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Internship Contract - University of Alaska Anchorage

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Internship Contract - University of Alaska Anchorage Powered By Docstoc
					        University of Alaska Anchorage
             College of Education
 Counseling and Special Education Department




       Master of Education
Early Childhood Special Education



           Sheila Sellers, M. Ed., ECSE
                  Assistant Professor
         Program Coordinator/Candidate Advisor
                ssellers@uaa.alska.edu




                     Cheryl Chapman
                     Program Manager
        Counseling and Special Education Department
                  case@uaa.alaska.edu

                       Website:
  http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/coe/programs/counseling/
                           Internship Handbook Table of Contents

   Vision ___________________________________________________________________________ 3
   Mission __________________________________________________________________________ 3
   Core Values ______________________________________________________________________ 3
   Research Based and Value Based ____________________________________________________ 4
Overview of the ECSE Internship _______________________________________________ 9
   Purpose of Internship Experience ____________________________________________________ 9
   Liability Insurance _______________________________________________________________ 13
   Accident (Medical) Insurance ______________________________________________________ 13
   Application: required process and documents—checklist _______________________________ 13
Preparing for the Internship __________________________________________________ 14
   Site selection ____________________________________________________________________ 14
        Interns with Type C Certification ______________________________________________ 14
        OJT _______________________________________________________________________ 14
   Technology Integration ___________________________________________________________ 14
   Time Commitment _______________________________________________________________ 15
   The Internship Triad _____________________________________________________________ 15
   The “Host” _____________________________________________________________________ 15
   UAA Internship Supervisor ________________________________________________________ 16
   UAA Internship Supervisor Responsibilities __________________________________________ 17
   Intern Responsibilities ____________________________________________________________ 18
   Internship Contract ______________________________________________________________ 20
   Contract Development ____________________________________________________________ 21
Interning __________________________________________________________________ 21
   General Expectations _____________________________________________________________ 21
   Professionalism __________________________________________________________________ 22
   Attendance______________________________________________________________________ 22
   Confidentiality __________________________________________________________________ 22
   Responsibility to Internship Team __________________________________________________ 23
   Flexibility _______________________________________________________________________ 23
   Preparation, Effectiveness, Confidence in Intervention Plans ____________________________ 23
   Increasing Responsibilities in the Internship __________________________________________ 23
Internship Assignments ______________________________________________________ 24

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                               1
   TaskStream _____________________________________________________________________ 26
UAA Supervisor Disposition of Candidate _______________________________________ 27
Evaluation of Interns ________________________________________________________ 28
Appendix___________________________________________________________________ 30
   Internship Application ____________________________________________________________ 31
   Internship Contract ______________________________________________________________ 34
   Candidate Disposition Self Survey __________________________________________________ 37
   Employer Disposition Survey ______________________________________________________ 38
   UAA Supervisor Disposition Survey _________________________________________________ 41
   UAA Host Teacher Summative Evaluation Form ______________________________________ 43
   Comprehensive Intervention Project Evaluation Form _________________________________ 44
   Electronic Portfolio Assessment ____________________________________________________ 45
   Final Written Summative Evaluation of Intern ________________________________________ 47
   Host Teacher Evaluation by Candidate Intern ________________________________________ 48
   UAA Supervisor Evaluation by Candidate Intern______________________________________ 49
   UAA Supervisor Evaluation by Host Teacher _________________________________________ 50
   Photo/Audio/Video Release Form ___________________________________________________ 52




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                           2
                  Mission and Core Values of UAA College of Education
Vision

We are a community of educators dedicated to improving the quality of education and preparing
educators to transform lives. Through innovative teaching, research, service, and leadership we
will

        Provide direction that inspires learning, informs the state's educational policy and
         research agendas, and addresses the challenges of Alaska;
        Call upon diverse cultural knowledge, values, and ways of learning and viewing the
         world, especially those of Alaska Natives, in order to promote the intellectual, creative,
         social, emotional, and physical development of educators, learners, families, and
         communities;
        Contribute to educators' understanding of development and learning from childhood
         through maturity and respond to the challenges of providing learning across the lifespan;
        Transform the beliefs and practices of educators, families, and communities in order to
         address the wide spectrum of human abilities in compassionate and innovative ways;
        Prepare educators with appropriate knowledge, skills, and dispositions in the judicious
         use of technology to enhance learning;
        Focus relentlessly on candidate learning; and
        Engage in dynamic partnerships with University, community groups, and urban and rural
         educators to improve the quality of education in Alaska.

Mission

We prepare educators and support the lifelong learning of professionals to embrace diversity and
to be intellectually and ethically strong, resilient, and passionate in their work with Alaska's
learners, families, and communities.

Philosophy

Our programs emphasize the power of learning to prepare educators to transform the lives of
learners. Across the university, faculty members teach professional educators to work in diverse
settings, to form and sustain learning partnerships, and to provide learning across the life span.
We are confident that this preparation will result in educators' significant contributions to
society.

Core Values

We believe that learning must be designed, delivered, and evaluated within the contexts of the
following core values and program outcomes. Consequently, College of Education promotes the
core values in their collegial interactions to ensure that program graduates exhibit



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                        3
intellectual vitality: Professional educators examine diverse perspectives, engage in research
and scholarship, contribute to knowledge and practice, and apply innovations in technology.

collaborative spirit: Professional educators generate, welcome, and support the collaborative
relationships and partnerships that enrich people's lives.

inclusiveness and equity: Professional educators create and advocate for learning communities
that advance knowledge and ensure the development, support, and inclusion of peoples' abilities,
values, ideas, languages, and expressions; and

leadership: Professional educators are committed to the highest standards of ethical behavior in
their roles, using professional expertise to improve the communities in which they live and work,
and demonstrating the ability to translate theories and principles into transformative educational
practice.

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION
(ECSE) INTERNSHIP
The mission of the Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) program is to prepare
professionals to support infants, toddlers, and preschoolers who experience or are at risk for
developing disabilities. The program also prepares professionals to support families, and to
work collaboratively with other professionals. Preparation of qualified personnel is
accomplished through presentation of pedagogical knowledge by experienced faculty and
through application of content knowledge during field experiences and supervised internships.
The following principles guide the coursework and the internship experiences candidates receive
in the ECSE program. All principles, in addition to coursework and internships are consistent
with the Council of Exceptional Children‘s (CEC) Division of Early Childhood (DEC) and the
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

The most current professional standards will be used as the guiding principles for the internship.
As standards are changed at the national level, the requirements in this internship handbook will
be updated and candidates will be expected to yield to the most current standards. Copies of new
standards will be provided to interns, when appropriate.

Research Based and Value Based
The coursework and internship are heavily based on recommended practices supported in the
research that demonstrate positive outcomes for infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their families.

Family Centered
Coursework and internship experiences support the philosophy of family centered services.
Candidates enrolled in the ECSE program gain experience with supporting the needs of the child
within the context of a family and community.

Multicultural Emphasis
Coursework and internship experiences are compatible with a multicultural perspective. That is,
practices must be able to be adapted for use with children or families who hold values or identify
themselves as members of ethnic groups that differ from the mainstream in American society.


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                  4
Candidates enrolled in the ECSE program learn the importance not only of the individual needs
of the child and families, but also the individual value system of the cultural group with whom
they identify.

Cross Disciplinary Participation
ECSE services involve the efforts of members of various disciplines working as a team rather
than as individual professionals. Candidates gain knowledge and skills in the area of cross-
disciplinary collaboration. Internship experiences involve membership roles that share
responsibilities.

Developmentally/Chronologically Age Appropriate (DAP)
DAP has been defined by the National Association for the Education of Young Children
(NAEYC) in relation to programs for typical young children as the extent to which knowledge of
child development is applied in program practices (Bredenkamp, 2006). The guidelines
developed by NAEYC for ensuring DAP are also appropriate for the early education of children
with special needs. However, Wolery, Strain and Bailey (1992) noted that the guidelines alone
are not likely to be sufficient for many children with special needs. A match must also be made
on the basis of the unique learning needs presented by the child with special needs within the
context of an environment and learning experiences that are chronologically age appropriate.

Normalization and the Philosophy of Inclusive Practices
The philosophy of the ECSE program and consequently the philosophy woven through the
coursework and internship support the principle of inclusion. To the greatest extent possible,
children who experience disabilities should be supported in settings where they would be if they
did not experience a disability.

Technology
The Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education is a distance delivered and on
campus program. The distance delivered component includes the use of the following types of
technological supports: coursework delivered via audio conferences, course materials
disseminated via computer courseware (e.g. Blackboard); course discussions conducted via
Blackboard chat rooms or discussion boards; course assignments posted on assignment sections
in Blackboard; e-mail submission of assignments to the instructor; use of digital drop box in
coursework; supplemental videotaped instruction mailed to candidates. Elluminate is another
type of technology used. Distance internships are supplemented by technology including: emails
between candidate and UAA supervisor; videotaped lessons submitted to the UAA supervisor;
one on-site supervision visit (for off-campus candidates pending available funding); audio
conference seminars; and phone conferences. Candidates are expected to fully participate via the
designated media.

Council of Exceptional Children Standards of Practice

Special educators demonstrate their mastery of standards through the mastery of the CEC
Common Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s)
Knowledge and Skills for which the program is preparing candidates.



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                5
The 10 Standards of practice are:

1: Foundations
Special educators understand the field as an evolving and changing discipline based on
philosophies, evidence-based principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and
historical points of view, and human issues that have historically influenced and continue to
influence the field of special education and the education and treatment of individuals with
exceptional needs both in school and society. Special educators understand how these influence
professional practice, including assessment, instructional planning, implementation, and program
evaluation. Special educators understand how issues of human diversity can impact families,
cultures, and schools, and how these complex human issues can interact with issues in the
delivery of special education services. They understand the relationships of organizations of
special education to the organizations and functions of schools, school systems, and other
agencies. Special educators use this knowledge as a ground upon which to construct their own
personal understandings and philosophies of special education.

2: Development and Characteristics of Learners
Special educators know and demonstrate respect for their students first as unique human beings.
Special educators understand the similarities and differences in human development and the
characteristics between and among individuals with and without exceptional learning needs
(ELN). Moreover, special educators understand how exceptional conditions can interact with the
domains of human development and they use this knowledge to respond to the varying abilities
and behaviors of individual‘s with ELN. Special educators understand how the experiences of
individuals with ELN can impact families, as well as the individual‘s ability to learn, interact
socially, and live as fulfilled contributing members of the community.

3: Individual Learning Differences
Special educators understand the effects that an exceptional condition can have on an
individual‘s learning in school and throughout life. Special educators understand that the beliefs,
traditions, and values across and within cultures can affect relationships among and between
students, their families, and the school community. Moreover, special educators are active and
resourceful in seeking to understand how primary language, culture, and familial backgrounds
interact with the individual‘s exceptional condition to impact the individual‘s academic and
social abilities, attitudes, values, interests, and career options. The understanding of these
learning differences and their possible interactions provide the foundation upon which special
educators individualize instruction to provide meaningful and challenging learning for
individuals with ELN.

4: Instructional Strategies
Special educators possess a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize
instruction for individuals with ELN. Special educators select, adapt, and use these instructional
strategies to promote challenging learning results in general and special curricula and to
appropriately modify learning environments for individuals with ELN. They enhance the
learning of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills of individuals with ELN,
and increase their self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem.
Moreover, special educators emphasize the development, maintenance, and generalization of


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   6
knowledge and skills across environments, settings, and the lifespan.

5: Learning Environments and Social Interactions
Special educators actively create learning environments for individuals with ELN that foster
cultural understanding, safety and emotional well being, positive social interactions, and active
engagement of individuals with ELN. In addition, special educators foster environments in which
diversity is valued and individuals are taught to live harmoniously and productively in a
culturally diverse world. Special educators shape environments to encourage the independence,
self-motivation, self-direction, personal empowerment, and self-advocacy of individuals with
ELN. Special educators help their general education colleagues integrate individuals with ELN
in regular environments and engage them in meaningful learning activities and interactions.
Special educators use direct motivational and instructional interventions with individuals with
ELN to teach them to respond effectively to current expectations. When necessary, special
educators can safely intervene with individuals with ELN in crisis. Special educators coordinate
all these efforts and provide guidance and direction to paraeducators and others, such as
classroom volunteers and tutors.

