Gta Draft

					        OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS—ACADEMIC PROGRAMS



TO:           Robert Mrtek, Chair
              Senate Committee on Educational Policy

FROM:         Roger Nelson
              Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

I am submitting here for review and action by the Senate Committee on Educational
Policy attached proposal from the Department of Occupational Therapy, College of
Applied Health Sciences (AHS), to establish a new doctoral professional degree, the
Doctor of Occupational Therapy.

The proposal was approved by the Department of Occupational Therapy on September
20, 2004, by the AHS Committee on Academic Policy on November 19, 2004, and by the
Graduate College Executive Committee on March 11, 2005.


RN:
Attachment

Cc:    C. Hulse
       J. Art
       M. Schechtman
       A. Levant
       S. Kragon
       C. Tate
       J. Wencel-Drake
       J. Livermore
       G. Kielhofner
       B. Braveman
REQUEST FOR A NEW UNIT OF INSTRUCTION


BACKGROUND

1. Name of Institution: _University of Illinois at Chicago______________________________

2. Title of Proposed Program: ___Doctor of Occupational Therapy______________________

3. Contact Person                   Dr. Charles Evans

    3.1. Telephone                  (217) 333-3079

    3.2. E-mail                     cevans4@uillinois.edu

    3.3    Fax                      (217) 244-5763

4. Level of Proposed Unit

      __ Undergraduate Certificate (1-2 years)                 __ Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
      __ Undergraduate Certificate (2-4 years)                 __ Post-Master‘s Certificate
      __ Associate                                             __ First Professional Certificate
      __ Baccalaureate
      __ Masters
      __ First Professional
      _X_ Doctorate1

5. Requested CIP Code (6-digits)             51.2306

6. Proposed Date for Enrollment of First Class: ____Fall, 2006_
7. Location Offered2: On-Campus _x__
                      Off-Campus ___: Region Number(s)______ or Statewide___


MISSION, OBJECTIVES AND PRIORITIES

8. Mission

8.1 Program Objectives and Contributions

This is a proposal to create a Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) degree program. The
primary objectives and measurable contributions of this program relate to the University‘s
mission elements of teaching and public service ―with a special focus on health and medical

1
  To assist staff in specialized areas of instruction, IBHE will retain two outside consultants to review all
new doctoral program proposals.
2
  Institutions may request approval to offer a program, simultaneously, on- and off-campus, including
statewide. However, assessments of program objectives and outcomes should be developed that address all
of the locations and modes of delivery for which the institution is seeking approval. Note that ―on-campus‖
approval extends to the entire region in which the main campus is located. New off-campus programs to be
offered outside the institution‘s region require approval.


                                                     2
sciences.‖ (UIC Focus Statement) The program seeks to graduate students that are ‗leader
scholars‘ who will be prepared to assume leadership roles in advanced clinical practice, education
and/or administration.

The objectives of the program are to:

          Graduate occupational therapy ‗leader-scholars‘ who will be prepared to enter non-
           traditional settings providing services to urban underserved populations and develop new
           programs and assume roles as organizational leaders.
          Provide a route of entrée to academic leadership as non-research faculty members to meet
           a growing shortage of doctorally prepared faculty in occupational therapy.
          To meet the needs of employers for clinicians who can function in leadership roles as
           ‗advanced practitioners‘ through the development of advanced professional knowledge
           via involvement in intensive and focused learning.
          To increase the number of occupational therapists with advanced professional knowledge
           and skills that are prepared to assume roles as peer educators and trainers on topics
           related to the needs of urban, underserved populations.

8.2.       Responsiveness of the program to regional and state needs and priorities, and to The
           Illinois Commitment.

Based on the goals put forth by The Illinois Commitment, the proposed OTD program will meet
regional and state needs and priorities in the following ways. First, the program will support the
health care industry in the state of Illinois to sustain strong economic growth by linking its
instructional materials, curriculum, and assessment strategies to the interests of potential
employers in the public and private health care sectors. Potential employers will be surveyed
yearly to ensure that program content meets industry and consumer needs. In addition, one of the
three foci of the proposed OTD program involves an opportunity for students to learn
administrative and leadership skills geared toward health care administration roles and private
practice settings (Goal #1). Second, the OTD program will place students interested in
developing advanced clinical skills related to school-based pediatric practice into fieldwork
settings in elementary and secondary schools throughout Illinois and in this way teaching and
learning will be mutually improved and sustained at all levels (Goal #2). Third, students in the
OTD program will be provided financial support through the significant amount of federal and
private grant funding held by the faculty. Other graduate research assistantships will also be
provided through the department‘s endowment funds. This will reduce dependence on financial
aid in the form of loans (Goal #3). Fourth, the OTD program will make deliberate and sustained
efforts to recruit and retain students from underserved diverse populations so that these students
will become professionals that can contribute to the overall diversity of the occupational therapy
healthcare force and to the welfare of clients seeking occupational therapy services (Goal #4).
Fifth, OTD students will be held to very high standards for learning and the extent to which their
learning reflects the program‘s learning objectives will be systematically assessed through course
exams and a summative, outcomes-based field examination required for graduation. This
examination will reflect the highest expectations for knowledge and competence in the field of
occupational therapy (Goal #5). Finally, the OTD program will improve productivity, cost-
effectiveness, and accountability in education because it answers a growing need in occupational
therapy for doctoral level clinicians, educators and administrators (Goal #6).




                                                   3
8.3.      Similar programs and sponsoring institutions in the state.
          There are currently no programs in the state of Illinois offering the doctor of occupational
          therapy. Thus, the proposed OTD program fulfills a statewide priority for UIC to provide
          a health science program that is ―not generally available through other colleges and
          universities in the state.‖ (UIC Focus Statement)

8.4.       Estimated Future Employment Opportunities:

       According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics (2004), the
       employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase faster than the average for all
       occupations through 2012. Estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggest that the
       growth of employment opportunities in the field could be as large as 35% between 2004 and
       2012. The American Hospital Association has reported workforce shortages in occupational
       therapy and that the National Association for Health Care Recruitment lists the national
       vacancy rate for occupational therapists as 11.33% (a rate of 8% is considered to be a crisis
       level) (Brachtesende, 2005).

       Illinois Department of Employment Security projects that the number of positions for
       occupational therapists in Illinois will grow by 29% between 2004 and 2012, and projects
       annual job openings for 192 therapists. The nature of occupational therapy practice in Illinois
       has changed dramatically in recent years. In 2001, major revisions to the Illinois Practice Act
       were passed to allow occupational therapy personnel to provide consultation, education and
       monitoring services for clients with non-medical needs without a physician‘s referral. This
       change responded to the practices of occupational therapists in community settings, such as
       school systems, transitional housing programs, and senior centers where services may not
       involve ―hands on‖ therapy for medical problems (Fisher, Cooksey, Reed & McClure (2002).
       Many of the growth areas in occupational therapy identified by the American Occupational
       Therapy Association (AOTA) (i.e. support for aging in place, driver assessments and training,
       community health and wellness, school therapy, ergonomics consulting, technology and
       assistive device development and consulting) are consistent with practice changes witnessed
       in Illinois and a consequence of both the shifts in population demographics and the increasing
       use of health care technologies that are saving and extending lives at both ends of the age
       continuum (Malugani, 2004; U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics (2004)).

Advances in health technologies are increasing the numbers of people at both ends of the life
course who are surviving with complex, disabling health conditions that have a significant impact
on their abilities to engage in everyday activities, and participate fully in their communities. The
use of technology is increasing the number of infants who are surviving very premature births,
which is increasing the demand for early intervention, school therapy, and services directed
towards enabling young adults to transition to independent living. Consequently, technology is
increasing the number of children who are likely to require therapeutic intervention at some time.
At the other end of the life course, the movement of the baby-boom generation into late middle
age and the fast growth of the 75+ population is also increasing the demand for occupational
therapy services. Late middle age is a time in life when many chronic health conditions begin to
have an influence on people‘s abilities to maintain involvement in meaningful activities, while
older age is associated with a wide variety of disabling conditions that can require extensive and
complex therapeutic intervention because of the interaction of many conditions simultaneously on
a person‘s life. Illinois has one of the largest health care markets in the country (Fisher,
Cooksey, Reed & McClure (2002)) and thus these shifts in demographics and medical
complexity have increased the demand for highly specialized practitioners in the state who are


                                                   4
able to excel in complex, interdisciplinary environments and systems. In addition to providing
cost-effective and efficient services, occupational therapy practitioners working in today‘s health
care environment must be able to make quick and difficult decisions that are based on the best
available evidence in order to justify and demonstrate the value of their services. Furthermore,
practitioners must have in-depth knowledge of the systems in which they operate, in order to
effect change at multiple levels (i.e., individual, family, community, etc).

In recognition of the increasing complexity of practice in occupational therapy, the Accreditation
Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) has mandated that a master‘s degree or
higher will be the minimum educational requirement in the field beginning in 2007. Mandating a
post baccalaureate degree as entry into the profession has important implications for the provision
of advanced educational opportunities. In the past, a master‘s degree would have been considered
an advanced degree, but this is no longer the case. Initial entry into the field must, by its nature,
be generalist so that all graduates can practice across a variety of areas. Yet, a generalist
education will not provide the opportunity for students to develop advanced clinical competencies
and to take on responsibilities of leadership and the role of educators of the future members of the
profession. Ultimately, the mandated move to entry level master’s within the field will
increase the demand for individuals with doctoral qualifications to fill roles as supervisors,
managers, and faculty members.

