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Diabetes

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					Can it be reversed?
What is it?
Diabetes is a disease in which the
body does not produce or properly
           use insulin.




                        American Diabetes Association
What is insulin?
Insulin is a hormone that is
needed to convert sugar,
starches and other food into the
energy needed for daily life.
What happens to our food when we eat?
• After a meal, food is broken down into a
  sugar called glucose, which is carried by the
  blood to cells throughout the body.
• Cells use insulin, which is made in the
  pancreas, to help them process blood
  glucose into energy.

                                National Institute of Health Publication No.
                                07–4805, December 2006
Diabetes results when this
   process is hindered
• Diabetes is divided into two major categories:
  type 1 and type 2.

• Only about 5-10% of all diabetics are type 1.

• Most, 90-95% are type 2.




               ―Diabetes: A 21st Century Epidemic‖ Michael T. Murray & Michael R. Lyon, NDs.
  • Type 1 diabetes - is usually first diagnosed
    in children, teenagers, or young adults.
  • In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the
    pancreas no longer make insulin because
    the body’s immune system has attacked and
    destroyed them.




David G. Marrero, Ph.D., Indiana University School of Medicine, Diabetes Research and Training Center; and Michael
L. Parchman, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas
Health Science Center.
                     Possible Causes of Type 1
      • Recent research links some cases of Type
        1 diabetes to an abnormal immune
        reaction to milk protein.
      • It has been shown that children who are
        breast fed for a shorter time or who
        started on cow’s milk earlier have an
        increased risk for this type of diabetes.
     Drinking cow’s milk may be the trigger that initiates the
           disease in over half of all Type 1 diabetics
Harris MI. Summary. In Harris MI, Cowie CC, et al, editors. Diabetes in America – 2nd edition. National Institutes of
Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; NIH Publications No. 95-1498, 1995 p. 3.
Cavallo MG, Fava D, et al. Cell-mediated immune response to beta casein in recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetes:
implications for disease pathogenesis. Lancet 1996 Oct 5;348(9032):926-928.
       • Type 2 Diabetes - is the most
         common form of diabetes.

       • People can develop type 2
         diabetes at any age.

       • This form of diabetes usually
         begins with insulin resistance,
         a condition in which fat,
         muscle, and liver cells do not
         use insulin properly.
David G. Marrero, Ph.D., Indiana University School of Medicine, Diabetes Research and Training Center; and Michael
L. Parchman, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas
Health Science Center.
     The progression of Type 2

• At first, the pancreas keeps up with the
  added demand by producing more insulin.
• In time, however, it loses the ability to
  secrete enough insulin in response to meals.
• As a result, the amount of glucose in the
  blood increases while the cells are starved
  of energy.
How common is Diabetes?
• Approximately 16,000,000 Americans are
  diabetic (50% are unaware).
• About 625,000 new cases are diagnosed per
  year.
• Total cost may be as high as 90 to 130
  billion dollars per year.




Harris MI. Summary. In: Harris MI, Cowie CC, et al, editors. Diabetes in America – 2nd edition.
National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; NIH
Publications No. 95-1468, 1995 p. 1-13.
Is it really dangerous?
        • Diabetes was the sixth
          leading cause of death listed
          on U.S. death certificates in
          2002
        • The risk for death among
          people with diabetes is about
          twice that of people without
          diabetes of similar age

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet: general information
and national estimates on diabetes in the United States, 2005. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services, National Institute of Health, 2005.
         Symptoms of Diabetes
•   Frequent urination
•   Excessive thirst
•   Extreme hunger
•   Unusual weight loss
•   Increased fatigue
•   Irritability
•   Blurry vision
                          American Diabetes Association
      Complications of Diabetes
        Blindness –

            Each year 12,000 to 24,000 people lose
            their sight because of diabetes




Bierman EL. Arteriolscler Thromb. 1992; 12:647-656. Carpentier A, Lewis GF. Can J Diabetes Care. 1998;22:28-
38. Miettinen H, et al. Diabetes Care. 1998;21:69-75.
                    Complications of Diabetes:
       Kidney damage -
             40% of people needing dialysis have
             kidney failure from diabetes




“Medical essay: Diabetes.” Supplement to Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Mayo Clinic. February 2004.
Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information.
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent
              Complications of Diabetes:
Heart Disease and Stroke –

People with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more
likely to have heart disease as well as
strokes.
More than 77,000 deaths are due to heart
disease annually.

