Docstoc

Tutor Handbook

Document Sample
Tutor Handbook Powered By Docstoc
					                                                       Table        of    ConTenTs

Letter from Dr. Gurney..............................................................................................................................2
Letter from Col. Garibay...........................................................................................................................3
Acknowledgements....................... .................................................................................................................4
Athletic Student Life Mission Statement/Introduction................................................................................5
Equal Opportunity Statement....................................................................................................................6
About Prentice Gautt..................................................................................................................................7
Athletic Student Life...................................................................................................................................8

Rules, Policies,and Procedures......................................................................................9
Rules, Policies and Procedures...........................................................................................................10-15
NCAA Rules and Regulations...................................................................................................................16
Sports Wagering Activities & NCAA Legislation..................................................................................17,18

Tutoring Overview....................................................................................................19
What is Supplemental Instruction?...........................................................................................................20
What is a Tutor?.........................................................................................................................................21
Expectations of Tutors.........................................................................................................................22,23
Tutoring Techniques................................................................................................................................24
Conducting Supplemental Instruction Sessions.................................................................................25,26
Frequently Asked Questions....................................................................................................................27
Learning Styles.....................................................................................................................................28,29
Test Taking Methods...............................................................................................................................30
Helping Students with Essay Questions..................................................................................................31
Types of Essay Exams...............................................................................................................................32

Learning Specialist..................................................................................................33
Learning Specialist Overview.............................................................................................................34-36
Learning Specialist Methods...............................................................................................................37,38
Situations and Strategies.....................................................................................................................39-42
Carson and Charlotte Thompson Writing & Study Skills Center..............................................................43

Students with Disabilities........................................................................................44
Students with Disabilities....................................................................................................................45-47

BridgeBuilders................................................................................................................48
Minority Study Management...................................................................................................................49
BridgeBuilders.....................................................................................................................50-53

NCAA & Big 12 Academic Eligibility Requirements.................................................................................54
Academic Calendar.............................................................................................................................55,56
Monthly Calendar................................................................................................................................57-62



                                                                                                                                                          1
                                                   leTTer        from        Dr. Gurney




                                           The University of Oklahoma
                                                      ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT



    Dear Athletic Student Life Office Employee,

    On behalf of the Athletic Student Life Office staff, I would like to thank you for your excellent work in
    providing tutoring and supplemental instruction for our student-athletes. We appreciate all your efforts
    in helping our student-athletes with their educational experiences.

    You may be aware that allegations have been made of academic misconduct at other universities involv-
    ing improper tutoring of student-athletes. Some note takers/tutors have been accused of misconduct
    for doing the academic assignments and papers for student-athletes. Maintaining the highest level of
    academic integrity is an essential component of the University of Oklahoma Athletics Department and
    its Athletic Student Life Office. We must be vigilant about our duties and responsibilities. The purpose
    of this letter is to remind you of your roles in note taking/tutorial support and the conduct expected of
    employees in the University of Oklahoma Athletic Student Life Office. Please note the following basic
    note taking/tutoring guidelines when working with student-athletes:

    • Tutors should not write papers or do assignments for student-athletes.
    • Tutors may not type papers for student-athletes. Tutors should not sit at a computer with a student-
    athlete and create a paper.
    • Tutors should assist student-athletes to develop their original thoughts and guide them through re-
    search and other learning processes.
    • Tutors and writing consultants should assist students-athletes by teaching proper grammar, but class
    assignments and papers should be derived from their own thoughts.

    It may be difficult deciding what constitutes too much work. If you are unclear of any aspect of your
    duties and responsibilities, please do not hesitate to contact Athletic Academic Services. Thank you
    again for your fine work.

                                                                                      Sincerely,




                                                                                      Dr. Gerald Gurney
                                                                                      Sr. Associate Athletics Director
                                                                                      for Academics & Student Life

           Athletic Student Life - NCAA CHAMPS/Life Skills “Program of Excellence” Award Winner
                OU Academic Center, 180 West Brooks, Room 2634, Norman, Oklahoma 73019-0210 (405) 325-8265 Fax (405) 325-0806;
            Academic Advising (405) 325-8373; Sooner Housing (405) 325-8403; Computer Center (405) 325-8474; Career Center (405) 325-8384;
               Foreign Language Center (405) 325-0117; Mathematics Center (405) 325-0554; Writing and Study Skill Centers (405) 325-8376




2
                                          leTTer       from        Col. Garibay




                                        The University of Oklahoma
                                                   ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT



Dear Academic Services Employee,

Welcome to the University of Oklahoma Athletic Student Life Academic Services team. I look forward
to getting to know and working with each of you as we assist our student-athletes in achieving their
individual academic goals.

Your active participation and professional development are the major goals of the initial orientation
training. We have prepared this tutor handbook for each of you to keep as a reference and to help
make your transition with us a little easier. Enclosed you will find key policy information concerning:

•   Academic misconduct/dishonesty
•   Sexual harassment
•   Fraternization
•   Confidentiality

Your orientation will include meetings with Athletic Student Life staff on various topics which are essen-
tial to new employees, as well as individual training with your respective unit coordinators.

Please take the time to read this handbook. It will assist with an understanding of what Athletic Aca-
demic Services expects of you, as well as answer any questions that might be running through your
mind about your new position.

Finally, let me say how excited I am that you have decided to join our academic team! If I can assist you
in any way, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time.


                                                                                   Sincerely,




                                                                                   Randy J. Garibay, LTC (Ret), USA
                                                                                   Assistant Director for Athletic Academic
                                                                                   Affairs / Academic Services


        Athletic Student Life - NCAA CHAMPS/Life Skills “Program of Excellence” Award Winner
             OU Academic Center, 180 West Brooks, Room 2634, Norman, Oklahoma 73019-0210 (405) 325-8265 Fax (405) 325-0806;
         Academic Advising (405) 325-8373; Sooner Housing (405) 325-8403; Computer Center (405) 325-8474; Career Center (405) 325-8384;
            Foreign Language Center (405) 325-0117; Mathematics Center (405) 325-0554; Writing and Study Skill Centers (405) 325-8376




                                                                                                                                          3
                                             aCknowleDGemenTs

    The Tutoring and Learning Specialist Handbook was prepared by Jarrett Turner, Coordinator of Athletic Aca-
    demic Services, Athletic Student Life under the direction of Randy J. Garibay, LTC (Ret.), USA, Assistant Director
    of Athletic Academic Affairs, University of Oklahoma. Content was also provided by The OU Athletic Academic
    Services Tutorial Handbook, The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Mentoring Training Hand-
    book, and College Study: The Essential Ingredients.

    In addition, the University of Oklahoma Athletic Academic Services would like to express a special thanks to the
    following people and their respective institutions for their valuable knowledge, correspondence, and assistance
    in the creation of this handbook:

             Ruth Bolzenius, Ohio State University
             Shawn Bowyer, Penn State University
             Walter Goffigan, Kansas State University
             Jeanne Hieronimus, Louisiana State University
             Terry MacDonald, Syracuse University
             Kim Meszaros, Princeton University
             Beth Stice, University of Kentucky
             Drew Scales, Virginia Tech University
             Joe Scogin, University of Missouri
             Jason Storch, University of Florida
             Kathy Sulentic, University of Colorado
             Kevin White, Florida State University
             Patricia Wilson, University of Buffalo

    Additional thanks for information and guidance provided by Suzette Dyer, Director of the Office of Disability
    and Judicial Services at the University of Oklahoma.

    Handbook design by Mark Selking.

    Material was obtained and adapted for our use from the following sources:

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), APA, Washington D.C., 1994.
    East Carolina University Tutor Handbook.
    James, W.B. and W.E. Blank. Review and Critique of Available Learning Style Instruments for Adults.
    New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. 1993.
    “Learning Disabilities”. Faculty Room. University of Washington. 2004.
    http://www.washington.edu/doit/faculty/strategies/disability/LD
    Northern Illinois University Tutor Handbook.
    University of Texas Tutor Handbook.
    2001 College Freshmen with Disabilities, Heath Resource Center, Washington D.C., 2001.




4
                                            inTroDuCTion

The OU Athletics Department Academic Services Office strives to cultivate an effective learning environment for
student-athletes while fostering the development of academic and self-management skills necessary in life. To aid
in this endeavor, the Athletic Student Life Office provides a variety of academic support services to student-athletes
including academic counseling, tutoring, supplemental instruction, Learning Specialists, supervised study, note-
taking, skill development, writing, math, and language centers.

    Tutoring and Learning Specialists are a vital element of this comprehensive program. It is a means by which
student-athletes receive not only information, but also study strategies that will assist them in future course work.
Tutors and Learning Specialists have a responsibility to help develop and maintain these strategies throughout their
work with student-athletes. The Athletic Academic Services Office is eager to help tutors and Learning Specialists
face this challenge in a way that will produce positive results.

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information about the goals, policies, and procedures of the tutoring
and Learning Specialist program. Tutors and Learning Specialists will be responsible for understanding and adher-
ing to these guidelines.

    This handbook outlines procedures and policies involving forms, reports, accountability, program structure,
and organization. It addresses tutor and Learning Specialist responsibilities with an emphasis on communication,
study skills, time management, and motivation. Copies of relevant forms are also included for reference.


                        aThleTiC sTuDenT life mission sTaTemenT
The mission of the University of Oklahoma Athletics Department is to inspire champions today and prepare leaders
of tomorrow by providing opportunities and support for student-athletes to develop an appreciation for community
service, skills for life and reach their highest academic potential. The academic, resident life, and student life units
of the Athletics Department support student-athletes through assessment, counseling and skill development services
so they may balance their academic and athletic responsibilities and maximize their potential.

Objectives

• To graduate student-athletes at a level consistent with the University of Oklahoma student body.
• To graduate all student-athletes who complete their eligibility at the University.
• To graduate each team at a level consistent with or better than the University student body.
• To meet the challenges of NCAA academic reform legislation.
• To provide meaningful opportunities for service to the community.
• To assess student-athletes academic skills and develop strategies for their success in the classroom.
• To provide excellent resources and training to enhance student-athlete learning skills.
• To enhance career development skills enabling student-athletes to understand their vocational interests and
  paths to realize their aspirations.
• To provide the outstanding academic, personal and career counseling to student-athletes.
• To foster the development of student-athlete interest and opportunities in intercollegiate athletic administration.
• To provide outstanding developmental experiences for residents of the Sooner Housing Center.

Please contact the Athletic Academic Services Office at 325-8453 for additional information.



                                                                                                                           5
                                       equal opporTuniTy sTaTemenT


       This institution, in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, does not discriminate
    on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies,
    practices, or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational
    services.

       Individuals are assured protection from harassment, retaliation, and discrimination for filing a complaint or
    assisting in an investigation under all relevant Equal Opportunity policies and procedures. Complaints of discrimi-
    nation may be filed with the Affirmative Action Office.

       All lawfully required documents, including the University’s Affirmative Action Plans, are available for inspection
    in the Affirmative Action Office between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on any working day. The contact person
    in that office will be the Affirmative Action Officer or a designated staff member.

       The Affirmative-Action Office on the Norman Campus is located at 660 Parrington Oval, Suite 102, Norman,
    Oklahoma. The office may be reached by telephone (405) 325-3546, V/TDD (405) 225-3546 or FAX (405) 325-7605.




6
                                    abouT prenTiCe GauTT


    Dr. Prentice Gautt was the first black athlete to receive an athletic scholarship and the support of legendary
Sooner coach Bud Wilkinson. Gautt was a success on the field and in the classroom, and proved to be the epitome
of a student-athlete. A two-time All-Big Eight honoree and an Academic All-American, he led OU in rushing in 1958
and 1959 and was named MVP of the 1959 Orange Bowl.

    After learning that the Tutoring and Learning Specialist program would be named after him in January of 2004,
Gautt offered his own advice by stating, “For this mentoring program to have a modicum of success, it is essential
that the staff not only understand and be a part of expressing the concepts on paper, but it must ensure that the
mentor’s behaviors speak volumes louder than these words, assisting the student-athletes’ comprehension of what
the program is about: the staff’s assisting in the development of integrity and a firm personal/social foundation for
those who participate. Moreover, I would hope that the process will be as edifying for the mentors as it will be for the
mentees.”




                                                                                                                           7
                                              aThleTiC sTuDenT life


    Following the theme of student-athlete welfare, Athletic Student Life strives to continue OU’s tradition of creating
    champions on the field, in the classroom, and in the community. With Gautt’s accomplished history of exemplifying
    successes that student-athletes can attain, and he was the perfect person to model our student-athlete study manage-
    ment program after at the University of Oklahoma.