6: Language
Special educators understand typical and atypical language development and the ways in which
exceptional conditions can interact with an individual‘s experience with and use of language.
Special educators use individualized strategies to enhance language development and teach
communication skills to individuals with ELN. Special educators are familiar with augmentative,
alternative, and assistive technologies to support and enhance communication of individuals with
exceptional needs. Special educators match their communication methods to an individual‘s
language proficiency and cultural and linguistic differences. Special educators provide effective
language models, and they use communication strategies and resources to facilitate
understanding of subject matter for individuals with ELN whose primary language is not
English.

7: Instructional Planning
Individualized decision-making and instruction is at the center of special education practice.
Special educators develop long-range individualized instructional plans anchored in both general
and special curricula. In addition, special educators systematically translate these individualized
plans into carefully selected shorter-range goals and objectives taking into consideration an
individual‘s abilities and needs, the learning environment, and a myriad of cultural and linguistic
factors. Individualized instructional plans emphasize explicit modeling and efficient guided
practice to assure acquisition and fluency through maintenance and generalization.
Understanding of these factors as well as the implications of an individual‘s exceptional
condition, guides the special educator‘s selection, adaptation, and creation of materials, and the
use of powerful instructional variables. Instructional plans are modified based on ongoing
analysis of the individual‘s learning progress. Moreover, special educators facilitate this
instructional planning in a collaborative context including the individuals with exceptionalities,
families, professional colleagues, and personnel from other agencies as appropriate. Special
educators also develop a variety of individualized transition plans, such as transitions from
preschool to elementary school and from secondary settings to a variety of postsecondary work
and learning contexts. Special educators are comfortable using appropriate technologies to


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   7
support instructional planning and individualized instruction.

8: Assessment
Assessment is integral to the decision-making and teaching of special educators and special
educators use multiple types of assessment information for a variety of educational decisions.
Special educators use the results of assessments to help identify exceptional learning needs and
to develop and implement individualized instructional programs, as well as to adjust instruction
in response to ongoing learning progress. Special educators understand the legal policies and
ethical principles of measurement and assessment related to referral, eligibility, program
planning, instruction, and placement for individuals with ELN, including those from culturally
and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Special educators understand measurement theory and
practices for addressing issues of validity, reliability, norms, bias, and interpretation of
assessment results. In addition, special educators understand the appropriate use and limitations
of various types of assessments. Special educators collaborate with families and other colleagues
to assure non-biased, meaningful assessments and decision-making. Special educators conduct
formal and informal assessments of behavior, learning, achievement, and environments to design
learning experiences that support the growth and development of individuals with ELN. Special
educators use assessment information to identify supports and adaptations required for
individuals with ELN to access the general curriculum and to participate in school, system, and
statewide assessment programs. Special educators regularly monitor the progress of individuals
with ELN in general and special curricula. Special educators use appropriate technologies to
support their assessments.

9: Professional and Ethical Practice
Special educators are guided by the profession‘s ethical and professional practice standards.
Special educators practice in multiple roles and complex situations across wide age and
developmental ranges. Their practice requires ongoing attention to legal matters along with
serious professional and ethical considerations. Special educators engage in professional
activities and participate in learning communities that benefit individuals with ELN, their
families, colleagues, and their own professional growth. Special educators view themselves as
lifelong learners and regularly reflect on and adjust their practice. Special educators are aware of
how their own and others attitudes, behaviors, and ways of communicating can influence their
practice. Special educators understand that culture and language can interact with
exceptionalities, and are sensitive to the many aspects of diversity of individuals with ELN and
their families. Special educators actively plan and engage in activities that foster their
professional growth and keep them current with evidence-based best practices. Special educators
know their own limits of practice and practice within them.

10: Collaboration
Special educators routinely and effectively collaborate with families, other educators, related
service providers, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways. This
collaboration assures that the needs of individuals with ELN are addressed throughout schooling.
Moreover, special educators embrace their special role as advocate for individuals with ELN.
Special educators promote and advocate the learning and well being of individuals with ELN
across a wide range of settings and a range of different learning experiences. Special educators
are viewed as specialists by a myriad of people who actively seek their collaboration to


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                    8
effectively include and teach individuals with ELN. Special educators are a resource to their
colleagues in understanding the laws and policies relevant to Individuals with ELN. Special
educators use collaboration to facilitate the successful transitions of individuals with ELN across
settings and services.

                            Overview of the ECSE Internship

Purpose of Internship Experience

The internship serves as a central and critical part of the ECSE program. It represents an
opportunity for candidates to demonstrate the CEC Performance Standards and DEC
Recommended Practices that have been developed through coursework and previous experience
in the field. It also allows for the development and demonstration of new knowledge and skills
that complete the professional preparation and to allow candidates to move into more specialized
professional roles in early childhood special education and/or early intervention. Internship
experiences give candidates the opportunity to demonstrate these skills under the supervision of
a university supervisor and a host teacher in the field.

The internship is a major assessment component of candidates enrolled in the ECSE program.
Even more than in coursework, candidates have the opportunity to work with their university
supervisor to individualize the ECSE program through the internship contract. Referring to the
CEC and DEC Performance Standards (Competencies) and DEC Recommended Practices, the
intern and supervisor work together to determine what sort of experiences are needed to prepare
the intern to function as a professional and to select a site (or sites) to accomplish this.

Six Credit Requirement
Candidates in the ECSE Program are required to complete a total of six (6) credit hours of
internship. All candidates participating in the internship enroll in EDSE 620Y Advanced
Internship for each internship in which they participate. All internship experiences must be
planned with the collaboration of the university supervisor.

The advanced internship offers the future early interventionist or early childhood special
educator support and guidance in acquiring authentic practices that are needed in the field of
early childhood special education. Based on the CEC‘s guidelines, all candidates must complete
either a six-credit semester long, full-time supervised internship (i.e. 400 hours) or two three-
credit internships (i.e. 200 hours each). Three program options are available to fulfill this
requirement.

1)     One full-time 400 hours, 6 credit advanced internship: The intern may participate in a
       setting in his or her geographical area in an Early Intervention (EI) or ECSE-approved
       setting for 6 credit hours (i.e., 400 hours) during either the fall or spring semester.
2)     Two part-time 200 hour, 3 credit advanced internships: The candidate typically completes
       internship experiences at both the infant/toddler and preschool levels (i.e. two 3-credit
       internships of 200 hours each) or one internship in an appropriate EI/ECSE for two
       semesters in the same setting.



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   9
3)     Internships may be completed ―on the job‖ with the approval of the internship supervisor
       and the employer. (This option is only available for candidates currently working in an
       appropriate EI or ECSE setting with administrative support, Master‘s level certified
       mentor, population and teaching responsibilities aligned with certification, and sufficient
       student contact hours).

Candidates are placed with cooperating professionals/host teachers who have training and a
degree in the area in which they seek an endorsement/credential (e.g., preschool special
education or early intervention). Additionally, the candidate is supervised by a university
supervisor with the appropriate credentials and experience. It is the university supervisor‘s
responsibility to provide the candidate guidance, conduct observations, provide feedback on the
candidate‘s strengths and weaknesses, and complete the final evaluation of the candidate.

Candidates must complete the DEC recommended practices outlined in the Internship Handbook.
Placements may be in local infant learning programs or preschool special education classrooms.
Candidates who are seeking an Alaska teaching certificate must have experience in a public
school setting. Each ECSE internship experience is individualized to meet the goals, expertise,
and needs of the candidate. The candidate, the agency host, the candidate‘s adviser, and the
instructor of EDSE 620Y establish the outcomes for each internship experience.

On the Job (OJT) Internships
The flexibility of the program allows experienced professionals who are updating and refining
their skills in the ECSE program the option of participating in internships through their current
job placement. This permits those currently employed in the field of ECSE to continue their jobs
while earning credits toward a Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education.
Candidates seeking ―on-the-job internship experiences‖ must have a minimum of six months of
successful professional experience in the ECSE field. OJT credit is at the discretion of the
advisor and internship supervisor.

University Supervision
The university supervisor may observe as often as necessary to verify the candidate‘s ability to
demonstrate the CEC performance standards and DEC recommended practices. Some
observations may be done via videotapes.

Host Teachers
A host teacher provides daily supervision at the site. The host teacher must possess a masters
degree or higher in special education or a related field with at least three years experience.
Experience and training in ECSE is preferred.

Supervisory Model
A clinical model of supervision is used to the extent possible by both the university supervisor
and host teacher. The model is designed to help candidates develop an attitude of open-minded
inquiry, or independent thinking, and of self-motivated personal and professional growth. The
model includes a pre-conference; observation to collect objective data on the candidates
performance; and a post conference to discuss the observation. Procedures for self-assessment
are built into the internship process at various checkpoints throughout the internship experience.


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   10
In addition to the above, a mid-term and final evaluation conference is held with the candidate
and host teacher.

Candidate Responsibilities and Opportunities
During the internship, candidates are expected to take on as many early intervention roles as
possible and to do so in an increasingly independent manner. The timing of the independence,
and the roles that candidates are able to take on depends upon the candidate, and the policies of
the internship site. The responsibilities and experiences are negotiated by the candidate,
university supervisor, and host teacher. The candidate must be able to accept constructive
feedback in a positive manner. The goal is to gain as much direct hands-on experience as
possible during the internship related to the core areas of: Professional Competencies,
Assessment, Intervention, Collaboration, Individualized Education Plan (IEP)/Individualized
Family Service Plan (IFSP) Development, Family Based Practices and Technology.

Site Selection
It is important that candidates maintain an attitude of flexibility. Although candidates may
request a particular site or semester, candidates are not assured of being assigned as requested.
Although sites are chosen to provide excellent experiences, all sites will not provide the same
experiences or have the same requirements or opportunities. In addition, not all sites will require
the same dress code or have the same schedule. As professionals, interns are expected to adhere
to the policies of the internship site. One of the first internship activities is to learn about the
policies of the internship site.

Candidates are expected to successfully demonstrate and perform internship activities and skills
as indicated in the descriptions and evaluations of their Internship Assignments. It is important
for candidates to monitor their internship activities and discuss the responsibilities and
opportunities needed frequently with the university supervisor and host teacher. Documentation
of the skills and activities will be placed into an internship portfolio and may also be used to
document standards in the exit portfolio.

When should candidates do their internship?
Internships should be done at the end of the candidate‘s program. Candidates should carefully
select the semester in which they will take internship and plan a time when personal, family, and
coursework issues will not interfere with a focus on the internship. Entry level candidates (those
without the skills and experience needed to do direct hands-on work with children and families,)
may need to commit additional time to observing and independent study prior to obtaining the
clock hours of direct experience. Internships are offered during fall and spring semesters.

Applying for an Internship (Application Deadlines: 1 October for spring; 1 March for fall)
Candidates doing internships in Alaska public schools must have an Alaskan teacher certificate
or Student Teacher Certificate of Authorization Application (from State of Alaska). Contact
internship supervisor one semester in advance to get forms and procedures. Please note: It takes
4-5 months for the student teaching certificate to be awarded. Candidates may not begin
their internships without a valid AK teaching certificate or the student teaching certificate.

It takes approximately one semester to set up an internship. The UAA Internship Supervisor will


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                  11
conference with the candidate to discuss options, then make contact with potential internship
sites. Candidate information such as transcript, graduate school admission application, letters of
reference, internship application and documents may be provided to the internship site. If
requested, interviews will be arranged. Once a placement is secured, the internship contract is
developed, executed, and approved. The intern registers for the internship course, and the
internship activities will begin.

Initial Candidate Contact with UAA Internship Supervisor
Candidates should contact the UAA Internship Supervisor by phone or e-mail at least one
semester in advance of the internship to announce their intent to apply for an internship.
Candidates should obtain a copy of the Internship Application (from the Internship Handbook,
Advisement Workshop Blackboard, or on the College of Education website:
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/coe/programs/counseling/forms/index.cfm). It is not necessary to
complete the entire application prior to contacting the supervisor. It is necessary to complete the
entire application, with required supplemental documentation, prior to the internship deadline.
Many host sites want to review the internship application and/or request interviews with interns
prior to accepting the intern.

Pre-requisites
EDSE 622Y Strategies in Early Childhood Special Education and EDSE 610Y Assessment are
pre-requisites for EDSE A620Y Advanced Internship. Both courses are usually offered in the
spring. Interns must plan ahead to meet this pre-requisite.

 The Internship Committee will review the internship application. The Internship Committee
includes UAA Supervisors, Program Director, and may include the host site. The committee will
consider the candidate‘s application and documentation to determine if the candidate is ready for
an internship.