The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) has recognized that the academic
terminal degree for occupational therapists is a doctorate (AOTA Commission on Education,
2003) and has developed a statement of role competencies for a professional-level occupational
therapist faculty member in an academic setting (AOTA Commission on Education, 2003). The
shortage of doctorally-prepared faculty members in the U.S. has been recognized as a problem by
the AOTA. The AOTA has begun to address the problem through their strategic planning process
and considerable time has been set aside to discuss the issue at the AOTA-sponsored Program
Director‘s meeting. The concerns raised by the AOTA are certainly realized in Illinois where the
number of doctorally-prepared faculty members is low as shown on the table below.


 Number of Doctorally Prepared Faculty Members at Occupational Therapy Educational
                                Programs in Illinois

   Occupational Therapy
                                     Type of             Number of      Number of Faculty with a
  Educational Programs in
                                     Program              Faculty        Doctorate (nonspecific)
           Illinois
Chicago State University          OT –               5                 0
                                  Professional

Governors State University        OT –               5                 1
                                  Professional

Midwestern University             OT –               4                 0
                                  Professional

Rush University                   OT –               8 (5 full-time,   2 (1 full-time,1 adjunct)
                                  Professional       3 adjunct)




                                                 5
   Occupational Therapy
                                     Type of             Number of     Number of Faculty with a
  Educational Programs in
                                     Program              Faculty       Doctorate (nonspecific)
            Illinois
University of Illinois at         OT –               17 (10 full-     7
Chicago                           Professional       time, 7 adjunct)

College of DuPage                 COTA –             1                 0
(currently inactive)              Technical

Illinois Central College          COTA –             3 (2 full, 1      0
                                  Technical          adjunct)

Lewis & Clark Community           COTA –             7 (2 full-time,   0
College                           Technical          5 part-time)

Lincoln Land Community            COTA –             2                 0
College                           Technical

Parkland College                  COTA –             3                 0
                                  Technical

South Suburban College of         COTA –             2                 0
Cook County                       Technical

South Illinois Collegiate         COTA –             1                 0
Common Market                     Technical

Wright College                    COTA –             3                 0
                                  Technical


It is in the best interest of the state to have an OTD program in Illinois. For occupational
therapists seeking faculty positions, leadership positions or advanced clinical expertise (as
opposed to research credentials) the OTD is the degree of choice. However, each of the 8 OTD
programs that currently exist is located outside of the state. Highly qualified ―master clinicians‖
who leave the state to seek advanced education may never return to Illinois. On the other hand, an
OTD program within the state would create an important educational option to licensed
occupational therapists in the state which have BS or master‘s degrees and future therapists. An
OTD program located within the state would have the potential to improve the quality of the
occupational therapy services in the state and graduate practitioners capable of responding to the
unique needs of the people of Illinois. Finally, given the large number of community-college and
university-based occupational therapy educational programs within the state, the potential to
enhance the educational quality of those programs through the development of doctorally –
prepared faculty members clearly exists.




                                                 6
In summary, a number of factors (e.g. changes in the Practice Act, increased demand for
occupational therapy specialists, the need for doctoral-level academic professionals, and the
profession‘s move to graduate level entry) have converged to create the need for an OTD
program within the state. The University of Illinois of Chicago is uniquely positioned to develop
an OTD program for several reasons.

UIC‘s occupational therapy department has been consistently recognized as a national and local
leader. The department has been ranked in the top five programs nationally by U.S. News and
World report since occupational therapy programs have been ranked nationally. The UIC's OT
program houses one of the two charter centers of research funded by the American Occupational
Therapy Association and the American Occupational Therapy Foundation a decade ago. The
center received the largest grant ever supported by these agencies in the United States. That
project involved development of faculty members from 12 other universities in the U.S., Canada
and Europe. An endowed chair now provides funding for the director of the center. The
department maintains a robust research and development program as evidenced by an average of
over $1 ½ million in extramural funding each year. Funded projects focus on better understanding
the need for, developing and testing occupational therapy services, especially in the urban context
with underserved populations.

The department has also been recognized for excellence in teaching. It was one of two units at
UIC recognized with the Departmental Excellence in Teaching Award and five of the faculty
members are recipients of the UIC teaching excellence award. The program‘s scholarship of
practice model, which is the topic of an upcoming book, represents an approach to engaged
scholarship that is being emulated by occupational therapy programs worldwide.

Need for Graduates with Estimated Number of Graduates:

As noted elsewhere the need for graduates will be in advanced practice, education and
leadership/management. The program is expected to graduate 12 - 14 students per year. Although
the number of students focusing in the three program areas will vary from year to year, it is
expected that advanced practice will constitute about half of graduates and education and
administration/management about one-quarter each.

The number of expected graduates is modest as compared to need and opportunities for such
graduates. For instance, there are approximately 60 individuals currently teaching in programs
that prepare occupational therapists and certified occupational therapy assistants in Illinois and
only 10 of these individuals currently hold doctoral degrees. Occupational therapy faculty
members make up a substantial portion of the students in existing OTD programs and if the
program graduated 3-4 per year, it would take nearly a decade to upgrade half the current faculty
members in Illinois to the doctoral level. As noted elsewhere in this proposal occupational
therapists are increasingly taking positions in settings where advanced clinical skills are needed.
Given the overall high demand for practitioners in this field, the 6-7 expected graduates will
readily find suitable employment. Finally, occupational therapists are increasingly taking on
positions of leadership in both traditional and non-traditional settings where doctoral education is
considered a necessity or an asset. In Illinois where there are over 4000 licensed occupational
therapists, there will be ample opportunity for the 3-4 anticipated graduates each year.

Special Need in Illinois for an OTD program

The most highly qualified students in Illinois who are seeking occupational therapy education
routinely chose UIC‘s program because of its high national ranking. These students also routinely


                                                 7
apply to our out-of-state competitors who are ranked by U.S. News and World Report among the
top four along with UIC. (i.e., University of Southern California, Washington University, Boston
University) Two of these programs already offer the OTD and Boston University is planning to
offer it in the near future. Students from Illinois who prefer to earn this advanced professional
degree along with their basic professional training elect to leave the state for their education.
Moreover, practitioners and educators in Illinois do not have the OTD as an option and must go
out of state currently for this degree. We plan to offer the degree as both a full time and part time
option to allow practitioners and educators to pursue the program while employed in Illinois
health care and educational institutions.

We polled our current entry-level master‘s degree students (N= 82) to ascertain their interest in
such a program. Our response rate for our poll was 94%. Eighty-six percent of the professional
students responding (n=66) indicated that had the OTD been available at the time they applied for
the program, they would have chosen to apply to that program as well as their MS program (an
option that will be available to students when this proposal is approved.) Moreover, we polled
both our present entry-level professional and post-professional students (N= 87) to ask if they
would be likely to apply to a UIC OTD program in the future, if UIC offered such a program. Our
response rate for that survey was 93%. Sixty –seven percent indicated they would be likely to
apply to a UIC OTD program in the future. Clearly our present student body has a high level of
interest in this program; therefore, by creating the program we will be able to be responsive to
student demands.


9. Program Description

9.1     Catalog description and program narrative

Catalog Description
The doctor of occupational therapy (OTD) degree provides students with advanced professional
knowledge and skills in advanced therapeutic work, administration and leadership, and/or
professional education. Students ordinarily chose a primary and secondary area of focus.

All students complete core courses (18-26 credits) that include: a theoretical survey of knowledge
in the field, a research methods course, an advanced field practicum, a seminar and pro-seminar
course. Students complete 34-42 credits of concentration courses selected by the student with
his/her advisor and approved by the OTD curriculum committee. The purpose of the core courses
is to develop advanced knowledge in a defined area(s) related to the student‘s chosen area(s) of
focus. A minimum of 20 credits must be departmental courses. Ten to sixteen credits of elective
courses are chosen by the student with his/her advisor to compliment or expand the chosen
professional foci. Each student must complete field exams designed to assess the student‘s
mastery of content related to his/her chosen foci. The exams are conducted by a three person
committee, one of whom is the student‘s major advisor/mentor.

Each student completes a project involving applied scholarship under supervision of a 3 person
committee. The project involves planning, implementation, evaluation and dissemination. A
project proposal which includes the complete plan of the project must be submitted in writing and
orally defended and subsequently approved by the committee. Implementation of the project is
done under the supervision of the major advisor/mentor and a final written and orally presented
report of the project must be approved by the committee.




                                                  8
Admission Requirements
Individuals with a Bachelors or Master's degree will be eligible for admission to the program.
Applicants will be considered on an individual basis by the OTD Admission Committee.

All applicants must meet following specific requirements:
     Grade Point Average: A minimum of 3.0 (A = 4.0) for all work beyond the baccalaureate
        level and at least 3.0 for the final 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of undergraduate
        study.
     Tests Required: Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general with a combined score of
        at least 1000 for the verbal and quantitative sections. Foreign students whose native
        language is not English must complete the TOEFL with a minimum score of 550 on the
        written test or 212 on the computerized test.
     Prior Degrees: Students must have completed a Bachelor‘s or Master‘s degree by the
        time they enroll in occupational therapy coursework. The OTD Admissions Committee
        reserves the right to determine the appropriateness of any graduate work completed by an
        applicant and may limit transfer credit.
     Letters of Recommendation: Three references pertaining to the applicant's academic
        skills and accomplishments are required.
     Personal Statement: Each applicant is required to submit a 300-500 word statement
        addressing his or her goals for professional doctoral study and career development.

