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					   Berkeley Energy & Resources Collaborative




Career Guide
                   for

 Energy, Climate
& CleanTech Law
                2008
Produced by BERC@Boalt
Introduction ..........................................................................................................3
      Preamble (Read this first!) ..............................................................................4
      Other Resources .............................................................................................4
      Note to 1Ls......................................................................................................5
      Note to Legal Practitioners..............................................................................5
      Berkeley Energy & Resources Collaborative (BERC) .....................................5
      Berkeley Center for Law & Technology (BCLT) ...............................................5
Law Firms..............................................................................................................6
      Practice Group Descriptions............................................................................8
      Large / Medium Law Firms............................................................................10
      Small / Boutique Law Firms ..........................................................................32
Other Legal Employers......................................................................................35
      Public Interest & Public Sector......................................................................36
      In-House.................................................................... (coming in future editions)
      Solo Practice & Consulting............................................................................45
Appendices.........................................................................................................46
      Glossary of Acronyms ...................................................................................47
      Index by City .................................................................................................53
      Index by Firm / Organization Name ..............................................................55
INTRODUCTION
                         Preamble (Read this First!)
While the fields of energy, climate change and cleantech have expanded dramatically in recent years, the le-
gal landscape of those practice areas remains very unclear to interested law students. The purposes of this
guide are to (1) help students understand the realities of practicing in different aspects of the energy, climate
change and cleantech sectors, (2) demonstrate the breadth of opportunities available, (3) identify the real
leading firms in the field, and (4) aid their employment search by offering a more comprehensive perspective
than any website or recruitment event can offer. We want students to seek out the jobs best suited for them,
and would like to help employers target the most motivated new lawyers for this area of practice.
This is a guide (not a directory) and we have not attempted to make it comprehensive. We have gathered in-
formation from a variety of sources - attorneys, office administrators, recruitment coordinators, students, pro-
motional materials, and websites - and we have not strived for uniformity. The fact that some entries are
longer or more detailed does not suggest that we value those employers more highly. We have aimed, how-
ever, to clearly distinguish between descriptions and summaries that we have created, and those coming
from lawyers or recruiters at the organization, and tried to give you the most accurate portrayals possible.
Although not intentional, the guide’s geographic bias is nonetheless obvious. We simply have had more occa-
sion to interact with lawyers in San Francisco, Silicon Valley and Sacramento than elsewhere. And although
we recognize that much of the most exciting climate and carbon finance work is located abroad, this guide
heavily favors U.S.-based companies and domestic practices. Our public sector entries also focus on posi-
tions at the federal and California-state level, but there are numerous opportunities in these fields in other
states and in local government offices (cities, counties, etc.)
We use “ECC” to represent Energy / Climate / Cleantech. This is by no means a standard acronym or term of
art; it just saves space in this guide.
Please send any comments, questions or suggestions to berc.boalt@gmail.com.


                                     Other Resources
Ranking Tables
 Ranking tables for various legal practices can be helpful to give an overview of which firms work in distinct
 areas, but definitely be careful and take them with a grain of salt! The sort of things that make a firm ap-
 pear or rise on these tables may not be at all correlated to whether it is a good place to start out as a new
 associate. Also, a handful of partners who we consider to be excellent lawyers and mentors in energy and
 cleantech practices are not ranked at all. To start, check out http://www.chambersandpartners.com and
 http://www.law.com/career_center/surveys_rankings.shtml.
Bar Associations
 Joining a relevant bar association or group can help put you in contact with others practicing the type of
 law that interests you - in both the public and private sectors. Consider the Energy Bar Association (http://
 www.eba-net.org), and the American Bar Association’s Section of Environment, Energy and Resources
 (http://www.abanet.org/environ/). City or regional associations might also have member groups for your
 preferred practice area.
National Association for Law Placement (NALP)
 The NALP directory (http://www.nalpdirectory.com) is a great place to search among medium and large law
 firms. Their database includes which practice groups are prominent in the firm, the number of lawyers work-
 ing in each office, whether they hire 2L and/or 1L summer associations, and much more. NALP also pro-
 vides information about public service legal work at PSLawNet (http://www.pslawnet.org/).
                                          Note To 1Ls
We understand that the process of looking for your first summer job can be daunting, and we hope this guide
can be of at least some help. For medium and larger firms, we suggest beginning your inquiries with the
NALP directory (www.nalpdirectory.com), but don’t be afraid to contact lawyers or recruiters directly if you are
particularly interested in a certain employer -- demonstrating your enthusiasm is never a bad thing. Smaller
firms are less likely to hire 1L summer associates, and their hiring needs are often less predictable than larger
offices. There are a great number of (usually unpaid) public interest and public sector summer internships
available. We have tried to highlight in this guide which organizations tend to consider 1Ls.