Bierman EL. Arteriolscler Thromb. 1992; 12:647-656. Carpentier A, Lewis GF. Can J Diabetes Care.
1998;22:28-38. Miettinen H, et al. Diabetes Care. 1998;21:69-75.
              Complications of Diabetes:
Nerve Disease and Amputations –

• About 60-70% of people with diabetes
  have mild to severe forms of diabetic nerve
  damage, which, in severe forms, can lead
  to lower limb amputations.
• The risk of a leg amputation is 15-40 times
  greater for a person with diabetes.
• Each year, 56,200 people lose their foot or
  leg to diabetes.
Bierman EL. Arteriolscler Thromb. 1992; 12:647-656. Carpentier
A, Lewis GF. Can J Diabetes Care. 1998;22:28-38. Miettinen H, et
al. Diabetes Care. 1998;21:69-75.
 Benefits of Lifestyle Intervention
Type I
  Fewer complications
     Lower levels of
     blood sugar and
     insulin
  Longer life
  Better quality of life
Type II
  Same as Type I
  Possible reversal of disease
        Uchee Pines Protocol
Diet:
Completely vegan (no animal products)
Salt free diet – to lower blood pressure
5-6 cloves steamed garlic for lunch (for
 lowering cholesterol, blood pressure etc).
1 T ground flax seed w/ each meal (for pain,
 cholesterol etc.)
No snacking between meals
Skip supper
Minimum of 8-10 glasses of water each day
             Health Recovery Diet
• 1st day – fast
• Stage 1 (2 days) – greens, including string beans,
  broccoli, lemon, garlic, onions
• Stage 2 (2-3 days) – Above + legumes (no soy beans
  or peanuts) + other vegetables (but no carrots, beets,
  white potatoes, or avocados
• Stage 3 (1-2 days) – Completely vegan diet – fruits,
  vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and seeds
   No refined sweeteners, dried fruits, or white potatoes
   No grapes, bananas, mangoes, melons, and other sweet
   fruits
   No refined products (white rice, white flour etc.)
               Treatments
• Daily exercise – at least an hour (preferably
  after meal)
• Sunbathing: at least 30 minutes per day
• Deep breathing
• Hydrotherapy
• Time w/ God
Eat abundantly
 of vegetables
  and (fruit?)
            Eat these!




NOT these
           Eat this!




NOT this
           Eat this!




NOT this
                     Why?
• In whole foods, starches are
  molecularly bound together and
  your digestive system has to
  break down the food to turn it
  into glucose.
• Because of this the digestive
  procedure takes place slowly over
  a period of time.

                      “The “Refined” Sweet Kiss of Death” Moss Greene, Nutrition Editor
  What about refined foods?
• Processed foods need relatively no digestion
  time.
• They are absorbed rapidly into the system.
• The blood and cells get flooded with glucose.
• In response to the emergency, insulin must be
  sent to deal with the enormous amount of
  glucose.
• Insulin then turns the glucose into fat to get it
  out of your blood.
                        “The “Refined” Sweet Kiss of Death” Moss Greene, Nutrition Editor
                The Importance of Fiber
      •    Helps detoxify our body
      •    Helps in weight reduction
      •    Reduces the risk of kidney damage
      •    Reduces insulin requirements
      •    Reduces risk of death from heart disease
      •    Helps maintain steady blood sugars

Anderson JW, Zeigler JA, et al. Metabolic effects of high carbohydrate, high-fiber diets for insulin-dependent diabetic
individuals. Am J Clin Nutr 1991 Nov;54(5):936-943; Anders JW, Akanji AO. Dietary fiber—an overview. Diabetes
Care 1991 Dec;14(12):1126-1131. U.S. Dept of Health and Human services. Cancer. In: The Surgeon General’s Report
on Nutrition and Health. Public Health Service, Washington, DC: DHHS Publication No. 88-50210, 1988 p. 192
   Research makes evident that foods that are
   higher in fiber lead to a slower rise in blood
   sugar, and as a result require less insulin to
   handle the meal

        Fiber is found ONLY in plant foods


Beaser RS. Outsmarting Diabetes: A Dynamic Approach for Reducing the Effects of Insulin-Dependent
Diabetes. (Joslin Diabetes Center Boston, MA). Minneapolis, MN: Chronimed Publishing, 1994 p. 87.
    3 Lifestyle Changes that Affect
         Diabetic Neuropathy