Semesters Available: Fall and Spring
Internships are available in the fall and spring semesters. In some circumstances a summer
internship may be arranged if internship is to be completed at an ILP site or at an ESY site.

POLICIES
Courses that are field-based, such as practicum or internships, require fingerprinting and a
national (FBI) criminal history background check.

   CERTIFIED TEACHERS: Candidates who are certificated teachers must submit a copy of
    a current Teacher Certificate prior to admission to the internship.
   STUDENT TEACHING AUTHORIZATION: Candidates who are not currently
    certificated in Alaska must submit a statement to the College of Education Office of Clinical
    Services and Certification as part of the internship application: (1) setting out the history of
    any criminal convictions in Alaska and other states in which they have lived, (juvenile crime
    records that have been sealed by the court need not be disclosed); (2) all names by which
    they have been known; and (3) all states in which they have lived. Candidates must receive
    authorization from EED to participate in an internship that is school-based. Internship

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   12
    applicants must apply for EED ―student teacher‖ authorization as part of the internship
    application process. Note: This application process requires fingerprinting and a criminal
    history background check, which must be initiated at least 5 months prior to the first day of
    fieldwork. If the background check is not initiated in time for the processing to occur before
    the first day of fieldwork, the Office of Clinical Services and Teacher Certification may deny
    the request for the internship.
   AGENCY BASED INTERNSHIP: Candidates who are not currently certificated in Alaska
    and are planning to take an internship that is agency-based must submit the results of
    fingerprinting/criminal history background check to the COE Office of Clinical Services and
    Certification the semester prior to enrolling in the internship. Applicants do not have to
    apply for EED ―student teacher‖ authorization, but they must initiate the criminal history
    background check through a local fingerprinting agency as part of the internship application
    process. See note above regarding timeline for initiating the check and receiving clearance.
   FAILURE TO COMPLY: Failure to comply with the criminal history background
    requirements, falsification of information, or evidence of a criminal conviction that would
    preclude State certification will result in denial of access to or removal from field placement
    settings and programs that lead to State certification. In addition, conviction of a crime
    involving moral turpitude may result in denial of access to or removal from field placement
    settings and programs that lead to State certification. Refer to the UAA College of Education
    Candidate Criminal History Background Check Policies and Procedures.

Liability Insurance
Professional liability insurance is required. Interns may use their own professional liability
insurance, or may purchase new insurance. CEC members may contact Forrest T. Jones and
Company at 1-800--265-9366 for purchase information. The company which provides insurance
may change.

Accident (Medical) Insurance
Interns must have proof of current Medical Insurance in case of accidents. Interns may submit
proof of their own Medical Insurance by providing a copy of their Insurance card or policy.

Application: required process and documents—checklist
      Contacted UAA Internship Supervisor via phone or e-mail, at least one semester in
      advance of internship and prior to submission of application.
      Application Form (due Oct. 1 for Spring; March 1 for Fall)
      Proof of Medical/Accident Insurance (due prior to internship start date)
      Proof of Professional Liability Insurance (due prior to internship start date)
      Disposition surveys completed by self and by a supervisor
      Copy of current Teaching Certificate OR Student Teacher Certificate of Authorization
      Application (EED) if placed in public school in Alaska. (due with application)
      Copy of Other Professional Licenses (due with application)
      Host Teacher Application Form
      Copy receipt for fingerprint check (unless already employed)

Submit all of the above in a packet and send it directly to:

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                 13
UAA College of Education
Counseling and Special Education Department
3211 Providence Dr., PSB 206E
Anchorage, AK 99508.

Preparing for the Internship
In addition to a phone/e-mail conference with the UAA Internship Supervisor, and submission of
the application form and supplemental documents, additional preparation occurs in the semester
prior to beginning the internship. These activities are described in this section to help interns
understand the necessity of early planning and of the time required of the intern during this
―preparation semester‖.

Site selection
Internship site assignments are based on several factors, including: the type of teaching
certificate intern holds, or plans to obtain; and whether completion of the internship and Master
of Education in Early Childhood Special Education program leads to a teaching certificate with
endorsement in Birth to Five Special Education by the State of Alaska Department of Education
and Early Development. A variety of internship options are available dependent upon those
variables and are described below:

   Interns with Type C Certification
    Interns with Type C certification (i.e. Related Service Specialists) will do internships with
    similar colleagues in a similar birth to five field or with an Early Intervention Provider in an
    early intervention setting. This may include hours in the Infant-Toddler Programs, school
    district programs, or a combination. The Alaska Teaching Certificate in Birth to Five Special
    Education is available for those candidates with a Type C certificate.

   OJT
    (On the Job Training): Internship credit may be provided to select interns who are
    professionally employed in either infant-toddler programs or 3-5 year old programs serving
    children with disabilities. In addition to demonstration of the DEC recommended practices,
    the internship focus will be on new areas of professional development. Interns in this
    category must have a minimum of six (6) months of professional experience in the
    professional field and must demonstrate, through the internship application documents and
    processes, professional practices at a level of quality that merits an OJT placement.
    Additional supervision by a qualified host, mentor, program administrator, and/or UAA
    Internship Supervisor may be required.

Technology Integration
University of Alaska Anchorage College of Education candidates are expected to (a) demonstrate
sound understanding of technology operations and concepts; (b) plan and design effective
learning environments and experiences supported by technology; (c) implement curriculum plans
that include technology applications in methods and strategies to maximize candidate learning;
(d) facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies; (e) use technology to



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enhance productivity and professional practice; and (f) understand the social, ethical, and human
issues surrounding use of technology in PreK-12 schools and apply those principles in practice.

Time Commitment
Internships will typically be 5 to 10 weeks in length. A total of 6 credits of EDSE A620Y
Advanced Internship is required. Three (3) credit internships require 200 clock hours, six (6)
credit internships require 400 clock hours. In addition both 3 and 6 credit internships require
planning, preparation, folio development, seminars, conferences, and evaluations. The clock
hours refer to direct hands-on and related activities. Observations (only a small number of
observation hours (20%) may be counted), independent study, and conference attendance do not
count toward clock hours. If, in the opinion of the internship host and/or university supervisor,
the candidate needs more observation to acquire the skills necessary to perform internship
activities such as assessments and interventions then the length of the internship may increase.
In other words, the time spent observing to learn procedures and skills does not count toward
internship clock hours. Time spent in internship activities with children and families in the core
internship areas does count toward internship clock hours.

―Clock hours‖ include activities related to intervention and assessment with children and
families; collaboration with other professionals; home visits and parent conferences; and other
general tasks affiliated with the professional work. ―Clock hours‖ do not include time used for
intern evaluation conferences, portfolio development, and other meetings regarding the
internship. Staff development, attendance at conferences, and workshops do not count toward
internship clock hours, but may be a valuable experience during the internship.

The Internship Triad
The internship consists of a triad of adults working together. This includes the host teacher,
university supervisor, and intern. This section of the handbook describes some of the
professional behaviors and task responsibilities of each member of the internship triad.

The “Host”
The ―host teacher‖ or ―host‖ is the person who the intern works with directly at the internship
site day to day. The host teacher is typically employed as a professional in the field of Early
Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education; possesses a degree at least at the level the
intern is seeking or is otherwise the most highly qualified candidate based on training and
experience. The host teacher is not only committed to fostering the development and learning of
children with disabilities but also has an interest in fostering the professional development of the
intern.

Host Teacher Responsibilities
Professional Behaviors
1.   Hold intern responsible for carrying out any assigned tasks.
2.   Provides intern with time for structured observation of other professionals at the internship
     site or relevant community sites
3.   Models the decorum desired of the intern
4.   Models and guides intervention and assessment strategies



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                  15
5.     Encourages the intern to be self-reflective in examining professional behavior and
       development
6.     Focuses feedback to intern on the strengths and needs for professional growth and
       development
7.     Helps the intern evaluate the university supervisor‘s feedback in terms of implications for
       the internship at the internship site
8.     Works in a collegial manner with the university supervisor

Task Responsibilities
1.   Participates in the review of the intern‘s contract for professional competencies to be
     worked on during the internship
2.   Participate in the post observation conference with the intern and supervisor
3.   Participate in the mid-term and final evaluation conference with the intern and supervisor
4.   Participate in an initial meeting with the intern and university supervisor to discuss the
     intern‘s responsibilities for internship assignments and host teacher participation.
5.   Identify on a calendar any special assignments, activities, events at the internship site
6.   Introduce the intern to the facilities, services, personnel, and children and families
7.   Discuss philosophy of the internship site, and other policies with the intern
8.   Discuss the pertinent information regarding children and families served at the site
9.   Share written policies, unwritten policies or expectations
10. Provide the intern and supervisor with intervention plan documents, IEP/IFSP forms, or
     other forms used at the site
11. Review with the intern, all intervention plans developed by the intern prior to the intern‘s
     implementation of the plans
12. Set aside a formal time to provide the verbal feedback
13. Inform the intern of schedule changes that will influence planning of activities or
     interaction with children and families.
14. Provide opportunities for the intern to do the following
     a. Implement at least six (if three credits) or 12 (if six credits) intervention plans
     b. Participate in home visits by taking the lead role in a home visit if applicable.
     c. Participate actively in, or take the lead role in all or a portion of at least three
         assessments, including assessing the child, report writing, and meeting with parents
         report writing
     d. Participate in the development of 3 IEP or IFSP by taking a lead role in developing the
         IEP/IFSP and managing all or a portion of the meetings
     e. Take the lead as the teacher for one week in 3-5 placements.
15. Provide the intern with opportunities to participate in workshops, in-services or other
     professional activities available at the site or community.
16. Contact the university supervisor immediately if there are any concerns or problems with
     the intern, assignments, interpersonal skills, or other issues that impact the intern‘s
     performance or ability to successfully complete the internship
17. Complete evaluation forms of the intern, and university supervisor. This is required as part
     of the university‘s accreditation and evaluation system.

UAA Internship Supervisor



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The UAA Internship Supervisor is a member of the UAA faculty or adjunct in the College of
Education in the Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education. The university
supervisor is responsible for:
  coordinating internship sites
  supervision of the intern
  communicating with the host teacher and intern regarding policies, procedures, and
     requirements of the internship program; and
  evaluation of the intern (including conferences, mid-term and final conference evaluations
     with the candidate and host
  grading portfolio
  conducting internship seminars each semester
  development of the internship contract with the candidate and host
  assignment of final grade

The University Supervisor is also responsible for upholding standards and best practices of the
profession including those set by NCATE, CEC, and DEC.

UAA Internship Supervisor Responsibilities
Professional Behaviors
1.   Complete tasks in timely fashion.
2.   Foster in the intern, an attitude of inquiry, independent thinking, self-reflection, and respect
     for alternative approaches.
3.   Work cooperatively with the host teacher and intern in planning experiences to promote the
     intern‘s growth and development
4.   Encourage the intern to thinking of the host teacher as a mentor and source of learning.
5.   Focus supervision feedback on candidate strengths and needs in pre-planning, intervention,
     and assessment and other internship activities
6.   Provide resources and sources of information related to the intern‘s internship contract
     competencies and responsibilities, as needed
7.   Provide information to host teachers, as needed, to ensure a successful experience for both
     the intern and host teacher. This may include topics such as: observation methods;
     methods of providing written and verbal feedback; general supervision and coaching
     methods; and suggestions for getting started with the intern
8.   Treat the host teacher and intern with respect and in a fair manner
9.   Treat the children and families with respect and in a fair manner
10. Resolve problems in a respectful, professional manner

Task Responsibilities
1.   Schedule a meeting with the intern to discuss the proposed intern sites, and focus of
     internship.
2.   Schedule a meeting with the intern to draft the contract.
3.   Schedule a meeting with the intern and host teacher to review the contract, and make
     revisions prior to the start of the internship, and to discuss intern and host teacher
     responsibilities
4.   Introduce the host teacher and intern to evaluation procedures and materials.