    The Prentice Gautt Tutor and Learning Specialist Program is another example of the support services that Athletic
    Student Life has added to its award winning department. Previous awards and honors Athletic Student Life has
    received include:

    NCAA CHAMPS/ Life Skills Program of Excellence Award
    • Awarded by Division IA Athletic Directors Association in recognition for the nations innovative programs in support
      of student-athlete welfare

    University of Oklahoma President’s Trophy Winner
    • Awarded the Sooner Housing Center for outstanding academic success, involvement in campus activities, commu
      nity service, and cultural interaction displayed by its residents

    USA TODAY/NCAA Academic Achievement Award
    • Awarded to OU for registering the highest one year increase in student-athletes’ graduation rates in the NCAA’s top
      football playing Division 1A




8
rules, poliCies,
& proCeDures




                   9
                                      rules, poliCies               anD      proCeDures


     Tutor Session and Location
     All sessions MUST be conducted in the Prentice Gautt Academic Center on the 2nd & 3rd floor of the Oklahoma
     Memorial Stadium. Under no circumstances is it acceptable to tutor a student-athlete in any other location. Sessions
     can be held on the following days and times:

              Sunday:                       2:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
              Monday - Thursday:            8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
              Friday:                       8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

     Reporting/Forms
     Forms reporting mandatory and individualized supplemental instruction are to be submitted electronically in after
     each session.

     Tutors are required to completely fill out the Tutor Session Summary screen for each tutoring session. Upon comple-
     tion of the tutor session, the form must be immediately recorded in the supplemental instruction database.

     Tutor Evaluation forms may be completed by the student-athlete periodically. This form gives the student-athlete an
     opportunity to evaluate the tutor. The Academic Services staff will give this form to the student-athlete and leave the
     room to eliminate any bias.

     Student-Athlete Tardiness or No Shows
     Both student-athletes and tutors are expected and required to be on time for all tutor sessions. Tutors should arrive
     before their tutor sessions with enough time to allow for any preparation. It is very important that tutors record
     “no shows” not only so that tutors can be paid, but also because it informs the Academic Services staff of a student-
     athlete’s status. For individualized and mandatory supplemental instruction, the Tutor Session Summary Form
     contains a drop down box to record absences.

     1. Tutors will wait at least 10 minutes for a student-athlete to arrive for their scheduled tutor session before leaving.

     2. Tutors must complete the relevant Tutor Session Summary screen or form to record whether the student was
        absent or tardy.

     3. In the event that a student-athlete is absent, tutors will be paid for the session as long as the proper procedure is
        followed and submission of a Tutor Session Form. Tutors will be paid for one hour of tutor time.




10
                rules, poliCies              anD     proCeDures ConTinueD


Reporting Requested Tutoring
When a student-athlete comes to Academic Services Office and requests a tutor, they will inform the tutorial coor-
dinator with the times they are able to meet. The tutor will then be contacted by the tutorial coordinator with the
times the student-athlete can meet. Once a time is set, both parties will be emailed and then the session will be
monitored. Upon completion of the requested session, a Tutor Session Summary Form needs to be submitted just
like it would be for a mandatory session.

Preparation
Tutors can be compensated for preparation time needed for upcoming tutor sessions as long as they receive qualify-
ing permission from the Coordinator of Athletic Tutoring Services beforehand. All tutors must do their prep work at
the Prentice Gautt Academic Center in order to be compensated.

Athletic Academic Services strongly recommends that all tutors use preparation time. Preparation ensures that dur-
ing supplemental instruction the tutor is able to provide the student-athlete with the necessary support to succeed.

Tutor Information Packets
Supplementary instruction material is available in Room 2681 for many courses. This material has been put
together by subject matter experts in each particular field and covers major terms and subject themes for each class.
Many tutor information packets also provide the tutor with worksheets, sample questions, past notes, and additional
instructional aids.




                                                                                                                        11
                          rules, poliCies              anD      proCeDures ConTinueD


     Cancellation
     Under no circumstance is a tutor or Learning Specialist allowed to cancel a mandatory tutor session without the
     permission of the Tutor Services Coordinator. No tutor is allowed to grant permission to a student-athlete to leave a
     mandatory tutor session prior to completion of the session.

     If a circumstance arises in which a tutor or Learning Specialist is unable to attend a scheduled session (mandatory
     or voluntary), the tutor or Learning Specialist must do everything within their means to contact the Coordinator of
     Athletic Academic Services at least 24 hours in advance.

     Length of Sessions
     Tutor sessions vary in length according to the amount of work/preparation the student-athlete needs.

              Requested Tutoring
              For individually requested supplemental instruction, the session times generally run about an hour, but
              may run longer or shorter depending on the amount of material that needs to be covered. Additional
              sessions may need to be scheduled.

              Mandatory Supplemental Instruction
              For mandatory supplemental instruction, the session must be at least one hour long with the option to stay
              longer if needed. It is important to note that tutors for mandatory sessions do not have the authority to
              cancel sessions or end them early. Student-athletes in mandatory sessions have been specifically placed
              there because of a recognized need for extra study time and are required to stay the whole time.

              Individualized Supplemental Instruction
              For individualized supplemental instruction, the session must be at least one hour long with the option to
              stay if needed. The tutor is assigned to multiple scheduled tutor sessions per week with a student-athlete. It
              is the responsibility of the tutor to monitor and report immediately to the Director of Academic Services if
              the time is not sufficient to provide supplemental instruction in all of the student-athlete’s classes.

              Learning Center Supplemental Instruction
              For learning center tutoring (math language, writing), the session length varies in accordance with the
              athletes needs.

     Relationship with Student-Athletes (Fraternization)
     Tutors/Learning Specialists consultants are expected to restrict their involvement with student-athletes to tutorial
     duties. The relationship should be characterized by a certain professional distance between the tutor/learning center
     consultant and the student-athlete. It is beyond the scope of a tutor/learning specialist position to become intimate
     friends with student-athletes or try to solve their personal problems. Failure to comply with these provisions may be
     grounds for termination of employment. Please refer to the OU Student Code of Responsibilities and Conduct
     regarding consensual sexual relationships.




12
               rules, poliCies               anD      proCeDures ConTinueD


Evaluation
Tutors will periodically be evaluated on their job performance. Tutor evaluations will evaluate knowledge of subject
matter, promptness, and past student-athlete evaluations. Evaluations are helpful in providing suggestions on how
tutors can be more effective. They also act as a mechanism to ensure that only the best tutors are working with
student-athletes.

Books and Supplies
Athletic Academic Services will provide a library of key texts for use by tutors during sessions and for preparation
purposes. Any tutor who needs a text will be required to check the book out from room 2681, and check it back
in after the session. Under no circumstances should tutors lend these books to student-athletes or take the books
out of the Academic Center without consulting the Coordinator of Athletic Tutoring Services. If a tutor needs a
particular text or any additional supplemental instructional material, they must see the Coordinator of Athletic
Tutoring Services.

Copy Machine
Tutors are allowed to make copies for tutor sessions provided the material is academic in nature and related to
the course the tutor is helping the student-athlete in. All requests for copies should be given to the Coordinator of
Athletic Tutoring Services. Tutors are not allowed to make copies without approval from the Coordinator of Athletic
Tutoring Services.

Student-Athletes
Although student-athletes should be aware of their responsibilities, tutors have a role to play in reminding them
what is required. Student-athletes should attend all of their classes. They should keep their tutors informed of
upcoming assignments, quizzes, tests, etc., as well as material covered in class. Tutors should ask for a copy of the
student-athlete’s syllabus to make sure that relevant coursework is covered during the tutor session. Although it is
the student-athlete’s responsibility to pay attention in class and be familiar with material, tutors should look for
opportunities to clarify concepts as well as help with difficult areas within the course.

Supervised Study
Many student-athletes are required to attend a specified number of supervised study hours per week as designated by
their coaches or academic counselors. Study hall is an environment that provides a structured atmosphere where
student-athletes can come to study as well as receive aid in their studies. This structured environment is a way to
help student-athletes learn effective time management skills and also acts as weekly built in time for student-athletes
to finish necessary class work. Supervised study is located on the 2nd floor of the Prentice Gautt Academic Center.

Internet Policy
All computers (to include lap tops) within the Prentice Gautt Academic Center will be monitored by the Athletics
Compliance Department. Websites will be monitored including but not limited to, pornography, weapons, drugs,
gambling and sites that could be seen as a representation of academic misconduct. Any violations of NCAA,
Big 12 rules or the University and Athletics Department codes of conduct could lead to immediate termination
of employment.




                                                                                                                          13
                                 rules, poliCies                anD      proCeDures ConTinueD
     Tutors found violating any of the following academic services rules will be subject to dismissal.

     If a tutor is ever in doubt or feels as if the rules are unclear, the tutor should see a staff member before proceeding. These
     rules are to be taken seriously.

     Severe consequences for the tutor, the student-athlete, and the athletic program may result if violations occur.

     Plagiarism
     To understand what is and is not considered plagiarism, the meaning of “academic integrity” should be examined. Academ-
     ic integrity means honesty and responsibility in scholarship. Professors and students have to obey the rule of honest scholar-
     ship. The basic assumptions about academic work at OU are:

     1.   Students attend OU in order to learn and grow.
     2.   Academic assignments exist for the sake of this goal.
     3.   Grades exist to show how fully the goal is attained.
     4.   Thus, all work and all grades should result from the student’s own effort to learn and grow. Academic work completed
          any other way is pointless, and grades obtained any other way are fraudulent.

     In light of this understanding, a tutor or learning specialist should not do a student-athlete’s work or encourage plagiarism
     in any manner. Within the academic community and specifically at OU, the following rules apply:

     1. IT IS PLAGIARISM TO COPY WORDS AND PRESENT THEM AS ONE’S OWN WRITING. It is the worst form
        of plagiarism to copy part or all of a paper from the Internet, from a book, or from another source without indicating in
        any way that the words are someone else’s. To avoid this form of plagiarism, the student must BOTH place the quoted ma-
        terial in quotation marks AND use an acceptable form of citation (APA, MLA, etc.) to indicate where the words come from.

     2. IT IS PLAGIARISM TO COPY WORDS, EVEN IF ONE GIVES THE SOURCE, UNLESS IT ALSO INDICATES
        THAT THE COPIED WORDS ARE A DIRECT QUOTATION. Simply documenting the source in a footnote or bib-
        liography is inadequate. A student must also indicate that the words themselves are quoted from someone else. To avoid
        this form of plagiarism, put all quoted words in quotation marks or use equivalent punctuation.

     3. IT IS PLAGIARISM TO COPY WORDS AND THEN CHANGE THEM A LITTLE, EVEN IF ONE GIVES THE
        SOURCE. Repeating someone else’s writing in different words so it is not a direct quotation is called “paraphrasing.”
        Paraphrasing is fine as long as the source is indicated and the new expression is original. When the expression remains
        substantially similar to the source as a whole, or in one of its parts, it is plagiarism. Even if not specifically prohibited
        by the instructor, writing a paper by copying words and then altering them violates OU’s basic assumption about writing
        and may easily result in a charge of academic misconduct. To count as original, the student’s paper must be significantly
        different from his or her sources so that a reasonable reader would consider it a new piece of writing. If the writing is
        substantially similar to someone else’s work where individual variations would be expected, it is plagiarism.

     4. EVEN IF THE WORDS ARE ORIGINAL, IT IS PLAGIARISM TO PRESENT SOMEONE ELSE’S IDEAS AS
        THE STUDENT’S OWN. It is plagiarism to present someone else’s original arguments, lines of reasoning or factual
        discoveries as original, even if one presents the material in a new wording. To avoid this form of plagiarism, the source
        should be cited.

     Any tutor or Learning Specialist who assists student-athletes in facilitating plagiarism/academic dishonesty will be dismissed immediately.



14
                      rules, poliCies               anD      proCeDures ConTinueD
Sexual Harassment
OU has stated clearly that sexual harassment will not be tolerated on campus. Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome
sexual advances, or unwelcome requests including the use of sexually oriented language. Any tutor/learning center con-
sultant who commits an act of sexual harassment will be dismissed immediately. Definitions of sexual harassment may be
found in the OU Student Code of Responsibilities and Conduct.




Confidentiality
All tutors sign a statement agreeing to maintain confidentiality in their work with student-athletes. Please discuss a student’s aca-
demic concerns, academic needs, or academic problems only with the student-athlete or, Athletic Academic Service Office Staff.

Do not discuss student-athletes’ academic concerns with:
         1. Other students
         2. People in your department
         3. Someone you meet in a social situation
         4. Your personal friends or family
         5. Members of the media
         6. Anyone other than the student-athlete or Athletic Academic Services Office Staff

Successful tutors will establish a close professional relationship with the student-athlete. This relationship will be based
primarily on trust and can be very rewarding. It is important that tutors do not violate this trust. Violation of this policy is
grounds for termination of employment.

Gambling
A tutor should be aware the University does not condone gambling activities of any kind. In addition, NCAA rules prevent
any Athletics Department staff member, including tutors, from participating in sport-related gambling activities. Specifically,
tutors shall not knowingly:

         •   Provide information to individuals in organized gambling activities concerning any collegiate athletics competition
         •   Provide information about student-athlete’s academic status or injuries
         •   Solicit any bet on any intercollegiate team
         •   Bet on any team representing OU
         •   Participate in any gambling activity that involves intercollegiate athletics or professional athletics through a
             bookmaker, parlay card, or any other method or organized gambling.



