Docstoc

Clinical Vignette Poster Session II Friday November

Document Sample
Clinical Vignette Poster Session II Friday November Powered By Docstoc
					                                    Clinical Vignette Poster Session II 
                                       Friday, November 13, 2009 
                                            12:15pm – 2:15pm 
                                                       
                                           Esophagus/Stomach 
 
cv 25  IS THERE A ROLE FOR UPPER ENDOSCOPY IN THE EVALUATION OF FAILURE TO THRIVE? 
Stuart Berezin, Michael S. Halata, Howard E. Bostwick. Pediatrics, NY Medical College, Valhalla, NY 
Fifteen patients with poor weight gain, 5 months to 2 years of age, were evaluated for failure to thrive 
due to inadequate caloric intake based on dietary history. All patients had weight for length less than 5% 
and experienced a significant decrease in weight percentile on the growth curve. None had 
gastrointestinal symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, constipation or dysphagia. Evaluation included CBC, 
total protein, albumin, ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, T4, TSH and electrolytes. Patients over 10 months had 
lab testing for celiac disease. Abdominal ultrasound was performed in eight patients and upper 
gastrointestinal series in four patients. Evaluations were normal for all patients, except for two with 
positive celiac disease serology.  
All patients had an upper endoscopy with biopsies of the duodenum, stomach and esophagus. Seven of 
fifteen patients were under one year of age. Two had biopsy‐confirmed eosinophilic esophagitis (> 100 
eosinophils/high power field (HPF)). Two patients had normal appearing endoscopies, but had 
histological evidence of reflux esophagitis (5‐7 eosinophils/HPF). One patient had a duodenal bulbar 
ulcer. Two patients had normal endoscopies.  
Eight of fifteen were over 1 year of age and also had upper endoscopies. One had eosinophilic 
esophagitis (> 30 eosinophils/HPF). This patient had previously been treated with omeprazole for 2 
months. Two patients had biopsy‐proven celiac disease that confirmed their abnormal celiac serology. 
Five patients had normal endoscopies. 
In this young population of failure to thrive patients, upper endoscopic examinations with biopsies were 
useful in obtaining a diagnosis in more than 50% of those examined. Upper endoscopy is therefore a 
useful evaluation in children under 2 years of age with failure to thrive due to inadequate caloric intake 
and who do not exhibit overt gastrointestinal symptoms. In children under 1 year of age eosinophilic 
and reflux esophagitis were the most common diagnosis; in children over one year of age, celiac disease 
was the most common diagnosis in this patient population. 
 
cv 26  ENDOSCOPIC REMOVAL OF A LARGE GASTRIC TRICHOBEZOAR IN A PEDIATRIC PATIENT 
Ahmet Aybar, Anca M. Safta. Pediatrics, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 
A trichobezoar is an accumulation of swallowed hair in the stomach that fails to pass through the 
intestines. The incidence is greater among the mentally retarded or emotionally disturbed children. 
Endoscopic removal is usually not successful and can cause severe complications. Surgical or 
laparoscopic removal is the preferred method. Many endoscopic techniques have been described for 
breaking up the trichobezoar. We report a young patient with a large trichobezoar which was removed 
using hot biopsy forceps and electrocautery snare. 
A 5 ½ year‐old girl presented to the Pediatric ED with symptoms of small bowel obstruction. Exploratory 
laparotomy revealed a trichobezoar in the ileum and was removed with resection of the distal ileum. 
She had persistent nausea and vomiting with poor appetite for 6 weeks. A follow up CT of the abdomen 
and UGI study confirmed a large residual trichobezoar in the stomach extending through duodenal bulb. 
Endoscopic removal was attempted to avoid a second operation. Initially, the retrieval of the intact 
bezoar through the lower esophageal sphincter failed. Subsequently the bezoar was broken into 13 
smaller pieces using hot biopsy forceps and snare via ERBE™ and completely removed. After the 
procedure, mucosal abrasions and small superficial mucosal burns noted in the greater curvature and 
treated with a course of lansoprazole and sucralfate. She was symptom‐free at follow up. 
Trichobezoar is a rare condition in which swallowed hair accumulates in the stomach. It is indigestible 
and slippery in character, can not be propulsed distally and may cause small bowel obstruction. 
Surgery is recommended for the removal of large bezoars. Endoscopic removal is very seldom successful 
due to a distal tail extending into small bowel or imbedding of hair in the gastric mucosa. We describe a 
safe and successful endoscopic removal of a large gastric trichobezoar without immediate 
complications. To our knowledge this is the first published report in the English literature removing a 
large trichobezoar endoscopically by cutting into small pieces using electrocautery. 
 
cv 27  RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BMI AND REFLUX ESOPHAGITIS(GERD) IN CHILDREN Radha Nathan, 
Nidhi Rawal. Pediatrics, Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 
BACKGROUND: Obesity is a rising public health concern, because of various co‐morbidities. Studies in 
adults have shown a positive correlation between obesity and GERD. However, data in children have 
shown conflicting results.  
AIM: To evaluate the relationship between BMI and GERD in children. 
METHODS: In a retrospective case control study, we identified patients between ages 3‐18 years, from 
Jan’06 to Feb’08, with histological evidence of GERD. Charts were reviewed for age, sex, weight, height 
and symptoms. BMI was calculated and BMI percentiles were obtained using CDC growth charts. We 
defined overweight as BMI between the 85th and 95th percentiles and obese as >or equal to the 95th 
percentile. Exclusion criteria included patients with neurological conditions, IBD, prematurity and 
age<3years. Pediatric patients seen in the Well Child Clinic with no history of reflux symptoms, served as 
controls. Cases and controls were age and gender matched. Information was obtained for 47 matched 
pairs. Demographic data were collected. Analysis was performed with STATA software using logistic 
regression and t test. 
RESULTS: About 48.9% of cases (GERD +) were overweight/obese compared to 25.7% of controls (GERD 
‐). The percentage of overweight and obese children in the control group corresponded closely to the 
population norm as per the CDC data. When regressed, GERD correlated well with BMI percentiles 
(OR=1.97, P=0.008) and female gender (OR=2.3, P value=0.026). No statistically significant relationship 
was found between GERD and age/simple BMI value.  
CONCLUSION: We report that children with BMI>85%ile have twice the risk of having GERD, as 
compared to the normal weight population. Prevalence is significantly higher in females. 