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5.     Request intern and host teacher to meet prior to the internship start date for an orientation
       to the internship site. This may include tour of facilities, review of children‘s files,
       discussion of schedule for the intern‘s first week, etc.
6.     Establish the supervision schedule for observations, mid-term and final evaluation
       conferences, and due date for the portfolio. A minimum of 5 observations by the
       university supervisor are required. Additional observations may be conducted as needed to
       document competencies.
7.     Review intervention and assessment plans and provide verbal and written feedback when
       necessary
8.     Review and respond to intern‘s weekly journal via conference, e-mail, or seminars
9.     Provide copies of written feedback for the intern and host teacher
10.    Check informally with the host teacher on a regular basis to identify the intern‘s strength
       and needs (via e-mail, phone, conferences)
11.    If the internship is not in the Anchorage area, establish alternative means of supervision,
       such as review of videotaped interventions and audio conferences.
12.    Plan and facilitate six internship seminars, to be held via audio conference. Coach new
       host teachers
13.    Contact the intern and host teacher as soon as possible regarding schedule changes
14.    Schedule a mid-term evaluation conference and final evaluation conference with the intern
       and host teacher
15.    Review and evaluate the internship portfolio, including the intervention plans, assessment
       protocols and reports, reflective journal, and other documentation that supports the intern‘s
       achievements of the competencies in the contract
16.    Evaluate and intern, independently from the host teacher, with consideration of the host
       teacher‘s evaluation.
17.    Provide letter of reference for intern, upon request

Intern Responsibilities
Professional Behaviors
1.   Complete assignments and responsibilities in a timely manner, as independently as
     possible, and in a professional manner.
2.   Adhere to all internship site policies and practices such as dress code, arrival and departure
     times, confidentiality of information, interaction style with children and families
3.   Demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills and sensitivity to children and families, in
     keeping with recommended practices and best practices of the field
4.   Be responsive to feedback, suggestions and recommendations of host teacher and
     university supervisor.
5.   Work cooperatively with the university supervisor and host teacher in planning internship
     experiences, conducting internship activities and, during observations and evaluation
     conferences (formal and informal).
6.   Develop an attitude of inquiry, reflective independent thinking, and respect for alternative
     approaches.
7.   Initiate requests for assistance and for additional learning experiences with the host teacher
     and university supervisor



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   18
8.     Contact the host teacher and university supervisor regarding schedule changes and
       absences. Interns must make up activities and hours they missed at a mutually agreeable
       time (agreed to by host, supervisor, intern) and must be approved by the university
       supervisor. Respect families by demonstrating regular, dependable attendance and by not
       canceling appointments.
9.     Resolve problems in a respectful, professional manner

       Task Responsibilities
1.     Notify university internship supervisor of intent to apply for internship via phone, e-mail,
       or in-person.
2.     Apply for the internship one semester in advance (i.e. Spring for Fall; and Fall for Spring).
3.      Include all required documentation with application.
4.     Participate in planning the internship, including meetings with the university supervisor
       and host teacher.
5.     Participate in conferences to develop the internship contract.
6.     Establish a personal and work schedule that allows for adequate time to fully participate in
       an internship experience. This may include taking time off from work, and decreasing
       course load.
7.     Become familiar with policies and procedures of the internship site.
8.     Become familiar with resources and technology available at the internship site.
9.     Review available child records relevant to the educational needs of children in the
       internship site.
10.    Maintain an internship file (may be a briefcase, bag, notebook, of file), in an accessible
       location at the internship site. This will include, but not be limited to, all intervention
       plans, assessments, the reflective journal, and written feedback from the host teacher and
       university supervisor. This will be available for review by the host teacher and university
       supervisor at all times.
11.    Prepare written intervention plans, and implement intervention plans. Include:
            IEP/IFSP objective related to the intervention plan
            intervention plan objectives;
            intervention strategies,
            anticipated child initiations or responses
            consequences to child initiations or responses
            activities, materials, setting
            modifications to the environment
            modifications to materials, curriculum
            opportunities for peer interaction,
            method for data collection;
            data forms and data collected
            data analyzed and summarized; (after intervention implemented);
            and self-evaluation of the intervention plan (after implementation).
12.    Meet with host teacher prior to implementation of intervention plan. Discuss the plan and
       seek input.
13.    During scheduled observations with the university supervisor:
       Provide copy of written intervention plan


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           Plan time for a pre-conference regarding the intervention plan (may be in person or by
            phone)
       Implement the intervention plan
       Collect data analyze child progress; review with supervisor
       Plan time for a post-conference immediately following the observation (or as soon as
            possible after the observation)
       Invite host teacher to participate in the post conference
       Provide a copy of the supervisor‘s conference and observation notes to the host teacher.
            Discuss with the host teacher.
14.    Participate in relevant internship site meetings, such as staff meetings, in-services, planning
       sessions, evaluations, reviews, and IEP/IFSP meetings.
15.     Plan to participate in other activities beyond the internship hours and beyond the contract
       to further professional development and to document other CEC and DEC competencies
       and practices.
16.    Seek opportunities for increasing the amount of intervention and assessment time. Discuss
       this with the host teacher.
17.    Maintain a weekly journal reflecting on internship activities and skills. This will be used as
       a basis of seminars as well as method to monitor the internship
18.     Complete a self-assessment of CEC/DEC Competencies
19.    Commit adequate time to the internship. The internship is a time for candidates to
       demonstrate their skills working directly with children with disabilities and their families.
       EDSE 620Y is an Advanced Internship. If a candidate is unprepared due to lack of training
       or experience, additional internship hours or credits will be required. EDSE 620Y is not an
       observation experience. If the internship site does not feel comfortable with the intern
       assuming responsibilities in assessment and intervention, then additional clock hours or
       additional credits may be required. The following activities are examples of the types of
       activities that do not count toward the required clock hours: observations of the host or
       other professionals, curriculum review, review of assessment tools, attendance at
       conferences or workshops. Although those activities listed above may be necessary and
       helpful to the entry level intern to acquire skills, those activities do not permit the intern to
       demonstrate their skills. No more than 20% of the internship hours may be spent in such
       activities. Otherwise, additional hours or credit will be required.
20.    If the candidate is completing a 3-5 internship it is highly recommended that he/she must
       function as the classroom teacher for one week.
21.    If the candidate does not possess a Teaching Certificate he/she must complete 2 weeks
       internship in a 3-5 program.
22.    Upload all portfolio artifacts and assignments onto TaskStream.

Internship Contract
A written internship contract will be cooperatively developed with the intern, university
supervisor, and host teacher. The contract will indicate the following:

a.     Identification of site and participants
b.     Start date and end data of contract
c.     Schedule for intern; identify internship hours available
d.     Contact information for host, intern, university supervisor

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                      20
e.     Agreement by intern to complete Internship Assignments
f.     Signatures to acknowledge agreement to meet requirements in EDSE 620Y Advanced
       Internship Syllabus and Internship Handbook

The internship activities and evaluation will be based on the CEC Standards of Professional
Practice and DEC‘s Recommended Practices. These standards and practices are updated
periodically and may differ from what is in this internship handbook. The most current standards
and recommended practices will be used as the guide for the contract, as well as any
requirements from NCATE.

Contract Development
The university supervisor and intern will draft a contract. A conference with the host teacher,
intern, and university supervisor will be held to review and revise the draft contract. The
purpose of the ―three-way‖ conference will be:

      to clarify the required competencies, outcomes, skills, and activities the intern must
       demonstrate (using the observation/feedback form as a guide)
      clarify the support needed by the intern, from the university supervisor and host teacher
      modify internship activities and expectations as appropriate to the specific internship
       assignment

A pre-visit to the internship site is recommended in order to insure availability of clock hours
and to ensure participation in appropriate internship activities in which the intern can
demonstrate skills with children and their families.

The internship contract must be signed prior to the start of the internship. A delay in finalization
of the contract, will delay the start of the internship.

Refer to contract form in appendix.

Interning

General Expectations
In addition to the planning for the internship, there are several factors critical to a successful
internship experience. These include:

      professionalism,
      attendance,
      confidentiality,
      responsibility to the internship team,
      flexibility,
      preparation and effectiveness in intervention,
      increasing responsibilities, and
      the first visit to the internship site
      dress professionally, according to the standards of the internship site.

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Professionalism
Professional demeanor and decorum is expected. Most unsuccessful internship experiences are a
result of lack of appropriate interpersonal skills, professional behavior, and attitudes. Candidates
must demonstrate the ability to accept feedback. Difficulties in areas of professionalism and
general expectations are cause to terminate the internship placement. Appropriate professional
dress is determined by the internship site.

Attendance
The Early Childhood Special Education Internships are built upon positive interdependence of
participants. Frequent absences interfere with this positive relationship. Daily attendance,
according to the internship schedule, is required. Absences may affect your status in the
internship. Schedule personal business and appointments outside of internship hours!
Documentation of illness, funeral, and other emergencies may be required. Please plan the
semester for the internship carefully.

Attendance at Internship Seminars is mandatory. Dates of seminars are posted on the EDSE
A620Y Internship Blackboard and included in the EDSE 620Y Syllabus. Missed seminars must
be made up at a time agreeable to the supervisor and candidate and/or via an appropriate
alternative assignment designed by the supervisor.

Interns must meet the 200 or 400 ―clock hour‖ requirement of the internship. All legitimate
activities in which the intern is actively involved may be counted. Observation is limited to 20%
of the total internship house. Absences must be made-up at a mutually agreeable time. Contact
the host teacher and internship supervisor regarding absences. Discuss make-up time with the
host teacher and university supervisor. It is not appropriate to ―cram‖ hours in just to make up
time.

Withdrawal/Termination of internship
Depending upon the situation, an intern may be advised to withdraw and apply for an internship
at a more convenient time. All withdrawals must be discussed with the UAA supervisor prior to
the candidate‘s identified last day. Host sites may not be receptive to those interns who
withdraw and wish to return.

An internship may be terminated if the candidate is:
    not respectful
    is unable to accept feedback in a positive manner, or
    has poor attendance

Confidentiality
Families of young children have a right to confidentiality, as does the host teacher, the
intervention team and site. Confidentiality means not sharing identifiable information regarding
the family, the children, the home, the internship site, or other adults unless information is shared
by mutual agreement (signed release) with those who are authorized to receive and exchange
information. During the internship experience, interns have access to records and other
confidential information regarding children and families. It is important that the information be

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used in a professional manner and remains confidential. This means using only children‘s first
names on documents; removing names of team members and specific sites on documents; and
carefully sharing verbal information during seminars in a way that maintains confidentiality.
Interns must obtain written parent permission prior to taking and using photographs of children
making audio tapes, or making videotapes. (a COE release form may be found on the web at
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/coe/programs/counseling/forms/index.cfm or in the appendix) The
photos and videotapes can only be used in the manner stated on the written permission form.

Responsibility to Internship Team
Families of young children and their interventionists are very selective about the adults with
whom they entrust their infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The hosts have spent a lot of time
building trust with the families. Interns are expected to behave in a manner that further builds on
this trust. Some ways to do this include:
      support the host by words and actions
      share opposing or alternative viewpoints with the host privately rather than with families
       present
      be willing to learn from the host in spite of any philosophical differences

Flexibility
Plans may change rapidly at the internship sites due to factors such as staff absences, late arrival
of children, weather, special projects, and reactions to children‘s attention span, interests, and
needs of families. Interns should be aware of such factors and demonstrate flexibility and a
cooperative attitude in adapting to the changes in activities and schedules. An example of this
would be when the intern has an intervention planned and needs to implement it for ―clock
hours‖ and ―contract requirements‖, but the family needs to talk about another priority issues.
The intern would be expected to modify plans and at the appropriate time, seek the opportunity
to implement the intervention plan. This may mean spending additional time at the internship
site.

Preparation, Effectiveness, Confidence in Intervention Plans
Learning and demonstrating the process of planning and preparing intervention plans is one of
the main purposes of the internship. Others include assessment, development of IEP/IFSPs,
family based practices, and collaboration. Intervention plans, assessment protocols and reports,
and IEP/IFSP activities must be completed on time and be of high quality. Otherwise, the host
teacher or university supervisor may delay the intern‘s opportunity to implement the plans and
internship activities. This may delay the intern‘s ability to meet the internship clock hour
requirements and course requirements by the end of the semester in which a grade is desired.

Timely submission of quality plans and reports will give the host and university supervisor the
opportunity to offer suggestions for improvement thereby enriching the internship activities.