                                                                                                                                        15
                                                  nCaa rules & reGulaTions
     This is a brief overview of the NCAA rules that may affect you. As an employee of the Athletics Department, a prior relationship that you
     have with a student-athlete changes. If you do have an established relationship (which began prior to your employment with our depart-
     ment) with a student-athlete that you wish to maintain, let us know so that we can document the relationship. This is necessary to avoid
     the possibility of NCAA violations in the future. The fact that you may provide some of the benefits listed below for your non-student-
     athlete acquaintances does not justify similar action with our student-athletes.

     The student-athlete shall not receive any extra benefit. The term “extra benefit” refers to any special arrangement by an institutional
     employee or representative of the institution’s athletic interest to provide the student-athlete or his/her relatives or friends with a benefit
     not expressly authorized by NCAA legislation. Examples of non-permissible benefits follow:

                •   movie tickets, sporting event tickets, or other entertainment
                •   dinners
                •   use of car
                •   providing or loaning of money
                •   birthday or holiday gifts/greeting cards
                •   guarantee of bond or paying bail
                •   providing transportation
                •   signing or co-signing a note with an outside agency to arrange a loan
                •   typing reports or papers without charge or at a reduced rate
                •   performing school work or taking tests for student-athletes
                •   use of departmental copy machines for or by student-athletes
                •   special discount, payment arrangement or credit on a purchase (e.g. airline ticket, clothing) or a service (e.g. laundry, dry
                    cleaning) from an institutional employee. An employee may not provide a student-athlete with professional services (for
                    which a fee would normally be charged) without charge or at a reduced cost unless they are available on the same basis to
                    the general student body. An employee may not allow a student-athlete to use a telephone or credit card for personal reasons
                    without charge or at a reduced cost.

     The above list is just a sample of some of the more common benefits that are NOT permissible. Always check with an Athletics Depart-
     ment Academic staff member if you are unsure about situation or if you have questions about NCAA rules. Remember, you are exposed
     to private and confidential information regarding our student-athletes. Under no circumstances should you discuss their personal or
     academic affairs with other students, reporters, members of the media, etc. Failure to abide by these NCAA rules will result in immediate
     termination of your employment with the Athletics Department.

     (Adapted from the University of Texas Tutor Handbook)




16
                sporTs waGerinG aCTiviTies & nCaa leGislaTion
Please take a few moments to read over this extremely important information. In April 2007, the NCAA passed several pieces of legislation
regarding gambling, each of these became effective on August 1, 2007. These new rules formally define what is considered gambling and
whom they apply to.

Who do these new regulations regarding gambling apply to?

          * Staff members of an institution’s athletics department;
          * Nonathletics department staff members who have responsibilities within or over the athletics department (e.g., chancellor or
            president, faculty athletics representative, individual to whom athletics reports);
          * Staff members of a conference office; and
          * Student-athletes.

Who is classified as an institutional athletics department staff member?

Please see the NCAA Interpretation from December 13, 2000, immediately below.

          Definition of Institutional Staff Member (I)
          Date Issued: Dec 13, 2000
          Type: Official
          Interpretation:

          The unthical-conduct provisions set forth in Bylaw 10.1 applicable to institutional staff members include any individual who
          performs work for the institution or the athletics department, even if the individual is a student at the institution (e.g., student
          manager, student trainer) and/or does not receive compensation from the institution for performing such services (e.g.,
          volunteer coaches, undergraduate assistant coaches and graduate assistant coaches). [References: Bylaws 10.1 and 10.1-(b)
          (unethical conduct), and official interpretation 09/06/00, Item No. 3

How has the NCAA defined gambling and sports wagering?

Examples of sports wagering include, but are not limited to:

          *   The use of a bookmaker or parlay card
          *   Internet sports wagering
          *   Auctions in which bids are placed on teams, individuals or contests
          *   Pools or fantasy leagues in which an entry fee is required and there is an opportunity to win a prize
          *   Use of a Sports Book at a casino

Does this mean no wagering on any sports?

The prohibition against sports wagering applies to any institutional practice or any competition (intercollegiate, amateur, or
professional) in:

          * Sports which the NCAA conducts championship competition
          * Bowl subdivision football (formerly referred to as Division I-A football)
          * Emerging sports for women




                                                                                                                                                 17
              sporTs waGerinG aCTiviTies & nCaa leGislaTion ConTinueD

     10.02.1 Sports Wagering.
     Sports wagering includes placing, accepting or soliciting a wager (on a staff member’s or student-athlete’s own behalf or on
     the behalf of others) of any type with any individual or organization on any intercollegiate, amateur or professional team or
     contest. Examples of sports wagering include, but are not limited to, the use of a bookmaker or parlay card; Internet sports
     wagering; auctions in which bids are placed on teams, individuals or contests; and pools or fantasy leagues in which an entry
     fee is required and there is an opportunity to win a prize. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

     10.02.2 Wager.
     A wager is any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in
     exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

     10.3 Sports Wagering Activities
     The following individuals shall not knowingly participate in sports wagering activities or provide information to individuals
     involved in or associated with any type of sports wagering activities concerning intercollegiate, amateur or professional
     athletics competition: (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)
     (a) Staff members of an institution’s athletics department;
     (b) Nonathletics department staff members who have responsibilities within or over the athletics department (e.g., chan
           cellor or president, faculty athletics representative, individual to whom athletics reports);
     (c) Staff members of a conference office; and
     (d) Student-athletes.

     10.3.1 Scope of Application.
      The prohibition against sports wagering applies to any institutional practice or any competition (intercollegiate, amateur
     or professional) in a sport in which the Association conducts championship competition, in bowl subdivision football and in
     emerging sports for women. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

     10.3.2 Sanctions.
     The following sanctions for violations of Bylaw 10.3 shall apply: (Adopted: 4/27/00 effective 8/1/00, Revised: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)
     (a) A student-athlete who engages in activities designed to influence the outcome of an intercollegiate contest or in an
     effort to affect win-loss margins (“point shaving”) or who participates in any sports wagering activity involving the student-
     athlete’s institution shall permanently lose all remaining regular-season and postseason eligibility in all sports. (Revised:
     4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)
     (b) A student-athlete who participates in any sports wagering activity through the Internet, a bookmaker or a parlay card
     shall be ineligible for all regular-season and postseason competition for a minimum of a period of one year from the date
     of the institution’s determination that a violation occurred and shall be charged with the loss of a minimum of one season
     of eligibility. If the student-athlete is determined to have been involved in a later violation of any portion of Bylaw 10.3,
     the student-athlete shall permanently lose all remaining regular-season and postseason eligibility in all sports. (Revised:
     4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

     10.4 Disciplinary Action
     Prospective or enrolled student-athletes found in violation of the provisions of this regulation shall be ineligible for further
     intercollegiate competition, subject to appeal to the Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement for restoration of eligibil-
     ity. (See Bylaw 10.3.2 for sanctions of student-athletes involved in violations of 10.3.) Institutional staff members found in
     violation of the provisions of this regulation shall be subject to disciplinary or corrective action as set forth in Bylaw 19.5.2.2
     of the NCAA enforcement procedures, whether such violations occurred at the certifying institution or during the individual’s
     previous employment at another member institution. (Revised: 1/10/90, 4/27/00 effective 8/1/00, 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)


18
TuTorinG
overview




           19
                            whaT         is   TuTorinG/supplemenTal insTruCTion?

     Tutoring/Supplemental instruction is a key support program offered by Athletic Academic Services for student-athletes at OU.
     The tutor is responsible for ensuring the ongoing success of the program. The tutor’s role is to serve as a learning resource for
     student-athletes and represent the Athletic Student Life Office. With the demands on the student-athlete’s time, tutoring helps
     them supplement their class lectures and maintain academic excellence as they pursue excellence within their sports.

     Tutoring sessions are designed to provide assistance for student-athletes in order to enhance the chances of academic success.
     Tutoring is offered in all subject areas. Student-athletes will be working one on one or in small groups with tutors to review
     and better understand course material. Tutor sessions are not provided to student-athletes in order to give answers or to
     replace the necessary study time outside of class. When combined with class attendance, and studying outside of class,
     tutoring will prepare student-athletes to be more successful in the classroom.

     Requested Tutoring:
     With the demands on student-athletes time, there may be situations when additional tutor help may be needed. In this case
     a student athlete must come to Academic Services to receive a tutor requisition form. A tutor’s contact information will be
     listed so that the student-athlete can email the tutor. The student-athlete and tutor will then arrange a time during normal
     operational hours in the Athletic Student Life Academic Center to meet for a session. Tutors will be responsible for contacting
     Academic Services with the requested tutor session information.


     Mandatory Tutorial/Supplemental Instruction:
     Some student athletes will be assigned to Mandatory Tutorials/ Supplement Instruction (in collaboration with academic
     advisors and PROS). Student-athletes will receive their schedule at the beginning of the term through official OU email and
     through a hard copy in the form of a block schedule. If at that time there is a scheduling conflict, it is their responsibility to
     talk to the Academic Services Coordinator to discuss changing the session time.

     Attendance is required. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of the tutor session and attendance reports will then be sent
     to counselors and coaches. Student-athletes must be aware of the importance of attendance. Missed sessions will be reported
     to head coaches, advisors, and all corresponding athletic administration. Please be advised: it is not allowed or acceptable
     for the tutor and/or the student-athlete to reschedule a mandatory session. All schedule adjustments will only be made and
     approved through the Coordinator of Athletic Academic Services. If, for ANY reason the student-athlete plans on missing
     a mandatory session and feels that the absence should be excused, the student-athlete needs to contact the Coordinator of
     Athletic Academic Services.


     Roles/Responsibilities of a tutor
            • Develop a subject-centered educational plan for the best academic potential in your student-athlete.
            • Create realistic and content driven subject level learning goals with the student-athlete.
            • Monitor and report grade progress on tutored items.
            • Encourage the student-athlete to keep an open line of communication with the professor.
            • Review notes and text with the student-athlete for more than just concept understanding.
            • Focus only on your content area, don’t try and fix other problems.
            • Report if the student-athlete has not completed necessary homework to make the session meaningful.

     The following pages will outline the purpose of tutoring/supplemental instruction at OU, as well as detail the methods and
     support available to ensure the student-athlete’s goals are achieved and exceeded.



20
                                             whaT         is a    TuTor?

1. A tutor should be a Facilitator
        A. A tutor is all of the following: a guide, assistant, helper, motivator, teacher, counselor, listener, and a friend. The
           student-athlete and tutor should have a professional academic relationship. The tutor must focus on the goals
           of the student-athlete not the other way around. Student-athletes do not exist to meet tutor’s needs; tutors exist to
           meet student-athletes’ needs.
        B. Tutors should work with a student-athlete. Tutor should not talk at a student.
        C. Tutor should not do any part of an assignment for a student-athlete. TUTORS SHOULD HELP A STUDENT-
           ATHLETE ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR OWN LEARNING.

2. Patience
        A. Move slowly in small, manageable units to help student-athletes learn concepts and skills they may not be familiar with.
        B. Be willing to review material several times.

3. Be humble
       A. Admit if you do not know something. Be willing to seek help.
       B. Relate as an equal and not a superior.

4. Trustworthy
       A. Tutors must keep personal and academic information about a student-athlete confidential.
                1. Do not discuss student-athletes academic concerns with:
                         a. Other students
                         b. People in your department
                         c. Someone you meet in a social situation
                         d. Personal friends or family
                         e. The media
       B. Tutors are expected to maintain a professional attitude toward student-athletes.

5. Tutors should utilize the Academic Services Staff
       A. Consult staff if you are ever put in an uncomfortable situation with student-athletes.
       B. Ask for assistance if a personality conflict develops between you and a student-athlete.
       C. A tutor should never try to act as a counselor for personal problems.
       D. If for some reason you cannot make an appointment, you must do everything you possibly can to contact the
          Coordinator of Athletic Tutoring Services to avoid letting the student-athlete come to meet you and find you
          absent or late. This is both unprofessional and unfair.

(Adapted from the Northern Illinois University Tutor Handbook)




                                                                                                                                      21
                                                expeCTaTions             of   TuTors

     Form Submission
     In order to meet the individual needs of the student-athlete, Athletic Academic Services relies on the correct submission of
     daily forms recording progress and actions of the student-athlete during supplemental instruction sessions. The information
     is used by administrators at all levels and in many departments throughout OU. Accurate and timely input of material is
     required without exception at the conclusion of every session and when instructed by the Director of Academic Services.