               Variables                             Cases(47)GERD+                   Controls(47)GERD‐  
               Weight(kg)                               15.3‐127.8                         10.3‐110  
                         2
              BMI(kg/m )                        12.6‐48 Mean=24.1±8.06            14‐37.9 Mean=22.04±6.3 
BMIpercentiles <85th%ile 85‐95th%ile         ‐ 24(51.06%) 8(17.02%)P=0.008           ‐ 35(74.4%) 6(12.7%) 
             >95th%ile                                 15(31.9%)                           6(12.7%)  
 
cv 28  ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION FOR TREATMENT OF RADIATION‐INDUCED HEMORRHAGIC 
GASTRITIS KATTAYOUN KORDY, MD, BRADLEY BARTH, MD, MPH UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 
SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS, CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER 
Kattayoun Kordy, Bradley Barth. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Children's 
Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, TX 
Argon plasma coagulation (APC) is a non‐contact, through the scope, monopolar, electrocoagulation 
technique that has potential benefit in children requiring endoscopic therapy for GI bleeding. It is 
especially well suited for patients who are at high risk for perforation or with diffuse lesions, including 
those undergoing chemotherapy. Case Report: We describe a 4 year old boy with history of biliary 
rhabdomyoscarcoma who recently completed a 5 week course of radiation therapy. He presented with 
transfusion dependent upper GI bleeding secondary to severe radiation‐induced hemorrhagic gastritis. 
Several multimodal endoscopic therapies failed to control his chronic GI bleeding, including epinephrine 
injections and endoscopic clip placement. Due to the diffuse nature of the lesion, APC was applied to 
80%‐90% of circumferential bleeding in the antrum with successful achievement of hemostasis. One 
week follow‐up endoscopy revealed improved gastritis limited to the antrum with some areas of oozing 
that was again treated with APC. Subsequent follow‐up endoscopy revealed complete resolution of GI 
bleeding without evidence of ulceration, and a significant drop in transfusion requirement post‐APC 
treatment. Discussion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of APC in the management of GI 
bleeding secondary to radiation induced hemorrhagic gastritis in a pediatric patient. Data is limited on 
APC in children with yet unknown long term effects. However, the non‐contact nature of this therapy, 
along with minimal depth of penetration make it ideally suited for this indication. 
REFERENCES 
1. Kahn K, Scharzenberg S, Sharp H, Weisdorf‐Schindele S. Argon plasma coagulation: Clinical experience 
in pediatric patients. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 2003; 57 (1): 110‐112. 
2. Watson J, Bennett M, Griffin S, Matthewson K. The tissue effect of argon plasma coagulation on 
esophageal and gastric mucosa. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 2000; 52(3):342‐5. 
 
cv 29  GASTRIC ADENOCARCINOMA IN A 14 YEAR‐OLD WITH HISTORY OF GIARDIA AND CMV 
INFECTIONS. Jeffrey H. Ho, Marvin E. Ament. Division of Pediatric GI, Hepatology and Nutrition, UCLA, 
Los Angeles, CA 
We describe a case of a 14 year old male with history of chronic abdominal pain and intermittent 
vomiting since two years of age. Family history is remarkable for members with gastric adenocarcinoma. 
At age two, patient began vomiting and was reported to have hypoalbuminemia and protein losing 
enteropathy. Endoscopy was normal but stool studies showed presence of Giardia. At age four, he 
presented with persistent vomiting. Endoscopy grossly showed antral ulcers. Biopsies showed severe 
gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and CMV intranuclear inclusions. Immunodeficiency work‐up showed 
reversal of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. He was then treated with Ganciclovir with resolution of 
symptoms. 
At age 14, he was evaluated for chronic abdominal pain. Endoscopy showed a friable and necrotic 
appearing gastric mass arising from mid‐body of the greater curvature. Biopsies showed high grade 
dysplasia. Patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound and the tumor appeared to penetrate through 
certain areas of muscularis propria. Patient then underwent subtotal gastrectomy with resection of 
gastric tumor, regional D2 lymphadenectomy and Roux‐en‐Y gastrojejunostomy. Frozen section analysis 
showed clear margins and benign reactive lymph nodes. Pathology revealed a 6.2 cm tubular/intestinal 
type gastric adenocarcinoma that was moderately differentiated. Tumor invaded into superficial 
submucosa and 76 resected lymph notes were negative for metastatic carcinoma. Tumor was classified 
as a Stage IA malignancy or T1N0M0. Interestingly, EBV EBER was positive in dysplasia but negative in 
adjacent normal mucosa. 
There have been limited studies on standardized treatment protocols for pediatric gastric 
adenocarcinoma, therefore approach was made to treat our patient as an adult. Patient received 
adjuvant chemotherapy with 11 courses of 5‐FU over six months. At one year post‐surgery, surveillance 
endoscopies with biopsies and imaging showed no recurrence of tumor or any evidence of metastatic 
lesions. 
 
 
cv 30  GASTROCOLIC FISTULA AFTER PERCUTANEOUS ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY (PEG) 
PLACEMENT 
K. Nguyen1, P. De Angelis2, N. Gupta3, A. S. Day3, J. Teitelbaum4, J. Dias5, A. Bautista6, C. Wilson7, R. Gill1, 
J. Xu1, S. Schwarz1, W. Treem1. 1SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 2Ospedale Pediatrico 
Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy; 3Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia; 4Children's Hospital 
at Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ; 5Hospital de S. João, Porto, Portugal; 6University Hospital 
Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; 7Lucille Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 
Introduction:Gastrocolic fistulas (GCF) are a known complication of PEG placement in children but have 
only been described in case reports.Aims:We determined signs/symptoms, predisposing factors, natural 
history, and management strategies for GCF after PEG in a series of children.Methods:A questionnaire 
was designed and distributed to physicians who cared for pts with GCF after PEG.Each physician 
performed a retrospective chart review. No specific pt identifiers were provided.Consent waiver was 
obtained from SUNY Downstate IRB.Results:12 pts were included.7 had cerebral palsy, 3 of whom had 
scoliosis.7 had previous abdominal surgery.The number of PEGs/year by each physician ranged from < 5 
and up to 40.Finger indentation/stomach insufflation alone was used in 11 cases.In 1 case, fluoroscopy 
was also used.The time from PEG to diagnosis of GCF ranged from <1 wk to >6 mo.The most common 
symptoms of GCF were feculent vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss.Diagnosis was made by contrast 
study in 10, by EGD in 1, and at surgery in 1. GCF spontaneously closed in 4, was surgically closed in 
6,and was endoscopically clipped in 1 pt.3 pts had repeat PEG and 7 had G‐tube replacement by 
surgery.Modifications to PEG after GCF included adoption of safe track technique,fluoroscopy 
w/transverse colon opacification,reduced stomach insufflation,or increased referrals to interventional 
radiology.Conclusions:GCF can present in the immediate post‐procedure period and as long as 10 
months after PEG.Previous abdominal surgery is a key risk factor for GCF.Surgical closure or 
spontaneous closure was used in the majority of cases.The varied number of PEGs/year suggests that 
increased experience with PEG does not necessarily mitigate the risk for the development of GCF. 
 