Increasing Responsibilities in the Internship
Although some observation by the interns will be necessary and helpful, it is the intern‘s actual
work with children and families and other team members in the areas of intervention,
assessment, IEP/IFSP development that constitutes the internship and on which the intern is
evaluated. Regardless of how much training and experience the intern has prior to the internship,


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the host teacher will determine the readiness of the intern for ―hands-on‖ experiences. An intern
may help prepare themselves for increasing responsibilities by doing the following:
     review children‘s IEP/IFSP
     review children‘s files
     locate professional materials and intervention materials
     identify the host teacher‘s strategies and prepare to model those
     look for opportunities to assist the host teacher
     seek opportunities to work with children and to demonstrate readiness for increased
      responsibility
     regularly reflect on performance and ask for suggestions for improvement

First Visit to Internship Site
A first visit to the internship may include the first conference to develop the final internship
contract. In addition, the intern should set up an initial meeting with the host teacher prior to the
start date of the internship (―pre-visit‖). The purpose of that meeting will be to:
      Become familiar with the site, staff, policies, procedures
      Establish a place to keep personal belongings (coat, lunch, etc.)
      Establish a place to keep internship file and other written materials
      Establish a work space
      Review the timeline of activities with the host teacher and get feedback on when those
       activities may be worked on
      Verify arrival, departure, and lunch times
      Check on policies regarding use of computers, printers, copiers, fax, and phones
      Request to be introduced to the site administrator and be introduced to other staff at an
       appropriate time

                                   Internship Assignments
1.    Comprehensive Intervention Project
Interns will do a comprehensive intervention project. In cooperation with the host teacher, the
intern will select a child and family of focus. Written parent permission must be obtained.
The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the ability to create sustained child change.

2.    Weekly Reflective Journal--electronic
Interns will maintain a weekly reflective journal on Blackboard using the blog tool. The purpose
of the weekly journal is to provide the opportunity to reflect upon internship experiences and
activities through documentation of insights and accomplishments. Interns will reflect on the 10
CEC standards of practice as well as other competency areas. The format will be set up on
Blackboard. 8 core areas will be addressed including professional behaviors, child focused
interventions, family based practices, use of technology, collaboration, IEP/IFSP
development and assessments. Questions related to internship experiences may also indicate
thoughtfulness relative to internship activities. The Journal will be posted weekly by Sunday at
12 am. The Journal will provide the basis for many of the seminar discussions. Please maintain
confidentiality and refrain from using school or program site names and teacher or student
names.


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3.    Self-Assessment
Interns will conduct one (1) self-assessment and provide a copy of it to the host teacher and
university supervisor prior to the Mid-Term Conference. Interns will complete a self-assessment
in the core areas of the Internship. Information may also be used in internship seminar
discussions when sharing examples of activities conducted with peers. Sample forms will be
provided from the DEC recommended practices handbook.

You may develop your own summative self assessment based on the recommended practices or
you may use one of the recommended tools from the list below. You will do an initial self
assessment during your internship that is due prior to the midterm conference. Then you will re-
evaluate the same assessment during your final week of internship. Both copies must be
uploaded onto TS.

The Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children has developed
Recommended Practices to bridge the gap between research and practice, offering much needed
guidance to parents and professionals who work with young children with disabilities. In creating
this resource, DEC‘s primary goal was to identify practices that result in better outcomes for
young children with disabilities, their families, and the personnel who serve them. The practices
are derived from two key sources. One source is the scientific literature on effective practices for
young children with disabilities, their families, and the personnel who work with them. The other
source is the knowledge and experience of those who work with young children and their
families.

4.    Develop and implement six (6) intervention plans (12 if a six-credit internship).
[Candidate funded by the USDOE, OSEP grant must ensure that he/she completes intervention
plans in the 0-3 as well as the 3-5 age range.] The intern should:
     provide organized and sequential lessons and interventions
     provide interventions that are motivating to children and families
     address the children‘s strengths and needs
     use specific facilitating strategies during planned, unplanned, and routine activities
     use positive individual and group organization and management methods
     monitor children‘s progress and make data-based decisions regarding intervention
     include all required components of written intervention plans

5.    Participate in three (3) assessments for each 3 credit internship or (6) for 6 credit
      internship
[Candidate funded by the USDOE, OSEP grant must ensure that he/she completes intervention
plans in the 0-3 as well as the 3-5 age range.]
     plan schedule with host teacher
     select a variety of assessment formats (scales, checklists, observational, standardized,
      curriculum based) Use no more than one screening tool.
     conduct assessment (conduct all or part of assessment)
     in lieu of conducting assessment, intern may co-score an assessment performed by host
      teacher or designee
     write all or part of report, include protocols, summary information, parent input, strengths,
      needs, suggested goals

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      in lieu of official report, write a sample report based on assessment results
      attend and lead part or all of parent meeting
      include introduction to this folio section to describe your assessment activities and
       experiences and needs
      include protocols

6.     Participate in the development of three (3) IEP/IFSPs for each 3 credit internship or
       (6) for six credit internship. [Candidate funded by the USDOE, OSEP grant must ensure
       that he/she completes intervention plans in the 0-3 as well as the 3-5 age range.]
      Lead all or part of meeting
      Demonstrate collaboration skills
      Learn roles of members of the meetings
      Write an introduction to this section of the folio to describe your role in the development of
       the IEP/IFSP and your role in the meeting, as well as a reflection of collaboration skills
       used (not used) by the team

7.     Participate in a Functional Behavioral Assessment or alternate project, related to
       behavior. Alternate must be approved by the university supervisor and host teacher.

8.     Attend and participate in Internship Seminars.
9.     Completion of Professional Development Plan
10.    Completion of other assignments to meet CEC standards of practice (Ex:
       collaboration, technology, family based practices).
11.    Upload all artifacts and assignments into Internship Portfolio on TaskStream

The purpose of the internship online portfolio is to document the DEC recommended practices
and the CEC Performance Standards for Early Childhood Special Education related to the
internship activities. Just as with children, no single procedure is used to assess the intern. The
online portfolio posted on TaskStream [TS] is one means of assessing the intern.

The TS portfolio consists of written explanations and artifacts that demonstrate what the interns
themselves did during the internship—not what they heard about, or read about. Written
explanations may be as brief as a one page explanation to describe the intern‘s role in the
assessment. Artifacts may be scanned and uploaded into TaskStream.
 It is the candidates responsibility to upload all documents onto the TS system.
 It is the responsibility of the UAA supervisor to grade and score the candidates portfolio after
    it has been posted onto TS.

TaskStream (subscription to TS is a requirement)

TaskStream is a comprehensive web-based resource and storage system for candidates to collect,
store and post work that will form the basis for an electronic internship portfolio, which is an
requirement for the program. In addition TaskStream has other tools and resources that may be
helpful to you in your program.

Candidates are responsible for purchasing a subscription to TaskStream just as you would

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                       26
purchase a textbook for a course. Instructors in your program will tell you when you need to
make your purchase. For most programs, if not the in the first course, it will be early on.

Subscriptions to TaskStream can be purchased by candidates directly from TaskStream. As of
January 2009 the subscription rates directly from TaskStream are:
       1 semester     $25    (one semester is 5 months)
       1 year         $42    (365 days from the date of purchase)
       2 years $69    (730 days from the date of purchase)

To subscribe online, go to www.taskstream.com, click on ―subscribe‖ (across the top). Then
choose ―Create a new TaskStream subscription‖ and follow the instructions using your credit
card to make the purchase. Please make a note of the username and password that you choose!
As part of the subscription information, you will need to enter your name and other information.
When asked for your email address, be sure and use an address that you use on a regular basis.

After you have subscribed, you will then login in using the user name and password that you just
created. Next you will need to self enroll in the specific program that you are in. There is no
cost to do this.

For the UAA Early Childhood Special Education Program, the program code is: NFRXX3

UAA Supervisor Disposition of Candidate

1. Final Self Assessment

Examples of portfolio artifacts and documents include, but are not limited to:
 A written, one-page, personal philosophy of early childhood development and early
   intervention incorporating beliefs and values regarding infants, toddlers, young children,
   and their families. If the intern previously wrote a philosophy for a course, a review of how
   the philosophy changed or how concepts were validated as a result of the internship could
   be included.
 Case study
 Videotape of intern demonstrating competency
 Data keeping system, developed by the intern to document child outcomes and to make
   data-based intervention decisions (described)
 Family Interview Forms, other family assessment forms
 A picture communication board developed by intern for use with child, family, and host.

If photos are submitted, there should be written parent permission, as well as a written
description of the competency being documented and what the intern did and how successful it
was. If an article is included, the intern should describe how they used the strategies or methods
in the article as part of their intervention plan, and reflect on that. When intervention plans are
included, there should be an introductory report that summarizes types of children worked with,
strategies used, the learning that occurred for children and the intern. Each intervention plan
should include the data collected, summary of the data, and a self-evaluation of the effectiveness
of the intervention (as well as the other specified requirements for written plans as stated in the

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                  27
internship handbook.)

Evaluation of Interns
Mid-Term and Final Evaluation Conference
The intern, host teacher, and university supervisor will meet in person or by phone conference
for a mid-term and final evaluation conference. Required evaluation forms will be discussed.

On-going Supervision by Host Teacher
The host teacher will observe the intern frequently, and provide verbal and written feedback.
The written feedback will be available for the university supervisor and be included in the
intern‘s portfolio. Three formal written observations by the host teacher will be required for a six
credit internship.

Observations by University Supervisor
The university supervisor will observe the intern 3 to 6 times across the six internship credits and
provide verbal and written feedback. Multiple observations may be completed on the same day
rather than six individual dates. Additional observations may be conducted as needed to monitor
and verify the intern‘s progress. Observations may be made on-site, phone conference, and/or
via video, or by other means including:
     Weekly Reflective Journal
     Participation in Seminars
     Attendance at internship site
     TaskStream Portfolio Review
     Host feedback

Passing Grade
The Internship is a Pass/Fail course. Interns must receive above average ratings and assessments
in all required internship areas to pass. Incompletes are given only if there are circumstances
beyond the control of the intern that prevents completion of the course. The University of
Alaska Anchorage Incomplete Grade Policy applies and is as follows;

    DF (Deferred Grade)
    A deferred grade may be assigned if it is not possible to complete the internship requirements
    during the semester registered. This grade is assigned as a temporary grade until the
    requirements are met (not longer than one year). Interns may need additional time to accrue
    clock hours and/or to complete the portfolio.
References
Bredekamp (2006 in NAEYC Position Statement.) Developmentally Appropriate Practice in
   Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8. Adopted July 1996.
   Retrieved from www.naeyc.org/resources/position_statements/dap1.htm (retrieval date April
   2002).

CEC Performance Standards. Retrieved from www.cec.sped.org. Retrieved February, 2002.



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                   28
Diamond, Karen E. (2001) Supporting Early Childhood Teachers A Reflection on the Kentucky
   Teacher Internship Program. TESE 21:3 Pro-Ed.

The George Washington University Infant and Early Childhood Special Education Programs.
   Master‘s Degree Student Handbook. 2001-2002.

The George Washington University Graduate School of Education and Human Development.
   Department of Teacher Preparation and Special Education. Infant Special Education.
   Handbook for Field Experiences. Student Edition. Spring 2002.

McCormick, Katherine M. Brennan, Sharon. (2001) Mentoring the New Professional in
     Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education: The Kentucky Teacher Internship Program.
     TECSE 21:3. Pro-Ed.

Sandall, Susan, McLean, Mary E.,Smith, Barbara J. (2002) DEC Recommended Practices in
       Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education. Longmont, CO. Sopris.




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                          29
                           Appendix

                            Forms




ECSE Internship Handbook              30
                                   University of Alaska Anchorage


                     3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
              907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                   Early Childhood Special Education
                                         Internship Application
                           Deadlines:    FALL: March 1     SPRING: October 1
Directions: Complete the form and required supplemental documentation. The Internship
Coordinators and your Advisor(s) as well as others who may work with you during your
internship will review this information to consider your readiness for an internship.

Name                                                                  UA ID

Home phoner                              Cell Phone                   Work phone


Address

E-Mail
                                        SEMESTER REQUESTED:
       Fall Semester ________ (year)            Spring Semester ________ (year)

                                   Internship Placement(s) Requested:
Desired Placement: (Please see Internship Handbook to determine the
categories for which you are eligible.
     Birth - 3 Setting(s)
     3-6 year old (preschool) settings
     OJT (some internship credit may be given for On-The-Job Experience.
Prioritize three suggestions for your internship assignment including general locale. Please do
not contact any teachers, service providers, districts or agencies regarding a placement.
1.
2.
3.
The following must be included in your application:
1.   Verification of liability insurance (attach copy of policy/card)
2.   Verification of medical (accident) insurance (attach copy of policy/card)
3.   Current Alaska Teacher Certificate (attach)
4.   Other professional licenses or certificates or degrees (attach)

Return the application packet and supplemental documents to the address above.


