cheese and custard.
                           Low -fat smoothies (no added sugar).
     Dairy Alternatives    Low - or reduced-fat soy varieties including plain soy-milk, Low- or reduced-
                           fat plain or flavoured soy- yoghurt, soy- cheese and soy-custard.
     Meat/fish/poultry      Lean chicken, turkey, beef, pork, lamb and veal with fat and skin removed.
     & alternatives        All fresh and plain frozen fish.
                           Plain tuna, salmon, sardines canned (preferably in spring water or oil as
                           these are healthier choices).
                           Eggs.
                           All plain or dry roasted, unsalted nuts and seeds.
     Drinks                Water.
                           Low - or reduced-fat plain and flavoured milk and soy milk.




18
        Amber Foods
The foods and drinks in the amber category are minimally processed. They should be supplied
in smaller quantities than green category foods and drinks. Amber foods have some nutritional
value but have moderate levels of saturated fat, sugar and/or salt. There may be options for some
categories of amber foods that will meet the ‘Sustainability and Healthy Eating’ criteria (see Section
1). In large serves amber foods may contribute to excess energy intake (kilojoules).

Food Type             Examples
Breakfast Cereals     Refined and processed breakfast cereals with added sugars and/or saturated
                      fat. Examples include some toasted muesli, flavoured and/or sugar
                      sweetened corn, rice or wheat based cereals.
Dairy foods and     Full-fat plain and flavoured milk/soy milk.
drinks, and dairy   Full-fat yoghurt, frozen yoghurt, custard and cheese and equivalent soy
alternatives        products.
Processed Meats     Use in small amounts only, as larger serve sizes can provide too much
                    saturated fat and/or salt. Examples include lean ham, lean bacon, sliced
                    chicken or turkey, corned beef and pastrami.
Savoury             Check label against the RED criteria. Examples may include some reduced-fat or
commercial          reduced-salt versions of products such as oven-baked savoury pastries, steamed
products            dim sims, pasta products, pizza, oven-baked potato products, grilled meat
                    patties (not crumbed), grilled or oven baked meatballs and chicken drumsticks.
                    DEEP FRIED PRODUCTS WILL BE RED
Margarine,          Use sparingly. Choose polyunsaturated or monounsaturated varieties.
mayonnaise/salad Examples of spreads include peanut butter and other nut spreads, fish,
dressing, spreads   chicken and meat paste, yeast and vegetable extract spreads. Some spreads
and oils            contain nut products that are a common allergen. Choose reduced-salt
                    varieties where available.
Sauces and gravy Use sparingly. Choose reduced-salt varieties where available. Examples
                    include tomato sauce, sweet chilli sauce and gravy. Some sauces (e.g. satay)
                    also contain nut products that are a common allergen.
Snack food bars     Some breakfast bars, cereal bars, dried fruit bars and sweet biscuits that are
and sweet biscuits a small to medium serve size or have been modified (for example reduced
                    levels of fat and/or sugar and include fibre) may fit into the Amber category.
                    (check against RED criteria)
Savoury snack       Examples most likely to fit here include oven-baked snack biscuits, plain
foods and biscuits popcorn and some dry biscuits. (check against RED criteria)
Some cakes,         Some un-iced unfilled cakes, sweet and savoury muffins, fruit breads,
muffins, sweet       sweet pastries and slices that are a small to medium serve size or have
pastries and slices been modified (for example reduced levels of fat and/or sugar and include
                    fibre) may fit into the Amber category. Examples include small reduced-fat
                    fruitcake, reduced-fat fruit or vegetable based muffins and plain wholemeal
                    biscuits with fruit or nuts. (check against RED criteria)
Ice-creams, milk-   Ice creams that are not coated in chocolate, premium or a large serve size
or soy-based ice    may fall into the Amber category (e.g. plain milk-based ice creams and
confections and     frozen yoghurts). (check against RED criteria)
dairy desserts




                                                                                                         19
     Food Type            Examples
     Ice blocks,          Check against RED criteria
     fruit-based ice
     confection/
     slushees
     Drinks               At least 99% fruit juice (no added sugar).
                          Other fruit juice drinks less than 99% fruit juice. (check against RED criteria)
                          Diet Drinks (artificially sweetened).
                          Iced tea, sweetened waters and sports drinks. (check against RED criteria)


             Red Foods
     The foods and drinks in the red category have little nutritional value. These foods should be
     consumed occasionally and in small amounts. They should also be limited at all times. Red foods
     and drinks can contribute to excess energy intake (kilojoules). There may be options for some
     categories of red foods that will meet the ‘Sustainability and Healthy Eating’ criteria (see Section
     1). These foods and drinks are also high in saturated fat, sugar and/or salt.

     Food Type          Examples
     Ready to eat       Commercial, frozen or freshly prepared ready to eat meals or pre made
     meals              pasta. (Check against RED criteria)
     Processed meats    High fat processed meats such as salami, mortadella, luncheon meats,
                        reconstituted meats, devon, cabanossi and fatty bacon or ham.
     Fried foods        ALL DEEP FRIED FOODS ARE RED
     Savoury            Includes pies, pastries and sausage rolls, pastas, pizzas, oven baked potato
     commercial         products, dim sims, spring rolls, burger patties and meatballs, hot dogs,
     products           frankfurters and sausages and quiche (Check against RED criteria)
     Snack food bars    Cream filled biscuits, chocolate biscuits and any sweet biscuit that exceed
     and sweet biscuits the nutrient criteria in a single serve (2 biscuits). High fat high sugar muesli,
                        breakfast or snack bars. (Check against RED criteria)
     Savoury snack      Includes some flavoured popcorns and biscuits. (check against RED criteria)
     food and biscuits
     Cakes, muffins,     Plain and flavoured cakes, cream filled cakes, sweet pastries, sweet pies and
     sweet pastries and slices. Medium to large serves of sweet and savoury muffins. Choose lower
     slices             or reduced-fat varieties where possible. (Check against RED criteria)
     Confectionery/     All types excluding sugar free gum, cough lozenges, sugar free mints and
     lollies            antacids as they have special uses.
     Ice-creams, milk- Chocolate coated and premium ice-creams.
     or soy-based ice
     confections and
     dairy desserts
     Sugar sweetened Soft drinks, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks and flavoured mineral
     drinks and ices    waters. (check against RED criteria)




20
                                                                    3:
Food
     and D                                                  Sectionable
          rink                               Classification T
This is a simple tool designed to assist in classifying food and drinks. It divides food and drinks
into fourteen product categories and outlines the nutrient profile of red category products. The
comments section of the table provides helpful hints for you to consider regarding healthy and
sustainable food and drinks.


How to classify a product:
Step 1. Find the ‘product category’ that the product fits into (Product Category column).
Step 2. Check the colours for the product category (Likely Colours column). Where there is a RED
colour, check the product label against the RED criteria (RED Criteria column).

Step 3. When using the ‘per serve’ criteria check the serve size of a product as the serve size on
the food label may not be the actual size of the serve sold.

Step 4. If the product fails any one of the RED criteria then it is classified as RED. If the product
does not fail on any of the RED criteria it will be classified as AMBER or GREEN.

See Tools and Resources section (Section 6) for examples of using these steps.