• Meatless diet
• Free from all animal products
• High in unrefined total vegetarian foods
                   Results
Brought complete relief to painful neuropathy
  in over 80% of diabetics in just 4 –16 days.
                      Crane MG, Sample C. Regression of Diabetic Neuropathy with Total
                      Vegetarian (Vegan) Diet. J Nutritional Medicine 1994;4 :431-439.
              When to eat?
• Heaviest meal            • Why?
  should be in the           – Glucose tolerance is
  morning.                     decreased in the
                               evenings
• A substantial meal
                             – Blood glucose
  in the afternoon.            levels run 10-15%
• Very light meal in           higher with six
                               small meals per day
  the evening (type 2          versus three meals
  may eliminate                per day
  supper altogether)    Beebe CA, Van Cauter E, et al. Effect of temporal distribution of
                        calories on diurnal patterns of glucose levels and insulin
                        secretions in NIDDM. Diabetes Care 1990 Jul; 13(7):748-755.
• Avoid high sugar foods
• Sugars raise triglyceride
  levels
• Combines with LDL to
  damage endothelial
  tissue: lining of blood
  vessels
• Avoid artificial
  sweetners: stimulate
  appetite; increase sweet
  cravings; may have other
  harmful effects
  Haber GB, Heaton KW, et al. Depletion and disruption of dietary fibre. Effects of satiety , plasma-glucose, and serum-
  insulin. Lancet 1977 Oct 1;2(8040):679-682) Tordoff MG, Alleva AM. Effect of drinking soda sweetened with aspartame or
  high fructose corn syrup on food intake and body weight. AM J Clin Nutr 1990 Jun;51(6):963-969.
               Hidden Sugars
 Malted Milk         12 oz                          42 tsp.
 Soft Drinks         12 oz                      10 –12 tsp.
 Canned fruit      1 serving                         8 tsp.
 (light syrup)
Chocolate cake   1 (4 oz slice)                      8 tsp.
  Ice cream        1 scoop                           5 tsp.
Donut, glazed       1 each                           4 tsp.
  Jam, Jelly        1 Tbs.                           3 tsp.
                     The Food Processor for Windows: Nutrition Analysis & Fitness
                     Software [computer program]. ESHA Research. Salem, Oregon
• Long-term, intensive exercise can
 significantly improve the body's ability
 to control blood sugar levels.
• Such exercise produces benefits that
 stay with the body for at least a month,
 even if exercising stops.


                        Palm Beach Post “Exercise Combats Diabetes‖ Apr 23, 2002
  • Exercise is a recommended
    component of diabetes
    management.
  • In both type 1 and type 2, exercise
    can increase insulin sensitivity,
    lower blood glucose, and have
    positive psychological effects.
  • Especially in type 2, regular
    physical activity improves glycemic
    control, reduces hypertension, and
    normalizes lipids.
“Exercise in Diabetes Management, Maximizing Benefits, Controlling Risks” Russell D. White, MD, with Carl Sherman,
Series Editor: Nicholas A. DiNubile, MD, THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 4 - NO. 27 - APRIL 1999
Exercise: How?
                                        • If you are not very active, start
                                          slowly.
                                        • Work up to 30 minutes a day
                                          most days of the week.
                                        • Choose activities you enjoy.
                                        • Incorporate it into your daily life.
                                                       i.e. take the stairs instead of the
                                                        elevator; park at the far end of
                                                        the parking lot and walk; get off
                                                        the bus a few stops early and
                                                        walk the rest of the way

Am I at risk for Type II diabetes? Taking steps to lower your risk of getting diabetes. National Diabetes Information
Clearinghouse, NIH.
• ―In a dehydrated state, insulin action is
  counterproductive.‖ –-- Dr. P Batmanghelidj

  – Insulin takes water into cells along with
    glucose
  – When dehydrated, water needs to stay in the
    blood stream, and not go into the cells
     • Body produces less insulin
     • Cells become more resistant to insulin
• Lack of vitamin D impairs a person's
  immunity and ability to produce insulin and
  respond to insulin.
• One study showed that giving vitamin D
  supplements to diabetics during the winter
  markedly improved control of their blood
  sugar level.

                      International Journal of Clinical Practice, Volume 57, Issue 4, 2003
  Although the study was done with vitamin
  D supplements – The best source of vitamin
  D is sunshine.