                         Note To Legal Practitioners
Please email berc.boalt@gmail.com if we have misrepresented your firm / organization, if you would
like your information to be added or updated, or if you have any other questions.



     Berkeley Energy & Resources Collaborative
                      (BERC)
 BERC@Boalt is the law school branch of the Berkeley Energy & Resources Collaborative, a student-led
 organization which aims to connect and develop the UC Berkeley energy and resources community. BERC
 acts as a bridge between the University's many programs, schools, and labs, and works to forge connec-
 tions with the larger cleantech and energy clusters in the Bay Area and beyond.
 BERC Boalt helps to educate law students about current legal practice and advances in the fields of en-
 ergy, climate change and clean technologies through curriculum development, an expanding alumni and
 professional network, and the promotion of events and discussions centered on green issues. The group
 also connects members to industry professionals and graduate students in other UC Berkeley departments
 to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration and project development.
 To learn more about BERC or join the group, please visit http://berc.berkeley.edu. If you have questions,
 please email berc.boalt@gmail.com.



   Berkeley Center for Law & Technology (BCLT)
                              The mission of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology is to foster benefi-
                              cial and ethical advancement of technology by promoting the understanding
                              and guiding the development of intellectual property and related fields of law
                              and policy as they intersect with business, science and technology.
                              To learn more, please visit http://www.law.berkeley.edu/institutes/bclt/ or
                              email bclt@law.berkeley.edu.
 The BERC@Boalt team is deeply grateful for the tremendous support provided by BCLT. Please note,
 however, that all opinions expressed in this guide belong only to the BERC students and do NOT reflect
 the views of BCLT staff.
LAW FIRMS
                             Emerging Companies
Emerging companies practice groups often work with clients from pre-formation, through financing,
and then in ongoing operations. In doing so, they gather expertise in a number of specific areas. On
the finance side, they advise clients on venture finance, private equity, securities, and tax issues.
Due to the nature of the product, many alternative energy companies face unique financing chal-
lenges, and lawyers must understand changing tax incentives, shifts in international markets and
trading platforms, and trends in venture funding. These practice groups also offer corporate counsel-
ing on choice of entity structure, executive and employee compensation, employee, human re-
sources, exit strategies, and other strategic issues. Additionally, they provide a great deal of coun-
seling regarding development, acquisition and exploitation of intellectual property.
Lawyers in emerging companies groups often form very strong ties with their clients, and maintain
professional relationships for very long periods of time. Attorneys new to the practice are often able
to have significantly more direct contact with the clients than in litigation or other corporate practices.
Silicon Valley remains the center of emerging company and venture finance law practice, but several
prominent practices exist in San Francisco and other major cities. Some firms that should be on your
list if you are interested in this field: Wilson Sonsini, Orrick, Heller Ehrman, Cooley, Gunderson
and Covington.