                                                                                                       21
22
                                  able
                                nT
                           catio
                      assifi
     Food and Drink Cl


       Product Category                                    Likely Colours         Red Criteria                            Comments
                                                                                  <less than >more than
       Food or Drink                                       GREEN    AMBER   RED
                                                                                  Serve size = serve sold




       BREADS AND GRAIN PRODUCTS                                                                                  Choose unbleached wholegrain or
                                                                                  Energy >600kJ/serve             whole wheat.
       Biscuits: Sweet                                                                                       Choose smaller items.
                                                                                  Saturated Fat > 3g/serve
       Breakfast Cereals                                                                                     Fruit breads, un-iced cakes and muffins
                                                                                                             are healthier alternatives to fancy cakes.
       Buns and Scones, soft pretzels                                                                        Encourage fresh fruit and vegetable
                                                                                  Energy >900kJ/serve        fillings. Avoid excessive packagaing.
       Cakes, Muffins, sweet pastries etc                                          Saturated fat >3g/serve    There are many organic options
       Sandwiches, bread rolls including focaccia,                                                           available.
       Turkish bread and wraps                                                                               Support local bakers.




       CONFECTIONARY                                                                                         All types are RED. Sugar free gum, cough
                                                                                                             lozenges, sugar free mints and antacids
       Lollies: boiled, jellies, liquorice, yoghurt                                                          are exempt as they have special uses.
       coasted, fruit juice lollies or jellies, “natural                                                     Highly processed & packaged.
       confectionary”, sugar coated nuts, choco-
                                                                                                             Support Fairtrade chocolate.
       late, and carob.
     Product Category                                 Likely Colours         Red Criteria                          Comments
                                                                             <less than >more than
     Food or Drink                                    GREEN    AMBER   RED
                                                                             Serve size = serve sold




     DAIRY PRODUCTS & ALTERNATIVES
                                                                                                       Reduced fat forms are encouraged
     Low and reduced fat forms: Cheese, custard,                                                       (except for young children under the
     fromage frais, plain or flavoured milk and                                                         age of 2 years). Reduce fat serve size
     yoghurt, plain or flavoured soy drinks and                                                         not limited.
     yoghurts which are enriched with calcium                                                          There are many organic dairy products
                                                                                                       available.
     Full Fat Forms of the above products

     FRUIT AND VEGETABLES
                                                                                                            Try Seasonal and Australian grown
     All forms: fresh, frozen, canned and dried                                                             fresh fruit salad .
                                                                                                            Encourage seasonal fresh fruit and
     Fruit juices (see ‘drinks’)                                                                            vegetables as sandwich ingredients.
     See ‘hot foods’ for baked potato products

     DRINKS

     Sugar sweetened drinks: cordials, energy
                                                                             Energy >300kJ/serve       Try introducing Fair-trade tea, coffee
     drinks, flavoured mineral water, iced tea,
                                                                                                       and/or hot chocolate products.
     soft drinks, sports drinks/waters, sweetened                            Sodium >100mg/serve
                                                                                                       Ideally the maximum serve size for RED
     waters, fruit drinks less than 99% juice                                                          drinks is 375ml.
     Diet drinks (artificially sweetened)                                                               Ideally the maximum serve size of a diet
                                                                                                       drink is 375ml.
     Fruit Juices (at least 99%)                                                                       There are many organic milk, juice and
                                                                                                       soft drink products available.
     Milk, soy drinks (low fat & reduced fat plain/
                                                                                                       Provide filtered water rather than
     flavoured)                                                                                         bottled.
     Milk, soy drinks (full fat, plain/flavoured)

     Water, unsweetened




23
24
     Product Category                                    Likely Colours         Red Criteria                          Comments
                                                                                <less than >more than
     Food or Drink                                       GREEN    AMBER   RED
                                                                                Serve size = serve sold




     COMMERCIAL, FROZEN/
     READY TO EAT MIXED MEALS                                                                             Beware of over processed and
                                                                                Energy >2500kJ/serve      packaged products.
     Eg. pasta and lasagne, curries, roast dinners,                             Saturated fat >4g/100g
     stir fried dinners, fried rice                                             Sodium >400mg/100g

     HOT SINGLE FOOD ITEMS                                                                                All deep fried foods are RED eg fried
                                                                                                          hot chips.
                                                                                Energy >1000kJ/100g
     Savoury pastries (eg pies, sausage rolls, quiche,                                                    A number of companies make reduced
                                                                                Saturated fat >5g/100g
     croissants), pizza, oven baked potato products,                                                      fat options.
                                                                                Sodium >400mg/100g
     dim sims, spring rolls, hot noodle cup                                                               Consider how far the product has
                                                                                Energy 1000kJ/100g        travelled.
     Crumbed and coated foods (eg patties,                                                                Beware of over processed and
                                                                                Saturated fat >5g/100g
     chicken products) frankfurts, sausages                                                               packaged products .
                                                                                Sodium >700mg/100g

     ICE CREAMS, MILK BASED ICE
     CONFECTIONS AND INDULGENT DAIRY
     DESSERTS (NOT YOGHURTS)

     Premium and chocolate-coated                                                                         Consider organic options.
                                                                                Energy >600kJ/serve
     Standard, reduced and low fat ice creams,
                                                                                Saturated fat >3g/serve
     milk based ice confections
                                                                                Energy 600kJ/serve
     Dairy desserts
                                                                                Saturated fat >3g/serve
     ICE BLOCKS,                                                                Energy >300kJ/serve       If less than 90% juice assess against the
     Water or fruit based ice confections                                       Sodium >100mg/serve       RED criteria.
     Product Category                                Likely Colours         Red Criteria                         Comments
                                                                            <less than >more than
     Food or Drink                                   GREEN    AMBER   RED
                                                                            Serve size = serve sold




     SALADS                                                                                           Salads with lots of oil or mayonnaise are
                                                                                                      AMBER.
     Mixed vegetable, Coleslaw, Cous Cous, Gar-
                                                                                                           Fresh, organic locally produced is
     den, Potato, Pasta, Rice, Tabouleh, Salads                                                            best.
     served with lean meats, tuna, salmon, egg,
     beans and fruit


     SAVOURY SNACK FOODS AND BISCUITS
                                                                                                      Air-popped, plain popcorn without
     Popcorn, plain                                                                                   added fat and salt, is GREEN.
                                                                            Energy >600kJ/serve       A number of companies have
     Flavoured popcorn, crisps/ packet chips and                            Saturated fat >3g/serve   formulated healthier AMBER options in
     similar                                                                Sodium >200mg/serve       snack food and savoury biscuits lines.
                                                                                                           Try a locally produced and organic
     Savoury biscuits, crackers, rice and corn                              Energy >600kJ/serve
                                                                                                           option.
     cakes, crispbreads                                                     Saturated fat >3g/serve
                                                                            Sodium >200mg/serve
     SNACK FOOD BARS                                                                                  There are organic options available.

     Breakfast bars, cereal based bars, fruit bars                          Energy >600kJ/serve
     and leathers (<90% dried fruit)                                        Saturated Fat >3g/serve   Reduced salt soups are good choices.

     SOUPS (AS RECONSTITUTED)                                                                         If you are making the soup try to use
                                                                                                      locally sourced fresh vegetables and
     Sushi                                                                                            beans you have soaked yourself.

                                                                                                      Sushi condiments are often high in salt
                                                                                                      eg soy sauce.




25
     How Can I Start to Change?
     The following are some steps you may take to help improve the percentage of healthy and
     sustainable choices.
       1. Identify which foods and drinks on your menu are GREEN, AMBER and RED. (Using the Food and
          Drink Classification Table and the Annual Monitoring Tool in Section 6 of these Guidelines).
       2. Discontinue any RED foods and drinks that are not selling well.
       3. Reduce the number of flavours/varieties of RED food and drinks and unsustainable products.
       4. Switch from a less healthy product to the healthier and more sustainable alternative.
       5. Promote and slowly introduce GREEN, AMBER and sustainable alternatives to customers by
          taste-tests, introductory price specials, meal deals and signage.
       6. Slowly delete the RED food and drinks.