Other Requirements: None


Degree Requirements:

All students in the program must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0
(A=4.0). Students who fall below the 3.0 standard for three consecutive terms of enrollment
(including summer, if registered) will be dismissed from the program. Students earning lower
than a C grade in any core requirement or approved concentration course must repeat the course;
students earning a grade below C in an elective course must either repeat the course or take an
alternative course to fulfill the elective requirement. Students entering the program must complete
a minimum of 90 semester hours of credit beyond the baccalaureate degree. Credit may be
awarded for other relevant graduate work completed either at UIC or another accredited
institution. Any credit awarded will be determined on an individual basis by the Admission
Committee. All students, however, are required to earn a minimum of 58 semester hours of credit
in formal course work in the program.

Narrative description of the program.
The OTD is designed to allow students to develop advanced professional knowledge and skills.
Professional practice encompasses advanced therapeutic work, administration and leadership, and
professional education.

Routes of Entry and Matriculation in the OTD program. The OTD program will have two routes
of entry: post-bachelors and post-masters. Students who have earned a Bachelor‘s degree in OT
will have two options:
     Admission and matriculation directly into the OTD program, in which case the student
        will complete a minimum of 90 credits




                                                9
       Concurrent admission and matriculation into the department‘s MS Degree program and
        the OTD. In this case the student‘s master‘s degree would be earned after completing the
        required 36 credits, and a minimum of 58 additional credits would be taken before award
        of the OTD.
Both of the above options would require the student to matriculate full time for 3 years.

Students who have earned a master‘s degree previously may be admitted to the OTD program. Up
to 32 credits of the previous masters degree can be approved for application to the OTD credit
requirements. Thus, a minimum of 60 credits would be taken before award of the OTD. Students
will be required to matriculate full time for a minimum of 2 years to complete OTD requirements
post-masters.

Plan of Study. Students ordinarily chose a primary and secondary area of focus from the three
options (i.e., advanced therapeutic work, administration and leadership, and professional
education). For example, a student who wishes to become an advanced practitioner with
responsibilities to train other practitioners through workshops and in-services would chose a
primary focus on advanced therapeutic work and a secondary emphasis on education. A student
who wanted to become an educator in a professional program focusing on the preparation of
students for practice in the area of mental health would chose a primary emphasis on education
and a secondary one on practice. (Appendix C contains sample plans of study)

The OTD is composed of five major components:
    Core courses
    Concentration courses
    Elective courses
    Field exam
    Project

Given their chosen foci, students will be guided by a faculty mentor in selecting courses, practica,
field exams, and a project that compliments these aims.

The core courses (noted below) include a theoretical survey of knowledge in the field, a research
methods course, an advanced field practicum designed to meet the career objectives of the student
in therapeutic practice, administration and leadership and/or education. Core courses include a
seminar and pro-seminar course; in the latter the students are required to make a minimum of two
presentations.

Concentration courses are determined by the student with his/her advisor based on the student‘s
identified foci. The purpose of the core courses is to develop advanced knowledge in a defined
area related to the student‘s foci. Concentration courses must include a minimum of 30 credits
approved by the OTD curriculum committee; a minimum of 20 credits must be departmental
courses.

Elective courses are chosen by the student with his/her advisor. Students may choose elective
courses to pursue a topic related to his/her concentration. For example, students interested in
advanced therapeutic practice may choose to take electives from the Ph.D. program in disability
studies which is offered in the college. A student with a leadership/management focus may elect
courses from business administration or public health administration. While students are not
required to identify a specific focus in the elective courses, the student is encouraged with the




                                                10
guidance of his/her mentor to identify courses that compliment or expand the chosen professional
foci.

Field exams are designed to assess each student‘s mastery of content related to his/her primary
and secondary area of focus. The content covered by the field exam will reflect the students
approved study plan/defined areas of concentration. The exam is conducted by a three person
committee, one of whom is the student‘s major advisor/mentor. The content questions and
administration format for the field exam will be at the discretion of the committee.

The project involves implementation of a major applied scholarship undertaking. Components of
the project involve planning, implementation, evaluation and dissemination. Students complete
the project under the supervision of a 3 person committee. A project proposal which included the
complete plan of the project must be submitted in writing and orally defended and subsequently
approved by the committee. Implementation of the project is done under the supervision of the
major advisor/mentor and a final written and orally presented report of the project must be
approved by the committee.

         Ethics and liability. While the OTD is a professional and not a research degree, students
in the program may be involved in research activities/projects as part of coursework or practicum.
The department requires all students involved in any research enterprise to meet the university
requirements for ethics training and related HIPPA training that pertains to research in medical
settings. Additionally, the department has a proactive policy to ensure compliance with the
university‘s ethics policy and procedures. Whenever a project or course involves any research
activity with human subjects it will be first submitted to the Institutional Review board.
         Students will be placed in advanced practica that may or may not involve direct clinical
care. Prior to placement all students must receive HIPPA training. All student placements are
covered by a Student Placement Agreement and these students will be covered under the
university‘s malpractice liability policy that currently covers all students in the department.

Core Courses
Students must complete all the following core courses:

 Course Number                          Course Title                              Credits
       OT 500                 Theories of Occupational Therapy                        4
       OT 510                 Research in Occupational Therapy                        3
 OT 530, 531,532                  Advanced Field Practicum                          8-16
       OT 595                 Seminar in Occupational Therapy                         1
       OT 593            Doctoral Proseminar in Occupational Therapy                  2
Total required core                                                                18-26
   course credits


Concentration Courses
A minimum of 20 credits of the concentration must be taken from within the department. The
following departmental courses can be taken to meet this requirement. The combination of
courses for the concentration will be chosen by the student with his/her advisor and must be
approved by the OTD curriculum committee (See Appendix C for sample course plans). Below
courses are coded according to which of the following concentrations each course potentially
serves: T= advanced therapeutic work, L=administration and leadership, and E=professional
education).



                                               11
   Course Number                                Course Title                                       Credits
                                                                                         Concen-
                                                                                         tration
                                                                                         Area(s)
       OT 515                                   Synthesis 1                                 T        1
       OT 534             Socio-Cultural Aspects of Occupational Therapy Practice         E,T,L      3
       OT 541              Advanced Human Occupation Theory and Application               E,T,L      4
       OT 544              Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Persons with Chronic              T        4
                                           Illness and Disability
       OT 550                      Disability in the Urban Environment                    E,T,L      4
       OT 552                Community Based Interventions with Underserved                 T        4
                                                Populations
       OT 553             Program Evaluation: Documenting the Impact of Human              L         3
                                                  Services
       OT 526                              Assistive Technology                             T        3
       OT 535                                   Synthesis 2                               E,T,L      2
       OT 554               Applied Professional Ethics in Occupational Therapy           E,T,L      2
       OT 556             Theory and Methods of Needs Assessment in Aging and              T,L       4
                                                 Disability
       OT 557                     Acting on Needs Assessment Findings                      T,L       3

       OT 558                       Writing for Professional Publication                   E,L       3
       OT 564             Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy            E,L       3
       OT 567                Professional Leadership in Occupational Therapy                L        3
       OT 565              Occupational Therapy Professional Curriculum Design,             E        3
                                      Implementation, and Evaluation
       OT 594                     Special Topics in Occupational Therapy                  E,T,L      1-4
       OT 596                                Independent study                            E,T,L      1-4
       OT 542             Advanced Clinical Reasoning and Therapeutic Use of Self          E,T        2
                                          in Occupational Therapy
   Total required                                                                                  34-42
Concentration credits

Elective Courses
Students choose 10-16 credits of elective courses which may be taken from within and/or outside
the department.

   Total required                                                                10-16
   Elective credits

     Field Exam                                                                     0

       OT 599                          Project Research                             20

   Total Program                                                                    90
      Credits




                                              12
9.1. Learning Objectives

Learning objectives in the OTD program depend, in part, on the focus that the student chooses.
The learning objectives below are organized into four major categories: program-wide objectives,
advanced practice objectives, curricular/teaching objectives, and leadership/management.

All Students in the OTD program will develop the following competencies.

      Discuss and critique contemporary occupational therapy theory and research and describe
       its implications for professional practice and for future knowledge development needs in
       the field.
      Identify and analyze major social trends and disability demographics, describing their
       implications for knowledge and practice development in the field of occupational
       therapy.
      Identify major contemporary challenges to the development of the profession and
       propose a strategic solution addressing those challenges.

Students who select a focus on Advanced Practice will develop the following competencies:

      Apply existing knowledge in the field of occupational therapy to address client
       population needs by creating and evaluating programs of service.
      Conduct a comprehensive analysis of research evidence in order to determine best
       practice of occupational therapy for a given population in clinical settings.
      Demonstrate expert knowledge and skill in assessment and intervention approaches for a
       given clinical population.

Students who select a focus on Curriculum/Teaching will develop the following competencies

      Develop and evaluate curriculum plans for professional educational programs in
       occupational therapy that respond to accreditation standards and demands of the clinical
       and academic marketplaces.
      Develop, implement and evaluate a module of instruction.
      Develop, implement, and evaluate presentational materials using multiple modalities
       suitable for conveying a particular occupational therapy topic.
      Demonstrate didactic skills for effective classroom communication.

Students who select a focus on Leadership/Management will develop the following competencies

      Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of political, economic, and social forces that
       influence major directions of the profession.
      Apply principles of gathering and analyzing evidence to decision making about
       professional and clinical program development.
      Apply principles of leadership/management to solving challenges and to creating
       innovations in professional, educational, and/or clinical programs and/or private practice
       and business.




                                               13
9.3.    Program strategies to promote student learning.