     Meetings
       1. Tutors are required to attend mandatory meetings. Attendance is mandatory.
       2. Monitoring the progress of student-athletes.
       3. Tutors should communicate with the Coordinator of Athletic Tutoring Services on the progress of each student-
           athlete they tutor on a consistent basis.
       4. Tutors should provide supplemental instruction and tutoring without the use of plagiarism or other forms of
           academic misconduct.
       5. Tutors should modify their instruction to meet the individual learning style of the student-athlete, and, if
           necessary, make appropriate recommendations to the appropriate administrator.
       6. Tutors should report any observation of academic misconduct to the Director of Academic Services immediately.

     Immediate Dismissal
       1. Violation of these rules would constitute grounds for immediate termination.
       2. Tutoring or meeting with student-athletes outside of the Prentice Gautt Academic Center.
       3. Cancellation or dismissal of a mandatory supplemental instruction session (even after tests) without prior permission
          from the Director of Academic Services or the Coordinator of Athletic Tutoring Services.
       4. Writing or typing reports, term papers, essays, etc. for student-athletes.
       5. Providing transportation for student-athletes.
       6. Scheduling tutor sessions without going through the Academic Services Office.
       7. Failure to complete Tutor Session Summary Form after a session.
       8. Unprofessional Relationships with a Student-Athlete.
       9. Violation of Confidentiality.




22
                             expeCTaTions             of    TuTors ConTinueD

As an employee of Athletic Academic Services, tutors are expected to meet certain criteria. This criterion is in place to ensure
proper representation by tutors as part of the Athletic Academic Services support team for student-athletes.

Professionalism
As an employee of Athletic Academic Services at OU it is expected that tutors conduct themselves in a professional manner at
all times and uphold the ethical and moral standards upheld by the institution.

Dress Code
A tutor or study manager’s attire should reflect the professional status they hold within the Athletics Department.
Provocative or unprofessional clothing is not permitted when conducting a tutor session. Tutors should not wear clothing
associated with any other college or university while conducting a tutor session. A tutor’s appearance/personal hygiene
should be consistent with normal office standards. Failure to abide by these guidelines may result in the dismissal of
the tutor.

Punctuality
A tutor is not fulfilling his/her requirement to serve the student-athlete to the best of their ability if he/she is neither
punctual nor prepared for a supplemental instruction session. It is therefore imperative that tutors are prepared for the
session and on time, every time. Failure to meet these expectations will result in dismissal.

Control of Environment
It is the responsibility of the tutor to facilitate a safe environment conducive to learning. In order to achieve this, the
tutor must have control of both the physical environment and learning situation. If at any point during a supplemental
instruction session the tutor feels that he or she is not in control of his/her environment, the Director of Academic Services
should be contacted immediately.




                                                                                                                                   23
                                                    TuTorinG TeChniques
     Overall Objectives
     As a tutor your objective is to combine your interpersonal qualities with your academic qualities.

     1. Interpersonal Qualities
             A. Patience - give them time to develop their learning. Be comfortable with students being quiet, and work to be
                comforting so that the quiet spells are eliminated. Refrain from posing questions you have to answer. If you ask a
                question, make sure that they answer it.
             B. Encouraging - create an atmosphere that is open and friendly, thus promoting their intellectual growth. Be
                cognizant of the student-athlete’s feelings. Do not laugh or appear to be shocked at unique responses to questions
                posed. Encourage them to take wild guesses with difficult problems.
             C. Sensitivity - keep in mind that the students have lives and stressors that can and do impact their emotions, which
                in turn impact their concentration and willingness to learn.

     2. Academic Qualities
     Preparation - Not only should you know the subject matter, but you should also know how to effectively go about learning/
     teaching it. Use concrete examples (meaningful interpretations), to help increase understanding.

     Make material meaningful. Student-Athletes are extremely intelligent. Tutors should work to provide athletes with
     interpretations of course materials that are made relevant to what the athlete finds important. For example, Modus Ponens is
     a deductively valid form of reasoning presented in standard logic and introductory philosophy courses. I provided Joe Athlete
     with the following example to help him understand.

              If Joe catches the football, he will score a touchdown.
              Joe caught the football.
              Therefore, he will score touchdown.

     3. Creating Rapport: (Getting Acquainted)
            A. Listen – by sincerely listening to the student-athlete, you increase the odds of gaining his/her trust and you show
               that you respect their intelligence.
            B. Patience – exercising patience is the key to helping the student-athlete gain their academic independence. Give
               time to answer questions that you pose. You must be comfortable with periods of silence.
            C. Openness – tutors need to be open to the ideas of the students-athletes. Students may have unique, but effective,
                ways of solving problems that are not anticipated by the tutors.

     4. Specific Tutoring Goals
            A. Help students help themselves.
            B. Active learning – structure activities that allow the students to teach themselves.
            C. Build their confidence – make students feel good about expressing their own ideas or interpretations. Set realistic
               and attainable goals to maintain intrinsic motivation.
            D. Student independence – strive to foster problem-solving techniques that are domain specific and can be
               employed independently (at home etc.).
            E. Motivation – work to deliver the material in a simplified manner so that the students feel they can grasp it and
                become eager to engage the material.

     Note: Interpersonal qualities and academic qualities help build a good rapport with the students. When combining the two
     with the goals of tutoring; promoting active learning, building confidence, and sparking motivation, tutors can create
     independent learners who have been equipped with a means of helping themselves.


24
                ConDuCTinG supplemenTal insTruCTion sessions

Before the First Session
  • Speak to tutors who have dealt with student-athletes in previous semesters.

  • Use this information to get an idea of what motivates the student-athlete, how the student-athlete behaves, what interests
    the student-athlete.

  • Be careful! Use this information to help provide a framework for you to work with in the first session. Do not use this
    information to form a set of negative presumptions.

  • Preview any supporting material such as tutor information packets and past notes.

Conducting the First Session
  • The success of both the tutor and the student-athlete depends upon open communication. The tutor and the student-
     athlete are accountable and have responsibilities to fulfill. Begin by discussing mutual expectations.




  • Tutors should help the student-athlete construct a plan for studying. The plan should include the student-athlete’s
    objectives for the course (i.e., the athlete wants to earn a ‘B’ in the course).

  • Tutors should take a copy of the syllabus and go over the course details. The tutor and student-athlete should construct
    a plan for studying based on the syllabus and athlete’s objectives.

  • Tutors should use the information from the student-athlete’s objectives and course syllabus to construct a weekly
    objectives checklist.




                                                                                                                                 25
                ConDuCTinG supplemenTal insTruCTion sessions ConTinueD

     Subsequent Tutor Sessions

     • Tutors should use the tutor information packet (if available for the class) to provide a framework for instruction. However,
       instruction should always be designed to accommodate the individual need of the student-athlete.

     • Tutors should have the following prepared for each supplemental instruction session:




     • Tutors should monitor student-athlete performance and academic progress against the list of objectives and expectations
       discussed during the first session.

     • If the progress of the student-athlete is below expectation then inform the Coordinator of Athletic Tutoring Services.




26
                        TuTorinG frequenTly askeD quesTions

1. Where do I tutor the student-athlete?
All student-athletes must be tutored on either the 2nd or 3rd floor of the Prentice Gautt Academic Center. No exceptions.
Under no circumstances are tutors to meet student-athletes at either the student-athlete’s or the tutor’s home.

2. What happens if I need to cancel a session?
The Academic Services office requires at least 24 hours notice before a session is canceled. All cancellations should be
reported to the Coordinator of Athletic Academic Services at 325-8453.

3. What do I do if I feel threatened or sexually harassed during a tutor session?
All instances of sexual harassment or verbal/physical threats must be reported to the acting supervisor IMMEDIATELY.

4. What should I do if I am having problems keeping the student-athlete’s attention during a tutor session?
All incidences where a student-athlete is exhibiting a poor attitude during the tutor session should be noted in the report and
shared with an Athletic Academic Services staff member. The staff member will see to it that the problem is addressed.

5. When do I turn in timecards and how often and where do I get paid?
Timecards are due every other Thursday by 12PM to the basket in Academic Services Rm. 2680, unless noted otherwise.

6. Am I permitted to use the copy machine?
Tutors are only permitted to use the copy machine if copies are needed to facilitate the actual tutorial session. Tutors are not
permitted to copy anything at the request of student-athletes. All copies must be directly related to specific tutorial session.
Tutors are required to ask daily or nightly staff to make any necessary copies.

7. What happens if I am tutoring more than one student-athlete at the same time?
Tutors should make sure to write the name and ID number for every student-athlete they tutor. A session with four or more
student-athletes is considered a group session.




                                                                                                                                   27
                                                         learninG sTyles


     Regardless of the student, an understanding of learning styles will enable the tutor to tailor instruction to the individual
     needs of the student-athlete.

     A learning style is:
     “The complex manner in which, and conditions under which, learners most efficiently and most effectively perceive, process,
     store, and recall what they are attempting to learn.” (James & Blank, 1993, pp. 47-48)

     Tutors must have an understanding of their own learning style to maximize their potential in designing appropriate
     instruction. With this understanding, the tutor can improve their own instruction of the material and tailor it to the needs
     of the student-athlete. Student-Athletes may prefer one learning style over another and excel when supplemental instruction
     is delivered in their Primary learning style.

     The three main learning style categories are:

     1. Visual learners
     A visual learner is someone who learns best by using his/her eyes to see information. He/she learns by seeing words and
     numbers printed in text form, or by using graphics and pictures, observing real life objects and events, and using maps,
     charts, graphs, and other visual aids.

     Characteristics of a Visual learner:
     • Likes to look at pictures in books
     • Find what others have lost
     • See details-literally visualizes
     • Has difficulty taking oral directions
     • Can recall words after seeing them a few times
     • Can concentrate on a visual activity for 20-30 minutes

     Supplemental instruction techniques with a Visual learner:
     Tutors should discuss modifications to supplemental instruction in order to enhance the student-athlete’s opportunity for success.
     • Use well designed visual references. Concept maps, diagrams, graphs etc.
     • Use dry erase boards, overhead projectors
     • Keep clear view of students and monitor body language and facial expression
     • Use study outlines and schedules
     • Study in a quiet place
     • Use multi media. E.g. Desire2learn, Web site support offered with textbooks

     2. Auditory learners
     An auditory learner is someone who learns best by listening and talking. He/she takes in information best by his/her sense of
     hearing. They learn reading and other subjects by listening to someone present information orally and by being allowed to
     discuss the topic and ask questions. Some auditory learners also learn best by involving music and sound effects.




28
                                    learninG sTyles ConTinueD


Characteristics of an Auditory learner:
• Likes to discuss
• Tell jokes and tries to be funny
• Easily repeats sentences
• Poor handwriting
• Easily memorizes
• Can concentrate on an auditory activity for 20-30 minutes

Supplemental instruction techniques with an Auditory learner:
Tutors should discuss modifications to supplemental instruction in order to enhance the student-athlete’s opportunity for success.
• Use well designed visual references. Concept maps, diagrams, graphs etc.
• Use dry erase boards, overhead projectors
• Keep clear view of students and monitor body language and facial expression
• Use study outlines and schedules
• Study in a quiet place
• Use multi media. E.g. Blackboard, Web site support offered with textbooks

3. Tactile/Kinesthetic learners
Tactile/Kinesthetic learners learn best through movement of their large or gross motor muscles. They take in information
best when they are moving. Movement includes learning while doing, being involved in projects, discovery, role-playing,
simulations, and real life activities, and learning while standing up or using the large arm muscles to write on a flip chart of
chalkboard.

Characteristics of a Tactile/Kinesthetic learner:
• Moves a lot
• Wants to touch and feel everything
• Recalls game and directions after performing a few times
• Can take an item apart and put it back together
• Remember the “feeling” of a situation better than the details
• Can concentrate on a “movement activity” for 20-30 minutes

Supplemental instruction techniques with a Tactile/Kinesthetic learner:
Tutors should discuss modifications to supplemental instruction in order to enhance the student-athlete’s opportunity for success.
• Frequent study breaks
• Incorporate physical activity
• Work in standing position
• Use inductive instruction methods
• Build physical models of concepts
• Be flexible with your time schedule




                                                                                                                                     29
                                                       TesT TakinG meThoDs

     True-False Questions
     • The basic strategy for answering true-false questions is to assume that they are true
     • Absolute determiners such as all, none, always, never, everybody, nobody, and only invariably tend to appear in false
       statements. Statements which include few, often, sometimes, most, many, and usually, tend to be true.
     • True-false questions that state reasons tend to be false, either because they do not state all the reasons or because they state
       the wrong reasons. When you answer true false questions, remember that statements of reasons tend to be false unless
       they are qualified in some way.

     Multiple Choice
     The basic strategy for answering a multiple-choice question is to eliminate the distractions.