cv 31  COIN RETRIEVAL AND EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS 
Nicole Jordan1, Aeri Moon2. 1Pediatric Gastroenterology, NYPH Weill Cornell Medical Center, NY, NY; 
2
  Pediatric Gastroenterology, NYPH Weill Medical College of Cornell University, NY, NY 
Coins are the most commonly ingested foreign body in children, and spontaneous passage occurs in up 
to a third. Of those lodged in the esophagus, approximately 10‐20% lodge in the mid‐esophagus. 
Retained esophageal coins occur most often in those who are small or with underlying esophageal 
pathology. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus. Although 
esophageal food impaction is a fairly common presentation of EE in adolescents, there are no published 
case reports on non‐food‐related foreign body impactions in children as an initial clinical manifestation 
of EE. This is the first case report of EE diagnosed in a child who underwent an 
esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for retrieval of a coin. Case: A four year‐old healthy male 
presented to the emergency department after having swallowed a coin the night prior. He was 
asymptomatic and a chest x‐ray showed a radiopaque foreign body within the esophagus. He underwent 
an EGD in which a coin was found in the mid‐esophagus. Gross endoscopic inspection noted linear 
exudates of the esophagus. Three‐level esophageal biopsies were taken and histologically reported as 
active esophagitis with eosinophilic infiltrates. The patient was placed on Prevacid. A repeat EGD was 
performed 3 months later which confirmed the diagnosis of EE whereby a swallowed topical steroid was 
added. Conclusion: In young children, EE is reported to present most often as dysphagia, pain and 
emesis, and in adolescents, as food impaction requiring endoscopic removal. This is not the first case in 
our institution where an EGD was performed on a child for coin retrieval in which the child was 
subsequently diagnosed with EE. This case illustrates two points: 1) presentation of a non‐food‐related 
foreign body impaction may be the first manifestation of EE in an otherwise normal child without 
symptoms of dysphagia or food impaction; therefore 2) it should be considered that all children 
undergoing an EGD for foreign body retrieval have biopsies taken when the foreign body is impacted in 
the esophagus. 
 
cv 32  RAPUNZEL SYNDROME: NOT JUST A FAIRY TALE 
Ryan K. Brislin1, Samantha Cook1, Bonnie Beaver2, Yoram Elitsur1. 1Pediatrics, Marshall, Huntington, WV; 
2
  Surgery, Marshall, Huntington, WV 
Rampion (campanula rapunculus) is a pot‐erb plan, characterized by its long stems and white hair. The 
plan was the main subject of the Grimms' brothers famous fairy tale, Rapunzel. Rapunzel syndrome was 
later described as a gastric trichobezoar that extended into the small intestine. Rapunzel syndrome is 
rarely described in the USA.  
Case report: A 12 year old female presented with intermittent and sharp abdominal pain with emesis, 
decreased appetite, early satiety, and weight loss. The patient reported history of trichotillomania, but 
denies hair swallowing. 
Physical examination : A diffuse abdominal pain with hyperactive bowel sounds. A mobile firm mass 
(approx. 15cm x 8cm) in the epigastric region was palpated. Abdominal CT scan showed a gastric bezoar 
that extended as far as the proximal jejunum and intestinal edema. Initial laboratory investigation 
showed normal CBC and electrolytes. A prliminary diagnosis of trichobezoar and partial bowel 
obstruction was made. An upper endoscopy documented the presence of a gastric trichobezoar 
occupying the entire gastric cavity. The hair was visualized exiting the pylorus and extending beyond the 
duodenal bulb, suggesting the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome. Surgical laparotomy revealed a firm 
trichobezoar occupying the entire gastric cavity. After removing the gastric portion, the distal portion of 
the bezoar was located 70 cm beyond the ligament of Treitz, well into the jejunum. A longitudinal 
incision was made and the removal of the remaining portion of the trichobezoar was performed. As a 
result of hair entrapment, a partial intestinal obstruction was present and was relieved. The patient 
tolerated the procedure uneventfully and was discharged at day 6. Surgical follow up was uneventful. 
The patient was referred for psychiatric evaluation. After few therapeutic sessions the patient was 
discharged in excellent condition. At 1.5 year post surgery, the patient is asymptomatic and his 
trichotillomania is under control. 
Conclusion : Rapunzel syndrome is a rare complication of trichotillomania that requires surgical therapy. 
 
cv 33  GASTRIC POLYPS IN MENKES DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING AND 
OUTLET OBSTRUCTION 
Melissa Kennedy, Rose Graham. Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Childrens Hospital of 
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 
A 19 month old male with Menkes Disease was admitted to the intensive care unit with 
metapneumovirus bronchiolitis and pnueomococcal bacteremia. Admission history and laboratory 
studies revealed severe anemia and a recent history of melena and intermittent hematemesis. The 
patient was treated with intravenous pantoprazole, antibiotic therapy, and supportive respiratory care. 
Endoscopy was postponed pending improvement in respiratory status as bleeding was manageable with 
supportive therapy. One week after admission, the patient developed acute hematemesis. Upper 
endoscopy revealed a large polypoid mass with numerous large fronds obstructing the pyloric outlet. As 
this could not be managed endoscopically, the procedure was converted to a surgical case, when the 
lesion was noted to be emanating from the gastric antrum. Antrectomy with a Bilroth Type 1 
reconstruction was performed to surgically remove the mass. Microscopic pathology revealed 
hyperplastic gastric foveolar epithelium with edema, inflammation and areas of ulceration. Menkes 
Disease is an X‐linked recessive disorder of impaired copper membrane transport secondary to 
mutations in the ATP7A gene. Depleted serum copper levels lead to copper dependent enzyme 
deficiencies causing most of the clinical features of Menkes Disease. Deficiency in lysyl oxidase, a copper 
dependent enzyme required in the first step of collagen cross linkage, results in connective tissue 
fragility and predisposition towards mucosal redundancy including polypoid masses in the 
gastrointestinal tract. Hypertrophic polyp formation is more common at the pyloric outlet which is 
exposed to persistent localized pressure during peristalsis. These lesions are more prone to bleeding 
secondary to the underlying vascular abnormalities associated with Menkes Disease. Gastric polyps in 
Menkes Disease have been reported infrequently in the literature but are likely an underappreciated 
clinical feature of Menkes and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding or obstruction. 
 