Hildebolt CF. Effect of vitamin D and calcium on periodontitis. Journal of Periodontology, vol. 76(9);
pp. 1444-1455, Sept. 2005.
                 Self-Control
―Avoiding excess or extravagance in that which is
good, and abstinence from anything injurious to
the physical, mental and moral health.‖
       In a study published in Diabetes Care they
       found that diabetics who overate and ate late
       in the evening were associated with poorer
       medical outcomes.




Morse SA, Ciechanowski PS, Katon WJ, Hirsch IB (2006). Isn’t this just bedtime snacking? The potential adverse effects of
night-eating symptoms on treatment adherence and outcomes in patients with diabetes. Diabetes Care, 29: 1800-1804.
  They were more than twice as
  likely as patients who did not
  to:
• Have poor blood glucose
  control
• Suffer from obesity
• Have two or more diabetes-
  related complications
            What it does…
• Increase Oxygen delivery to blood cells and
  tissues.
• Strengthen and stimulate the immune
  system.
• Make people feel more alert, stable and
  energized.
• Stimulate the reticuloendothelial system, a
  group of defense cells in our bodies which
  marshal our resistance to diseases.
A long series of laboratory
and epidemiologic studies
has suggested that cutting
back on sleep has a
harmful effect on glucose
control, insulin secretion
and metabolism in ways
that might increase
diabetes risk.

                    Eve Van Cauter, professor of medicine at the University of Chicago
             Case Study

1,709 men who regularly got less than 6
            hours of sleep

Result of compromised sleep = doubled
              diabetes risk



                                          Yale University
One inexpensive way to
improve the health of
patients with type 2
diabetes might be to
improve the duration and
quality of their sleep.



                           University of Chicago Medical Center
Does it make a difference?
          TRUST IN GOD
• HEALTH BENEFITS
  OF FAITH
   • Reduced stress
   • Improved healing from
     surgery or illness
   • Lower blood pressure
   • Associated with
     choosing healthier
     lifestyle behaviors
Is lifestyle really that
        crucial?
Case history 1: 58 year-old female
     • History:
       – Gained ~30 pounds over the past year
       – Sugar level = 350 mg/dl
     • Diagnostics before starting program
       – Weight = 160 lbs, Height = 5’5’’
       – Blood pressure = 160/90
       – Fasting blood sugar = 368
       – Serum cholesterol = 348

           Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts,
           findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 111-2
Case history 1: 58 year-old female
       • Treatment
         – Diet
            • Predominately vegetarian
            • Very low in fats
            • High in unrefined carbohydrates
            • Plenty of raw foods
         – Exercise
         – Weight control
Case history 1: 58 year-old female
  • Result
    – 2 weeks
       • Lost 6 pounds
       • Fasting blood sugar was down to 190
    – 4 weeks
       • Fasting blood sugar dropped to 124
       • Cholesterol dropped to 220
Case history 1: 58 year-old female
 • Result
   – 4 months
      • Lost 30 pounds
      • Blood sugar was normal
   – Ongoing
      • Blood pressure continued to drop slowly
      • Cholesterol reached 190
      • Dropped to 118 pounds
Case history 2: 68 year-old male
     • History:
       –   Taking 65 units of NPH insulin daily
       –   On medication for hypertension
       –   Had a heart attack several years before
       –   Continued to have severe angina
       –   Had osteoarthritis in many joints
       –   Had chronic phlebitis in both lower legs
       –   Weight: 215 pounds
       –   Blood sugar: 265; serum cholesterol: 258
       –   Blood pressure: 176/100
             Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts,
             findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 111-2
Case history 2: 68 year-old male

     • Treatment, part 1:
       – Stopped the insulin immediately
       – Went on a two day fast
     • Result
       – Blood pressure dropped to 150/90
       – Blood sugar dropped to 200
Case history 2: 68 year-old male
    • Treatment, part 2:
       – Mildly heated whirlpool to lower extremities
       – Massage
       – Mild exercise
       – Diet: total vegetarian, oil-free, high in
         unrefined carbohydrates
    • Results
       – Within 3 days, his blood sugar had
         dropped within the normal range
       – In 3 weeks, his serum cholesterol came
         down to 186
“Ponder the path of thy feet, and let all
      thy ways be established.”
           Proverbs 4:26

				
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