Three themes will be used in the proposed program to underpin and guide the OTD program and
the Department of Occupational Therapy‘s commitment to excellence in teaching and learning.
These themes include:
     ―The Scholarship of Practice,‖ which is a guiding departmental vision of how research
        and practice intersect. This is a ―working ideal‖ that was originally conceived
        collaboratively by faculty to articulate our view of the critical interactions between
        practice and research in our field. It embraces the value of generating theoretical and
        empirical knowledge in the context of efforts to identify and solve real-life problems. We
        operationalize this scholarship through addressing problems that arise within the urban
        community. This vision guides all aspects of our curriculum development, teaching,
        program evaluation, research and service learning within the department, and will be the
        foundation of the OTD program.
     A shared commitment to weaving education, research and service together into a
        seamless whole in which all three are enhanced to the mutual benefit of students, faculty,
        and the community.
     Conscious and continuous efforts to apply the concepts of social learning theory and to
        operationalize complimentary educational strategies (e.g., problem-based learning,
        cognitive apprenticeships, collaborative learning) within a cohesive learning community
        that supports the intellectual and professional development of students and faculty.

Together, these three themes will provide guidance to the OTD curriculum as a whole, to the
development of individual courses, and to faculty efforts to advise and mentor students. Thus,
teaching and learning within the OTD program will be viewed and operationalized as a social
process that is embedded in a community of scholars working collaboratively on salient human
problems in the urban context.
    The specific educational strategies that we will employ within this curriculum include:
     problem-based learning,
     collaborative learning,
     mentored preparation for life-long learning and career development
     cognitive apprenticeships.

Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes active student learning and reflection using case
studies and small group tutorials. We will apply key ideas from PBL, for example, small group
work, case studies based on real-life practice examples, cross-course content integration, and peer
mentoring. The goal will be to challenge students to select information from a variety of
sources, synthesize previous learning with new sources of information, exercise and develop
critical reasoning skills, improve group communication skills, and increase their comfort with
ambiguity, including the idea that there is not always ―one right answer‖.

Collaborative learning fosters a social context of learning in which students work together in
teams to create and complete group projects and assignments. Collaborative learning is used in
the classroom and within the advanced fieldwork experiences and community-based course work.
Students will be placed in situations where they must learn how to work together toward a
common goal for the benefit of the team as a whole; similar to how they would be expected to
practice professionally.

Mentored preparation for life-long learning and self-directed professional development.
Students will be mentored in how to develop a personal mission statement, set clear professional



                                                14
development and career goals, and to monitor their own goal attainment and career development
progress. As part of this mentoring process, students will be guided in selecting advanced
fieldwork opportunities, a final project, and other learning experiences that advance their goal
attainment and progress toward career objectives. Students will be supported to engage in self-
evaluation activities that promote awareness throughout their matriculation.

Cognitive apprenticeships are based upon the concept that novices learn first-hand through
―doing in context‖. At UIC our scholarship of practice model emphasizes a cycle of generating
new knowledge that addresses problems and issues in practice and taking that knowledge back to
practice to create innovations and improvements in service which are then tested for their
efficacy. Every OTD student will be assigned to a faculty member with a line of applied
scholarship. Students will immerse in this line of work through independent studies, advanced
coursework and fieldwork, and completion of projects. They will learn not only from their
faculty advisor, but also from a community of scholars (i.e., research and clinical staff, and
graduate students pursuing research degrees and post-doctoral fellows). Students matriculating
within the OTD will have experiences applying scholarship which is generated in these teams.
Student apprentices will engage in progressively more challenging activities with mentors whom
they can observe, consult, challenge, and critically reflect with about their learning. An example
of this type of apprenticeship in the OTD would be a student who in advanced fieldwork develops
a service approach or provides educational in-services to other practitioners that reflects new
knowledge being generated as part of a scholarship team lead by the student‘s mentor at UIC.
Through such experiences, students will have multiple opportunities to interact with mentors,
clients and staff of community agencies to apply skills learned in the classroom.

RESOURCES

10. Student enrollment projections for the program

Table 1 indicates projected enrollment in the program. We anticipate enrolling 14 students in the
first year. Of these students we anticipate 4 will be half time, resulting in enrollment of 12 full
time equivalent (FTE) students. Since the OTD program is a 3 year program post-bachelors and
approximately 2 years post-masters, students are expected to average approximately 2 ½ years to
graduation. With modest growth in the rate of annual enrollment, the program will eventually
enroll a total of 42 students (36 FTE) and graduate approximately 12-14 students per year.

Students in the program will enroll in 90 credits hours of coursework that will include some
combination of courses from among 17 courses which already exist in the department (listed in
Appendix A). Some of these existing required courses are required courses for the OTD. Others
courses are chosen as concentration courses or as electives that serve students in our Master‘s
programs and the Ph.D. in Disability Studies program we offer along with the Departments of
Physical Therapy and Human Development and Disability. Some of these existing courses have
had limited enrollment since the programs they serve are relatively small and the courses are
electives. It is anticipated that, on average OTD students will represent half the future enrollment
in these 17 courses.

Additionally, 9 new courses (indicated in Appendix A) are being developed for this program. It is
anticipated that these new courses will not only enroll OTD students but also attract students in
the Ph.D. program in Disability Studies as well as other graduate students in the health sciences.
It is anticipated that OTD students will constitute approximately three quarters of the enrollment
in these new courses.



                                                15
It should also be noted that students in the OTD program would enroll in elective courses outside
those offered in the unit (and noted below on Table I). Given, the three areas of focus (advanced
practice, leadership/administration, and education) students in the OTD program would likely
elect courses from the College of Applied Health Sciences under the Disability Studies and
Health Informatics rubrics, from Public Health, and Education, as well as courses offered
throughout UIC.

                                            Table I

       STUDENT ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS FOR THE NEW PROGRAM

                                                Budget        2nd       3rd       4th      5th
                                                 Year        Year      Year      Year     Year

Number of Program Majors (Fall headcount)      14           28        42        42       42
                                               12           24        36        36       36
Annual Full-Time-Equivalent Majors
Annual Credit Hours in EXISTING                216          382       464       464      464
Courses1 (OTD majors only)
Annual Credit Hours in EXISTING                406          762       844       844      844
Courses 2 (all majors)
Annual Credit Hours in NEW                     144          338       466       466      466
Courses 3(OTD majors only)
Annual Credit Hours in NEW Courses 4           159          371       535       535      535
(all majors)
                                               0             0         12        13       14
Annual Number of degrees Awarded
1
  Courses currently offered in the department that currently enrolls MS and/or Ph.D. students.
Enrollment projection based on the assumption that OTD students will take ½ of their
concentration and elective courses from existing courses.
2
  Reflects anticipated total enrollment of MS, Ph.D. and OTD students in existing courses. This
figure reflects the expectation that OTD students will constitute, on average, slightly more than
half the credit hours generated from these courses. For the most part, these figures reflect
increased enrollment in elective courses that currently enroll small numbers of students and can
readily double enrollment.
3
  Based on projection that 75 percent of the students enrolled in new courses will be OTD
students. This is an average percent based on some courses that will draw a mixture of students
and some that will only enroll OTD students.

11.     Program Funding

As shown in Table II no new state resources are required or requested. The necessary new
resources for the program (shown on Table II) will be funded through internal reallocation,
economies of scale, and a tuition differential. In addition the program will be supported by
enrollment of new students in a number of existing courses as noted earlier. This increased
enrollment will result in some economies of scale in the department and therefore, will not
require new resources.
        Internal Reallocation. Internal reallocation of resources will be made possible by
anticipated changes in our existing professional master‘s degree program, which will result in
decreased advising and teaching responsibilities for our faculty. The department‘s MS program



                                               16
leading to certification as an occupational therapist was a 2 ½ year program, culminating in a
thesis or project. A separate program change eliminated the thesis or project requirement and
reduces the number of required credits. Since the MS program admits 28 students per year the
changes will free up substantial resources which can be reallocated to the proposed program. For
example, the changes will reduce the fall head count by 28 students. Based on enrollment
projections, we have calculated the net impact of both the changes in the existing MS program
and implementation of the OTD program as a change in enrollment from approximately 77 to 88
FTE students. The addition of these 11 FTE students will be managed through economies of scale
and new resources generated through the tuition differential.
         Economies of Scale. The department currently offers a number of courses that will enroll
OTD students. Current levels of current course enrollment readily allow for additional OTD
students to be enrolled in those courses. Moreover, the department‘s current administrative
structures for recruitment, admission and student support services can readily accommodate the
proposed OTD student body, in part because we will realize a reduction in student head count of
28 students per year because of the changes in the M.S. program and in part because the new
OTD students can be readily incorporated into ongoing student service processes. For example,
part of our administrative structure supports the development of student placement agreements for
sites where students do fieldwork. Existing fieldwork sites (and addition of sites at the current
rate of new site development) will be sufficient for the proposed OTD program.
         Tuition Differential. Students in the OTD program will pay a tuition differential (i.e.,
currently $1200 per semester and $600 per summer session). This tuition differential will provide
the additional necessary support for additional faculty time (beyond that freed up due to the
professional program changes noted above) as required to provide the new courses, mentor
students in advanced practica, and provide mentoring for the applied scholarship project and other
independent scholarship that will be part of OTD students‘ matriculation. The tuition differential
revenue will grow incrementally during the first three years of the program, and will be fully
realized in year three. The figures shown in Table II reflect a net figure budgeted for the
department, after 10% of the tuition differential revenue is retained in the Provost‘s office, and
assuming 2.85% bad debt allowance, as recommended by the campus budget office.