cv 34  17‐YEAR‐OLD IMMUNOCOMPETENT MALE WITH HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS ESOPHAGITIS; 
COULD THIS BE PRECIPITATED BY ESOPHAGEAL EOSINOPHILIA? 
M. Samer Ammar. Pediatric, SIU School of Medicine, Springfield, IL 
Introduction: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) may cause esophagitis in immunocompromised patients and 
seldom in immunocompetent ones. In immunocompetent patients, risk factors are yet to be identified. 
In this patient, follow up histological examination of esophageal biopsies supported the diagnosis of 
Eosinophilic Esophagitis. 
Case report: 17‐year‐old male with history of intermittent dysphagia for years, developed odynophagia 
2‐3 days before he was evaluated by pediatric gastroenterologist. Mucosal irregularity was seen on the 
contrast esophogram. Patient underwent an Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsies. 
Grossly, esophageal mucosa appeared thickened with blunted vasculature and whitish, nonwashable 
adherent materials. Fungal culture of esophageal brushing was negative. Distal esophageal biopsies had 
extensive ulceration with focal squamous mucosa demonstrating viropathic changes. Proximal 
esophageal biopsies demonstrated focal findings similar to those in the distal. The immuno stain for HSV 
was positive in distal and proximal esophageal biopsies confirming the diagnosis of HSV related 
esophagitis. GMS stain for fungal organisms was negative. Patient was then determined to be 
immunocompetent. He was treated with proton pump inhibitor and acyclovir, intravenously initially, 
followed by oral administration with improvement in symptoms. Patient underwent EGD with biopsies 
about 3.5 weeks and 6 months from the first endoscopic evaluation. The diagnosis of eosinophilic 
esophagitis was confirmed. 
Conclusion: HSV may cause esophagitis in immunocompetent patients. Esophageal eosinophilia was the 
only identifiable risk factor in this patient. Esophageal eosinophilia may be a risk factor for HSV 
esophagitis. 
 
cv 35  CHRONIC COUGH CAN IT BE HELICOBACTER PYLORI 
Vaibhav Goyal, Rima Jibaly. Pediatrics, Hurley Medical Center, Flint,, MI 
Chronic cough is defined as cough present for more than 4 weeks.Asthma,allergic rhinitis,foreign body 
ingestion and sinusitis are few of the common causes of chronic cough.Only one study looked at H.pylori 
as a possible etiology of chronic cough in adult patients.No similar publication was identified in the 
literature in the pediatrics age group.We are presenting a child with persistent cough who was found to 
have H.Pylori gastritis. His symptoms resolved after he was treated for H. Pylori.  
Case:13 year old child with a history of asthma came to the clinic complaining of cough since past three 
month.It was affecting his sleep and daily activities.He had been in and out of the asthma clinic where 
his medications were adjusted with no relief.PPI were added for possible reflux with no 
improvement.He was referred to the ENT specialist where a direct laryngoscopy showed erythema of 
larynx. GERD was suspected and he was referred to the GI clinic because of failure of reflux 
treatment.His chief complaint included cough with no abdominal pain, dyspepsia or vomiting.His exam 
revealed epigastric tenderness.GI endoscopy was done which showed: decreased vascularity of the 
oesophagus but no lesions were present.Stomach was erythematous with red streaks especially in the 
antrum. The esophageal biopsy was normal,but the Gastric antral biopsy revealed gastritis and 
Helicobacter pyori organisms were identified.Patient was treated with amocixillin and clarithromycin for 
2 wks and prevacid for 4 weeks. Cough subsided within next couple of days after starting the treatment. 
Patient came for follow up one month after treatment and was asymptomatic.His last coughing was 
before initiating the treatment.  
Conclusion:Our case supports the possible association between H pylori and persistent cough.It was 
suggested by Petar Rouev et al that it may be a result of the pro inflammatory nature of the bacteria.The 
possibility of reflux as contributing to the cough can not be completely ruled out in this patient. We 
suggest keeping H. pylori in the differential of patients with persistent cough after the common causes 
have been ruled out. 
 
cv 36  ANTRAL POLYPS IN A CHILD WITH HYPOPROTEINEMIA, ANEMIA AND ABDOMINAL PAIN 
Yilda Alvarado, Iona Monteiro. Pediatrics, UMDNJ‐NJMS, Newark, NJ 
12 year old male was initially seen in ‘02 with generalized swelling, abdominal pain and blood‐streaked 
vomiting. On exam he had macrocephaly and generalized edema. Lab studies showed anemia and 
hypoproteinemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed few pedunculated antral polyps. 
Pathology: inflammatory/hamartomatous polyp. Colonoscopy: no polyps. Small bowel series: 
questionable filling defects. MRI of head was normal. He was lost to follow‐up till ‘09, when he came in 
with abdominal pain, hypoproteinemia and anemia. EGD revealed marked increase in polyps. Pathology 
revealed hyperplastic polyps. His pain decreased post polypectomy. 
Hyperplastic polyps are the commonest polyps in the stomach occuring in either gender and common in 
the 7th decade of life1. They are small solitary antral lesions, usually asymptomatic but can present with 
dyspepsia, abdominal pain or gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and anemia1. Pathogenesis is unknown, but 
may occur with chronic gastritis ‐ autoimmune or H. pylori2. They can cause GI blood loss in older 
patients3. Removal of the polyps using endoscopic or surgical methods is required for resolution of the 
blood loss together with iron therapy3. 
 
In children there are very few case reports of hyperplastic polyps causing hypoproteinemia, anemia4 or 
gastric outlet obstruction5. We feel that this child's pain was likely secondary to obstruction at the 
pylorus as it improved post polypectomy. 
1. Gastric hyperplastic polyps. A Review. R Jain, P Chetty. Dig Dis Sci, Nov 27, 2008 (E pub) 
2. Hyperplastic polyps of the stomach: Associations with histologic patterns of gastritis and gastric 
atrophy. Abraham SC et al. Am J Surg Pathol, April 2001:25 (4) 500‐7 
3. Hyperplastic polyps of the gastric antrum in patients with GI blood loss. M. Al‐Haddad et al. Dig Dis 
Sci. Jan 2007:52 (1):105‐9 
4. Juvenile polyposis of the stomach: clinicopathological features and its malignant potential. Hizawa K. 
et al. J Clin Pathol Sep1997;50(9):771‐4 
5. Prolapsed hyperplastic gastric polyp causing gastric outlet obstruction, hypergastrinemia, and 
hematemesis in an infant. Brooks GS et al. J Pediatr Surg Dec 1992:27(12):1537‐8 
 
cv 37  DELAYED SPONDYLODISCITIS AFTER BUTTON‐BATTERY INGESTION 
Rupinder K. Gill, J. Amodio*, K. Nguyen, J. Xu, S. Schwarz, W. R. Treem. Pediatric Gastroenterology and 
Radiology*, Children's Hospital at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 
Ingestion of a button‐battery requires immediate endoscopic removal to avoid tissue necrosis, 
perforation, TE fistula, or death. We report a case complicated by spondylodiscitis, an unusual 
complication of button‐battery ingestion. Case report: A 14‐mo. old female presented with 4 wk history 
of persistent cough and a normal physical exam. A CXR revealed a round battery in the mid‐esophagus. 
The battery was removed by rigid endoscopy with only mild irritation of the esophagus reported. A 
barium swallow (BS) performed two days later showed a focal area of dilatation in the thoracic 
esophagus and a scalloped appearance of the posterior wall of the esophagus. There was no evidence of 
perforation or fistualization. The patient began oral feeds and was discharged home. Six weeks later the 
patient returned with torticollis but no fever or dysphagia. The CBC was normal with an elevated ESR 
(76) and CRP (12). MRI of the neck showed spondylodiscitis with erosion of the inferior endplate of T1 
and the superior endplate of T2 vertebral bodies; with abnormal contrast enhancement of the T1 and T2 
intervertebral disc and prevertebral tissue; and with extension into the posterior wall of the esophagus 
at the level of the previous button battery. Repeat BS showed a filling defect in the proximal esophagus 
without evidence of contrast leak. An upper endoscopy revealed a smooth, movable, polypoid lesion. 
The endoscope was easily passed beyond the lesion into the distal esophagus. Biopsy of the polyp 
showed granulation tissue. The patient was treated with IV antibiotics for 6 weeks and the torticollis 
resolved. Blood cultures obtained prior to IV antibiotics were negative and ESR and CRP returned to 
normal with treatment. Conclusion: We present a case of button‐battery ingestion complicated by 
spondylodiscitis 6 weeks later in the absence of esophageal necrosis, perforation, or fistualization at the 
time of battery removal. The onset of torticollis weeks after removal of a button battery should prompt 
imaging for this complication. 
 