     To help find new healthier products see Tools and Resources section (Section 6) of these
     Guidelines and the following websites have buyers guides, which allow you to search for GREEN
     and AMBER products that have been registered.

     www.healthy-kids.com.au/buyersguide, www.healthyfoodproducts.com.au

     NOTE: Not all products are in these guides; you can always check labels of new products against
     the RED criteria on the Food and Drink Classification Table. Remember to consider the sustainability
     criteria when looking at these recipes.

     For recipes that have been assessed against sustainability criteria:
     “The Conscious Cook – Sustainable Cooking and Living” by Giselle Wilkinson
     Brolga Publishing 2008

     NOTE: Remember to consider the Food and Drink Classification (RED, AMBER, GREEN) criteria
     when looking at these recipes.




26
                                                                  4:
                 Health
                                                          SectionFood
                       y and Sustainable
                          Choices at Functions
Food choices available at functions and events should aim for the following:
  • Predominantly plant-based foods such as fruit, vegetables, wholegrain breads and cereals.
  • Moderate amounts of lean meat, skinless chicken, fish and reduced-fat dairy products (eg
    reduced fat milk, cheeses and yoghurt).
  • Use polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats (eg olive oil and margarine) in preparation of
    foods.
  • Preference for foods that are either fresh, steamed, stir-fried, lightly grilled, oven baked or
    poached. Fried foods and heavily char-grilled foods should be kept to a minimum.
  • Source local products where available (for list of local producers visit
    www.katoombachamber.com).
  • Source organic products/ingredients where available.
  • Attempt to meet the Sustainability Criteria detailed in Section 1.

When contacting prospective caterers it may be useful to explain the Council’s view on healthy
eating and the need for healthy and sustainable options to be provided at functions and events.
It may be useful to provide prospective caterers with a copy of these Guidelines. The following
checklist may be used to assess a caterer’s proposed menu suitability.




                                                                                                      27
28
     External Caterers Menu Checklist
     NOTE: if products meet both nutrition and sustainability criteria, they should be your first choice

     CHECK THE MENU OFFERS …                                                                 Check if offered   Products offered that meet criteria


                             A range of different types of foods should be offered.
     VARIETY                 The emphasis should be on a wide variety of plant-based
                             foods served in different and appetising ways.


                             Vegetables and fruit should be incorporated into most
                             menu items (eg fruit platters, sandwich fillings, soups, pizza
     VEGETABLES AND          toppings and finger foods). Vegetarian items should be
     FRUIT                   included to provide choice for those who do not eat meat.

                             Salads and vegetables should be available at meals and
                             fruit should be available with desserts.


                             Possible options include multigrain, wholegrain rolls, rye
                             bread, Turkish bread, wholemeal pita bread, high-fibre
     BREADS AND              white bread, water crackers or crisp breads.
     CEREALS                 At breakfast, high-fibre breakfast cereals are recommend-
                             ed such as wheat breakfast biscuits, porridge, bran flakes
                             and natural muesli.


                             Lean cuts of meats should be used and all visible fat
                             trimmed.

     LEAN MEAT/              Skin should be removed from chicken.
     POULTRY AND FISH        Use of processed meats such as sausages, salami,
                             frankfurts, should be kept to a minimum.

                             Fish is a healthy alternative including canned fish.
                               Reduced-fat dairy products should be used in preference to
                               full-fat products.

                               Milk: Offer both reduced fat and full fat milk and a milk
                               alternative (such as soy milk), correctly labelled, whenever tea
     DAIRY PRODUCTS            and coffee is served.

                               Yoghurt: Low-fat fruit/natural yoghurts can be offered as
                               snacks or desserts, or in place of cream.

                               Cheese: Cottage cheese and ricotta are both suitable options.

                               Butter: Margarines made from polyunsaturated and mono-
     FATS
                               unsaturated oils should be used in preference to butter.

                               Suitable non-alcoholic beverages include:

                               Water: still, sparkling, soda or mineral

                               100% fruit juices
     BEVERAGES
                               Fruit cocktails, fruit punch

                               Tea: herbal, green, black

                               Coffee: instant or filtered.

                               Organic options/ingredients.
     SUSTAINABILITY
     CRITERIA
                               Locally produced options.
     (check with the caterer
     to see what they offer
                               Fair-trade ingredients.
     or if they will offer
     anything that meets
     the criteria)             Unprocessed options (eg. fresh fruit/veg,
                               homemade options).




29
     Healthy Food Suggestions for External Caterers
     This section provides some “healthy choice” selections for different meals. It also provides some
     food preparation tips. Please note this list is by no means exhaustive.

     MORNING/AFTERNOON TEA
                                                                   Tips for Caterers
       • Fruit buns, fruit loaf or English muffins with minimal
         icing. Serve with a spread of polyunsaturated or            • Make buns, slices and cakes
         mono-unsaturated margarine                                    with no or minimal icing.

       • Fruit slices and fruit or vegetable based cakes with        • Prepare fruit and vegetable
         minimal icing                                                 based cakes and slices with
                                                                       plenty of fruit/vegetables.
       • Almond bread
                                                                     • Use polyunsaturated or
       • Plain, fruit or vegetable scones with ricotta cheese
                                                                       monounsaturated oil/
       • Fruit pikelets                                                margarine in cakes and slices.
       • Wholegrain and/or fruit muffins                              • Use reduced-fat milk in cakes
       • Crackers topped with cottage cheese, light cream              and slices.
         cheese, vegetables, fruit, and avocado                      • Serve spreads separate from
       • Sandwiches                                                    slices etc.
       • Fresh fruit platter                                         • Add fresh, poached or dried
       • Hot vegetable slice (filo pastry or no pastry)                 fruit to cake, muffins, slice and
       • Mini pizzas topped with lean meat, vegetables and             biscuit recipes where possible.
         reduced fat mozzarella



     NIBBLES AND FINGER FOODS
                                                                   Tips for Caterers
     COLD
                                                                     • Add flavour to dips with herbs
       • Dips
                                                                       and spices such as garlic,
          • Vegetable-based dips such as hommos, tzatziki
                                                                       chilli, basil, coriander etc.
            or eggplant dip
                                                                     • Use reduced-fat cream
          • Serve with crackers (eg water crackers,
                                                                       cheese, reduced-fat yoghurt,
            reduced-salt crispbreads), raw vegetables,
                                                                       pureed vegetables or pureed
            breads and fresh fruits
                                                                       beans to prepare dips.
       • Fruit and vegetable platters
          • Fresh seasonal fruit, vegetable crudités (pieces)
          • Dried fruit and plain nuts (almonds, peanuts, walnuts, and cashews)
          • Seasonal fruit kebabs with reduced-fat yoghurt or passionfruit sauce
          • Vegetable kebabs with non-creamy dipping sauces (eg tomato salsa, mango chutney, chilli
            and ginger sauce or satay sauce)
       • Cheese platters
          • Offer reduced-fat cheeses such as cottage cheese, ricotta and reduced-fat tasty cheese.
            Other cheeses such as Brie, Camembert and Edam are higher in fat, however small
            amounts can be served
          • Serve with crackers or French bread stick slices




30
 • Breads and spreads
    • Serve small sandwiches or top small slices of bread with various spreads and toppings
    • Use polyunsaturated or monounsaturated margarine or avocado as a spread
 • Stuffed vegetables: cherry tomatoes, mushrooms and zucchini
 • Sushi or Californian rolls
 • Reduced-fat and reduced-salt pretzels
 • Popcorn (no butter, no salt)
 • Bagel chips (bagel pieces brushed with oil and baked in the oven)
 • Mini fruit muffins, scones or pikelets