     These types of options tend to be distractions:
     • Ones with absolute determiners
     • Unfamiliar terms or phrases
     • Jokes and insults
     • High and low numbers

     These types of options tend to be correct answers:
     • More complete or inclusive statements
     • “All of the Above”
     • One of two similar-looking answers

     Matching Questions
     The basic strategy for answering matching questions is to use one list as the starting place for making all matches and to
     cross our items as they are matched. When the statements in one list are longer than items in the other list, use the list with
     the longer statements as the starting place to make all matches.

     Fill in the Blank Questions
     When you answer a fill-in-the-blank question, decide what type of answer is wanted and give that type of answer. Also, re-
     member that the word “an” just before a blank may be a clue that the answer begins with a vowel. (Conversely, if an “a”
     is before the blank the answer probably begins with a consonant.)




30
                       helpinG sTuDenTs                 wiTh      essay quesTions

Writing essay exams:

A. Your answers should be:
        1. Exactly responsive to the questions
        2. Complete and factually accurate
        3. Convincingly supported by specific details
        4. Coherent and well organized (have a thesis and support it)
        5. Clearly and concisely written
        6. Free of grammatical and mechanical errors

B. Before you write:
        1. Read through the entire exam
        2. Note directions carefully
        3. Plan/allot time for each question
        4. Choose the questions you will answer

C. Then, begin to write:
        1. Determine what is required
        2. Outline your structure and support
                 a. Opening paragraph should contain a thesis
                 b. Body paragraphs should each have a topic sentence and everything in that
                     paragraph should relate to that topic-switch paragraph.
                 c. Conclusion that restates your thesis
        3. Begin response with thesis (modeled on question).
        4. Do not stray from your topic
        5. Leave space for revisions: write on one side of page and on every other line unless instructed
           otherwise by your professor.

D. Revise
        1.   Do not recopy
        2.   Add sentences and words by using carets (^) or arrows
        3.   Worry less about neatness and more about effective writing – do worry about clarity.
        4.   Proofread!!!!!

(Adopted from the East Carolina University Tutor Handbook)




                                                                                                            31
                                                     Types      of    essay exams


     Most examination questions fall into recognizable types, and if you can recognize those types, you will know how to organize
     them and begin to write.

     A. The Cause-and-Effect Question
     In general, these questions are easy to recognize. They often mention causes and effects. They will ask how “A” leads to “B”
     and so forth.

     B. The Compare and Contrast Question
     One of the most popular type of exam questions, this demands a writer to discuss two subjects. By pointing out similarities
     (comparing) and discussing differences (contrasting), you can explain both. A question of this kind may not always use the
     words compare and contrast but, if you read carefully, you can determine what is called for. Sometimes this type of question
     will ask you to offer proof of the superiority of one of the things you are comparing over the other. This should be part of your
     thesis and in your conclusion.

     C. The Demonstration Question
     In this kind of question, you are given a statement and asked to back it up or supply supporting evidence.

     D. The Discussion Question
     A discussion question may tempt an unwary writer to shoot the breeze. Whenever a question says “discuss,” you will be wise
     to play your discussion carefully.

     E. The Divide or Classify Question
     Sometimes you are asked to slice a subject into parts, or sort things into categories. Make sure you do not ramble with this one.

     F. The Definition Question
     Writing an extended definition is task you will often meet on an essay exam. It might help to illustrate each definition with
     an example, whether recalled or imagined.

     G. The Evolution Question
     This is another favorite question, much beloved by instructors because it calls on students to think critically. When you for-
     mulate your outline, decide the order or sequence you want to use to most effectively answer the question.

     H. The “Respond to the Quotation” Question
     “Test the validity of this statement,” a question might begin, and then it might go on to supply a quotation for close read-
     ing. You would begin by reading that statement a couple of times carefully and then seeing whether you can pick a fight with
     it. It is a good idea to jot down any contrary evidence you can discover. If you end up supporting the statement, then supply
     evidence to support it. However, you need to know how to fight with it before you can defend it.

     I. The Process Analysis Question
     Often, you can spot this kind of question by the word “trace.” It may invite you to tell how something occurs or occurred. It
     may also ask a “how to” type of question.




32
learninG speCialisT
    overview




                      33
                                            whaT         is   learninG speCialisT?

     Learning Enhancement Center
     The Learning Enhancement Center employs individuals with varying post-graduate degrees to provide over 300 contact-hours
     a week to student-athletes. The program is coordinated by a graduate student pursuing a Master’s degree in Adult and Higher
     Education with an emphasis in Intercollegiate Athletic Administration.


     One of our goals is to provide the best possible leadership to student-athletes who may have trouble in the challenging
     academic environment of OU. All Freshmen and Transfer student-athletes receive services a minimum of twice a week, even
     if their GPA indicates previous success at the high school or collegiate level. Student-athletes who are on an Academic Success
     Plan (ASP) are also required to meet with a Learning Specialist twice a week. As progression is shown academically, the need
     for mandatory participation is re-evaluated.


     Staffing in the Learning Enhancement Center is drawn from dedicated resources such as Graduate Assistants and part-time
     staff that are pursuing a graduate degree or have unique credentials for this setting. We internally refer to this team of staff
     as Learning Specialists or Study Managers. Weekly meetings are held with the Graduate Assistants for continuous process
     improvement. Reports are critiqued, in-services are delivered, and trends are discussed. This core group serves as a proactive
     team in anticipating academic issues and adapting to new needs.


     A typical routine in the Learning Enhancement Center for a student-athlete would be a bi-weekly 60-minute meeting with
     their assigned Learning Specialist (Study Manager) with all class related materials. Grades are reviewed from instructors,
     returned work, and Desire-2-Learn (D2L). If an instructor does not use D2L, an email will be periodically sent by the
     student-athlete to the professor for comments about academic performance. Study habits, classroom participation, study
     organization, team travel and academic conflict avoidance are just a few of the many things tailored to the needs of each
     student as they demonstrate responsibility and progress in all academic areas.


     Encouraging student-athletes to set goals is another important part of our program. Weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly goals are
     set at each session. This constant goal setting and review provides benchmarks for the student-athlete and early indicators of
     academic jeopardy. Goals may include uninterrupted study time, meetings with professors, group project completion, or even
     getting to bed on-time.


     The design of the Learning Enhancement Program is to give student-athletes the tools to become self-directed in their
     learning, which leads to successful academic achievement. Our approach addresses the unique needs and learning styles of
     all students at any academic performance level. This tailored approach lessens the stigma associated with identified students
     and provides a comfortable atmosphere for setting academic related goals with their Learning Specialist.




34
                                  learninG speCialisT overview

Learning Specialist Responsibilities
•The primary goal of the Learning Specialist program is to create an environment conducive to student-athlete success in
  the university academic setting. The Learning Specialist will establish a one-on-one professional relationship with the
  student-athlete in an attempt to provide valuable academic and social guidance.

•Learning Specialists should possess the ability to communicate effectively and to motivate a diverse group of student-
 athletes. It is expected that the Learning Specialist meet with the student-athlete at least twice per week to discuss academic
 goals, organization, and learning strategies. Learning Specialists should also report concerns about the students to the
 Learning Specialist Coordinator regarding absenteeism, lack of preparation, emotional stress, and inappropriate personal
 invitations from students that violate established rules, both academic and socially. When Learning Specialists report such
 concerns in a timely fashion, the staff is better equipped to provide the appropriate services.

•Learning Specialists serve as a kind of success facilitator, encouraging student-athletes to take the initial steps toward
 academic development, with the ultimate goal of attaining their college degree.

•Learning Specialists will provide a personal support network for the student-athletes while promoting motivation,
 persistence, and self-discipline.

•Learning Specialists are expected to be enthusiastic about learning and project this to the student athlete.

•During the early stages of the Learning Specialist/student relationship, a Learning Specialist’s focus should be on
 developing a consistent, trusting, and mutually fulfilling relationship.

•Look over all syllabi and record each assignment, paper, and exam and their due dates on the semester calendars. Have
 students follow along with their daily planner, filling in important dates.

•Make a plan every week for all their classes, including what will accomplish in their tutoring, Learning Specialist sessions,
 and study hall time. This makes the student accountable for their study time so they aren’t wasting it.

•Communicate effectively to the student-athlete that attending class and taking good notes are crucial to his/her academic
 success in college.

•Explain to the student-athlete that you expect to see their grades! Make sure they bring in each grade for you to see and
 analyze. Some of the student’s tutors may be looking over this material as well, but it will be beneficial for the student to
 go over their work again.

•Submit reports with new grades, updates, and pertinent comments. The comment section should be used to indicate
 problems, evaluation of effort, need for tutors, or to commend the student for something good! Please use the sections every week.

In Addition:
  1. Reports should be detailed and submitted electronically at the end of every session. Submit a report even if
     the student did not show.
  2. Be Modest...
          a. Admit it if you do not know something. Be willing to seek help.
          b. Relate as an equal and not as a superior. Communicate to the student that our role as a
             Learning Specialist is to act as a tool rather than a superior.


                                                                                                                                      35
                                             learninG speCialisT overview

     Specific Goals of the Learning Specialist Program
     The following represent specific goals of the program:
     •Assist with identification and formulation of that week’s plan, so student athlete is clear on the task at hand.

     •Introduce and refine various need-based study skills and outlined objectives, including time management, organization skills, etc.

     •Serve as liaison between the student-athlete and the academic services coordinator.

     •Familiarize the student-athlete with the academic and social culture of OU, helping to ease the transition to the university setting.

     •Serve as an academic role model for the student-athlete.

     •Help to foster an environment in which academic and social success are both desired and achieved.

     Learning Specialist Dependency
     Learning Specialist dependency is actively discouraged. Learning Specialists are a tool to be used for guidance not a crutch.
     Under no circumstances should a Learning Specialist complete academic related work for a student, including writing/
     typing papers, completing homework or assignments or assisting with take-home exams. Learning Specialists differ from
     tutors in that the objective is to improve and refine general learning strategies which can be applied to all subject matter (i.e.
     time management, etc.) and help the student remain organized and motivated. OU has an extensive mandatory tutorial
     program which deals with specific classes and coursework. Furthermore, Learning Specialists may NOT under and
     circumstances contact a faculty member or TA regarding a student’s work. If the Learning Specialist feels that there is
     an issue that needs to be addressed, they must contact the Learning Specialist Coordinator.

     Evaluation
     Learning Specialists will periodically be evaluated on their job performance. Learning Specialist evaluations will cover
     such areas as knowledge of subject matter, promptness, and past student-athlete evaluations. Evaluations may include an
     observation of a session by the Learning Specialist Coordinator. Evaluations are helpful in providing suggestions on how
     Learning Specialists can be more effective, and they also act as a mechanism to ensure that only the best Learning Specialists
     are working with student-athletes.

     Copy Machine
     Learning Specialists are allowed to make copies for study management sessions, provided the material is academic in nature
     and pertains to the coursework. All requests for copies should be given to the Academic Services Staff and they will make the
     copies for the Learning Specialist.

     Computer Access
     The computer centers can be a useful tool for Learning Specialists to supplement student-athletes in different areas of their
     class work. If a Learning Specialist feels that it is necessary for them to have computer access, they should complete the
     Athletic Information Systems Service Request form. Learning Specialists should be aware that a login name and password
     may take up to a week to become activated.

     Learning Specialist Session
     Learning Specialists will arrive promptly for all sessions and be dressed appropriately. Meetings will be scheduled individually
     in order to accommodate both the Learning Specialist and the student-athlete’s schedule. Finally, Learning Specialists will
     work only with student-athletes assigned by the Learning Specialist Coordinator.



36
                                 learninG speCialisT meThoDs

EVALUATION- Assessing to what degree the student-athlete has met the session objective.
• Formal evaluation includes but is not limited to tests, quizzes, and completion of assignments
• Informal evaluation includes but is not limited to questioning and alternative activities; games, self evaluation,
  group questioning.

While knowledge sharing is an important part of Learning Specialist, so is the communication of support, challenge, and
feeling. For success in the Learning Specialist relationship, information and/or subject matter need to be repackaged to fit
the student’s maturational, developmental level, and the particular experiences the students have had. Here are some activi-
ties in areas vital to the student-athlete’s success in college.

- Assessment – determine skills students have and which skills are lacking that need addressing and work on.
        • See all grades and record them on report.
        • Check notes for quality. Lack of notes could indicate poor attendance. Address the issue and indicate the situation
          and how it has been addressed on mentor report form.
        • Go over class assignments.
        • Use and organization of student’s daily planner.
        • Completion of reading assignments. Difficulty in reading the material maybe a sign of other issues and should be
          addressed to the Learning Specialist Coordinator.

- Planning– evaluate past objective planning & needed adjustments for success
        • Discuss upcoming week—Focus On Time Management! Monitor student’s use of daily planner.
        • Discuss importance of establishing effective routines.
        • Track semester goals weekly and have students discuss how they plan to use the objectives to reach their goals.
        • Organize assignments from syllabi into the weekly objectives.
        • In first two meetings write all important dates into the planner for the semester.