cv 38  RECURRENCE OF RAPUNZEL SYNDROME 
Sheela Raikar1, Prateek Wali2, Seema Khan2,1. 1Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; 
2
  Pediatric Gastroenterology, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE 
We report a case of a 12‐year‐old girl presenting with a three day history of severe, intermittent 
abdominal pain and vomiting. The pain was localized to the epigastric area. It was worse with meals and 
ambulation. She had one episode of diarrhea. Her history was negative for fever, back pain, dysuria or 
dymenorrhea. She reported similar symptoms three months earlier that resolved spontaneously. She 
had a history of depression. She had a history of prior trichobezoar and laparotomy at age four. On 
physical exam, she appeared in discomfort, had short cropped hair and was wearing a wig. Her 
abdominal exam was positive for generalized tenderness and guarding, otherwise unremarkable. CT of 
the abdomen revealed a mass in the stomach extending through the pylorus, into the proximal small 
bowel. An upper endoscopy revealed a large trichobezoar extending from the LES to the third part of the 
duodenum. Multiple attempts at endoscopic removal failed. She underwent laparotomy with removal of 
an extensive trichobezoar. She had an uncomplicated post‐operative course and was discharged home 
with psychiatric follow‐up.  
Trichobezoars result secondary to ingestion of hair with associated trichotillomania. Rapunzel syndrome 
is a rare complication of trichobezoar formation resulting in a mass extending through the pylorus into 
the small bowel. This mainly affects girls and has been linked to psychiatric conditions. The human body 
is unable to digest hair, leading to a ball formation in the stomach. Complications include FTT, chronic 
anemia, ulcer formation, perforation, pancreatitis, intussusception, and intestinal obstruction. Extent of 
the bezoar may be determined by CT or MRI. Endoscopic removal is generally unsuccessful due to large 
dimensions and firmness of the bezoar. Endoscopic fragmentation can lead to distal small bowel 
obstruction. If a large bezoar is present (greater than 20cm), surgical removal is required. Open 
laparotomy or laparoscopy remains the standard of treatment. After removal, psychiatric evaluation is 
essential to prevent recurrence of trichobezoar. 
 
 

cv38a   DIEULAFOY LESION IN A CHILD  
A.N. Nasir, C.M. Wilhelm, J.N. Udall, Pediatrics, WVUHSC‐Charleston, Charleston, WV;J.A. Levien, 
Medicine, WVUHSC‐Charleston, Charleston, WV;W.P. Tomlison, Medicine/Pediatrics, WVUHSC‐
Charleston, Charleston, WV. 
Dieulafoy lesions are caused by a large tortuous artery that erodes as it approximates the mucosa of the 
GI tract leading to massive bleeding.The patient is a 7 year old boy who had a chronic fever and cough. 
He was treated with no improvement. A chest x‐ray showed a right lung pneumonia and large pleural 
effusion. The boy was hospitalized. The hemoglobin in gm% and hematocrit in % (H/H) were 11.3/32.3. 
A right‐sided chest tube was placed. On hospital day 2 he vomited 45 ml of blood. His H/H dropped to 
7.4/21.7.He was transfused 2 units of PRBCs. I.V. pantoprazole and p.o. sucralfate were started. He was 
stable until day 8, when he had a 40 ml hematemesis. His H/H dropped from 10.3/29.5 to 8.5/25.3. 
Three units of PRBCs were given. At upper endoscopy there were clots of blood in the stomach but no 
active bleeding. Two ulcers approximately 3 cm apart in the duodenal bulb were noted. One had a white 
escar base (healing) and the other was covered with clot (recent bleed). There was no active bleeding. 
Following endoscopy octreotide and pantoprazole drips were started. A day later blood was aspirated 
from his NG tube, and his hemoglobin dropped from 9.0 to 6.8. He was returned to the OR for upper 
endoscopy. At endoscopy, a small clean based ulcer crater was found (healing) in the duodenal bulb. In 
the duodenal sweep there was a moderate sized blood clot. The clot was removed and a large blood 
vessel which had recently bled was noted. The area was injected with 2.5 ml of 1:10,000 epinephrine 
and cauterized.The boy remained stable with no signs of active bleeding during the rest of his hospital 
stay. However, he did require 4 more units of PRBCs. He had a third upper endoscopy just prior to 
discharge on hospital day 21. There was no active bleeding and healing of both duodenal ulcers was 
evident. Biopsies from the gastric antrum were negative for H. pylori, and a fasting serum gastrin level 
was normal. The H/H at discharge was 12.6/36.8. In outpatient clinic 2 months later the H/H was 
14.2/42.0. This case illustrates the success of endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of a duodenal 
Dieulafoy lesion in a 7 year old boy. 
 
                                             Intestine/Colon/IBD 
 
cv 39  AN UNUSUAL CASE OF GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING 
Kristin N. Fiorino1, Brian Lestini2, Asim Maqbool1. 1Gastroenterology, The Children's Hospital of 
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; 2Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 
A previously healthy 10‐year‐old African American boy presented with a 3 day history of fever, 
headaches, and periumbilical abdominal pain, with the development of nonbloody, nonbilious emesis 
and melena 24 hours prior to presentation. No history of ingestion, trauma, travel, use of NSAIDs, or sick 
contacts; family history was negative for inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcer disease, and 
polyposis syndromes. Upon initial examination, HR 126, BP 116/56; he was afebrile and dehydrated. No 
oral lesions, rashes, joint swelling/effusions, or perirectal lesions. Abdomen was soft, with epigastric 
tenderness, no hepatosplenomegaly/masses. Stool was hemoccult positive. Laboratory studies included 
hemoglobin 4 g/dL, MCV 80.1 fL, sedimentation rate 42 mm/hr, lipase 202 U/L, BUN 12 mg/dL, 
creatinine 0.8 mg/dL. Infectious stool studies and abdominal x‐ray were negative. Within 8 hours, a 
palpable fullness was felt in the epigastric and suprapubic regions which rapidly progressed to a 
discrete, dense 10 cm firm mass. CT revealed a well‐defined, vascular 8 cm retroperitoneal mass near 
the pancreas, compressing the duodenum with near complete effacement of the inferior vena cava, 
with arterial branches from the gastroduodenal and superior mesenteric arteries and the infrarenal 
aorta. Histopathologic evaluations of tissue suggested a neuroendocrine tumor, specifically 
paraganglioma. Neo‐adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by surgical exploration and eventual 
resection. A malignant ulcer eroded into the third part of the duodenum, the primary source of the 
bleeding. Follow‐up imaging revealed no residual mass or MIBG‐avid disease. The patient remains 
disease‐free two years post‐resection. Paragangliomas are rare tumors of neuroendocrine origin with 
the potential for malignant progression. They may initially grow insidiously and lack biochemical 
secretion, and therefore may present with nonspecific symptoms dependent upon the site of origin. 
Abdominal paragangliomas are not typically associated with GI bleeding, unless invading the intestinal 
tract. 
 