NIBBLES AND FINGER FOODS
HOT                                                          Tips for Caterers
                                                                • Use plenty of vegetables in
 • Skinless chicken, seafood or lean meat pieces /
                                                                  pastry triangles and pizza
   kebabs / balls with a non-creamy dipping sauce
                                                                  toppings.
   (eg tomato salsa, chilli and ginger sauce, mango
   chutney or reduced fat yoghurt and mint sauce)               • Add chucky slices of
                                                                  vegetables to meat kebabs.
 • Hot vegetable kebabs with a non-creamy dipping
   sauce (eg tomato salsa, chilli and ginger sauce,             • Ensure vegetarian options are
   mango chutney or reduced fat yoghurt and mint                  available.
   sauce)
 • Baked filo pastry triangles with vegetable fillings (eg. spinach and ricotta). Brush layers lightly
   with polyunsaturated or monounsaturated margarine or reduced fat milk
 • Chunky skins – potato wedges/ chunky potato skins brushed lightly with oil and baked in
   oven, served with salsa or a reduced fat sauce
 • Pita bread pizza slices – topped with vegetables, lean meat and reduced-fat mozzarella
   cheese
 • Small baked potatoes with a reduced-fat topping (cottage cheese and chives)


LUNCH/DINNER
                                                             Tips for Caterers
 • Sandwiches:
                                                                • Use crepes as casing for rolls
    • Provide a variety of breads (eg French bread
                                                                  and pies instead of pastry.
      sticks, bagels, focaccia, pita, soy, high-fibre
                                                                • Use a layer of cooked
      white, linseed, wholemeal and wholegrain)
                                                                  couscous or rice under meat
      Use polyunsaturated or monounsaturated
                                                                  or vegetable pie fillings
      margarine as a spread
                                                                  instead of pastry.
    • Fillings to be 70% vegetarian and 30% fish/
                                                                • Use low or reduced fat milks,
      lean meat
                                                                  yoghurts or evaporated
                                                                  reduced fat milk instead of
                                                                  cream.
                                                                • Try fruit or vegetable purees
                                                                  or juices as a base for
                                                                  dressings.




                                                                                                       31
       Combine any of the following for tasty sandwich fillings:
       • Salad (e.g. lettuce, carrot, tomato,                • Cottage cheese, ricotta or quark
         beetroot, cucumber, sprouts, onion)
                                                             • Avocado
       • Roasted vegetables
                                                             • Dried fruit
       • Lean meat
                                                             • Jam
       • Skinless chicken
                                                             • Peanut butter
       • Fish – tuna, salmon, sardines (including
                                                             • Chutney
         canned varieties but try for canned in
         spring water)                                       • Pickles

       • Egg                                                 • Pesto

       • Reduced-fat tasty cheese

     • Soups
       • Vegetable-based soups, broths and consommé
       • Soups containing legumes (eg: red kidney beans, lentils, split peas, chick peas) and/or rice
         or noodles
       • If boiling meat, allow to cool and skim off excess fat
       • For a creamy taste and appearance, use evaporated skim milk rather than cream
     • Salads and vegetables
       • Must be available with all meals/menu items
       • Serve dressings separately
       • Prepare dressings from ingredients such as polyunsaturated or mono-unsaturated oils,
         balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, herbs and spices, etc
     • Meat dishes
       • Use lean meat (that is, all visible selvedge fat         Tips for Caterers
         removed and minimum fat marbling)                           • Extend meat with addition
       • Remove skin from the poultry (eg: chicken,                    of legumes (eg lentils,
         turkey)                                                       chickpeas), bread crumbs etc.

       • Select a healthy cooking method (eg: oven bake,             • Use unsweetened fruit juice,
         stir-fry, boil, lightly grill, microwave, steam, poach        low or reduced fat yoghurt or
         or pan fry with small amount of oil)                          wine as the base ingredients
                                                                       of marinades.
       • Use beans and lentils to bulk up meat dishes
         where possible                                              • Base a variety of dishes on
                                                                       soy foods such as tofu and
       • Avoid processed meats as the majority are high
                                                                       tempeh.
         in fat and salt (eg: sausages, cabanossi, salami,
         frankfurts, kabana, devon, strassburg, mortadella)
     • Pasta and Rice
       • Use wholemeal pasta
       • Tomato based sauces rather than cream based sauces
       • Ravioli or cannelloni filled with vegetables such as spinach and legumes




32
DESSERTS
                                                          Tips for Caterers
 • Desserts should contain fruit, such as:
                                                             • Use fruit purees as sauces.
   • Apple strudel with filo pastry
                                                             • Try whipping ricotta cheese
   • Crepes with fruit                                         with a little honey and vanilla
   • Stewed fruit                                              to replace whipped cream.
   • Fruit compote                                           • Try a proportion of wholemeal
   • Rice pudding with sultanas (prepared with re-             flour to white flour where
     duced-fat milk)                                           possible in baked goods (a
   • Baked apple                                               ratio of 1:1 works well).

   • Pikelets topped with fruit                              • Add fresh, poached or dried
                                                               fruit to cake, muffins, slice and
   • Fresh fruit gelato or sorbet
                                                               biscuit recipes where possible.
 • Do not offer cream with desserts. Serve reduced fat
                                                             • Use canned fruit in natural
   yoghurt, ice cream or custard as an accompaniment.
                                                               juice or with no added sugar.


BREAKFAST
 • Fruit
   • Fresh fruit
   • Tinned fruit in natural juice or unsweetened
   • Dried fruit
   • 100% fruit juice (no added sugar)
   • Fruit smoothies made with reduced-fat milk and/or yoghurt
 • Breads
   • A range of bread and rolls such as wholemeal, wholegrain, rye, white high fibre, bagels,
     English muffins, raisin toast, crumpets
   • Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated margarines are the preferred spreads. Serve on
     the side (as appropriate)
 • Breakfast cereals
   • Lightly processed, high-fibre cereals (eg wheat breakfast biscuits, porridge, bran flakes,
     natural muesli)
   • Heavily processed cereals have added sugar; fat or salt (eg: toasted and sweetened
     muesli, sugar coated cereals) so keep them to a minimum
   • Reduced-fat milk, soymilk and yoghurt
 • Cooked breakfast
   • Pancakes and waffles topped with fruit (eg banana, strawberries etc) and reduced-fat
     yoghurt
   • Eggs – scrambled, poached, boiled or as omelettes
   • Savoury tomatoes, baked beans, fish cakes (grilled or baked), creamed corn, onion and
     mushrooms, bubble and squeak (potato and vegetables)




                                                                                                  33
       • Toast toppers (can also use on English muffins, crumpets or buns)
          • Tomato and finely chopped onion
          • Mushrooms
          • Creamed corn
          • Spinach
          • Peanut butter
          • Banana
          • Spaghetti
          • Baked beans
          • Reduced-fat cheese



     DRINKS
       • Cold Drinks
          • Always have iced water (plain or with lemon or mint)
          • Offer both full fat, low or reduced fat milk and ‘added calcium’ soy beverages (minimum
            100mg calcium/100ml)
          • Offer 100% fruit juice
          • Offer plain mineral water
          • Fruit cocktails, fruit punch
       • Hot Drinks
          • Tea: herbal, green, black
          • Coffee: instant or filtered, decaffeinated

     Food Safety
     Food safety refers to the careful handling, storage and preparation of foods to reduce the risk of
     food poisoning. Although Australia had one of the safest food supplies in the world, steps can still
     be taken to reduce our risk of food poisoning. Unfortunately food with unsafe levels of bacteria
     often does not look, smell or taste any different from food that is safe.