- Learning – ask students about relevant past experiences in school
        • Go over main topics discussed in the student’s classes.
        • Give student-athlete a chance to discuss their personal matters or concerns.
        • Discuss college life adjustments regarding academic, athletic, and social adjustments.
        • Promote benefits of interaction with instructors.
        • Explain any questions regarding email or Desire2learn.
        • Quiz student on material before an upcoming test.
        • Share personal success stories relevant to student-athlete’s life.
        • Review learning styles.

- Challenge & Support – effective verbal/nonverbal communication produce success
         • Be sensitive to the growth needs of the student.
         • Challenges must match the student’s readiness for growth.
         • Be flexible in use of motivational techniques.




                                                                                                                                37
                                  learninG speCialisT meThoDs ConTinueD

     Week 1-4
     • Establish a good rapport with student and learning basic educational criteria of the student (learning styles, any
       disabilities, work ethic, etc.)
     • Encourage student to start strong in all classes. It is more difficult for students to dig themselves out of holes rather than
       put constant effort in the whole semester.
     • Set realistic goals.

     Week 6-9 Midterm
     • Help students prepare for any upcoming midterm exams.
     • Assess and reevaluate semester goals and establish academic strategies for classes for the remainder of the semester leading
       up to finals.
     • Discuss student-athletes about any reflections they have had regarding their college experience.
     • Check on any missing or delinquent assignments rather than waiting until conclusion of semester.

     Week 14-16 Finals Preparation
     • Establish goals for final exams and grades.
     • Determine grades that need to be made on final exams to attain goals set earlier in the semester.
     • Set up a final examination schedule for students including dates, times, and locations.

     Final Session
     • Discuss which goals the student accomplished and which were not attained.
     • What did students learn about themselves during the semester?
     • What were the greatest challenges the students faced?
     • What adjustments do they need to make for success next semester?
     • Discuss student-athletes about any reflections they have had regarding their college experience.

     Desired Student Outcomes from the Learning Specialist Program

     1. The student will be an independent learner.
     2. The student will have confidence in abilities.
     3. The student will improve critical thinking and reasoning skills.
     4. The student will have the motivation to complete tasks.
     5. The student will improve their grades over time.
     6. The student will improve their communication skills.




38
                                     siTuaTions           anD     sTraTeGies

In an effort to make your experience and your relationship with your student-athlete more positive, it might be helpful to
prepare yourself for a few possible situations that could arise during your Learning Specialist sessions.

What follows is a list of several situations which a Learning Specialist may face. We have collected a number of potentially
difficult situations for you to think about and have tried to recommend successful approaches to these situations.

I. The student-athlete is passive and contributes little to the session.
        A. Possible Reasons
        • The student-athlete may not have the necessary preparation for a session.
        • The student-athlete is insecure and does not believe they have anything to contribute.
        • The student-athlete may be experiencing mental or physical fatigue.
        • The student-athlete may be overwhelmed by your ease with the subject matter

         B. Possible Approaches
         • Ask the student-athlete to work at the markerboard or similar facility to demonstrate what they know. Be
           encouraging but not demanding.
         • Try to elicit an active response from the student. Watch yourself to make sure you are not doing all the talking or
           all the doing. Leave enough time for a response (count to ten).
         • If the student-athlete is not prepared, try to find out why, and then address the problem.
         • Relate our own struggles with similar material. Help the student feel that they are safe from ridicule if they make
           a mistake.

II. The student-athlete avoids giving information to you concerning their academic progress.
        A. Possible Reason
        • The student-athlete may be too proud to admit that things are not going well. The student may be using this
           approach to avoid the reality of the situation.

         B. Possible Approach
         • As with the passive student-athlete, ask for feedback to make certain the student understands what you are
            tutoring. Do not just ask, “Do you understand?” Work in such a way that the student can show understand
            ing. If you suspect the student-athlete may be misrepresenting their grades to you (perhaps “forgetting” to bring
            in essays or tests), you may want to contact the Athletic Academic Coordinator.

III. The student-athlete thinks you can work academic miracles.
        A. Possible Reasons
        • The student-athlete would like you to take responsibility for the work because of a lack of confidence in their
           ability to do it.
        • The student-athlete may prefer to think in terms of miracles rather than in terms of the hard, tedious work that
           may be necessary.

         B. Possible Approaches
         • Help the student-athlete take responsibility for their own work. It may prove helpful to isolate specific,
            manageable tasks.
         • Set up a daily schedule as a way to help the student feel less overwhelmed. Make it clear from the outset that you
            are there to assist in the learning process and it is their responsibility to do the learning.



                                                                                                                                 39
                                    siTuaTions           anD      sTraTeGies ConTinueD


     IV. The student-athlete refuses to take responsibility for his/her grades (they blame you or the
     teacher for his/her academic problems).
             A. Possible Reason
             • This behavior is just the other side of the “miracle worker” coin. The student-athlete wants you to take the
                responsibility for their work.

              B. Possible Approaches
              • You and the student-athlete must determine objective reasons for the grades—and you both must explore what
                 your student can do to improve his/her academic situation. Both of you must understand that the ultimate
                 responsibility for failure or success rests on the student.

     V. The student-athlete wants you to write a paper or do homework for them.
            A. Possible Reasons
            • The student-athlete may not understand the function of the tutorial session
            • The student-athlete may be in a panic, unmotivated, or unwilling to do the work.

              B. Possible Approaches
              • NEVER do the student’s assignments. Instead, try to help the student feel capable of doing the work himself/
                 herself by determining the part of the assignment the student does not understand or feels incapable of
                 completing. (For some students with writing assignments, it may be a simple matter of not being able to type.
                 While there are options, encourage the student to learn to type. Stress the need for that skill in order to have a
                 successful college career as well as life in general.)
              • Make certain the student understands that the tutorial policy prohibits you from ever providing direct authorship
                 of any portion of his/her assignments.
              • Send then to Writing Support Services for help with writing assignments.

     VI. The student-athlete constantly wants to talk about personal problems rather than do school work.
             A. Possible Reasons
             • Discussing problems has been a way of avoiding academic work in the past.
             • The student-athlete is more comfortable with social interaction than academic interaction
             • The student-athlete is genuinely troubled.

              B. Possible Approaches
              • If the student-athlete seems to be inventing personal things to talk about, get down to basics
                 such as outlining what the tutorial goals are for this session. Be assertive. Begin to require tangible work.
                 The student should walk away from each tutoring session with some feeling of accomplishment.
              • Focus on what the student-athlete wants or needs to accomplish during the tutorial session.
              • Speak to the Athletic Academic Coordinator if the problem persists.




40
                          siTuaTions            anD      sTraTeGies ConTinueD


VII. The student-athlete will not take the session seriously.
        A. Possible Reasons
        • The student-athlete does not realize what tutoring can accomplish
        • The student-athlete is anxious about needing tutoring and tries to hide the anxiety by continually joking about it.

         B. Possible Approaches
         • This student-athlete needs to see tangible objectives and ways tutoring can meet these objectives.
         • Focus on a constructive plan and not on attitudes. Try to ignore negative attitudes and small
            comments the student-athlete may make. If the problem persists, ask a supervisor to intervene. Eventually you
            may have to confront the student.
         • Talk about the student’s academic problems, goals, and ways to meet these goals. Find out if the student fully
            understands course requirements.

VIII. The student-athlete feels their academic problem is overwhelming and/or hopeless.
        A. Possible Reasons
        • The student-athlete may need a skills course or may be in class that does not meet their academic needs.
        • The student-athlete may be having personal problems totally unrelated to school.

         B. Possible Approaches
         • Try to explore whether the student’s feelings of hopelessness are grounded in reality. (For example, has the
            student been receiving bad grades?) This student should see a supervisor.
         • Encourage the student-athlete to talk with the instructor of the class in which he/she is doing poorly.
         • If the Student Athlete is really in trouble, talk to the ATHLETIC ACADEMIC COORDINATOR.

IX. The student-athlete is finding school too difficult.
        A. Possible Reasons
        • The academic course load may be weighted heavily with courses the student has had little success with in the past.
        • The student-athlete may have personal problems or be over-anxious.
        • The student-athlete may not be studying enough or using the proper study skills/techniques.

         B. Possible Approaches
         • Talk about some of these reasons.
         • If you find that the student athlete’s anxieties about school are exaggerated, help the student-athlete see this
            by reviewing what the student has already accomplished including essays, tests, and feedback from the teacher.
            Help the student-athlete set short range goals that are easily and realistically accomplished.
         • If it seems that the student-athlete has the ability to do well in the course, find out if the student is putting in the
            required time. Talk about the student-athlete’s goals for the course and how much time and work is needed to
            meet these long-range goals.




                                                                                                                                      41
                                    siTuaTions           anD      sTraTeGies ConTinueD

     X. The student-athlete flirts or has a crush on you.
            A. Possible Reasons
            • The student-athlete wants to equalize the relationship between the two of you.
            • The student-athlete is new to dating and misreads your professional interest for social interest.
            • The student is nervous or embarrassed about being tutored.
            • The student is attracted to you.

              B. Possible Approaches
              Be professional – that is, understand that your professional relationship does not allow for social contact
              with the student-athlete at this time. Discuss the matter openly with the student-athlete if necessary so that there
              are no hard feelings and so the student-athlete understands the reasons for your attitude. If the problem persists,
              you might consider asking your supervisor to have the student transferred to another tutor.

     XI. The student-athlete comes to a session and appears to be under the influence of an
     impairing substance.

     Terminate the session as tactfully as possible, and report this behavior to the Athletic Academic Services staff. If the session
     is a mandatory session, contact the staff on duty to help determine the appropriate course of action. Before you jump to the
     obvious conclusion, remember that sometimes student-athletes are injured and on medication.

     XII. The student-athlete is consistently late or absent.

     This is not acceptable and should be reported to the Coordinator of Athletic Academic Services.

     (Adapted from East Carolina University Tutor Handbook)




42
Carson         anD     CharloTTe Thompson wriTinG & sTuDy skills CenTer

English Tutorials / Writing Support
The goals of the Writing and Study Skills Center are to give student-athletes an opportunity to learn proper academic writing
skills, learn how to correctly cite sources in academic papers, and to facilitate an environment where student-athletes gain
confidence in their own writing abilities. The Writing Center serves two main functions.

The first is to provide tutorial sessions for all student-athletes enrolled in English 0113, English 1113, and English 1213
courses. Student-athletes enrolled in these courses are required to meet with an English tutor for two one-hour sessions per
week. Student-athletes may also be assigned to meet with a tutor in the Writing Center based on their advisor’s assessment at
the beginning of each semester. The Writing Center also helps student-athletes who are not required to meet with an English
tutor, but may request to meet with a tutor or come in on a walk-in basis.

The second main function of the Writing Center is to review papers turned in by student-athletes. Student-athletes have
the option of turning in their papers to the Writing Center to be reviewed by the Writing Center staff. After a paper has been
reviewed, the student-athlete must sit down with a Writing Center staff member and participate in the educational process of
learning how he or she can improve his or her paper. All Writing Center staff is trained to only review papers for grammar,
spelling, and punctuation.

The Writing Center also employs the use of Turnitin.com, a plagiarism detection tool, as an educational tool to help further
facilitate the student-athletes’ learning of how to correctly cite academic sources within their papers. Turnitin.com generates
a report showing where a student has incorrectly cited sources throughout a paper. All student-athletes are required to email
their papers into the Writing Center at aslwritingcenter@ou.edu, so they can be reviewed and run through Turnitin.com.




Reading Specialist Program
The reading program allows the Reading Specialist to meet with student-athletes two hours a week. These students were
recommended after the WRAT assessment measured their weaknesses in decoding, sentence comprehension, and vocabulary.
From the diagnosis, the Reading Specialist develops intervention plans based on the reports. Each week student-athletes
work on word recognition, reading comprehension, fluency, vocabulary development, and spelling. The higher functioning
students work on argumentation, rhetorical strategies, and generalizations. Lesson plans are developed and adapted based on
the individual student.




                                                                                                                                  43
     sTuDenTs wiTh
      DisabiliTies




44
                                      sTuDenTs           wiTh      DisabiliTies


In order to ensure Athletic Academic Services serves the needs of student-athletes, it is essential that tutors are able to
recognize behavior that may require the University to implement instructional accommodations or modifications on the
student’s behalf. These accommodations and modifications are not in place to give the student an advantage over their
classmates, or indeed lower the expectations on the individual; they are implemented to allow the student the fullest
opportunity to compete on an equal basis.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a person with a disability as one who:

• Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such individual
• Has a record of such an impairment
• Is regarded as having such an impairment

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act as amended, regulates non-discrimination in programs and activities serving qualified
individuals with disabilities. In addition to this, the ADA extends civil rights and nondiscrimination protection to private
sector employment, transportation, state and local government activities and programs, privately owned businesses that
are open to the public and telecommunications. The Office of Disability Services at OU has been established to ensure
compliance with Section 504 and the ADA.