Because the department has adequate laboratories, support staff, instructional materials and a
wide range of existing contracts for student internships, we do not project any new resources will
be needed to support these aspects of the program. Moreover, the department‘s existing
administrative structure for student admissions and management will be adequate to manage this
new program. In a few instances increased enrollment in existing courses and a modest expansion
in the number of courses offered will require additional scheduling of classroom and laboratory
space but we anticipate this need will readily be met with available classroom and laboratory
space in our building.



                                Table II
           TOTAL RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NEW PROGRAM

                                           Current     Budget       2nd         3rd       4th
                                            Year        Year       Year        Year       Year
1   Total Resource Requirements              0         $100.1     $125.2      $150.3     $150.3

2   Resources Available from Federal          0          0           0          0           0
    Sources



                                                  17
3       Resources Available from Other              0
        Non-State Sources
        (tuition differential revenues)
4       Existing State Resources                    0                     $100.1      $125.2         $150.3

5       Resources Available through                 0        $100.1       $25.1        $25.1           0
        Internal Reallocation1

6       New State Resources Required2               0           0            0           0             0

        Breakdown: New State
        Resources Required
7       FTE Staff                                   0           0            0           0             0

8       Personal Services                           0           0            0           0             0

9       Equipment and Instructional Needs           0           0            0           0             0

10 Library                                          0           0            0           0             0

11 Other Support Services                           0           0            0           0             0
1
    Existing resources reflect resources that will be made available to the program though
     economies of scale as discussed earlier. These figures are based on faculty and program
     staff efforts directed to admissions and student services and to the teaching of existing
    courses that will have expanded enrollment because of the OTD program.
2
    Internal relocation resources are calculated as available faculty and academic personnel
    time that will be freed up as a result of change and reduction in credit hours in the existing
    Master of Science Degree program leading to certification. These changes were discussed
    in the preceding section.

12.      Institutional resources available to develop and maintain a quality program.

Faculty qualifications, evaluation, and reward structure

The department of occupational therapy has six tenure track faculty members (four tenured) and
four clinical associate professors. Seven of these faculty members hold doctoral degrees and an
eighth is pursuing a Ph.D. All of the department‘s faculty members are actively involved in
funded applied research and the faculty as a group has the highest publication rate in the field.
Curriculum Vitae for all full time faculty are in Appendix B.

Our faculty was asked to present on our successful model of scholarship, three years ago at a
meeting of all the academic program directors in the country. Our program was chosen from a
national competition to become the field‘s center of outcomes research—funding for this center
came in large measure as recognition of our faculty members‘ scholarly productivity.

Collectively the faculty has a strong commitment to high quality education, to integrating our
educational programs with departmental scholarship, to applied scholarship that advances
practice and to UIC‘s urban mission.




                                                        18
The department currently offers two Master of Science Degree programs (one leading to
professional certification and one post-professional) and collaborates with two other units to offer
a Ph.D. in Disability Studies. As noted elsewhere campus awards for excellence in education
have recognized the department and over half of the faculty members. The department is ranked
by U.S. News and World Report as fourth in the country out of a field of well over 100 programs.
Moreover, the program is recognized internationally as a leading program, attracting students,
visiting scholars and fellows from throughout the world. The department has had a longstanding
collaborative relationship with the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and with London Southbank
University.

Faculty evaluation and reward structure currently emphasizes achieving a balance and integration
of teaching, research and service. As a matter of department policy, faculty members maintain
relationships with agencies in the greater Chicago area that serve as laboratories for their teaching
and scholarship. The department has a strong faculty teaching evaluation, development program
and award structure. Faculty members are evaluated in each course through independently
administered student course evaluations and each faculty member is evaluated annually through
peer observation. Students are also surveyed routinely as a cohort, to assess whether courses and
the curriculum as a whole are meeting program objectives. Faculty members are annually
evaluated in the three areas of teaching, research and education. Each faculty member completes
a standard report. The report is submitted to two peers who confidentially review and comment
on performance and make suggestions for further development. These materials are submitted to
the head who then meets with each faculty member at least annually to discuss and evaluate
performance in each area. Additionally meetings are scheduled as deemed necessary by the head
or desired by faculty members. The department also has a program of systematic review for
promotion and tenure. While initial tenure review is on a fixed timetable, clinical track
promotions and advancement to full professor are evaluated by the head and a departmental
promotion and tenure committee. The department maintains clear standards for advancement and
each faculty member is expected and supported to advance in rank. Currently all clinical faculty
members have been promoted to associate professor and working toward full clinical professor
status. Five of six tenure-track faculty members are tenured and one is a full professor.

Adequacy of library and related resources

The Library estimates that it currently spends approximately $6,500 per year for resources that
support the study of Occupational Therapy. Occupational Therapy and Library faculty find that
the current resources are adequate, so no additional Library funding will be necessary.

In addition to UIC‘s medical libraries, the Department of Occupational Therapy maintains a
library which is funded through alumni and faculty donations. The library‘s collection focuses on
occupational therapy books and journals and closely related topics. Between the two libraries
there is a comprehensive collection of periodicals and texts to support the program.

The UIC College of Applied Health Professions Urban Allied Health Academy offers a unique
opportunity for OTD students to gain skills needed to work effectively in the urban environment.
The Urban Allied Health Academy grew out of allied health grants developed by the Department
of Occupational Therapy in collaboration with the Departments of Human Nutrition and Physical
Therapy. The Academy is committed to fostering a strong academic community among our
diverse college constituency and a greater appreciation of cultural differences. To that end, the
Academy bridges all the units of the College of Applied Health Sciences through a dedication to
developing zeal, sensitivity, skill, and leadership in students, staff, faculty, alumni, and



                                                 19
community partners with the goal of eliminating health disparities among diverse groups in the
urban environment. Membership in the Academy is open to all students and includes: 1) student
leadership opportunities; 2) scholarship opportunities and fellowship consulting; 3) research and
service opportunities; 4) networking with professionals and experts in your field of study; 5)
development of diversity competencies to compete in the current job market.

Adequacy of student support services, support staff, equipment, and other resources.

         Student support services. The current level of clerical support and support staff in the
Department is adequate to support program operations with the addition of the OTD.           The
department currently employs 4.5 FTE academic professional staff. These individuals provide
administrative support for human resources, business operations, student recruitment and
admissions, curriculum support, fieldwork support, clerical/ administrative services, and public
relations/marketing.

        Equipment. The department has invested extensively in office equipment over the last
several years. The department maintains a special collections library and a computer laboratory
which will be available to OTD students. We have excellent software resources, including MS
Word, SPSS, SAS, Atlas-1, and more. The department owns a high tech classroom multimedia
projection system, extensive digital photography and video equipment for case documentation.
This equipment will not only be used for OTD courses, but OTD students who are concentrating
in education will have access to state of the art media. It includes an LCD projector, computer
with Internet access, sound, and video projection capability. The department has an apartment
designed with technology to allow persons with disabilities with a variety of impairments to
function. These equipment and supply resources are adequate to support the OTD Program.

Clinical and Community Practicum Sites
The department has a wide range of clinical and community sites with which we have standing
Student Placement Agreements. The nature and range of the sites are adequate for the practicum
which is required for the proposed OTD program. We do anticipate adding a modest number of
sites as we do periodically to assure that we have the highest quality sites representative of
contemporary practice. The department has a faculty member who functions as the fieldwork
coordinator and assistant who supports her in development and maintenance of relationships with
fieldwork sites.

         Clinical Sites. Clinical sites include traditional hospital and rehabilitation facilities. Our
sites include the University of Illinois Hospital and clinics (discussed below) and other facilities.
Most of these facilities are located in metropolitan Chicago area, but we do have sites throughout
the U.S. mostly concentrated in the Midwest. Almost all of these clinical sites have longstanding
relationships with us and we have Student Placement Agreements in place with all these sites.

The department at UIC is a unified academic-clinical department. The head of the academic
department serves as chief of services for Occupational Therapy in the University of Illinois
Hospital and clinics. Moreover, faculty research and development projects routinely involve the
clinics and clinicians are intimately involved in the department‘s teaching and scholarship
missions. Thus the clinical programs in the hospital and ambulatory care clinics will serve as
important resources for the proposed program.

         Community Sites. The department maintains longstanding relationships with a number of
community based agencies (e.g. El Valor which provides services to persons with developmental
disabilities, Bonaventure House, AIDS Care, and Chicago House which are a transitional living


                                                  20
facility for persons with AIDS, Family Rescue which serves women and children homeless as a
result of fleeing domestic violence, Chicago Lighthouse which serves persons with visual
impairments, and three senior centers administered through the Chicago Department of Aging)
We refer to the aforementioned and other agencies as ―community partners‖ who are closely
involved in our research, education and service mission. These agencies collaborate with us in
grants, provide student internship opportunities, provide lecturers and panelists for the classroom.
In turn our faculty, staff and students, sit on advisory boards, provide consultation and services,
undertake special projects that benefit the settings, help the setting obtain grant funding and
conduct studies that document the impact of services provided through the agencies. We have
Student Placement Agreements in place with all these sites.