     Important points:
       • Refrigerate sandwiches and fruit platters if there is a delay between delivery and serving.
       • Provide clean tongs or other implements to self serve finger foods.

     Follow the following table as guidelines for how long food should be kept at room temperature:

     TOTAL TIME LIMIT AT ROOM TEMPERATURE               WHAT YOU SHOULD DO
     Less than 2 hours                                  Refrigerate or use immediately
     Between 2 hours and 4 hours                        Use immediately
     More than 4 hours                                  Throw out




34
                                                                    5:
                                                            Sections for
                 Timeframes and target
            Imple
                 mentation of the Guidelines
1. Sustainability and healthy eating
Blue Mountains City Council supports sustainable food initiatives. It is our aim to have continuous
improvement in increasing the options of ‘sustainable foods’ on all Council services menus.

Over the next year:
  • Assess your current menu against the sustainability criteria (see Tools and Resources, Section 6)
  • Increase the number of items that check against the sustainability criteria

For example you could include:


       organic dairy product snack food options


       locally produced food and drinks


                organic and locally produced bakery goods


                fresh seasonal fruit (organic) grown in Australia


       Fairtrade tea, coffee and/or chocolate



Over subsequent years:
  • Aim for continuous improvement against the sustainability criteria




                                                                                                        35
     2. Nutrition and healthy eating

     Kiosks
     The Guidelines will be phased in over a two-year period (2008-2010).

     Phase 1     Over the next year:

                 Reduce percentage of RED products to a maximum of 50%

                 Increase percentage of GREEN products to a minimum of 20%.

     Phase 2     Over the following year (after phase 1) have a maximum of
                 30% RED products.


     Vending Machines
     The Guidelines will be phased in over a two-year period (2008-2010).

     Phase 1     Over the year:

                 Reduce percentage of RED products to a maximum of 60%.

     Phase 2     Over the following year (after phase 1) reduce percentage
                 of RED products to a maximum of 50%.


     Review
     The Guidelines will be reviewed in partnership with the public health nutritionist from Blue
     Mountains District Anzac Memorial Hospital, every 2 years.

     The uptake of these Guidelines will be monitored as part of the Blue Mountains City Council
     performance measures and targets. See Tools and Resources, Section 6 of these Guidelines for the
     Annual Monitoring Tool.




36
                                                                      6:
                                                              Sectionrces
                                             Tools and resou
1. Label Reading Guide for Red Criteria
Example 1: Crumbed Chicken Fillet Patty
            Crumbed Chicken Fillet Patty Nutrition Panel

             Servings per package: 60
             Average Serving Size: 120g
                            Quantity         Quantity
                            Per Serving      Per 100g
             Energy         1176kj           980kj
             Protein        17.4g            14.5g
             Fat
             – total        15.8g            13.2g
             – saturated    4.1g             3.4g
             Carbohydrate 18.3g              15.3g
             – sugars       0.2g             0.2g
             – Sodium       734mg            612mg

Step 1: Identify correct product category. The Crumbed Chicken Fillet Patty is in the Hot Single
Food items- Crumbed and Coated foods (eg patties, chicken products) frankfurts, sausages
product category and should be assessed against the RED criteria.

Step 2: Look at the quantity per 100g column for
   a) Energy (kilojoules)
   b) Saturated Fat
   c) Sodium

Step 3: Compare per 100g results against RED criteria
If any one of the values is higher than the criteria or it is deep fried it is classified as RED.

The Crumbed Chicken Fillet Patty is lower than the RED criteria values therefore is classified as
AMBER. If the Crumbed Chicken Fillet Patty is deep fried it is classified as RED.




                                                                                                   37
     Example 2: Sultana and Oat Slice (in an individual package)
                 Sultana and Oat Slice Nutrition Panel

                    Servings per package: 2
                    Average Serving Size: 60g
                                    Quantity      Quantity
                                    Per Serving   Per 100g
                    Energy          1068kj        1780kj
                    Protein         8.0g          13.3g
                    Fat
                    – total         11.3g         18.3g
                    – saturated     8.0g          13.3g
                    Carbohydrate 31.9g            53.1g
                    – sugars        15.7g         26.2g
                    Sodium          102mg         170mg
                    Fibre           4.45g         7.4g

     Step 1: Identify correct product category. The Sultana and Oat Slice is in the Breads and Grain
     Products category under Cakes, Muffins, sweet pastries.

     Step 2: Sultana and Oat Slice could be red or amber therefore should be assessed against the
     RED criteria

     Step 3: Cakes, Muffins, sweet pastries are assessed as per serve sold.
     This slice is pre-packaged with a total weight of 120 grams. Therefore it is two times the serve on
     the label i.e. 60g x 2 = 120g (serve as sold)

     Step 4: Look at the quantity per Serve column for
        a) Energy (kilojoules)
        b) Saturated Fat

     The serve sold of this product is two times the average serving size listed.

     Therefore the values in the per serve column will need to be doubled to determine the total
     amount per serve sold (i.e. 120g).
        • Energy: 1068 kilojoules x 2 serves
          = 2136 kilojoules per serve sold
        • Saturated Fat: 8.0g x 2 serves
          = 16.0g per serve sold

     Step 5: Compare the adjusted per serve values against the RED Criteria
     The Sultana and Oat Slice is greater than 900kJ per serve and greater than 3g saturated fat per
     serve therefore s a red product.




38
     2. Annual Monitoring Tool
     Photocopy and use the following monitoring tool each year to determine whether the menu is meeting the guidelines.

     Use the RED Criteria on the Food and Drink Classification Table in Section 3 to help determine the colour by recording the energy, saturated fat and
     sodium content of the product as required.

     Date___________________________ Venue_____________________________________________________________   kiosk   vending machine       coffee cart (Circle the venue)


      Breads and Grain
                                                              Energy kJ/      Sat Fat g/     Sodium
      Products                    Serve Size     Size Sold                                                GREEN AMBER   RED         Local       Env      Fair Trade      Organic
                                                                serve           serve        mg/serve
      (Record item name)




39
40
     Breads and Grain
                                                   Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
     Products             Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
                                                     serve        serve      mg/serve
     (Record item name)




                                                                                        Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                         Total Env
                                                                                        Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals
     Cakes, muffins and
                                                   Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
     sweet pastries       Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
                                                     serve        serve      mg/serve
     (Record item name)




                                                                                        Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                         Total Env
                                                                                        Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals




41
42
     Commercial, frozen
     and ready to eat                              Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
                          Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
     mixed meals                                     serve        serve      mg/serve
     (record item name)




                                                                                        Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                         Total Env
                                                                                        Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals
     Ice Creams &
                                                   Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
     Dairy Desserts       Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
                                                     serve        serve      mg/serve
     (Record item name)




                                                                                        Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                         Total Env
                                                                                        Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals




43
44
     Ice blocks, water or
     fruit based ice                                 Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
                            Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
     confections                                       serve        serve      mg/serve
     (Record item name)




                                                                                          Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                           Total Env
                                                                                          Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals
     Savoury Snack
                                                   Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
     Foods & Biscuits     Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
                                                     serve        serve      mg/serve
     (Record item name)




                                                                                        Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                         Total Env
                                                                                        Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals




45
46
     Snack Food Bars
     (breakfast bars, cereal
                                                        Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
     based bars, fruit bars    Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
                                                          serve        serve      mg/serve
     and leathers)
     (Record item name)