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                      31
Courses and Grades: * = prerequisite.
Include grade for courses completed and ―IP‖ (in progress) for courses enrolled in this semester.
 Course                   Grade Course                   Grade Course                      Grade
EDSE A474                        EDSE A622Y*                     EDSE A681
EDSE A610Y*                      EDSE A633                       EDSE A690
EDSE A620Y                       EDSE A674                       EDSE A690

List other applicable courses from other universities and/or workshops attended:


Additional Requirements:
1. LETTERS (2) of RECOMMENDATION (for candidate not completing internship OTJ):
   Attach two letters of recommendation from supervisors or colleagues that speak to the
   candidates dispositions as well as potential in working with young children with disabilities.
2. Professional Dispositions: (1) supervisor, (1) self
   Interns should attach a Professional Dispositions Indicators Survey completed by the intern‘s
   current supervisor or a former supervisor who has knowledge of the dispositions. A copy of
   the survey is included in *the appendix.
The Alaska Professional Standards Commission requires the following information. Please
answer true or false.
 T F
       I have never been convicted of any of the following legal actions: moral turpitude, sex
       offenses, any crimes against children, or any felony.
       I have never been convicted of a DWI.
       My teaching credential has never been suspended or revoked in Alaska or any other
       state.
Please attach an explanation if you answered ―False‖ to any of the above questions.
Your signature below certifies that all information contained in this application packet is
accurate and correct and allows faculty in the program to gather appropriate information to
review your application and to share the information with other professionals who may agree to
work with you during the Internship experience. All placements require current health/accident
insurance. If you are not covered, insurance is available through Megalife Insurance (1-800-767-
0700). You are also required to possess liability insurance (see practicum handbook for
information). If you experience a disability and would like information on support services,
please contact the Manager of Disability Support Services at: 907-786-4530 (voice); 907-786-
4536 (TTD).


Signature                                                    Date:




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                32
                                  University of Alaska Anchorage


                     3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
              907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                  Early Childhood Special Education
                                   Host Teacher Information Form

Intern:
                                                                             UA ID

Site of Internship

Street                                                    City                              State    Zip


Host:                                                                    Fall       Spring Year


Mailing address                                           City                              State    Zip

Home Phone                             Work Phone                         Cell Phone

Home e-mail

Work e-mail

Host must complete a W9 if they wish a stipend.     Host chooses not to receive a stipend

Degrees Earned including Emphasis Area and Date/University Name and Location


Credentials held (Type A, Sp.Ed.):


Description of current position including number and type of children/families served:




Years of special education and/or early intervention:


Summary of previous positions or other credentials:




Host Signature:                                                              Date



ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                            33
                                        University of Alaska Anchorage


                       3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
                907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                               EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION
                                         Internship Contract

Intern:                                                               UA ID                            Semester:


University Supervisor:                                                Host Teacher:


Internship Start Date:                                               Internship End Date:

                                                 Contact Information
                           Cell/home
                                        Work Phone                  Address                                E-mail
                            Phone
Intern




Host Teacher:




University Supervisor:                                 UAA~COE~CASE
Sheila Sellers           907.227.1764   907.786.4662   3211 Providence Dr., PSB 206E        ssellers@uaa.alaska.edu
                                                       Anchorage, AK 99508-4613

                                          SCHEDULE (list time & place)
          Monday                    Tuesday              Wednesday                     Thursday                    Friday




                                          Professional Development Plan
           Skill, Objective,                                                            Documentation/Monitoring &
                                                       Activities
          Competency Area                                                                  Evaluation Procedures




Support and/or Resources Needed:




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                              34
Roles and Responsibilities
The host teacher agrees to:
 provide                    (#) observations (which may be in person, on video or review of
   written intervention plans), conferences and written feedback
 participate in a mid-term conference and final conferences with the intern and university
   supervisor
 provide internship opportunities for the intern as indicated in ECSE Internship Handbook,
   which provide hands-on experience with children and families
The university supervisor agrees to:
 observe/supervise a minimum _____ times over six credits, which may be on-site or via
   videotape, and may occur on one or more occasions
 lead and participate in mid-term and final evaluation conferences with host and intern
 periodically check on progress
 resolve problems in a professional manner
 review and grade comprehensive intervention project
 review and grade portfolio
 respond to weekly reflective journals
 lead six seminars for each three credit internship
 assign final grade
The intern agrees to:
(see ECSE Internship Handbook for details of these requirements) (Intern must document work
in both 0-3 and 3-5 in the areas of assessment, intervention, IEP/IFSP).
 complete all internship assignments in a professional, timely manner
 maintain excellent interpersonal relationships
 respond to feedback in a positive manner
 attend internship on a regular basis
 respond to requests to schedule observations, conferences, evaluations
 actively work with the host teacher and university supervisor to successfully complete
    internship activities
 complete a Comprehensive Intervention Project
 maintain a Weekly Reflective Journal, submit to university supervisor weekly by email and
    prior to seminars (form in ECSE Internship Handbook)
 complete one Self-Assessment: provide to host teacher and university supervisor prior to the
    mid-term conference
 develop, implement, and evaluate, six intervention plans for each three credit internship (12
    for 6 credit internships).
 participate in three assessments for each 3-credit internship. (six for 6-credits)
 participate in the development of three IEP/IFSPs (six for 6-credit internships)
 participate in a Functional Behavioral Assessment or alternate project. Alternate project
    must be approved by the university supervisor and host teacher prior to initiation.
 attend and participate in Internship Seminars. Make up any missed seminars by attending a
    conference with the supervisor or completing an alternative assignment designed by the
    supervisor

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                              35
    write a one page reflection of each of the content related internship seminars and complete
     any assigned reading or assignments assigned during or prior to the seminars.
    submit an Internship Portfolio as described in the ECSE Internship Handbook
    develop and complete a professional development plan, in conjunction with the host teacher
     and university supervisor.(on contract)
    maintain a schedule of activities (calendar)
    maintain a log of internship hours and activities (form in appendix of ECSE Internship
     Handbook)
    complete 200 clock hours of hands-on internship activities with children and families in the
     core internship areas for each three credit internship. Or, 400 clock hours of hands-on
     internship activities with children and families for each six credit internship
    devote additional time to the internship to observe and learn procedures and skills. Such
     hours are not part of the required clock hours, but are ‗in addition to‘ the clock hours. Entry
     level interns, or those interns whose hosts feel are not ready to demonstrate hands-on skills
     with families and children, may need to spend a lot of extra time observing and learning
     procedures and skills.
    Complete work/experience in a 3-5 program if candidate does not possess a teaching cert
    Function as lead teacher or gain increasing level of responsibility for one week if
     completing a 3-5 placement

By signing this contract, we agree to meet the requirements of the internship as indicated in this
contract, and the EDSE 620Y Syllabus, and the ECSE Internship Handbook.


Intern Signature                                                         Date



Host Teacher Signature                                                   Date



UAA Supervisor Signature                                                Date




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                    36
                                         University of Alaska Anchorage


                   3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
            907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                    Early Childhood Special Education
                                          Candidate Disposition Self Survey
All three completed surveys (entry, internship, & exit) must be uploaded onto TaskStream

Candidate                                                                                     UA ID:

This survey will be completed at various points during the M.Ed. Program.
(entry to program, during internship and at exit).

Date:                                                     Entry Survey          Internship Survey         Exit Survey

Rating Scale:
1 = Needs improvement in this area. Supervision is required.
2 = Demonstrates competency in recommended practice and professional disposition.
3 = Demonstrates exemplary competency in recommended practice and professional disposition across all settings.
    Independently performs at a professional level.
                                    Intellectual Vitality Comments & Examples                                           Rating
Engages in on-going professional development
Critically examines self and work
Promotes critical and creative thinking in students
Engages in inquiry and research
Asks questions and thinks critically
Engages in collaborative intellectual work
                                   Collaborative Spirit Comments & Examples                                             Rating
Functions as a positive member of a team
Participates in activities with other professionals, families, and students to increase knowledge of different
cultures and recognize intergroup and intragroup differences among members of different cultures.
Demonstrates appropriate and effective written and verbal communication skills.
                                  Inclusiveness & Equity Comments & Examples                                            Rating
Values family, culture, and community.
Considers opinion of others with an open mind
Interacts in a polite and respectful manner
Uses appropriate language that are sensitive to cultural and linguistic issues
Demonstrates empathy and concern for others
Treats others equitably
Interacts appropriately in relation to cultural norms
                                        Leadership Comments & Examples                                                  Rating
Uses appropriate strategies to respond to emotional and emergency situations
Initiates communication to resolve conflict
Maintains self-control
Uses self-disclosure appropriately
Identifies personal responsibility in conflict/problem situations
Responds appropriately to actions and reactions of others
Adapts to unexpected or new situations
Maintains positive attitude when necessary changes occur
Implements ideas suggested by others




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                                37
                                    University of Alaska Anchorage


                    3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
             907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu
                     Early Childhood Special Education
                                        Employer Disposition Survey
    *Must be completed by current supervisor and submitted with internship application.

Candidate:                                                                           UA ID:

Supervisor:                                                                          Date:

Title:                                                                   Total Score (219)

Please read the following statements and indicate the level that the candidate possesses the specific disposition:
               (3) exemplary performance is typically displayed;
               (2) performance is average or typical;
               (1) performance is not readily observable or may need to be prompted.

Collaboration: The ability to work together, especially in a joint intellectual effort (10
                                                                                                  (3)     (2)        (1)
items)
Cooperates with others
Makes contribution to group effort
Shares information and materials with others
Assists peers
Supports decisions of group willingly, even if different from own
Volunteers to participate in group effort
Supports work of others
Plans and sets goals and priorities with others
Establishes professional goals that are aligned with those of the organization
Makes relevant contributions to discussions
                                                                               TOTAL (30)
Honesty/Integrity: The ability to demonstrate truthfulness to oneself and to others;
                                                                                                  (3)     (2)        (1)
demonstrate moral excellence and trustworthiness (6 items)
Maintains confidentiality of students/colleagues
Communicates without intent to deceive
Demonstrates ethical behavior
Models moral behavior expected of both teachers and learners in an educational setting
Makes decisions based on honesty and integrity
Gives credit to others when using their work
                                                                               TOTAL (18)
Respect: The ability to honor, value, and demonstrate consideration and regard for
                                                                                                  (3)     (2)        (1)
oneself and others (12 items)
Considers opinion of others with an open mind
Listens attentively to others in a variety of contests
Demonstrates a warmth, friendly, and caring manner to others
Interacts in a polite and respectful manner
Uses appropriate language
Takes care of property of others
Demonstrates empathy and concern for others


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                    38
Displays equitable treatment of others
Acknowledges perspectives of individuals from diverse cultural and experiential
backgrounds
Interacts appropriately in relation to cultural norms
Appreciates and embraces individual differences
Demonstrates positive attitudes
                                                                                  TOTAL (36)
Reverence for Learning: Feeling of profound awe, respect and seriousness of intent to
                                                                                               (3)   (2)    (1)
acquire knowledge (9 items)
Values knowledge, content, and experiences presented in pre-service academic programs
Takes initiative to expand knowledge base
Values instructional time
Seeks opportunities to learn new skills
Uses credible and data-based sources
Demonstrates enthusiasm for the subject being taught
Demonstrates positive attitude toward learning
Demonstrates intellectual and academic curiosity
Conveys high expectations for achievement
                                                                                  TOTAL (27)
Emotional Maturity: The ability to adjust one’s emotional state to a suitable level of
                                                                                               (3)   (2)    (1)
intensity in order to remain engaged with one’s surroundings (11 items)
Uses appropriate strategies to respond to emotional and emergency situations
Responds to situations professionally
Uses appropriate tone of voice
Initiates communication to resolve conflict
Maintains emotional control
Uses self-disclosure appropriately
Uses appropriate non-verbal expressions
Responds appropriately to actions and reactions of others
Acts from a positive frame of reference most o the time
Accepts feedback from others
Identifies personal responsibility in conflict/problem situations
                                                                                  TOTAL (33)
Reflection: The ability to review, analyze, and evaluate the success of past decisions in an
                                                                                               (3)   (2)    (1)
effort to make better decisions in the future (6 items)
Accepts and incorporates suggestions in subsequent practice
Identifies own biases and prejudices
Demonstrates accurate self-analysis regarding one‘s own strengths and weaknesses
Uses reflective practices to set goals
Collects accurate data and incorporates it into the reflective process
Recognizes situations that call for a problem-solving approach
                                                                                  TOTAL (18)
Flexibility: The willingness to accept and adapt to change (5 items)                           (3)   (2)    (1)
Adapts to unexpected or new situations
Accepts less than ideal situations when necessary
Maintains positive attitude when necessary changes occur
Implements ideas suggested by others
Demonstrates willingness to apply a problem-solving approach
                                                                                  TOTAL (15)
Responsibility: To act independently, demonstrating accountability, reliability and
                                                                                               (3)   (2)    (1)
sound judgment (14 items)
Accepts consequences for personal actions or decisions
Submits assignments on time or follows procedures for extensions
Uses sound judgment in decision making

ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                               39
Takes action to solve problems
Prepares for classes, meetings and group work
Manages time effectively
Completes assigned tasks from group activities within an acceptable time frame
Seeks clarification and/or assistance as needed
Prioritizes work based upon established goals
Returns borrowed materials in a timely manner
Takes initiative to get materials and notes when absent from meetings or classes
Seeks/locates needed resources
Ensures accuracy of information for which he/she is responsible
Given priority to health and safety concerns of others
                                                                                TOTAL (42)



The disposition list is taken from: Angell, M. E., & DeMario, N. C. (2002). Disposition Standards: How do we
evaluate disposition of teacher candidates? Normal, IL: Illinois State University, Department of Special Education.
A presentation given at The Teacher Education Division Conference, Savannah, Georgia (Nov. 2000)




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                 40
                                         University of Alaska Anchorage


                    3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
             907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu


                                    Early Childhood Special Education
                                        UAA Supervisor Disposition Survey

Candidate                                                                                     UA ID

Supervisor                                                                                    Date:

                                      Internship Midterm Survey                       Exit Survey

Rating Scale:
1 = Needs improvement in this area. Supervision is required.
2 = Demonstrates competency in recommended practice and professional disposition.
3 = Demonstrates exemplary competency in recommended practice and professional disposition across all settings.
    Independently performs at a professional level.
                                    Intellectual Vitality Comments & Examples                                    Rating
Engages in on-going professional development
Critically examines self and work
Promotes critical and creative thinking in students
Engages in inquiry and research
Asks questions and thinks critically
Engages in collaborative intellectual work
                                   Collaborative Spirit Comments & Examples                                      Rating
Functions as a positive member of a team
Participates in activities with other professionals, families, and students to increase knowledge of different
cultures and recognize intergroup and intragroup differences among members of different cultures.
Demonstrates appropriate and effective written and verbal communication skills.
                                  Inclusiveness & Equity Comments & Examples                                     Rating
Values family, culture, and community.
Considers opinion of others with an open mind
Interacts in a polite and respectful manner
Uses appropriate language that are sensitive to cultural and linguistic issues
Demonstrates empathy and concern for others
Treats others equitably
Interacts appropriately in relation to cultural norms
                                        Leadership Comments & Examples                                           Rating
Uses appropriate strategies to respond to emotional and emergency situations
Initiates communication to resolve conflict
Maintains self-control
Uses self-disclosure appropriately
Identifies personal responsibility in conflict/problem situations
Responds appropriately to actions and reactions of others
Adapts to unexpected or new situations
Maintains positive attitude when necessary changes occur
Implements ideas suggested by others




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                         41
                                  University of Alaska Anchorage


                     3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
              907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                  Early Childhood Special Education
                                      Internship Progress Sheet

Intern:                                                         Semester:


University Supervisor:                                          Host Teacher:


Internship Start Date:                                           Internship End Date:

Progress
Midterm Conference Date:                          Final Evaluation Date:

Activities and Assignments                                                                   Status
                                                                            Not started   In progress   completed
Hours completed to date
IEP/IFSPs 3 (6 for 6 credits)
Comprehensive Intervention Project
Assessments (6 for 6 credits)
Intervention plans 6 (12 for 6 credits)
Professional Development Project
Technology Competencies
Functional Behavioral Analysis or alternative behavior based assignment
Lead Teacher/Independent Visits
Self Assessment I & II
Praxis II
Culminating Project
Host Teacher Observations Completed/Scheduled
UAA Observations Completed/Scheduled
TaskStream Account
Blog (Weekly Reflection Journal)
Leadership Activity
Collaboration Competency
Recommendations




Intern Signature                                                              Date

Host Teacher Signature                                                        Date

UAA Supervisor Signature                                                      Date


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                  42
                                University of Alaska Anchorage


                   3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
            907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                Early Childhood Special Education
                           UAA Host Teacher Summative Evaluation Form

Intern:                                                                ID:

Host Teacher:                                                          Observation number:

School Site:                                          Observation Date :




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                     43
                                       University of Alaska Anchorage


                    3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
             907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                  Early Childhood Special Education
                           Comprehensive Intervention Project Evaluation Form
You may use this form for comments or attach a separate sheet of paper for comments. Please refer to
CEC guidelines for suggestions of competencies and standards to observe.

Intern:                                                                                 Date:
Information identifying child, family, and other providers blocked out. (confidentiality) Includes Purpose of
Section, to introduce each section Well written—few grammar and spelling errors. Minimal typos.

                                                     Grading Rubric
0~does not meet 1~needs Improvement 2~ meets requirements 3~exceeds requirements
      Sections                                    Examples of Information to Include                                    Score
1. History             Brief history of child, family history, parent interview, teacher interview
2. Consent Forms     Written consent by parent for video demonstration Include purpose of project;
                     confidentiality; and components (assessment, interviews, intervention plan, data, video).
3. Child Assessment Summary of available assessment information
                     Additional formal assessments (if any). Additional informal assessments (i.e. baseline
                     data, observations, checklists, etc. Pre-Post intervention data, Data on each intervention
                     (collect, graphed, interpreted with narrative statement)
4. IFSP/IEP          Include copy of IFSP/IEP. Indicate the sections which you contributed to; Link IFSP/IEP
                     to assessment and/or intervention. Narrative reflection of the IFSP/IEP process, the
                     document, team collaboration, family friendliness, intern‘s role
5. Intervention Plan Long Range Goal, Measurable behavioral objectives, Functional goals/objectives—
                     measurable, sensitive to cultural diversity, developmentally appropriately, Link to
                     assessment results and IFSP/IEP Intervention strategies include: antecedents; behavior;
                     consequences, Environmental strategies and modifications, Social interaction, Positioning
                     and handling, Modifications to materials, Other modifications and adaptations,
                     Description of activities, Materials needed, Resources for parents (B-2) Reflection:
                     rational for selection of strategies and activities; collaborative efforts; tools and resources;
                     modifications in intervention plan day to day
6. Data Collection Data collection form reflective of goals and objectives selects, Easy to understand for all
                     team members, Data collected during each intervention plan, Quantitative, Qualitative data
                     recorded, Data collected by multiple sources (parent, intern, other team members), Key
                     with codes to match criteria or objective, Evidence of on-going data-based decision
                     making, Narrative reflection
7. Interpretation    Data converted to graph to show child change over time. Narrative interpretation of the
                     data, Anecdotes, Significance of data relative to progress or lack of progress toward
                     IFSP/IEP objectives, Identification of areas which need modified, continued
8. Reflection         Self-evaluation of strengths and challenges of the intervention plans, Narrative to indicate
                     how child change was accomplished. What you learned from the intervention project
9. Video             5-10 minute video demonstration of intern implementing intervention plan or coaching
Demonstration        family, Format: Digital (on CD) or VHS




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                           44
                                          University of Alaska Anchorage


                   3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
            907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu


                                        Early Childhood Special Education
                                               Electronic Portfolio Assessment
                        * All documents must be uploaded and will be accessed using TaskStream

Rating Scale:
1 = Quality of work is below average. Demonstrates minimal competence in required recommended practices and
    professional dispositions. Additional experience is needed to increase independence and improve quality of
    work. Supervision is required.
2= Quality of work is very good. Demonstrates competence in required recommended practices and professional
    dispositions.
3= Quality of work is exemplary. Demonstrates competence in a recommended practices and professional
    dispositions across various disabilities and settings. Independently performs at a professional level.
         CEC Standards
Score        Addressed           Portfolio Sections                  Artifacts and Materials to Include
        CEC Standard 9:           Section 1:                     Professional Documentation:
                                                                 Signed contracts, log of hours, activities, and other professional documents
        Professional And          Contract                       should be placed here. Confidentiality contract, permission slips, clearance,
        Ethical Practices         Log of hours, schedule, and    insurance, training attended, workshops presented, etc.
                                  activities                     PDP
                                  Professional Documents         Interns will self select a topic of interest to create an artifact/project,
                                                                 complete research, participate in, or receive training in an area of interest in
                                                                 which the intern would like to strengthen knowledge or skills of a particular
        COE VALUE:                                               area of interest.
        Leadership                Professional Development       Self-Assessment
        Collaborative Spirit      Plan (PDP)                     Interns will conduct one (1) self-assessment and provide a copy of it to the
                                                                 host teacher and university supervisor prior to the Mid-Term Conference. A
                                                                 final reflection documenting growth will be required at the end of the
                                                                 internship experience. Interns will use the self-assessment to reflect on the
                                                                 core competencies in the internship. You may use the DEC toolkit self-
                                                                 assessment instruments or you may design your own self-assessment
                                  Self Assessment                document based on the core areas of the internship listed below:
                                                                 Professional Competencies
                                                                 Collaboration
                                                                 Assessment
                                                                 Child focused intervention
                                                                 IEP/IFSP Development
                                                                 Family based practices (primarily birth-2 years)
        CEC Standards 1-10        Section 2:                     Reflective Journals
                                  Reflective Journals            Interns will maintain a weekly reflective journal documenting activity in the
        COE VALUE:                (one per week/10 weeks)        10 CEC standards. The purpose of the weekly journal is to provide the
        Leadership                                               opportunity to reflect upon internship experiences and activities through
        Intellectual Vitality                                    documentation of insights and accomplishments. Questions related to
                                                                 internship experiences may also indicate thoughtfulness relative to internship
                                                                 activities. The Journal will be posted to the e-Live blog weekly for peer and
                                                                 faculty review. The Journal will also provide the basis for many of the
                                                                 seminar discussions.
        CEC Standard 3:           Section 3:                     CIP
        Individual       Learning Comprehensive Intervention Intern will complete a comprehensive intervention project. In cooperation
        Differences               Project (CIP)                  with the host teacher, the intern will select a child and family of focus. The
                                                                 purpose of this project is to demonstrate the ability to impact learners‘
        COE Value:
                                  Ecological Assessment for CIP academic and social abilities, attitudes, interests, and skills.
        Intellectual Vitality
                                  History of child for CIP       Intern will use intervention strategies with an infant or young child and their
        Inclusiveness and Equity
                                  Intervention Plans (6) for CIP families that affirm and respect family, cultural, and linguistic diversity.
                                  Data Analysis and Reflection The intern should use strategies that facilitate maintenance and
        CEC Standard 4:
                                  for CIP                        generalization of skills across a variety of environments.
        Instructional Strategies
                                                                 The intern should use strategies and procedures that increase students‘ self-


ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                                          45
          CEC Standards
Score       Addressed                 Portfolio Sections                    Artifacts and Materials to Include
        COE Value:                                          awareness, self-regulation, and self-esteem.
        Intellectual Vitality                               The intern should use strategies to assist young children for successful
        Inclusiveness and equity                            transitions. Intervention Plans should be designed as outlined in Section 4 of
                                                            this document (Intervention Plans).