OTD students will benefit from collaborations with our community partners, particularly in the
advanced clinical and urban practice domains of the OTD program. With respect to advanced
clinical training, OTD students will have the opportunity to assume a leadership role as
participatory-consultants in community-based organizations. They will learn to gain and establish
entry into a community based organization and to determine how OT Services
might best be utilized by that organization. They will learn how to implement a program of
collaborative service for that organization, and they will learn strategies they can utilize to
evaluate their own work as well as to evaluate the overall functioning and strengths of the
organization from a participatory evaluation perspective

Demonstrated teaching/scholarship effectiveness and course evaluation

The department has been recognized on several occasions for excellence in teaching. It was one
of two units at UIC recognized with the Departmental Excellence in Teaching Award and five of
the faculty members are recipients of the UIC teaching excellence award. Faculty of the program
perform consistently well on student-rated course evaluation, and peer evaluations of faculty
performance are conducted regularly as a matter of practice within our department so that faculty
can work to modify their existing teaching skills and implement new techniques as they arise.

QUALITY ASSURANCE

13.   Program/Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

13.1. Assessment Plan

Student learning objectives in the OTD program depend, in part, on the focus that the student
chooses. Therefore, the learning objectives below are organized into four major categories:
program-wide objectives, advanced practice objectives, curricular/teaching objectives, and
leadership/management. Students in the OTD program will develop the following competencies.

Program-Wide Objectives
    Discuss and critique contemporary occupational therapy theory and research and describe
       its implications for professional practice and for future knowledge development needs in
       the field.
    Identify and analyze major social trends and disability demographics, describing their
       implications for knowledge and practice development in the field of occupational
       therapy.
    Identify major contemporary challenges to the development of the profession and
       propose a strategic solution to addressing those challenges.



                                                 21
Advanced Practice Objectives
    Apply existing knowledge in the field of occupational therapy to address client
      population needs by creating and evaluating programs of service.
    Conduct a comprehensive analysis of research evidence in order to determine best
      practice of occupational therapy for a given population in clinical settings.
    Demonstrate expert knowledge and skill in assessment and intervention approaches for a
      given clinical population.


Curricular/Teaching Objectives

       Develop and evaluate curriculum plans for professional educational programs in
        occupational therapy that respond to accreditation standards and demands of the clinical
        and academic marketplaces.
       Develop, implement, and evaluate a module of instruction.
       Develop, implement, and evaluate presentational materials using multiple modalities
        suitable for conveying a particular occupational therapy topic.
       Demonstrate didactic skills for effective classroom communication.

Leadership/Management Objectives

       Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of political, economic, and social forces that
        influence major directions of the profession.
       Apply principles of gathering and analyzing evidence to decision making about
        professional and clinical program development.
       Apply principles of leadership/management to solving challenges and to creating
        innovations in professional, educational, and/or clinical programs and/or private practice
        and business.

The following outlines a plan to evaluate the outcomes of the program and of student learning
outcomes based upon these program objectives and intended learning outcomes. A Program and
Curriculum Evaluation Committee that will meet no less than Quarterly will be responsible for all
program evaluation activities and submit written reports to the faculty and Department Head.

Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes:

In addition to assessment of student learning conducted in each course the following activities
will serve as measures of student learning outcomes:

       Professional Portfolios highlighting the advanced knowledge gained, experiences
        demonstrating advanced competencies achieved and professional leadership skills and
        experiences.
       Field Examinations focused on evaluation of knowledge.
       Reviews of student achievements and learning on advanced fieldwork conducted by
        clinical, administrative, or educational fieldwork educators.
       Evaluation of student projects conducted by each student‘s project committee that will
        evaluate and approve the proposal, implementation, evaluation and dissemination of the
        project. The committee will be comprised of faculty and at least one clinical,
        administrative, or educational fieldwork educator from the community.



                                                22
Assessment of Program Outcomes:

      Annual feedback collected from the following stakeholder groups on program
       effectiveness:
           o Students
           o Employers of graduates
           o Graduates of program
      Structure and process indicators chosen on an annual basis to address problems,
       opportunities for improvement, or need of students or faculty. A Continuous Quality
       Improvement approach will be used so that indicators will be identified and change on an
       ongoing basis.
      Faculty effectiveness as indicated by course evaluations and faculty teaching portfolios.

13.2. The following measures will be used to assess and improve student learning, curriculum,
      and instruction.

      Retention and graduation rates and time-to-degree completion.
      Percent of graduates employed in the field within 3 months of graduation.
      Percent of graduates who report significant career advancement as a result of graduation
       from the program.
      Percent of graduates who have formal leadership roles as advanced clinicians,
       administrators or as educators.
      Level of graduate satisfaction with the program.
      Level of employer satisfaction with graduates
      Percent of students involved in employment with urban underserved populations.
      Percent of students and graduates who publish or present at local, state and national
       conferences.
      Percent of graduates adopting a paid or volunteer professional leadership role.


   13.2. Identify measures to be used to assess and improve student learning, curriculum, and
       instruction. Evidence of success should include, but not be limited to, such specific
       outcomes as the following:

          Percent pass rate of graduates on end-of-program certification examinations;
          Enrollment of graduates in graduate and/or professional programs or other
           subsequent education;
          Percent of graduates employed in the field;
          Career advancement achieved by program graduates;
          Graduate/employer satisfaction with the program;
          Retention and graduation rates and time-to-degree completion;
          Percent of students involved in faculty research or other projects; and
          Percent of graduate students presenting or publishing papers.




                                              23
                                            REFERENCES

AOTA Commission on Education (2003). Role competencies for a professional-level
occupational therapist faculty member in an academic setting. Retrieved September 24, 2004
from http://www.aota.org

Brachtesende, A. (2005). The Turnaround is Here! OT Practice, January 24, 2005.

Fisher, G., Cooksey, J., Reed, M. & McClure, C. (2002). The Occupational Therapy Workforce
in Illinois and National Workforce Trends. Chicago: The Illinois Regional Health Workforce
Center.

U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics (2004). Occupational Outlook Handbook:
Occupational therapists. Retrieved October 8, 2004 from http://www.bls.gov

Malugani, M. (2004.) Emerging areas in OT. Retrieved September 24, 2004, from
http://www.aota.org




                                              24
                                       Appendix A

                          Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD)
                                    Course Descriptions
                   (* indicates a new course developed for the program)



OT 500                       Develops an understanding of the theoretical basis of
                             occupational therapy and the impact of theory on clinical
Theories of Occupational     practice. Covers the history of knowledge and practice
Therapy                      development in the field. Focuses on specific practice models
                             developed as guides to clinical reasoning. Prerequisite(s):
                             Consent of instructor.
OT 510                       Introduction to basic elements of research design relevant to
                             occupational therapy practice. Prepares student to become
Research in Occupational     critical consumer of research in occupational therapy and related
Therapy                      fields. Quantitative and qualitative approaches to research.
                             Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Master of Science in
                             Occupational Therapy program, or consent of the instructor.
                             Recommended background: Statistics and research methods
                             background.
OT 515                       Integrating theory, practice and research knowledge and skills
                             across courses using case studies and small group learning
Synthesis 1                  activities. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.
                             Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in OT 401 and grade of C
                             or better in OT 406 and grade of C or better in OT 407 and grade
                             of C or better in OT 500 and grade of C or better in AHS 510.
OT 526                       Assessing the need for, delivering, and evaluating the outcomes
                             of occupationally-based technology and environmental
Assistive Technology         interventions with people with disabilities within the home,
                             school, workplace and community. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C
                             or better in OT 411 and grade of C or better in OT 412 and grade
                             of C or better in OT 416 and grade of C or better in AHS 510.
OT 530 Advanced Field        Provides opportunity for the student interested in advanced
Experience: Clinical         occupational therapy practice to observe a master clinician and
Specialization in            participate in treatment and/or clinical research. Prerequisite(s):
Occupational Therapy         Consent of instructor
OT 531 Advanced Field        Practicum experience working with an experienced professional
Experience: in               to develop projects or programs in student‘s interest area, e.g.,
Occupational therapy         administration, middle management, consultation, program
Management                   evaluation, and craftsmanship.
                             Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
532 Advanced Field           Provides opportunity to observe, prepare and present lectures/lab
Experience: Occupational     to occupational therapy students in technical or professional
Therapy Education            curricula or to develop skills as a clinical educator.
                             Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor



                                            25
OT 534                       Addresses social and cultural contexts in which chronic illness
                             and disability are experienced; contexts which impact that
Socio-Cultural Aspects of    experience, and broad contexts in which
Occupational Therapy         recovery/accommodation and occupational therapy treatment
                             occur. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in OT 424 and grade
                             of C or better in OT 428 and grade of C or better in OT 526.
OT 535                       Integrating advanced theory, practice and research knowledge
                             and skills across courses using complex individual and
Synthesis 2                  programmatic case studies and small and large group
                             intervention planning activities. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
                             grading only. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in OT 424
                             and grade of C or better in OT 428 and grade of C or better in
                             OT 526 and satisfactory completion of OT 422.
OT 541                       Provides an advanced understanding of evaluation, intervention,
                             program development and research based on the model of
Advanced Human               human occupation. Focuses on use of the model to address
Occupation Theory and        psychosocial problems in a range of disabled persons.
Application                  Prerequisite(s): OT 400 or consent of the instructor.