                                                                                             Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                              Total Env
                                                                                             Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals
     Other Menu Items
                                                 Energy kJ/   Sat Fat g/   Sodium
     Including          Serve Size   Size Sold                                        GREEN AMBER      RED     Local     Env       Fair Trade   Organic
                                                   serve        serve      mg/serve
     confectionary




                                                                                      Total    Total   Total   Total               Total Fair    Total
                                                                                                                       Total Env
                                                                                      Green   Amber    Red     Local                 Trade      Organic
     Totals




47
48
     Totals Tally Sheet (record your total from each product category worksheet)


     Product catagory                                                        GREEN AMBER   RED   Local   Env   Fair Trade   Organic


     Hot Foods


     Drinks


     Breads and Grain products


     Cakes, muffins and sweet pastries

     Commercial, frozen and ready to eat

     mixed meals

     Ice creams & Dairy Desserts


     Ice Blocks, water or fruit based ice confections


     Savoury snack foods & biscuits


     Snack food bars


     Other menu items


     TOTAL NUMBER OF ITEMS

     Percentage of menu
     (total no. of items in criteria/total number of items on menu)
3. Examples of Alternative Healthier Food Options
   on Colless’ Product List 2008
Note: these items have not been assessed against sustainability criteria

BREADS AND GRAIN PRODUCTS
Sara Lee – Mervin’s Blueberry Muffin                                        AMBER
Sara Lee – 97% Fat Free Muffin apple and blueberry                          AMBER
COMMERCIAL, FROZEN/READY TO EAT MIXED MEALS
Allied Chefs – Lasagne                                                     GREEN
Allied Chefs – Nacho Dippers                                               AMBER
Allied Chefs – Quicks Lasagne                                              GREEN
Allied Chefs – Quicks Twista Bolognese                                     GREEN
Allied Chefs – Spaghetti Bolognese                                         GREEN
Allied Chefs – Vegetable Lasagne                                           GREEN
Enrico’s Kitchen – Lasagne                                                 GREEN
Enrico’s Kitchen – macaroni cheese                                         GREEN
Enrico’s Kitchen – Pizza Slab 3 types                                      AMBER
Enrico’s Kitchen – Twirls Bolognese                                        GREEN
Enrico’s Kitchen – Vegetable Lasagne                                       GREEN
Rice King – Fried Rice                                                     GREEN
Rice King – Stir Fry Hokkein Noodles                                       GREEN
Rice King – Traditional Potato Bake                                        GREEN
Sunny Queen – Heat & Serve Omelette Ham & cheese                           GREEN
HOT SINGLE FOODS ITEMS
Mrs Mac’s – Cruizer Lite Pie                                               AMBER
Mrs Mac’s – Good Eating Pie 120g                                           AMBER
Mrs Mac’s – Good Eating Potato Top Pie                                     AMBER
Mrs Mac’s – Good Eating Sausage Roll                                       AMBER
ICE CREAMS, MILK BASED ICE CONFECTIONS
Bulla – Frozen Yoghurts range of flavours                                   AMBER
Milo smooth stick ice cream                                                AMBER
Miniz Milo school ice cream                                                AMBER
Nestle Mousse variety of flavours                                           AMBER
SNACK FOOD BARS
K-Time Twists – 4 flavours                                                  AMBER
SOUPS
Maggi – asparagus soup mix                                                 GREEN
Maggi – Minestrone soup mix                                                GREEN
Maggi – thick vegetable soup mix                                           GREEN
Maggi – tomato soup mix                                                    GREEN




                                                                                   49
     4. Alternative Healthier Food Options
        available from other distributors
     Note: these items have not been assessed against sustainability criteria

     DAIRY PRODUCTS AND ALTERNATIVES
     Bulla - Lite’ N Healthy Yoghurt – Range of Flavours                        GREEN
     HOT SINGLE FOOD ITEMS
     Boss Hogs Hot Dogs – Reduced Fat Frank                                     AMBER
     Mamee Express Cup Noodles 60g Beef                                         AMBER
     Mamee Express Cup Noodles 60g Chicken                                      AMBER
     ICE CREAMS, MILK BASED ICE CONFECTIONS
     Enrico’s Kitchen – Gelato chocolate flavour                                 AMBER
     Enrico’s Kitchen – Gelato vanilla flavour                                   AMBER
     Nestlé Vanilla Cup                                                         AMBER
     Perfection Food Group – Mini Gelato Cup range of flavours                   AMBER
     SAVOURY SNACK FOODS AND BISCUITS
     Movietime Popcorn – 4 flavours                                              GREEN
     Piranha Snacks – 7 flavours                                                 AMBER
     Sunrice – 3 pack thin rice cakes- BBQ                                      GREEN
     Sunrice – 3 pack thin rice cakes- chicken                                  GREEN
     SNACK FOOD BARS
     Be Natural – Trail bars 5 whole grains Cranberry                           AMBER
     Be Natural – Trail bars 5 whole grains honey nut                           AMBER
     Be Natural – Trail bars 5 whole grains nut and fruit                       AMBER
     Go Natural – 100% fruit Bar- 3 flavours                                     GREEN
     Go Natural – popcorn and fruit bar                                         AMBER




50
5. General Healthy Food Preparation Tips
 • Use lean cuts of meat and skinless chicken for burgers and sandwiches. Remove fat and/or
   skin before cooking.
 • Add lots of salad items to burgers, sandwiches and wraps.
 • Use thin scraping of polyunsaturated or monounsaturated margarine or avocado as a spread
   on sandwiches, burgers, rolls and wraps.
 • Use clear ‘oil free’ dressings or those made with canola, olive, sunflower and soy oil.
 • Use low fat, low salt varieties of products when making menu items.
 • Microwave, oven bake or grill foods when possible.
 • Try seasoning with herbs and spices.
 • Use low or reduced fat milks, low or reduced fat yoghurts, reduced fat cheese or evaporated
   reduced fat milk.
 • Try a proportion of wholemeal flour to white flour where possible in baked goods (a ratio of
   1:1 works well).
 • Use canned fruit in natural juice or with no added sugar.
 • Use evaporated skim milk with coconut essence or coconut flavoured low-fat evaporated
   milk instead on coconut cream/milk.
 • Use polyunsaturated or monounsaturated oil/margarine in cakes and slices.
 • Try some of these sandwich fillings:
   • Salad (e.g. lettuce, carrot, tomato, beetroot, cucumber, sprouts, onion)
   • Roasted vegetables
   • Lean meat
   • Skinless chicken
   • Fish – tuna, salmon, sardines (including canned varieties but try for canned in spring water)
   • Egg
   • Reduced-fat tasty cheese
   • Cottage cheese, ricotta or quark
   • Avocado
   • Dried fruit
   • Jam
   • Peanut butter
   • Chutney
   • Pickles
   • Pesto




                                                                                                     51
     6. Seasonal Produce Guide: January to June
     Fresh fruit and vegetables are higher in nutrients and have a better flavour than those that have
     been sitting in storage for months at a time. Eating local and seasonal foods is not only good
     for you but supports local farmers and the production of crops that are appropriate to our
     environment.

     The following list of seasonal foods has been adapted from www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au.