                                                            Artifacts and Materials to Include
        CEC Standard 5:            Section 4                Intervention Plans (6 minimum lesson plans)
        Learning Environments      (6) Intervention Plans   Interns must develop, implement, and monitor developmentally and
        and Social                                          functionally appropriate lessons after reviewing students‘ IEP or IFSP. Plans
        Interactions                                        should include the following: materials needed, teaching practices,
                                                            classroom management strategies, positive behavior supports, A-B-C- charts,
                                                            environmental modifications or supports needed, safety precautions, media,
        CEC Standard 7:                                     and technology support, data, data analysis, and suggestions for future
        Instructional Planning                              modifications.
                                                            Interns must ensure that the plans are developmental and functional
        COE Value:                                          appropriateness for young children with exceptional needs and motivating to
        Intellectual Vitality                               the child and family.
                                                            Interns should make responsive adjustments based on observation and
                                                            review of assessments, the child‘s strengths and needs, and review of the
                                                            child‘s IFSP or IEP goals.
                                                            Plans may include, but not limited to: peer and social interaction, behavior
                                                            modification, adaptive skills, the use of instructional and assistive
                                                            technology, inquiry experiences, language activities, environmental routines,
                                                            play, or parent-mediated activities.
        CEC Standard 8:            Section 5                Functional Behavioral Assessment
        Assessment                 Functional Behavioral    Lead or participate in a FBA or alternate project (alternative project must be
                                   Assessment               approved by UAA supervisor)
                                                            Assessment Reports and Protocols
        COE Value:                                          Participate in three (3) assessments for each 3 credit internship (6) for 6
        Leadership                                          credit internship
        Intellectual Vitality    Assessment Reports and     Use variety of assessment formats (scales, checklists, observational,
        Inclusiveness and Equity Protocols                  standardized, curriculum based) Use no more than one screening tool.
        Collaborative Spirit                                Conduct assessment (conduct all or part of assessment)
                                                            write all or part of report, include protocols, summary information, parent
                                                            input, strengths, needs, suggested goals
                                                            in lieu of official report, write a sample report based on assessment results.
                                                            Attend and lead part or all of parent meeting, include protocols.
        CEC Standard 10:           Section 6                Participate in the development of three (3) IEP/IFSPs for each 3 credit
        Collaboration              IEP/IFSP                 internship (6) for 6 credit internship.
                                                            Lead all or part of meeting
        COE VALUES:                                         Demonstrate collaboration skills
        Collaborative Spirit                                Learn roles of members of the meetings
        Leadership                                          Include copy of IEP/IFSP with identifiable candidate/adult information
        Inclusiveness and Equity                            omitted.
                                                            Collaboration Documentation:
                                   Other Collaboration      Interns may use any documentation that provides evidence of collaboration
                                   Documentation            with families, school personnel, community members, team- building, family
                                                            correspondence such as newsletters, daily notes, etc.
        CEC Standards 1-10         Section 7                Interns should include formal observations from host teacher and UAA
                                   Mid-Term Evaluation      supervisor, any written or verbal observations documenting intern‘s
                                   Observations             strengths and weaknesses, the Mid-Term Assessment, and the Final
                                   Evaluations              Evaluation.
        CEC Standards              Technology               Use of assistive technology, PECS, social stories, use of personal computer
                                                            programs, data base, programming,
        COE Value:                                           Or special project as agreed upon by host teacher and UAA supervisor.
        Inclusiveness and Equity




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                                    46
                                  University of Alaska Anchorage


                    3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
             907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                            Early Childhood Special Education
          Final Written Summative Evaluation of Intern—Pass/Fail Grade

Intern:                                                             UA ID:

                                                                                                 Intern‘s
          Evaluation Areas                               Criteria to Pass
                                                                                                  Rating
Attendance: Seminars         Misses no more than 1 audio conference                                P/F
Attendance: Internship Site  Notifies host and supervisor of absences, Provides
                             documentation to support absences, Plans personal business
                             after hours, Seeks prior approval for release time, Maintains             P/F
                             health and personal schedule to allow maximum attendance
                             during internship
Completion of hands-on clock Clock hours include time spent with children, families,
hours (no more than 20% may interdisciplinary teams or related activities (200 hours for 3             P/F
be from observation)         credits; 400 hours for 6 credits)
Weekly Journal               Submits one journal weekly, Submits prior to seminars                     P/F
Comprehensive Intervention   Scores 4 or above
                                                                                                       P/F
Project
Host Observation and         Scores 4 or above in all areas on Final
                                                                                                       P/F
Evaluation: Final
University Supervisor        Scores 4 or above in each area on Final
Observations and Evaluation:                                                                           P/F
Final
Portfolio Review             Professional, Comprehensive, Meets Requirements,
                                                                                                       P/F
                             Demonstrates Above Average applied skills
Final Grade                  Passes each area                                                          P/F

NOTE: Completion of an activity related to a core skill, does not necessarily indicate that the intern
successfully applied the skill or fulfilled the contract. Completion of ―clock hours‖ alone does not
constitute successful completion of the internship. The success or failure of the internship will be
determined by the university supervisor based on the quality and appropriateness of the internship
experiences.



Signature University Supervisor                                             Date




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                          47
                                   University of Alaska Anchorage


                      3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
               907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                  Early Childhood Special Education
                             Host Teacher Evaluation by Candidate Intern


Host Teacher                                                                           Semester/Year

My Host Teacher conducted                   formal observation(s) throughout the internship.
Please respond to the following statements by checking the appropriate rating:
N/O Not Observed           1 – Inadequate 2 – Adequate               3 - Excellent
N/O 1            2   3
                   1. The host teacher prepared the parents/children/agency to accept and work with me.
                   2. The host teacher was available and helpful in presenting and clarifying policies
                     and procedures related to the school/agency.
                   3. The host teacher collaborated and interacted with me in a collegial and
                     professional manner.
                   4. I clearly know my responsibilities in the program.
                   5. The host teacher was supportive of me in my role and responsibilities as an intern.
                   6. The host teacher was available to talk with me about professional concerns.
                   7. The host teacher expressed and demonstrated a sincere concern with regard to my
                     progress in developing program competencies.
                   8. The host teacher modeled effective interventions that reflect current best practices
                     described in university classes and special education literature.
                   9. The host teacher observed/reviewed my interventions, assessment, home visits,
                     and/or IFSP/IEP development and provided meaningful feedback regarding my
                     progress in meeting program competencies. (Check all that apply to types of
                     feedback) ___Conferences___ Email___ Phone Conferences
Based on your experience, should this placement be used again in the future?
    Yes        No         Undecided
Additional Comments (use back if needed):

                                    Instructions to Candidate Interns
The purpose of this evaluation is to provide information about the Masters in Education with Emphasis in
  Early Childhood Special Education program. The information will be used to improve the program.
                            Please return this evaluation form to the address above.




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                               48
                                   University of Alaska Anchorage


                   3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
            907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                Early Childhood Special Education
                           UAA Supervisor Evaluation by Candidate Intern

UAA Supervisor                                                            Semester/Year
The supervisor conducted ___ *formal observation(s) throughout the internship period.
Please respond to the following statements by circling the appropriate numerical rating preceding each:
N/O Not Observed           1 – Inadequate         2 – Adequate          3 – Excellent
N/O 1 2         3
                    A. The supervisor provided an internship orientation including(check all that apply):
                       __Internship Handbook ___Discussed Future Visits ___Contact Information
                       ___Conferences ___Seminars
                    B. The supervisor interacted with me in a respectful, professional manner.
                    C. The supervisor observed/reviewed my interventions, assessment, home visits, and/or
                       IFSP/IEP development and provided meaningful feedback regarding my progress in
                       meeting program competencies. (Check all that apply to types of feedback)
                       ___Conferences ___Seminars___ Email___ Phone Conferences___ Review of
                       weekly logs/journals/intervention plans
                    D. The supervisor encouraged collaboration by (check all that apply): ___Soliciting
                       your self-evaluation of the observed lesson ___Requesting feedback and comments
                       from the host teacher ___Valuing comments from you and the host teacher
                    E. The supervisor encouraged reflection by (check all that apply): ___Soliciting your
                       self-evaluation of the observed lesson ___Valuing comments from you and the host
                       teacher
                    F. The supervisor demonstrated knowledge of content and interpersonal skills to
                       promote an optimal learning experience for you and the host teacher.
Program standards require one observation for each hour of internship credit. Candidates enrolled in a three-credit
internship will have a minimum of three observations while candidates enrolled in six-credits will have a minimum
of six observations. Observations can include onsite classroom/work environments or video-tapes of interventions
conducted in planned, unplanned or routine activities. When completing the evaluation form, please consider the
above program standards.

What did the UAA Supervisor do that was particularly beneficial to you during the internship experience?
What, if anything, should the UAA Supervisor do in the future to improve the internship?

Instructions to Candidate Interns
The purpose of this evaluation is to provide information about the Masters in Education with Emphasis in Early
Childhood Special Education program. The information will be used to improve the program.
Please return this evaluation form to address above.




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                   49
                                   University of Alaska Anchorage


                   3211 Providence Drive, PSB206z, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
            907.786.6317  888.822.8973  fax: 907.786.4474  e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                Early Childhood Special Education
                             UAA Supervisor Evaluation by Host Teacher

UAA Supervisor                                                          Semester/Year
Please respond to the following statements by checking the appropriate numerical rating preceding each
statement:
N/O - Not Observed           1 – Inadequate         2 – Adequate         3 - Excellent
N/O 1       2    3
                     A. The supervisor provided an internship orientation including (check all that apply):
                        __Internship Handbook ___Discussed Future Visits ___Contact Information
                        ___Conferences
                     B. The supervisor interacted with me in a respectful, professional manner.
                     C. The supervisor observed/reviewed the candidate intern‘s interventions, assessment,
                        home visits, and/or IFSP/IEP development and provided meaningful feedback
                        regarding the intern‘s progress in meeting program competencies.
                     D. The supervisor encouraged collaboration.
                     E. The supervisor encouraged the intern to reflect on his/her performance.
                     F. The supervisor demonstrated knowledge of content and interpersonal skills to
                        promote an optimal learning experience for the candidate intern and me.
                     G. The supervisor solicited questions/concerns from me
What did the UAA Supervisor do that was particularly beneficial to you during the internship experience?




What, if anything, should the UAA Supervisor do in the future to improve the internship?




Instructions to Host Teachers:
The purpose of this evaluation is to provide information about the Masters in Education in Early Childhood Special
Education program. The information will be used to improve the program.
Please return this evaluation form to the address above.




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                50
SPECIAL NOTE:

Note to USDOE, Office of Special Education Program Grant Funded Candidates:

Welcome to the ECSE Masters degree program. As a grant funded candidate you will be
required to document the following:

a)     Experience in working with both the Birth to three and the 3-5 populations. Specifically,
       plan on completing assessments on both populations as well as IEP/IFSP and interventions
       on both populations;
b)     Experience working with children with autism (e.g., document ability to conduct
       assessments and intervention plans)
c)     Experience working with children with FASD (e.g., document ability to conduct
       assessments and intervention plans)
d)     Experience working with children with severe disabilities (e.g., document ability to
       conduct assessments and intervention plans)

Please ensure that you have incorporated the above in some aspect of your ECSE Masters
program. You can choose to do the above in either field based experiences in coursework,
elective credits, or your EDSE 620Y internship.




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                51
                             Photo/Audio/Video Release Form


I authorize the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and/or parties designated by UAA
to photograph, videotape, and/or audiotape me/my child for educational purposes or a
brochure.




Name (please print) of person being photographed, videotaped, or audio taped


Name (please print) of parent or legal guardian if person being photographed, videotaped, or audio taped is
under 18


address                                                      City                             State    Zip


phone       home      work     cell                          phone     home       work      cell


e-mail address


signature     person being photographed, videotaped, or audio taped      parent      legal guardian


Thank you,


UAA Representative




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                                                 52
A                                        Liability Insurance
                                           Log of Hours
Application checklist
  Application Form                       M
  Applying                               Medical Insurance
  Assessment                               Mid-Term Evaluation
  Assignments                            O
C
                                         Observation Form
Comprehensive Intervention Project   ,     Observations
  Confidentiality                          On the Job (OJT) Internships
  Contract                                 Other Means of Evaluation of
D                                          Internship
DF (Deferred Grade)                      P
  Disposition Survey                     Passing Grade
E                                          Portfolio
                                           Portfolio Evaluation
Evaluation of Intern
                                           Preparing for the Internship
F                                          Pre-requisites
                                           Professionalism
Final Evaluation
  Final Evaluation Conference Form       R
  Functional Behavioral Assessment       References
H                                          Reflective Journal
                                           Reflective Journal--electronic
Host Information Form
  Host Observation Form                  S
  Host Teacher Responsibilities          Self-Assessment
  Host Teachers                            Self-Assessment Documents
I                                          Seminars
                                           Candidate Responsibilities
IEP/IFSPs
  Intern Responsibilities                T
  intervention plans                     Time commitment
  Intervention Project
                                         U
L




ECSE Internship Handbook                                                    53

				
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