OT 542*                      Course develops advanced ability to treat and relate to clients
                             and families with a wide range of interpersonal presentations
Advanced Clinical            during therapy. This is designed to address many different
Reasoning and                clinical contexts and presenting diagnoses. Covers issues
Therapeutic Use of Self in   involved in clinical relating as they pertain to both non-
Occupational Therapy         psychiatric aspects of relating and aspects of relating that
                             involve psychiatric overlay in clinical practice. Prerequisite(s):
                             Fieldwork Levels 1 and 2 or prior work experience.
OT 544*                      Introduces theoretical underpinnings and basic concepts of the
                             practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Provides a critical
Cognitive-Behavior           analysis of the use of cognitive behavioral therapy in medical/
Therapy for Persons with     rehabilitation settings with people with chronic
Chronic Illness and          illness and disabilities. Covers nuanced aspects of the
Disability                   application of cognitive behavior therapy to specific
                             psychological issues as well as common medical symptoms
                             faced by individuals with chronic illnesses and disabilities.
                             Prerequisite(s): None required.
OT/DIS 550                   This course addresses the social, cultural, physical and economic
                             elements of the urban context and how these influence the
Disability in the Urban      experiences of persons with disabilities. Features of the inner
Environment                  city environment that exacerbate
                             problems for persons with disabilities are examined, as are
                             potential resources for low-income urban communities. This
                             course also examines the impact on effectiveness of treatment
                             that results from the different cultural values of professionals
                             and clients.




                                            26
OT 552*                    Addresses theories, ethics and strategies of developing and
                           providing outcomes-based clinical interventions in underserved
Community Based            communities. Students will be assigned a population with whom
Interventions with         they will collaborate to implement
Underserved Populations    course concepts. Prerequisite(s): Level II Fieldwork or prior
                           work experience.
OT 553                     Examines methods in program evaluation with emphasis on
                           empowerment and participatory evaluation. Students will study
Program Evaluation:        quantitative and qualitative strategies, how to communicate
Documenting the Impact     information to stakeholders, and how to design evaluations.
of Human Services          Same as DHD 553. Recommended background: Interest in
                           research, health or behavioral sciences, and implementation and
                           evaluation of community initiatives and community-based
                           organizations.
OT 554*                    Integrates advanced theory, practice and research knowledge and
                           skills from advanced fieldwork and coursework to identify and
Applied Professional       mitigate ethical dilemmas, legal concerns and/or complex
Ethics in Occupational     intervention problems encountered in occupational therapy
Therapy                    practice. Applies problem-based learning methods and uses
                           complex case studies in context as the basis for student learning.
                           Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Field work required.
                           Prerequisite(s): OT 448.
OT 556                     Introduces theories of need, models of the needs assessment
                           process, and reviews research methods typically used in
Theory and Methods of      conducting needs assessments. Emphasis will be on needs
Needs Assessment in        assessments in health-related community agencies. Same as
Aging and Disability       CHSC 556, and DIS 556. Prerequisite(s): A 400 or 500-level
                           research course such as OT 510, DHD 415, CHSC 446, or SOC
                           500. The prerequisite research course needs to provide students
                           with an understanding of basic research design, sampling
                           strategies, and an introduction to methods such as surveys and
                           focus groups. Recommended Background: Health or behavioral
                           sciences, research methods.
OT 557*                    Follows the course ‗Theory and Methods of Needs Assessment
                           in Aging and Disability‘, focusing on the translation of needs
Acting on Needs            into solution strategies. Addresses different methodologies for
Assessment Findings        setting needs-based priorities, developing solutions, setting
                           action plans, and working with communities to enact those
                           plans. Prerequisite(s): OT/CHSC/DIS 556.
OT 558*
                           Addresses processes and issues related to writing for publication
Writing for Professional   in occupational therapy and related journals and magazines,
Publication                including preparation and submission processes, IRB, receiving
                           critiques, and communicating with reviewers and editors.
OT 564                     Overview of issues related to administration and management in
                           varied settings in which occupational therapists practice. Topics



                                          27
Administration and        include management functions, service planning, quality
Management in             improvement, financial management and accreditation.
Occupational Therapy      Prerequisite(s): OT 554.
OT 567*                   Follows the course OT 564 Administration and Management in
                          Occupational Therapy and focuses on advanced understanding
Professional Leadership   and skills for applying theory and evidence in administrative and
in Occupational Therapy   managerial leadership. Provides an opportunity to examine the
                          roles and functions of an administrator or manager in a specific
                          setting and to apply principles of problem solving, change
                          management and quality improvement within that setting.
                          Prerequisite(s): OT 564.


OT 565*                   Covers curriculum design, implementation and evaluation.
Occupational Therapy      Includes didactic material as well as experiential learning as the
Professional Curriculum   student immerses in the process of implementing a professional
Design, Implementation    curriculum. In addition to the curriculum focus, students will
and Evaluation            also be exposed to supplemental topics such as student
                          admissions, advising, student life and accreditation.
                          Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.
OT 595                    Students attend a series of colloquia, including seminars that are
                          relevant to their doctoral project and area of study. .
Seminar in Occupational   Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s):
Therapy                   Consent of the instructor.


OT 596                    This course is for graduate students who wish to pursue
                          independent study not related to their project/thesis research.
Independent Study         Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.
OT 593                    Pre-project seminar. Students participate in faculty-student
                          presentation and a discussion of proposed ideas related to the
Doctoral Proseminar       student‘s chosen foci and leading up to the student project.
OT 599*                   Applied scholarship involving planning and implementation of
                          one or more action projects based on theory and evidence,
Project Research          evaluation, writing a comprehensive report, dissemination, and
                          oral presentation.
594 Special Topics in     New course under development and selected seminar topics of
Occupational Therapy      current interests to faculty and students. Prerequisite(s): Consent
1 TO 4 hours.             of the instructor.




                                         28
 APPENDIX B
FACULTY VITAE




     29
                                        APPENDIX C
                                  SAMPLE COURSE PLAN
The following is a Sample Course Plan for a Doctor of Occupational Therapy student whose
career goal is to develop advanced practice in the area of mental health and who also had an
interest in developing management leadership skills for developing a community-based mental
health program. The course plan below would allow the student to develop advanced clinical and
program development and evaluation skills, develop an appreciation of mental health problems
from a disability studies perspective. The student would also develop a broader appreciation of
issues of community health, planning, and fiscal management through electives.

Core Courses
The student would complete all the following core courses:

   Course Number                        Course Title                            Credits
      OT 500                  Theories of Occupational Therapy                    4
      OT 510                 Research in Occupational Therapy                     3
      OT 530              Advanced Field Practicum in Mental Health               8

       OT 531             Advanced Field Practicum in Administration                4

      OT 595                  Seminar in Occupational Therapy                       1
      OT 593             Doctoral Proseminar in Occupational Therapy                2
    Total credits                                                                  22


Concentration Courses

   Course Number                                Course Title                            Credits
      OT 534              Socio-Cultural Aspects of Occupational Therapy Practice         3
      OT 541               Advanced Human Occupation Theory and Application               4
      OT 544               Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Persons with Chronic            4
                                            Illness and Disability
       OT 552                Community Based Interventions with Underserved                4
                                                 Populations
       OT 553             Program Evaluation: Documenting the Impact of Human              3
                                                   Services
       OT 554               Applied Professional Ethics in Occupational Therapy            2
       OT 564             Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy            3
       OT 567                Professional Leadership in Occupational Therapy               3
       OT 542             Advanced Clinical Reasoning and Therapeutic Use of Self          2
                                          in Occupational Therapy
      DIS 501                                Disability Studies I                          4
      DIS 535                    Advocacy and Empowerment in Disability                    3
    Total credits                                                                         35




                                              30
Elective Courses
This student would likely chose elective courses that span, for instance, public health,
psychology, and business.

     Total credits                                                                     16

     Field Exam                                                                            0

       OT 599             Project Research. Project undertaken in a                    20
                          community setting that provides mental
                          health services involving development and
                          evaluation of a new program to support
                          return to work for persons with chronic
                          substance abuse problems and co/morbid
                          mental illness

   Total Program                                                                       93
      Credits




                                                 31
                                         APPENDIX D
                                  SAMPLE COURSE PLAN
The following is a Sample Course Plan for a Doctor of Occupational Therapy student whose
primary career goal is to develop advanced practice in the community-based care of people with
multiple sclerosis (MS). The student‘s secondary goal is to develop skills in teaching and
education in order to develop workshops for professionals interested in working with people with
MS. The course plan below would allow the student to develop advanced clinical skills, assess
needs of workshop participants, develop educational programs, and evaluate both clinical and
educational initiatives. The student would also develop a broader appreciation of issues of
community health, planning, and fiscal management through electives.

Core Courses
The student would complete all the following core courses:

Course Number                             Course Title                               Credits
   OT 500                      Theories of Occupational Therapy                        4
   OT 510                      Research in Occupational Therapy                        3
   OT 530             Advanced Field Experience: Clinical Specialization in            6
                            Occupational Therapy (focused on MS)
    OT 530                        Advanced Field Experience:                            3
                        Clinical Specialization in Occupational Therapy
                        (focused on community-based service delivery)
   OT 532                   Advanced Field Practicum in Education                        3
   OT 595                      Seminar in Occupational Therapy                           1
   OT 593                Doctoral Proseminar in Occupational Therapy                     2
 Total credits                                                                          22

Concentration Courses (34-42; minimum of 20 from within department)

 Course Number                               Course Title                               Credits
    OT 556                    Theory and Methods of Needs Assessment                      4
                                        in Aging and Disability
     OT 557                     Acting on Needs Assessment Findings                          3
     OT 552           Community Based Interventions with Underserved Populations             4
     OT 553                     Program Evaluation: Documenting the                          3
                                      Impact of Human Services
     OT 565              Occupational therapy Professional Curriculum Design,                3
                                   Implementation, and Evaluation
     OT 558                      Writing for Professional Publication                        3
     OT 544                 Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Persons with                      4
                                    Chronic Illness and Disability
    OT 536                       Fatiguing Conditions and Disability                          3
    OT 526                               Assistive Technology                                 3
    OT 596                Independent study (focused on models of MS care)                    4
    OT 554               Applied Professional Ethics in Occupational Therapy                  2
  Total credits                                                                              36




                                               32
Elective Courses (10-16 credits)

  Course Number                                   Course Title                 Credits
    CHSC 527                       Critical Issues in Long Term Care Policy       3
    CHSC 586                             Health Behavior Interventions            3
     UPP 540                         Community Development I: Theory              3
     UPP 541                        Community Development II: Practice            3
    PSCH 558                           Seminar in Cognitive Psychology            2
   Total credits                                                                 14

     Field Exam                                                                  0

       OT 599           Project Research. Project undertaken in a community      20
                        setting that provides services to persons with MS
                        including the development of educational modules for
                        both clients and staff.