     JANUARY
     Fruits: Banana Blackberries Blueberries Grapes Honeydew Nectarine Orange Peach Plum
     Raspberries Rockmelon Strawberries Tomato Watermelon

     Vegetables: Asparagus Beans Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Cabbage Capsicum Carrot Celery
     Cucumber Eggplant Lettuce Mushrooms Rhubarb Turnip Zucchini
     FEBRUARY
     Fruits: Banana Blackberries Blueberries Grapes Nectarine Orange Peach Pear Plum Strawberries
     Tomato Watermelon

     Vegetables: Asparagus Beans Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Cabbage Capsicum Carrot Celery
     Cucumber Eggplant Lettuce Mushrooms Pumpkin Snow peas Sweetcorn Turnip Zucchini
     MARCH
     Fruits: Apple Banana Grapes Nectarine Peach Pear Plum Tomato Watermelon Nashi

     Vegetables: Asparagus Beans Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Cabbage Carrot Cucumber Eggplant
     Lettuce Mushrooms Potato Pumpkin Snow peas Spring onions Sweetcorn Turnip Zucchini
     APRIL
     Fruits: Apple Banana Grapes Watermelon Figs Nashi Quince

     Vegetables: Asparagus Beans Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Carrot Cauliflower Lettuce
     Mushrooms Potato Pumpkin Snow peas Spring onion Sweetcorn Turnip Zucchini
     MAY
     Fruits: Apple Banana Grapefruit Grapes Kiwifruit Watermelon Figs Lemon Persimmons

     Vegetables: Beanshoots Broccoli Carrot Cauliflower Mushrooms Potato Pumpkin Spring onion
     Turnip
     JUNE
     Fruits: Banana Grapefruit Lemon

     Vegetables: Beanshoots Broccoli Carrot Cauliflower Fennel Mushrooms Potato Pumpkin
     Silverbeet




52
Seasonal Produce Guide: July to December
JULY
Fruits: Banana Grapefruit Lemon Mandarine Orange
Vegetables: Beanshoots Broccoli Brussels sprout Cauliflower Fennel Mushrooms Silverbeet
AUGUST
Fruits: Banana Grapefruit Lemon Mandarine Orange
Vegetables: Beanshoots Broccoli Brussels sprout Cauliflower Fennel Mushrooms Silverbeet
SEPTEMBER
Fruits: Banana Grapefruit Lemon Orange

Vegetables: Artichoke Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Brussels sprout Cauliflower Fennel
Mushrooms Silverbeet Spinach
OCTOBER
Fruits: Banana Grapefruit Lemon

Vegetables: Artichoke Asparagus Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Brussels sprout Cabbage
Cauliflower Leek Mushrooms Rhubarb Silverbeet Spinach
NOVEMBER
Fruits: Banana Lemon Orange

Vegetables: Artichoke Asparagus Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Cabbage Cauliflower Cucumber
Leek Lettuce Mushrooms Peas Rhubarb Spinach
DECEMBER
Fruits: Banana Cherries Honeydew Orange Raspberries Strawberries

Vegetables: Asparagus Beanshoots Beetroot Broccoli Cabbage Capsicum Cauliflower Celery
Cucumber Leek Lettuce Mushrooms Rhubarb Spinach Spring onion Zucchini




                                                                                           53
     7. Recipes
     These recipes have been produced by the Healthy Kids School Canteen Association more recipes
     can be accessed from www.healthy-kids.com.au




             Banana Bread (Serves 15)
             60g margarine, poly or monounsaturated
             ¼ cup brown sugar
             2 eggs
             1 teaspoon vanilla
             2 bananas, ripe, mashed
             1/2cup milk, reduced fat
             1 cup self-raising flour wholemeal
             1 cup self-raising flour white

     1. Cream margarine and brown sugar
     2. Add eggs, banana, vanilla and milk
     3. Add flours to banana mixture and mix lightly
     4. Spoon mixture into a well greased loaf pan (14cm x 21cm)
     5. Bake in 180°C moderate oven for 50 minutes or until skewer inserted into the loaf comes out clean.


             Banana Muffins (Serves 12)
             1 egg
             ¼ cup caster sugar
             ¼ cup canola oil
             200g natural yoghurt
             3 bananas, ripe, mashed
             1 cup wholemeal self-raising flour, sifted
             ½ cup self-raising flour white, sifted

     1. Preheat Oven to 200°C. Coat muffin tray with cooking spray
     2. Beat egg, sugar, oil and yoghurt together in a medium sized mixing bowl.
     3. Gently fold in bananas and flour into mixture in one go, DO NOT BEAT as this will make the
        muffin tough
     4. Once flour is just combined spoon into prepared muffin tin, divide equally into 12 cups
     5. Bake for 30 minutes or until cooked.
     6. Allow muffins to sit in the pan for 5 minutes before turning onto a wire rack to cool.




54
        Banana Bran Muffins
        2 eggs
        ¼ cup sugar
        ¾ teaspoon bicarbonate soda
        ½ cup apple sauce (in jar)
        1 ½ cup banana, ripe, mashed
        ½ cup skim milk
        ½ teaspoon cinnamon
        1 tablespoon orange rind (optional)
        2 cups self-raising flour
        1 cup unprocessed bran

1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Coat muffin tray with cooking spray
2. Beat eggs and sugar for 1 minute in a medium sized mixing bowl
3. Stir bicarbonate soda into apple sauce (it will froth) then add to bowl with banana, milk, cinna-
   mon and rind.
4. Gently fold flour and bran into mixture in one go, DO NOT BEAT as this will make the muffins
   tough
5. Once flour is just combined (mixture can look a little lumpy) spoon into prepared muffin tin,
   divide equally into 10 cups.
6. Bake for 20 minutes or until firm to touch in centre
7. Allow muffins to sit in tin for 5 minutes before turning onto wire rack to cool.


        Sweet Treat Bread Toasties
        Spray canola or olive oil
        16 fruit bread, slices
        400g canned pie peach or pie apple, in natural juice drained
        200g ricotta cheese, reduced fat
        pinch ground ginger
        pinch ground cinnamon

1. Spray heated toasted sandwich maker with oil
2. Top 8 slices of bread with 2 tablespoons of unsweetened canned pie peach or canned pie
   apple, 1 tablespoon of reduced fat ricotta spread, sprinkle with ground ginger and cinnamon.
3. Place other side of bread on top
4. Cook until brown.




                                                                                                       55
              Fried Rice
              Spray canola or olive oil
              2 eggs, lightly beaten
              1 cup shallots, sliced
              2 green capsicum, chopped
              3 cups cabbage, finely shredded
              2 carrots, grated or finely sliced
              1 cup peas
              1 cup ham, lean, diced
              10 cups rice cooked
              2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
              6 tablespoons soy sauce, slat reduced

     1. Spray non-stick wok or frying pan with oil and heat
     2. Add the eggs and swirl to create a thin omelette. When the eggs have set and cooked, turn out,
        cool and cut into short, thin strips
     3. Spray the non-stick wok or frying pan with oil and heat again.
     4. Add the shallots and capsicum and cook over moderately high heat for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.
     5. Add remaining vegetables and diced ham and stir fry for a further 2 mins or until the vegetables
        are just softened
     6. Add the rice and stir until well combined and heated through
     7. Stir through the parsley and egg and season with soy sauce
     8. Serve into 25x300g plastic containers


              Roasted Vegetable Filo Rolls
              2 cups sweet potato, carrot, pumpkin, red capsicum, cut into small cubes
              3 spring onions, sliced
              80g ricotta cheese, reduced fat, crumbled
              50g feta cheese, reduced fat, crumbled
              100g cheddar cheese, reduced fat, grated
              1 tablespoon basil, finely chopped
              1 egg lightly beaten
              10 filo pastry, sheets

     1. Place vegetables on a baking tray and spray lightly with cooking oil spray.
     2. Bake at 200° for 20 minutes, turning occasionally until cooked and golden brown. Cool.
     3. Combine roasted vegetable, spring onions, cheese, basil and egg in a bowl.
     4. Cut filo sheets in half crossways. Lightly spray each filo sheet with cooking oil spray and fold in half again.
     5. Place a table spoon of the vegetable mixture 2 cm from the top edge of the pastry. Fold the
        sides of the pastry and roll up to enclose the filling.
     6. Place on a baking tray and bake at 200°C for 15mins or until lightly brown.
     7. Serve with a side salad.