A learning disability is diagnosed when “the individual’s achievement on individually administered, standardized tests in
reading, mathematics, or written expression is substantially below that expected for age schooling and level of intelligence.”
(DSM IV, 46) The fact that learning disabilities manifest themselves in reading, mathematics, or written expression
demonstrates that learning disabilities are diverse and are not characterized in the same way from individual to individual.
For this reason, it is important that tutors are aware of the most commonly diagnosed learning disabilities and the visible
characteristics that may indicate a student has a learning disability.

The most common learning disabilities diagnosed are:

Dysgraphia
An individual with Dysgraphia has a difficult time with the physical task of forming letters and words using a pen and paper
and has difficulty producing legible handwriting.

Dyscalculia
A person with Dyscalculia has difficulty understanding and using math concepts and symbols.

Dyslexia
An individual with Dyslexia may mix up letters within words and sentences while reading. The student may have difficulty
spelling words correctly while writing. Letter reversals are common. Some individuals with Dyslexia have a difficult time with
navigating and routefinding tasks as they are easily confused by directions and spatial information such as left and right.

Dyspraxia
A person with Dyspraxia may mix up words and sentences while talking. There is often a discrepancy between language
comprehension and language production.




                                                                                                                                    45
                                    sTuDenTs          wiTh      DisabiliTies ConTinueD

     Non-Verbal Learning Disorder
     Poor motor coordination, visual-spatial organization, and/or a lack of social skills may characterize non-verbal
     learning disorders.

                        (“Learning Disabilities”. Faculty Room. 2004. University of Washington.
                        http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/Strategies/Disability/LD/)

     The following are common characteristics of individuals with learning disabilities. If an individual exhibits these
     characteristics, it certainly does not mean that they should be labeled as learning disabled; however, help may be
     required to maximize learning potential.

              • Reading well but not writing well or vice versa
              • Having a short attention span or a tendency to be impulsive or easily distracted
              • Misinterpreting language or having difficulty understanding what is said; hearing sounds, words,
                or sentences imperfectly
              • Difficulty following a schedule, being on time, or meeting deadlines
              • Getting lost easily, either driving or finding your way in a large building
              • Misreading or miscopying
              • Confusing similar letters or numbers or numbers, reversing them, or misreading their order
              • Difficulty in reading their newspaper, distinguishing small print, or following columns
              • Difficulty explaining ideas in writing, not orally
              • Difficulty in completing job applications
              • Difficulty with math, math language and math concepts
              • Reversing numbers in a check book or having difficulty balancing it
              • Confusing right and left, up and down
              • Inability to restate what has just been said

     If an athlete exhibits the above behavior inform the Coordinator of Academic Services.




46
                           sTuDenTs          wiTh     DisabiliTies ConTinueD

If the student-athlete makes the tutor aware of his or her disability, then open dialogue will help the tutor make meaningful
accommodations in the student-athlete’s instruction. For this reason, it is essential that the tutor and the student-athlete
develop a relationship that is open and flexible. Do not ask the student-athlete if they have a learning disability, this may
make the student-athlete uncomfortable.

Because of their learning disability, a student-athlete may already be receiving one or more of the following provided by the
University or the Athletic Department:

•   Note takers
•   Extended exam time
•   Books on tape
•   Concise course and lecture outlines
•   Alternative evaluation methods

Supplemental instruction generally falls into two main situations: supplemental instruction that is lecture based and/or
supplemental instruction based on group work or discussion. The following suggestions can be used in each specific
supplemental instruction situations.

                                          Lecture Style Supplemental Instruction




                           Group Work and Discussion Style Supplemental Instruction




                                                                                                                                47
      briDGe
     builDers




48
                                   minoriTy sTuDy manaGemenT

Minority Study Management Guidelines
The guidelines for minority Study Management are as follows:
• All logistical support and/or budgetary oversight that deals with the functioning and operation of minority Study
  Management programs (Ex. Bridge Builders) must be coordinated through the Study Management Coordinator.
• All work performed through the Prentice Gautt Learning Specialist Program and/or its components need to enhance the
  overall mission of the OU Athletic Department as a whole.
• The coordinator of Bridge Builders will be appointed by the Coordinator of Academic Services and will be an ex-student-
  athlete who is still attending school at OU, but has exhausted their playing eligibility.
• All Study Managing will take place in the Prentice Gautt Academic Center. Under no circumstances is it acceptable to study
  manage a student-athlete in any other location without prior approval from the Study Management Coordinator (see
  Contact Information). For Academic Center hours see Section III, Mentor Session Hours and Location.
• All scheduling will be done by the Study Management Coordinator. Study Managers simply need to arrive on time and be
  dressed appropriately (see Section III, Professionalism, Dress Code).
• Study Managers will abide by the NCAA compliance rules listed in section (see Section III, NCAA Rules and Regulations). Always
  check with the Study Management Coordinator if you are unsure about a situation or if you have questions about NCAA rules.
• For any further questions/concerns regarding policy and procedure, please review Section III: Rules and Guidelines or
  contact the Learning Specialist Coordinator.

Study Manager-Student Relationship
Minority Study Management is not separate from academic Learning Specialist, but it is specifically designed to address the
diverse needs of our minority student-athletes. Besides recognizing the rules established by our compliance department, there
are no specific expectations or relationships required by the minority Study Management program, and each Study Manager
will have his/her own way of building rapport with the student-athletes.

Many Study Managers will be separated from the student-athletes by several degrees and/or by various occupations, and such
separation can discourage the student-athlete/Study Manager relationship from achieving its full potential if the student-
athlete cannot relate to the Study Manager. To prevent this, initial stages of the relationship should focus on breaking down
such barriers. Study Managers will share prior college or life experiences to establish a connection with the student-athletes.

For example, when working with a student-athlete that is struggling in classes or does not care about school, Study Managers
could discuss the obstacles and difficulties they encountered in their educational experience. After presenting such situations,
Study Managers could discuss methods they used to solve the problems. It is necessary to let student-athletes know that Study
Managers understand and relate to their problems. Thus, Study Managers will use relevant personal experiences to gain
credibility from student-athletes, while proving themselves as knowledgeable problem-solvers that student-athletes can trust.

Program Goals
At its most basic level, minority Study Management supplements the other programs (tutoring, academic study management,
etc.) offered by the Athletic Student Life Office. With this in mind, activities or interactions that you share with student-ath-
letes should initially focus on the short term goal of motivating student-athletes to take advantage of the academic opportu-
nities they are provided. As the Study Manager-student relationship evolves, Study Managers can incorporate long term goals
such as developing personal, social, and career skills that will sustain diverse student-athletes far beyond their college careers.

The Prentice Gautt Learning Specialist Program not only provides academic support for student-athletes at OU, but it also
provides opportunities for personal development. The University of Oklahoma’s Prentice Gautt Learning Specialist program
has implemented a new component designed specifically to mentor African-American student-athletes called Bridge Builders:
African American Student-Athlete Network.


                                                                                                                                      49
        briDGebuilDers: afriCan-ameriCan sTuDenT-aThleTe neTwork faCTs


     What is BridgeBuilders: African-American Student-Athletes Network?
     BridgeBuilders is the first and only organization for, about, and run by African-American student-athletes at the University
     of Oklahoma.

     What is the mission of BridgeBuilders?
     • To effectively address and find solutions to the academic, athletic, social, cultural, and emotional issues relevant to African-
       American student-athletes at the University of Oklahoma.
     • To provide a positive representation of this student-athlete population on local, regional, and national levels.

     What are the goals of BridgeBuilders?
     • Increase graduation rates of African-American student- athletes.
     • Provide a vehicle African-American student-athletes can direct and control.
     • Enhance cultural/social awareness for African-American student-athletes at OU.
     • Deliver timely and practical information that ensures African-American students are prepared to succeed in life.
     • Increase the overall campus experience for African-American student-athletes.
     • Develop a strong support network for African-American student-athletes throughout the Athletics Department, the
      University, and the surrounding professional community.

     What are BridgeBuilders’ Seven Core Topics?
     BridgeBuilders believe that for our student-athletes to meet their full potential, the following seven areas below must be
     discussed, understood, and mastered from the African-American perspective:

     Spirituality • Health • Politics • Education • Economics • Activism • Community Involvement

     What are BridgeBuilders “Bridges to Success”?
     The “bridges” will ensure the organization effectively fulfills its mission, successfully facilitates understanding of its core
     topics, and confidently accomplishes its goals.

     Life Coaches/Mentors: Local and regional business professionals who are successful in their field assist BridgeBuilders
     members in their career and personal development

     Current & Former Professional Athletes: Athletes who are or have participated in professional sports to serve as a sounding
     board and positive representation for those members who are seeking or want to know more about professional athletics

     Selected Readings and Discussions: Readings from various topics and discussion about relevant and cultural issues makes
     BridgeBuilders members more aware of how it affects them and more competent in these areas

     Professional Seminars/Core Topic Sessions: These sessions give BridgeBuilders members the opportunity to understand the
     importance of professional and culturally relevant issues. The purpose of these presentations are the application of the core
     topics to their daily activities on a social and academic basis to increase confidence and responsibility of these student-
     athletes as leaders on campus and in the community.




50
                              builDinG briDGes beyonD sporTs


With the help of this campus organization, African-American student-athletes are being assisted in marketing their skills off
the playing field.

BridgeBuilders, the first and only University of Oklahoma organization for, about, and run by African-American student-
athletes, is quickly gaining support from both the community and professionals. The organization was started in January
2004 by current and former student-athletes and focuses on the importance of creating a support group for African-American
student-athletes.

The overall goal of the organization is to help them be successful not only at the University, but within the Oklahoma
community. Student-athletes have tremendous amounts of resources they are not taking advantage of and BridgeBuilders
is here to help them maximize their opportunities. BridgeBuilders’ mission is to effectively address and find solutions to
the academic, athletic, social, cultural and emotional issues unique to African-American student-athletes at OU. The
organization has set six primary goals in order to strive and fulfill its mission. Some of the goals currently making progress
include developing a strong LifeCoach/Mentoring support network in the athletic department, the University, and community;
as well as providing practical information that will ensure BridgeBuilders members are prepared to succeed in life.

Within the community, BridgeBuilders continues to develop a strong network, as the heart of this organization is to give back
to the community. To accomplish this, they have joined with Madison Elementary School of Norman; BridgeBuilders
members sign up to go to the school each week and spend some time mentoring, tutoring, and answering questions. The
plan is to continue their weekly visits and build close relationships with the school. Additionally, in November Bride Builders
collected nearly 400 dry goods for the Salvation Army to pick up during the holiday season as a way to help feed the needy
during one of the most difficult times of the year. In February along with the Oklahoma Blood Institute and the Oklahoma
City/New Orleans Hornets, BridgeBuilders had a blood drive at the OU ROTC Armory. The event was a successful event for the
Oklahoma Blood Institute with more than 500 blood units donated.

“BridgeBuilders gives our African-American student-athletes confidence in their abilities as they are provided with
opportunities to actively affect the Norman and Oklahoma City communities in many ways. Their influence on the youth
in our area is also to be commended for their dedication and commitment to them,” states Cecil Rose, Career Development
Coordinator.

Another goal of BridgeBuilders is to make sure their members are successful when their sports careers come to an end.

BridgeBuilders has the power to change the lives of student athletes here at the University of Oklahoma. Never has an
organization for African American student athletes been so dedicated to bettering the lives of the student-athletes through
community service and awareness.




                                                                                                                                  51
              briDGebuilDers: afriCan-ameriCan sTuDenT-aThleTe neTwork


     The University of Oklahoma’s Prentice Gautt Mentoring program has implemented a new component designed specifically to
     mentor African-American student-athletes. “BridgeBuilders”- The African-American student-athlete network provides African-
     American student-athletes the opportunity to broaden themselves and become more enriched as students and citizens. The
     mission of the program is to effectively address and find solutions to the academic, athletic, social, cultural and emotional
     issues unique to African-American student-athletes at the University of Oklahoma. “Being a black student-athlete at a
     predominantly white student campus can create a number of obstacles to overcome. At Oklahoma the BridgeBuilders
     program helps our student-athletes celebrate their diversity and contributions to the University through mentors’ wisdom,
     experience and fellowship,” states Dr. Gerald Gurney, Associate Athletics Director for Academic Affairs.




     The BridgeBuilders program is focused on enhancing the quality of life for student-athletes by increasing overall campus and
     community experiences. The program tackles the need for player development and assists student-athletes in recognizing
     how to maximize their opportunities while in school. The program provides opportunities for student-athletes to break out,
     meet, and be involved with the general student body and people of the community. All the while, helping in decreasing the
     emphasis athletes tend to place on their athletic identity through involvement in non-sport activities. “Our student-athletes
     must realize that there is more to life than sports. The reality is most student-athletes will never become professional athletes
     and that’s okay; instead, they will need to enter the work force. BridgeBuilders can help them prepare to succeed in their
     place of employment,” states Eric White, Coordinator of BridgeBuilders. The mentor/mentee segment connects student-
     athletes with professionals in the community to cultivate relationships with and assist in the path of vibrant citizenship
     during and upon graduation.