   Total Program                                                                 92
      Credits




                                              33
Catalog Descriptions:

OT 500 Theories of Occupational Therapy. 4 hours. Develops an understanding of the theoretical basis
of occupational therapy and the impact of theory on clinical practice. Covers the history of knowledge and
practice development in the field. Focuses on specific practice models developed as guides to clinical
reasoning. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

OT 510 Research in Occupational Therapy. 3 hours. Restricted to students in the following majors:
Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program). Introduction to basic
elements of research design relevant to occupational therapy practice. Prepares student to become critical
consumer of research in occupational therapy and related fields. Quantitative and qualitative approaches to
research. Prerequisites: Admission to the M.S. in Occupational Therapy program, or consent of the
instructor. Recommended background: Statistics and research methods background.

OT 515 Synthesis I. 1 hour. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Restricted to students in the
following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program).
Integrating theory, practice and research knowledge and skills across courses using case studies and small
group learning activities. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 401 and Grade of C or better in OT 406
and Grade of C or better in OT 407 and Grade of C or better in OT 500 and Grade of C or better in AHS
510.

OT 526 Assistive Technology and the Environment. 3 hours. Restricted to students in the following
majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program). Assessing the
need for, delivering, and evaluating the outcomes of occupationally-based technology and environmental
interventions with people with disabilities within the home, school, workplace and community.
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 411 and Grade of C or better in OT 412 and Grade of C or better
in OT 416 and Grade of C or better in AHS 510.

OT 530 Advanced Field Experience: Clinical Specialization in OT. 1 to 8 hours.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Provides opportunity for the student interested in advanced
occupational therapy practice to observe a master clinician and participate in treatment and/or clinical
research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor.

OT 531 Advanced Field Experience in Occupational Therapy Management. 1 to 8 hours.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Practicum experience working with an experienced professional to
develop projects or programs in student's interest area, e.g. administration, middle management,
consultation, program evaluation, and grantsmanship. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of
the instructor.

OT 532 Advanced Field Experience: Occupational Therapy Education. 1 to 8 hours.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Provides opportunity to observe, prepare, and present lectures/labs
to occupational therapy students in technical or professional curricula or to develop skills as a clinical
educator. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor.


OT 534 Socio-Cultural Aspects of Occupational Therapy. 3 hours. Restricted to students in the
following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program).
Addresses social and cultural contexts in which chronic illness and disability are experienced; contexts
which impact that experience, and broad contexts in which recovery/accommodation and occupational
therapy treatment occur. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 424 and Grade of C or better in OT
428 and Grade of C or better in OT 526.

OT 535 Synthesis II. 2 hours. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Restricted to students in the
following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program).
Integrating advanced theory, practice and research knowledge and skills across courses using complex
individual and programmatic case studies and small and large group intervention planning activities.
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 424 and Grade of C or better in OT 428 and Grade of C or better
in OT 526 and satisfactory completion of OT 422.

OT 541 Advanced Human Occupation Theory and Application. 4 hours. Provides an advanced
understanding of evaluation, intervention, program development and research based on the model of human



                                                      34
occupation. Focuses on use of the model to address psychosocial problems in a range of disabled persons.
Prerequisites: OT 400, Theories of Occupational Therapy or Consent of Instructor.

OT 542 Advanced Clinical Reasoning and Therapeutic Use of Self in Occupational Therapy. 2
hours. Restricted to students in the following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy:
MS (Certification Program). Doctorate in Occupational Therapy Program. The main objective of this course
is to teach occupational therapy students advanced skills in forming and maintaininig ethical, empathic, and
successful treatment relationships with their clients Recommended background: Exposure to coursework
in psychopathology or in psychosocial aspects of occupational therapy.

OT 544 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Persons with Chronic Illness and Disability. 4 hours.
Restricted to students in the following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS
(Certification Program). Doctorate in Occupational Therapy Program. This course covers the core concepts
of cognitive behavioral therapy for individuals with chronic illnesses and disabilities from practice and
theoretical perspectives. Recommended background: Exposure to coursework in therapeutic use of self,
psychopathology or in psychosocial aspects of occupational therapy.

OT 550 Disability in the Urban Environment. 4 hours. Same as DIS 550. Features of urban contexts
that influence experiences of persons with disabilities are examined as they exacerbate problems or
enhance resources in low income communities. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

OT 552 Community Based Interventions with Underserved Populations. 4 hours. Restricted to
students in the following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification
Program). Doctorate in Occupational Therapy. Addresses theories, ethics and strategies of developing and
providing outcomes-based clinical interventions in underserved communities. Students collaborate with a
community population to implement course concepts. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor Level II
Fieldwork or prior work experience. Recommended background: OT 550.

OT 553 Program Evaluation: Documenting the Impact of Human Services. 3 hours. Same as
DHD 553. This course examines methods in program evaluation with emphasis on empowerment and
participatory evaluation. Students will study quantitative and qualitative strategies, how to communicate
information to stakeholders, and how to design evaluations. Recommended background: Interest in
research, health or behavioral sciences, and implementation and evaluation of community initiatives and
community-based organizations.


OT 554 Applied Professional Ethics in Occupational Therapy. 2 hours. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
grade only. Restricted to students in the following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational
Therapy: MS (Certification Program). Doctorate in Occupational Therapy. Integrates advanced theory,
practice and research knowledge and skills from fieldwork and coursework to identify and mitigate ethical
dilemmas, legal concerns and/or complex intervention problems encountered in occupational therapy
practice. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 500 and Grade of C or better in OT 510.

OT 556 Theory & Methods of Needs Assessment in Aging & Disability. 4 hours. Same as CHSC 556,
DIS 556. This course introduces theories of need, models of the needs assessment
process, and reviews research methods typically used in conducting needs
assessments. Emphasis will be on needs assessments in health-related
community agencies. Prerequisites: A 400 or 500-level research course such as OT 510, DHD 415,CHSC
446, or SOC 500. The prerequisite research course needs to provide students with an understanding of
basic research design, sampling strategies, and an introduction to methods such as surveys and focus
groups. Recommended background: Health or behavioral sciences, research methods.

OT 557 Acting on Needs Assessment Findings. 3 hours. Restricted to students in the following majors:
Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program). Doctorate in Occupational
Therapy. Follows the course OT 556, focusing on the translation of needs assessment findings into solution
strategies. Addresses setting needs-based priorities, developing solutions, setting action plans, and working
with communities to enact those plans. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 500 and Grade of C or
better in OT 510 and Grade of C or better in OT 556; or consent of the instructor.

OT 558 Writing for Professional Publication in Occupational Therapy. 3 hours. Restricted to
students in the following majors: Occupational Therapy: BS or Occupational Therapy: MS. Doctorate in
Occupational Therapy. Addresses processes and issues related to writing for publication in occupational



                                                     35
therapy and related journals and magazines, including preparation and submission processes, IRB,
receiving critiques, and communicating with reviewers and editors. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in
OT 500 and Grade of C or better in OT 510.

OT 564 Administration and Management in Occupational Therapy. 3 hours. Restricted to students in
the following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program).
Doctorate in Occupational Therapy. Overview of issues related to administration and management in varied
settings in which occupational therapists practice. Topics include management functions, service planning,
quality improvement, financial management and accreditation. Prerequisites: OT 428; or approval of the
department.


OT 565 Occupational Therapy Professional Curriculum Design, Implementation and Evaluation. 3
hours. Restricted to students in the following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy:
MS (Certification Program). Doctorate in Occupational Therapy. Includes didactic material and experiential
learning as students explore design and implementation of a professional curriculum. In addition students
will be exposed to student admissions, advising, student life and accreditation. Prerequisites: Consent of
the instructor.

OT 567 Professional Leadership in Occupational Therapy. 3 hours. Restricted to students in the
following majors: Occupational Therapy: MS or Occupational Therapy: MS (Certification Program). Focuses
on application of theory and evidence in administrative, managerial and educational leadership. Examines
roles and functions of leaders and application of problem solving, change management and quality
improvement in a variety of settings. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in OT 564; or consent of the
instructor.

OT 594 Special Topics in Occupational Therapy. 1 to 4 hours. New course under development and
selected seminar topics of current interests to faculty and students. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
consent of instructor.

OT 595 Seminar in Occupational Therapy. 1 hour. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Pre-thesis
seminar. Students participate in faculty-student discussion and activities related to individual areas of
research/thesis. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and consent of the instructor.

OT 596 Independent Study. 1 to 4 hours. This course is for graduate students who wish to pursue
independent study not related to their project/thesis research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
consent of instructor.


OT 599 Project Research. 0 to 16 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 20 hours.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade only. Doctorate in Occupational Therapy Program. Applied scholarship
involving planning and implementation of one or more action projects based on theory and evidence,
evaluation, writing a comprehensive report, dissemination, and oral presentation. Prerequisites: Consent
of the instructor Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.




                                                    36

				
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