cv 40  FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR EPCAM AS THE GENE FOR CONGENITAL TUFTING ENTEROPATHY 
Tiffany D. Schaible1, Mamata Sivagnanam2, Robert H. Byrd3, Milton J. Finegold3, Reka Szigeti3, Nina 
Tatevian3, Sarangarajan Ranganathan4, Richard Kellermayer1 
1
  Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor 
College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX; 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology 
and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, Rady Children's Hospital, San 
Diego, CA; 3Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX; 
4
  Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 
Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a rare, but severe disorder resulting in early postnatal diarrhea. 
This entity has been recently shown to associate with mutations in the gene encoding epithelial cell 
adhesion molecule (EpCAM). However, this association was conclusively made in only 4 individuals thus 
far. We present an ethnically distinct patient with CTE affected by the first nonsense mutation described 
in EpCAM. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry of duodenal tissue from the patient, demonstrated lack 
of EpCAM staining. Our results underscore EpCAM as the gene for congenital tufting enteropathy. 
 
cv 41  DAIRY ALLERGY AS POTENTIAL CAUSE OF RECURRENT INTUSSUSCEPTION 
Crystal M. Knight1, Laura Finn2, David Suskind1, Ghassan Wahbeh1. 1Gastroenterology, Seattle Children's 
Hospital, Seattle, WA; 2Pathology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA 
Case. 
A 4 year old female presented with abdominal cramps and subsequently demonstrated ileocolic 
intussusception. Within 48 hours after air enema reduction, intussusception recurred twice with 
successful nonoperative reduction. Contrast enema studies showed residual ileocecal valve edema 
(figures 1, 2). A nuclear scan for Meckel’s diverticulum was normal. 
Milk protein allergy had been diagnosed in infancy due to vomiting and diarrhea, and later peanut 
allergy presented with facial rash and swelling. At age 1 year she had ileocolonic intussusception which 
was reduced by air enema. She was asymptomatic since on a dairy and peanut free diet. Milk was 
reintroduced 3 days prior to the latest episode. 
Colonoscopy (done to assess for lead points) was normal except for prominent edema and erythema in 
the terminal ileum. Capsule endoscopy revealed lymphoid hyperplasia in the distal ileum (figure 3). 
Histologic exam showed focal neutrophilic inflammation, reactive epithelium and moderate mucosal 
eosinophilia, raising the possibility of allergic enteritis (figure 4). She received oral steroids and was kept 
dairy free. After 1 year of follow up, she remained without symptoms.  
Discussion. 
Intussusception is the second most common cause of bowel obstruction in children, most commonly in 
the ileocecal region. The majority occur in children under one year of age. In children age > 1 year, a 
pathologic lead point is not uncommon. There are no prior reports of allergic enterocolitis association 
with intussusception. Given this temporal association to the reintroduction of dairy and the biopsy 
findings, as well as the resolution after treatment with steroids and resumption of a dairy‐free diet, we 
propose dairy allergy to be a plausible cause of intussusception in our patient. Allergic enterocolitis 
should be considered as a trigger of recurrent intussusception in the future, particularly in children with 
prior known allergies. 
 
cv 42  HERMANSKY PUDLAK SYNDROME; A PEDIATRIC CASE WITH SEVERE COLITIS AND GOOD 
RESPONSE TO INFLIXIMAB 
Lina M. Felipez, Ranjana Gokhale, Barbara Kirschner, Stefano Guandalini. Pediatric Gastroenterology, 
University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL 
Hermansky Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by tyrosine 
positive oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis resulting from platelet dysfunction and ceroid 
deposition within the reticuloendothelial system. HPS results from 1 of at least 7 different gene 
mutations. It has been associated with fatal pulmonary fibrosis and severe colitis. The colitis has been 
associated mostly with HPS 1 and HPS 4 genotypes and is severe and poorly responsive to medical 
therapy. 
We report a case of a pediatric patient with HPS type 1 with clinical, endoscopic and histologic features 
of Crohn's disease, refractory to medical treatment with azathioprine, sulfasalazine, flagyl and steroids. 
The patient was started on infliximab infusions with good response and quiescent colitis but later 
developed perianal fistulas. IBD serology was positive for ASCA IgA, Anti‐OMPC IgA and PANCA. These 
observations suggest there are many similarities between granulomatous colitis in HPS and Crohn's 
disease. The pathogenesis of granulomatous colits has been attributed to the lysosomal accumulation of 
ceroid lipofusion but this relationship is speculative. The findings of severe colitis at presentation and 
perianal fistulization refractory to infliximab suggest that HPS is a severe form of inflammatory bowel 
disease that may need aggresive treatment comparable to severe Cronh's disease. 
 
cv 43  COLLAGENOUS GASTROENTEROCOLITIS CAUSING PREOTEIN LOOSING ENTEROPATHY IN A 
TODDLER 
Osama F. Almadhoun, Megan Gabel, Thomas Rossi. Pediatric GI, University of Rochester Medical Ctr, 
Rochester, NY 
Collagenous Colitis (CC) is a cause of watery diarrhea in the elderly, but it is rarely reported in children. 
Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) in association with this disease has never been reported in children. We 
report a 15 month old boy who presented with severe diarrhea, diffuse edema, and hypoalbuminemia. 
Further testing revealed PLE associated with collagenous colitis and enteritis.  
Our patient is a 15 month old who presented with progressive peripheral edema for two weeks. Parents 
reported that the child had 4‐5 explosive diarrheal bowel movements per day for approximately 4 weeks 
prior to presentation in addition to vomiting after almost every meal. His physical exam was significant 
for facial, upper limb, and lower limb edema. Albumin level was 2.4, and total protein 3.6.Stool for alpha 
one antitrypsin was >1.33,consistent with protein losing enteropathy.Celiac panel, EBV and CMV 
profile,stool for bacterial and viral culture, were all negative.Upper endoscopy showed edematous 
antral and duodenal mucosa.The rectal and sigmoid mucosa appeared normal on flexible 
sigmoidoscopy.Biopsies showed wide subepithelial band of collagen typical of collagenous 
gastroenterocolitis.The patient was started on oral budesonide 3 mg per day for 5 days but he continued 
with diarrhea and protein loss requiring parenteral replacement. Methylprednisolone was then added at 
2 mg/kg/day. A marked improvement of his symptoms was noticed, and gradually he tolerated oral 
intake and was weaned off TPN.  
Collagenous Colitis is a rare entity in Pediatrics. While there are 12 reported pediatric cases of CC none 
of them were found to have small intestinal involvement. This is a novel description of severe protein 
losing enteropathy as the presenting feature of collegenous gastroenterocolitis in child. Our patient was 
treated according to modified guidelines established for adults and has had a favorable response. 
 