56
         Dips and Sticks
         Sticks
         • Carrot                       • cucumber
         • Celery                       • beans
         • Snow peas                    • asparagus
         • Baby corn                    • capsicum (red, green or yellow)

Dips
Serve dips in the bottom of clear plastic cup and add sticks. Keep left over dips in the fridge and
add sticks as needed.

Hommus
         2x 400g cans of chickpeas, rinsed and drained or dried chickpeas (soaked)
         2 cloves of garlic, crushed
         ½ cup lemon juice
         3 tablespoons tahini
         ¼ teaspoon cumin
         pinch of paprika

1. Place ingredients into a blender or food processor
2. Blend until smooth
3. Serve 2 tablespoon in the bottom of plastic cup, chilled, with 6-8 crunchy vegetable sticks

Corn Relish
         500g reduced fat ricotta
         500g creamed corn
         1 cup chopped fresh chives

1. Combine reduced fat ricotta with creamed corn and chives
2. Serve 2 tablespoon in the bottom of plastic cup, chilled, with 6-8 crunchy vegetable sticks

Tzatziki
         4 Lebanese cucumbers, peeled and finely chopped
         4 cups low-fat natural yoghurt
         4 cloves of garlic, crushed
         4 tablespoons of chopped fresh mint

1. Gently squeeze excess moisture from cucumber in paper towels.
2. Combine yoghurt, garlic and mint in a bowl
3. Add cucumber last
4. Serve 2 tablespoon in the bottom of plastic cup, chilled, with 6-8 crunchy vegetable sticks




                                                                                                      57
Ref                                                              7:
                                                        Section ites
   erenc
        es and Relevant Webs
1. Eat Well Australia A Strategic Framework for Public Health Nutrition 2000- 2010. Strategic
   Inter-Governmental Nutrition Alliance of the National Public Health Partnership. 2001.

2. Eat Well NSW Strategic Directions for public health nutrition 2003 to 2007. NSW Health. 2002.

3. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2007). 2006 Census QuickStats: Blue Mountains local
   government area. Retrieved 23rd May, 2008 from http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au

4. NSW Department of Health (2007). Annual Report 2006/ 07. Retrieved 23rd May, 2008 from
   http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/pubs/2007/annualreport07.html

5. National Health and Medical Research Council (2003). Dietary Guidelines for Australian Adults.
   Australia: Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing

6. National Health and Medical Research Council (2003). Dietary Guidelines for Children and
   Adolescents in Australia. Australia: Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing

7. NSW Health. (2007). Healthier food and Drink Choices in NSW Health Facilities. Retrieved 14th
   April 2008 from http://ambulance.nsw.gov.au/policies/pd/2007/pdf/PD2007_081.pdf

8. Queensland Health. (2007). A Better Choice: Healthy Food & Drink Supply Strategy for
   Queensland Health Facilities. Retrieved 14th April 2008 from http://www.healthqld.gov.au/ph/
   Documents/hpu/32511_a.pdf

9. The Cancer Council (n.d) Workplace Healthy Catering: Sample Guidelines. Retrieved
   16th June 2008 from www.cancercouncil.com.au

10. The Cancer Council- Workplace Healthy Catering: Sample Guidelines accessed from
    www.cancercouncil.com.au on 16th June 2008

11. Heart Foundation’s Healthier Catering Guidelines 2003, accessed from www.heartfoundation.
    org.au on 16th June 2008 (updated guidelines due to be released in July 2008).

12. FSANZ. (2007). Fact Sheets for Charity and Community Organisations-Temperature Control.
    Retrieved 22nd May 2008 from http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/_srcfiles/ChriatyFS_
    Temperature_Control_July07.pdf

13. The Conscious Cook - sustainable cooking and living. Giselle Wilkinson. Brolga publishing 2008

14. Sustainable Seafood: Towards an ocean wise Australia
    http://www.acfonline.org.au/uploads/res/res_oceanwisebrochure.pdf


                                                                                                     59
     15. Australian Marine Conservation Society – Sustainable Seafood Guide
         http://www.marineconservation.org.au

     16. Australian Conservation Society – Eat Green
         http://www.acfonline.org.au/default.asp?section_id=147

     17. Australian Bureau of Statistics – Year Book Australia 2003, Environmental Impacts of Agriculture
         http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/featurearticlesbyCatalogue/3319EB4D2D14BD2
         DCA256CAE0015BAD3?OpenDocument

     18. Sydney Food Fairness Alliance – Discussion Sheets (eg.Food Miles)
         http://www.sydneyfoodfairness.org.au

     19. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners; Environmental toxins and health – the
         health impact of pesticides http://www.racgp.org.au/afp/200712/21201

     20. Seasonal Food Guides
         www.sydneymarkets.com.au          www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au

     21. Cittaslow Blue Mountains
         http://www.katoombachamber.com/

     22. The True Food Network (GreenPeace) True Food Guide – indicates which brands
         do and don’t contain GM ingredients
         http://www.truefood.org.au/guide2.html

     23. Blue Mountains Food Coop
         http://www.bluemtnsfood.asn.au/

     24. Organic Federation of Australia
         http://www.ofa.org.au/

     25. Organic Food Directory & Directory of Organic Certifiers
         http://www.organicfooddirectory.com.au

     26. Fairtrade Association of Australia
         http://www.fta.org.au/

     27. Fairtrade Labelling Organisation
         http://www.fairtrade.net/30.html

     28. Australian Farmers Market Association
         http://www.farmersmarkets.org.au




60
                                                               1:
                                                        endix ren
   The
       Dietar                                       Ap p
             y Guidelines for Child a
         and Ad
                olescents in Au strali
THE DIETARY GUIDELINES FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS IN AUSTRALIA
Encourage and support breastfeeding
Children and adolescents need sufficient nutritious foods to grow and develop normally
   • Growth should be checked regularly for young children
   • Physical activity is important for all children and adolescents
Enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods
Children and adolescents should be encouraged to:
   • Eat plenty of fresh vegetable, legumes and fruits
   • Eat plenty of cereals (including breads, rice, pasta and noodles) preferably wholegrain
   • Include lean meat, fish, poultry and/or alternatives
   • Include milks, yoghurt, cheese and/or alternatives. Reduced fat milk is not suitable for
     young children under 2 years old, but reduced fat varieties should be encouraged for older
     children and adolescents
  • Choose water as a drink
Care should be taken to:
   • Limit saturated fat and moderate total fat intake. Low fat diets are not suitable for infants
   • Choose foods low in salt
  • Consume only moderate amounts of sugars and foods containing added sugars
Care for your childs food: prepare and store it safely


THE DIETARY GUIDELINES FOR AUSTRALIAN ADULTS
Enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods:
   • Eat plenty of vegetable, legumes and fruits
   • Eat plenty of cereals (including breads, rice, pasta and noodles) preferably wholegrain
   • Include lean meat, fish, poultry and/or alternatives
   • Include milks, yoghurt, cheese and/or alternatives. Reduced fat varieties should be chosen
     where possible.
   • Drink plenty of water
Prevent weight gain: be physically active and eat according to your energy needs
Care for your food: prepare and store it safely
Encourage and support breastfeeding

                                                                                                     61

				
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