52
                                               briDGebuilDers

BridgeBuilders is comprised of seven core topics that assists student-athletes in reaching their full potential and touch upon
issues unique to the African-American heritage. They include spirituality, health, politics, education, economics, activism,
and community involvement. These factors are reinforced through the mentor portion of the program. The mentor/mentee
segment connects student-athletes with professionals in the community to cultivate relationships with and assist in the path
of vibrant citizenship during and upon graduation. Randy Garibay, LTC (Ret.), USA, Assistant Director of Athletic Academic
Affairs and sponsor of BridgeBuilders, states, “BridgeBuilders is a program that has a direct impact on African-American
student-athletes and their everyday life.”

BridgeBuilders: African-American Student-Athlete Network is the first and only organization for, about, and run by African-
American student-athletes at the University of Oklahoma. This program is another example of the continued OU tradition of
creating champions on the field, in the classroom, and throughout the community.




                                                                                                                                 53
     nCaa & biG 12 aCaDemiC eliGibiliTy   requiremenTs




54
                                          fall 2008 aCaDemiC CalenDar
Registration......................................................................................................................................................April 7-August 22
Last Day to Register Before Classes Begin....................................................................................................................August 22
CLASSES BEGIN....................................................................................................................August 25
First Day for Late Registration Fee...............................................................................................................................August 25
Advance Registration for Next Term(s) Begins........................................................................................................November 3
Final Exam Preparation Period.........................................................................................................................December 8-14
Final Day of Classes.................................................................................................................................................December 12
Final Examinations..........................................................................................................................................December 15-19
Final Grades Due.....................................................................................................................................................December 22

ADD/DROP
100% Reduction of Charges on Dropped Courses..................................................................................August 25-September 8
No Reduction of Charges on Dropped Courses after this date................................................................................September 8
No Record of Grade on Dropped Courses..............................................................................................August 25-September 8
Final Day to Register or Add a Class............................................................................................................................August 29
Automatic Grade of W for Dropped Course(s)........................................................................................September 9-October 3
Grade of W or F for Dropped Course(s)...............................................................................................October 6-December 12
Petition to College Dean to Drop Course(s).....................................................................................November 3-December 12

COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL
Cancellation Deadline (no record of grade on transcript)........................................................................................August 22
100% Reduction of Charges on Complete Withdrawals........................................................................August 25-September 8
Automatic Grade of W on Complete Withdrawal....................................................................................August 25-October 3
No Reduction of Charges on Complete Withdrawals after this date.......................................................................September 8
Grade of W or F on Complete Withdrawals........................................................................................October 6-December 12

AUDIT
Final Day to Change from Audit to Credit...............................................................................................................September 5
Final Day to Change from Credit to Audit..................................................................................................................October 31

GRADUATION AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS
Final Day to File as a Candidate for Master’s Degree.......................................................................................................April 7
Final Day to File Graduation Application...................................................................................................................October 1
Final Day to Submit Dissertation Reading Copy or Apply for the Doctoral General Examination......................December 1
Final Day for Oral Defense of Dissertation/Thesis Defense...................................................................................December 12
Final Day for Comprehensive Exam......................................................................................................................December 12
Final Day to Complete Work Needed for Graduation..........................................................................................December 19
Final Day to Deposit Thesis or Dissertation in Library.........................................................................................December 19
Final Day to Submit Work Needed for Graduation to Admissions & Records.......................................................January 9

HOLIDAYS AND VACATION DAYS
Labor Day Holiday..................................................................................................................................................September 1
Thanksgiving Vacation.....................................................................................................................................November 26-30

INTERSESSION
December Intersession Registration..................................................................................................November 3-December 19
December Intersession.........................................................................................................................December 22-January 16


                                                                                                                                                                                      55
                                                    sprinG 2009 aCaDemiC CalenDar
     Registration...........................................................................................................................................November 3-January 16
     Last Day to Register Before Classes Begin....................................................................................................................January 16
     CLASSES BEGIN..................................................................................................................January 20
     First Day for Late Registration Fee...............................................................................................................................January 20
     Advance Registration for Next Term(s) Begins.................................................................................................................April 6
     Final Exam Preparation Period.....................................................................................................................................May 4-10
     Final Day of Classes.............................................................................................................................................................May 8
     Final Examinations.....................................................................................................................................................May 11-15
     Commencement Weekend..........................................................................................................................................May 15-16
     Final Grades Due...............................................................................................................................................................May 19

     ADD/DROP
     100% Reduction of Charges on Dropped Courses..................................................................................January 20-February 2
     No Reduction of Charges on Dropped Courses after this date................................................................................February 2
     No Record of Grade on Dropped Courses.............................................................................................January 20-February 2
     Final Day to Register or Add a Class............................................................................................................................January 23
     Automatic Grade of W for Dropped Course(s).......................................................................................................February 3-27
     Grade of W or F for Dropped Course(s)..............................................................................................................March 2-May 8
     Petition to College Dean to Drop Course(s)........................................................................................................March 30-May 8

     COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL
     Cancellation Deadline (no record of grade on transcript)........................................................................................January 16
     100% Reduction of Charges on Complete Withdrawals........................................................................January 20-February 2
     Automatic Grade of W on Complete Withdrawal..........................................................................................January 20-March 2
     No Reduction of Charges on Complete Withdrawals after this date.........................................................................February 2
     Grade of W or F on Complete Withdrawals........................................................................................................March 2-May 8

     AUDIT
     Final Day to Change from Audit to Credit...............................................................................................................January 30
     Final Day to Change from Credit to Audit.....................................................................................................................April 3

     GRADUATION AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS
     Final Day to File as a Candidate for Master’s Degree.......................................................................................................October 1
     Final Day to File Graduation Application........................................................................................................................March 1
     Final Day to Submit Dissertation Reading Copy or Apply for the Doctoral General Examination................................April 17
     Final Day for Oral Defense of Dissertation/Thesis Defense..............................................................................................May 8
     Final Day for Comprehensive Exam.................................................................................................................................May 8
     Final Day to Complete Work Needed for Graduation.....................................................................................................May 15
     Final Day to Deposit Thesis or Dissertation in Library.................................................................................................May 15
     Final Day to Submit Work Needed for Graduation to Admissions & Records...........................................................May 22

     HOLIDAYS AND VACATION DAYS
     Martin Luther King Jr. Day........................................................................................................................................January 19
     Spring Vacation.......................................................................................................................................................March 14-22

     INTERSESSION
     May Intersession Registration...............................................................................................................................April 6-May 15
     May Intersession...................................................................................................................................................May 18-June 6


56
                                               monThly CalenDar
                                                         August 2008
		Sunday		            		Monday	         				Tuesday	            			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
             	                      	                       	                   	                      	                        1	                         2




             3	                    4	                   5	                     6	                     7	                        8	                         9




             10	                  11	                  12	                   13	                     14	                       15	                     16




             17	                  18	                  19	                   20	                     21	                       22	                     23




              24	                 25	                  26	                   27	                     28	                       29	                     30
             /31



                                                   September 2008
		Sunday		            		Monday	         				Tuesday	            			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
             	                     1	                   2	                    3	                      4	                        5	                         6	


                    Labor	Day
             7	                    8	                   9	                   10	                     11	                       12	                     13	




             14	                  15	                  16	                   17	                     18	                       19	                     20	




             21	                  22	                  23	                   24	                     25	                       26	                     27	




             28	                  29	                  30

                    Rosh	Hashanah
                    Begins	at	Sundown



                                                                                                                                                            57
                                                              monThly CalenDar
                                                               October 2008
     		Sunday		            		Monday	           				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                  	                       	                     	                  1	                     2	                        3	                         4	




                   5	                    6	                    7	                  8	                     9	                       10	                     11	

                                                                    Yom	Kippur
                                                                    Begins	at	Sundown
                   12	                  13	                   14	                15	                     16	                       17	                     18	


                         Columbus	Day
                   19	                  20	                   21	                22	                     23	                       24	                     25	




                   26	                  27	                   28	                29	                     30	                       31


                                                                                                               Halloween

                                                              November 2008
     		Sunday		            		Monday	           				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                  	                       	                     	                   	                      	                         	                         1	




                  2	                     3	                    4	                 5	                      6	                        7	                         8	

Daylight	
Savings	Ends                                  Election	Day
                  9	                    10	                   11	                12	                     13	                       14	                     15	


                                              Veteran’s	Day
                  16	                   17	                   18	                19	                     20	                       21	                     22	




                   23	                  24	                   25	                26	                     27	                       28	                     29	
                  /30

                                                                                        Thanksgiving



58
                                               monThly CalenDar
                                                        December 2008
   		Sunday		          		Monday	         				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	          										Friday	         										Saturday	
                	                   1	                   2	                    3	                    4	                        5	                         6	




                7	                  8	                   9	                   10	                   11	                       12	                     13	




                14	                15	                  16	                   17	                   18	                       19	                     20	




                21	                22	                  23	                   24	                   25	                       26	                     27	
Winter	Begins
Hanukkah
Begins	at	Sundown                                             Christmas	Eve         Christmas	Day          Kwanzaa	Begins
                28	                29	                  30	                   31


                                                              New	Year’s	Eve

                                                        January 2009
   		Sunday		          		Monday	         				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	          										Friday	         										Saturday	
                	                    	                    	                     	                    1	                        2	                         3	


                                                                                    New	Year’s	Day
                4	                  5	                   6	                   7	                     8	                        9	                     10	




                11	                12	                  13	                14	                      15	                       16	                     17	




                18	                19	                  20	                21	                      22	                       23	                     24	


                      MLK	Day
                25	                26	                  27	                28	                      29	                       30	                     31	




                                                                                                                                                          59
                                                             monThly CalenDar
                                                               February 2009
     		Sunday		           		Monday	             				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday
                  	1	                     2	                    3	                   4	                    5	                        6	                         7	




                  8	                      9	                   10	                11	                     12	                       13	                        14	


                                                                                                                                            Valentine’s	Day
                  15	                 16	                      17	                18	                     19	                       20	                        21	


                        President’s	Day
                  22	                 23	                      24	                25	                     26	                       27	                        28	


                                                                     Ash	Wednesday




                                                                   March 2009
     		Sunday		           		Monday	             				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                  	1	                     2	                    3	                 4	                      5	                        6	                         7	




                  8	                      9	                   10	                11	                     12	                       13	                        14	

Daylight	
Savings	Begins
                  15	                 16	                      17	                18	                     19	                       20	                        21	


                                               St.	Patrick’s	Day                                                 Spring	Begins
                  22	                 23	                      24	                25	                     26	                       27	                        28	




                  29	                 30	                      31	




60
                                                   monThly CalenDar
                                                                  April 2009
   		Sunday		            		Monday	           				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                	                       	                     	                  1	                     2	                        3	                         4	


                                                                  April	Fool’s	Day
                5	                     6	                    7	                  8	                     9	                       10	                     11	

                                                                  Passover
                                                                  Begins	at	Sundown                           Good	Friday
                12	                   13	                   14	                15	                     16	                       17	                     18	


Easter
                19	                   20	                   21	                22	                     23	                       24	                     25	




                26	                   27	                   28	                29	                     30	




                                                                  May 2009
   		Sunday		            		Monday	           				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                	                       	                     	                      	                   	                        1	                         2	




                3	                     4	                    5	                 6	                      7	                        8	                         9	


                                            Cinco	de	Mayo
                10	                   11	                   12	                13	                     14	                       15	                     16	


Mother’s	Day
                17	                   18	                   19	                20	                     21	                       22	                     23	




                 24	                  25	                   26	                27	                     28	                       29	                     30		
                /31

                       Memorial	Day



                                                                                                                                                             61
                                                     monThly CalenDar
                                                               June 2009
     		Sunday		         		Monday	         				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                  	                  1	                   2	                  3	                     4	                        5	                         6	




                  7	                 8	                   9	                10	                     11	                       12	                     13	




                  14	               15	                  16	                17	                     18	                       19	                     20	




                  21	               22	                  23	                24	                     25	                       26	                     27	

Father’s	Day
Summer	Begins
                  28	               29	                  30	




                                                               July 2009
     		Sunday		         		Monday	         				Tuesday	         			Wednesday													Thursday	         										Friday	         										Saturday	
                  	                   	                    	                 1	                      2	                        3	                         4	


                                                                                                                                      Independence	Day

                  5	                 6	                   7	                 8	                      9	                       10	                     11	




                  12	               13	                  14	                15	                     16	                       17	                     18	




                  19	               20	                  21	                22	                     23	                       24	                     25	




                  26	               27	                  28	                29	                     30	                       31	                          	




62
noTes




        63
     noTes




64

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:30
posted:8/4/2011
language:English
pages:66