cv 44  ULCERATIVE DUODENITIS IN A CHILD WITH CELIAC DISEASE 
Richard L. Mones1, Geraldine O. Mercer2. 1Pediatric Gastoenterology/Nutrition, Goryeb Children's 
Hospital, Morristown, NJ; 2Dept. of Pathology, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ 
A 15 month old boy was seen because of a 2 month history of weight loss, vomiting, irritability and 
abdominal distension. His family history was non‐contributory.He had been having one to two formed 
bowel movements per day. The review of systems was otherwise non‐contributory. An UGI series, 
abdominal ultrasound, CBC, metabolic panel, TSH and T4, CRP, food allergy panel and celiac screen were 
all normal. Stool for infectious agents were negative. On exam, he was a thin, irritable, sallow appearing 
toddler with a distended abdomen. An UGI endoscopy was performed. There were multiple ulcers of the 
duodenal bulb and the second part of the duodenum. Biopsies of the duodenum showed ulceration of 
the mucosa, total villous atrophy, marked glandular hyperplasia and increased numbers of IELs. On the 
day following the endoscopy, the repeat celiac screen was received and was as follows: Anti‐Human 
Tissue Transglutaminase IgA >100U/ML, Anti‐Endomysial IgA Ab. positive, Anti‐Giadin IgG Ab 49.3U/ml 
and the Anti‐Gliadin IgA Ab was 21.9U/ml. The patient was treated with a brief course of oral 
corticosteroids and a gluten free diet. He is happy, totally asymptomatic and thriving.  
Ulceration of the duodenum is a rare finding in children with celiac disease. The first description of 
ulcerative duodenitis in children with celiac disease was reported by Eltumi et.al.(1)  
This case also illustrates the great variability of results when screening for celiac disease. 
 
1.Eltumi M, Brueton MJ, Francis N. Ulceration of the Small Intestine in Children with Celiac Disease. Gut. 
1996 Oct;39(4)613‐4 
    TTG IgA Ab <3U/ml 9/08/2008      EGD/Biopsy 11/18/2008                  TTG IgA>100U/ml  
           EMA not done                                                           EMA +  
      Gliadan IgA Abs. <3U/ml                                      Gliadin IgA Abs. 21.9U/ml (<5 WNL)  
 
 

cv 45  HEMATURIA & BLADDER GRANULOMA WITHOUT ENTEROVESICULAR FISTULA AS 
PRESENTATION OF CROHN'S DISEASE 
Kara M. Sullivan1, Aseem R. Shukla2, Glenn R. Gourley1. 1Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; 2Pediatric Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 
13‐year old male referred to pediatric GI for evaluation of elevated liver enzymes. His AST and ALT had 
been in the 300‐450 range, with normal bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels for four months. His 
past medical history included an 18‐month history of hematuria and dysuria. Previous evaluations by 
pediatric urology and nephrology had revealed hematuria with >150 rbc/hpf, 50 wbc/hpf, normal 
calcium and protein to creatinine ratios, multiple sterile urine cultures, a normal renal ultrasound, 
normal CT scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis, normal CRP, CBC, ESR, ANA, and electrolytes. Hepatic 
panel six months prior to referral was normal. Bladder biopsy showed inflammatory changes with 
foreign body reaction and noncaseating granulomas. Evaluation for tuberculosis, chronic granulomatous 
disease, and sarcoidosis were negative. Urine culture and PCR for viruses, Chlamydia and gonorrhea 
were negative. Viral hepatitis testing was negative. His ANCA was positive at 1:80 (reference range 
<1:20).  
He reported occasional abdominal discomfort when eating dairy products and having 4‐5 loose stools 
daily. There was a family history of rheumatoid arthritis in his grandfather and a cousin with an 
undefined autoimmune disease. His medications included pyridium 100 mg three times daily for bladder 
pain, and daily Tylenol and ibuprofen. IBD serology was consistent with ulcerative colitis. His liver 
enzymes returned to normal with discontinuing his medications. Endoscopy revealed an ulcer in the 
duodenum, but was otherwise grossly normal. Biopsies revealed granulomatous inflammation in the 
stomach, duodenum, terminal ileum and colon consistent with Crohn’s disease. He was treated for 
Crohn’s disease with steroids, 5‐ASA and 6‐MP with resolution of his symptoms and hematuria, gross 
and microscopic. While extraintestinal manifestations are common in IBD, granuloma without fistula is 
very rare, especially in a patient without a previous diagnosis of Crohn’s disease. 
 
cv 46  BEDSIDE SUCTION RECTAL BIOPSY FOR GRAFT‐VS‐HOST DISEASE IN CHILDREN 
Robert P. Dillard, Ashok Raj, Alexandra C. Cheerva. Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 
Background. Graft‐vs‐host disease (GVHD) is often a major complication of hematopoietic stem cell 
transplantation (BMT) in children. Clinical criteria can be inadequate for accurate diagnosis and tissue 
biopsy of the intestinal tract is required. These seriously ill patients are at increased risk for procedural 
complications and routinely are emotionally exhausted. Our aim was to evaluate our experience with 
bedside suction rectal biopsy (SRB) to determine if it could establish the diagnosis of GVHD using 
minimal or no sedation. Others found rectal biopsy useful. However, this is the first report of bedside 
suction rectal biopsy as the initial test. 
Methods. A retrospective chart review was done of children who underwent bedside SRB for suspected 
GVHD following allogenic BMT at the Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville, KY. from August 2006 to 
February 2009. 
Results. Seven children required tissue biopsy to differentiate GVHD from other diagnoses. Six had 
bedside SRB and the diagnosis of GVHD was established from histology in 4 cases. One had a negative 
biopsy and no further evidence of GVHD. One had a negative SRB but subsequent endoscopic biopsies 
were positive. One had mild GVHD, evidence of infectious proctitis with repeat stool culture positive for 
an enteric pathogen. No complications occurred. One had minimal midazolam for anxiety, one a small 
dose of fentanyl by patient controlled analgesia and one distraction therapy. The remainder agreed to 
no intervention following assurance about the ease and painlessness of the procedure. No colon 
preparation was required and tissue was obtained within hours of gastroenterology service 
consultation. All patients and family members were relieved and pleased with the rapidity of diagnosis 
and ease of the procedure. 
Conclusions. We conclude that, in children, bedside SRB should be the initial test for suspected GVHD. It 
provides a readily available, safe and rapid method to obtain tissue. Potential complications from 
anesthesia and more invasive procedures are avoided as well as emotional trauma to already anxious 
children and their families. 
 
cv 47  CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSED IN A PEDIATRIC PATIENT WITH HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE 
Alexandra N. Menchise, Adria A. Condino, Michael J. Wilsey. University of South Florida College of 
Medicine, Tampa, FL 
Hirschsprung disease is a disorder of neural crest migration characterized by intestinal aganglionosis 
along a variable segment of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a complex disorder associated with several 
syndromes. Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy characterized by a dietary intolerance to 
gluten proteins. Celiac disease can mimic Hirschsprung disease when it presents with constipation and 
megacolon. We present the case of celiac disease diagnosed in a pediatric patient with Hirschsprung 
disease. CASE REPORT: A five year old Caucasian male with history of delayed meconium passage (>48 
hours) was diagnosed with Hirschprung disease during infancy by contrast barium enema and full‐
thickness rectal biopsy. Patient underwent a primary pull‐through procedure with resection of the 
rectum, sigmoid colon, and part of the descending colon and primary coloanal anastomosis without 
colostomy at seven months of age. Gross pathology and histology confirmed proximal megacolon, recto‐
sigmoid transition zone and aganglionosis of the rectum. The patient did well postoperatively until 18 
months of age when he developed progressive constipation, abdominal distention and recurrent fecal 
retention, which was only partially responsive to laxative therapy and rectal irrigation. Celiac testing at 
age three revealed elevated TTG IgG (>100 U/mL) and IgA ( >100 U/ml) levels and he was homozygous 
for HLA‐DQB1*0201 allele. Duodenal biopsies showed severe villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia 
consistent with celiac disease. The patient symptomatically improved with a gluten‐free diet, but later 
required surgical revision of his pull through at age four. Currently, the patient is maintained on laxative 
therapy and rectal irrigation as needed. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case 
of celiac disease diagnosed in a pediatric patient with concurrent Hirschsprung disease. Further research 
is warranted to establish whether an association exists between celiac disease and Hirschsprung disease 
or if celiac disease can complicate and delay the diagnosis of Hirschsprung disease. 
 
cv 48  OCCULT COLONIC DUPLICATION: A CASE REPORT 
Andrea C. Hernandez Troya1, Souheil Gebara1, David A. Bloom2, Winston K. Chan3. 1Department of 
Pediatrics, Beaumont Children’s Hospital, Royal Oak, MI; 2Department of Pediatric Radiology, Beaumont 
Children’s Hospital, Royal Oak, MI; 3Department of Pediatric Surgery, Beaumont Children’s Hospital, 
Royal Oak, MI 
Gastrointestinal (GI) duplication is uncommon and has a variety of clinical presentations. Colonic 
duplication (CD) is even less common, occurring in 4‐18% of all cases of GI duplication. We report the 
case of a 33 week GA female, born with neonatal bowel obstruction. The initial contrast enema (CE) 
demonstrated a microcolon and possible ileal atresia (IA). No other anatomic issues were identified. An 
IA was found at surgery, with resection and primary reanastamosis. At 6 weeks of age, the patient 
developed recurrent episodes of diarrhea and abdominal distention, suggestive of bacterial overgrowth, 
perhaps in relation to ileal stricture, dysmotility and prestenotic small bowel ectasia. An upper GI was 
performed at 5 months of age, demonstrating a dilated loop of bowel on the scout radiograph that 
eventually filled with barium. It extended into the pelvis, paralleling the rectosigmoid. Its exact etiology 
was unclear, so the patient underwent a CE one week later. The scout image showed retained contrast 
in the same dilated loop as seen by prior upper GI. During the CE this loop filled further with contrast, 
extended deep into the pelvis, appeared to be colonic in origin, and was blind ending at its distal extent. 
At laparotomy, a CD was found with a communication between native colon and the duplication at the 
level of the splenic flexure. The CD was resected without complication. Since then, the patient has been 
well, with resolution of all GI symptoms. To our knowledge, no case of a communicating CD that 
presented in a similar, delayed fashion, with an initial negative CE and surgery has been reported. We 
hypothesize that the communication between the CD and native colon was missed at CE due to 
meconium and other thick secretions obstructing the fistula, or that the size of the microcolon and 
adjacent dilated small bowel led to occlusion of the connection. Duplication must always be considered 
in patients with symptoms of bacterial overgrowth. 
 
cv 49  HEPATIC PELIOSIS AND GANULOMATOUS HEPATITIS IN A CHILD WITH CROHN'S DISEASE 
Chuan‐Hao Lin. Children Hospital LA, Los Angeles, CA 
Background: Increases in childhood Crohn's disease have paralleled overall population trends. 
Sulfasalazine and ‐ASA have been used as active and preventive treatment for Crohn's disease. 
Azathioprine (AZ)/6 MP, given as the immunomodulatory drugs, have become a mainstay of the 
management of pediatric Crohn's disease. However, there are potential adverse effects of both 
medications. 
OBJECTIVE: We report a pediatric Crohn's disease patient treated with Sulfasalazine and 6 MP. The 
patient developed adverse effects of both medications with hepatic peliosis and granulomatous 
hepatitis. 
DESIGN/METHODS: A 9 years old female presented with bloody diarrhea was diagnosed with Crohn's 
disease by endoscopic findings. She was initially treated with Prednisone, Sulfasalazine and 6 MP with 
improvement. The prednisone was tapered after 6 months treatment. She was found to have mild 
hepatomegaly and minimally elevated liver enzymes (ALT:68) after 14 months of treatment with both 
medications. A CT scan showed hepatic peliosis. 6 MP was discontinued after CT scan finding. 
RESULTS: Two months after discontinuation of 6 MP, a repeat CT scan showed resolution of hepatic 
peliosis. A liver biopsy was performed one month after discontinuation of 6 MP. The liver biopsy showed 
extensive granulomatous hepatitis and no micro‐organisms were found. Sulfasalazine was discontinued. 
Asacol was introducted as the only medication for treatment of her Crohn's disease. Prednisone was 
added again 4 months later due to active terminal iletis. CONCLUSIONS: 1)Potential adverse effects of 6 
MP in the treatment of pediatric Crohn's disease include hepatic peliosis. 2) Granulomatous hepatitis 
can occur in pediatric Crohn's disease treated with Sulfasalazine. 3) Hepatobiliary involvement of 
pediatric Crohn's disease includes granulomatous hepatitis and fibrosis. 4) Early detection of 
hepatobiliary lesions using CT scan and/or liver biopsy is indicated with pediatric Crohn's disease with 
hepatomegaly and/or mildly elevated liver enzymes. 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:12
posted:8/5/2011
language:English
pages:15