                                       Cleantech IP
Cleantech-specific practices are beginning to branch out of several traditional IP practices – forming
a distinct industry group similar to biotech or software. Lawyers working in these groups help to ac-
quire and develop clients’ intellectual property (most notably through patent prosecution), license
and transfer their technology, and protect their IP rights through alternative dispute resolution. Fu-
ture years are almost certain to bring more intellectual property disputes over clean technologies,
requiring more IP litigators to become familiar with the industry as well.
If you want to do cleantech-IP, some big firms to look at include Morrison & Foerster, Cooley, Fen-
wick, Gunderson, and Wilson Sonsini. Especially in Silicon Valley, some IP or patent boutique
firms are beginning to develop cleantech-specific practices as well.
                                    Project Finance
The objective of this practice is to finance the construction of large projects - traditionally infrastruc-
ture or utility projects such as power plants, refineries or dams, and increasingly wind farms, concen-
trated solar arrays, and other forms of renewable generation. A complex financial structure is used,
usually employing both project debt and equity, with the debt being repaid from the income gener-
ated by the functional project. This differs from other forms of finance because acquisition of funding
is generally more dependent upon the analysis and management of risk associated with the project
than with the credit risk of the borrowers. The practice requires lawyers to understand the rationale
for project financing, prepare the financial plan, assess the risks, design the financing mix, and help
procure funds. It further draws upon knowledge of public/private financing structures, credit require-
ments of lenders, contractual partnerships, cash flow projection, and tax rules.
A project may be subject to a number of technical, environmental, economic and political risks, par-
ticularly in developing countries and emerging markets. To cope with these, project sponsors (equity
investors) often contract with a syndicate of banks and other parties to allocate risk effectively while
simultaneously ensuring profits for each party involved. A special purpose entity is often created for
a new project, which shields other assets owned by the sponsor in the event the project fails.
The project finance practice tends to be geographically focused in large markets, and often involves
significant international components. Day-to-day work involves document drafting and negotiation; it
is a very document-intensive practice. Beyond working at law firms or in-house at the financial insti-
tutions which sponsor projects, other in-house opportunities can include development banks. Such
public interest positions have both international and political components, often allowing the attorney
to interact with governments and large international organizations. No matter where a lawyer works,
project finance work can be challenging – deals are very complex, require extraordinary organiza-
tion, and often can take years to close.
The heart of United States project finance work is undoubtedly in New York, but many of the firms
with big NY practices also have reasonably strong practice groups along the west coast. If you want
to do energy project finance, we recommend that you consider: Milbank, Latham, Chadbourne &
Parke, Andrews Kurth, Wilson Sonsini, Baker & McKenzie, Allen & Overy, White & Case, Or-
rick, Skadden and Heller Ehrman.



                        Large-Scale Transactional
We are using this category as a catch-all corporate practice for non-emerging companies specializ-
ing in the energy and cleantech industries. Legal work of this nature includes practice specialties
such as tax, M&A, and employment agreements. Depending on the firm and the situation, there
may be several attorneys who would not consider themselves to be “energy lawyers,” but neverthe-
less know the ins and outs of the energy sector because of familiarization with the taxing schemes
applied to energy companies/projects, or employment arrangements unique to the industry.

Some firms we recommend for your consideration: Skadden, White & Case, Milbank, Latham,
Chadbourne & Parke, Andrews Kurth, Wilson Sonsini, Orrick, Baker & McKenzie, Fulbright &
Jaworski, Pillsbury, and Dewey.
                                Energy Regulatory
Energy regulatory work exists at the federal level - primarily with the Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission (FERC) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and at the state level with a
variety of agencies. On behalf of their clients (which often include utilities, IPPs, trade groups, mu-
nicipalities, power marketers and other energy companies) lawyers participate in ratemaking and
rulemaking proceedings, lobby for favorable legislation, and advocate for license, project or merger
approval. Energy regulatory practices are often similar to litigation practices in terms of attorney work
product and participation, but matters are typically resolved on a much more contracted timetable.
FERC Practice - While other offices nationwide frequently have FERC cases, the heart of the prac-
tice is obviously in DC. Some firms to check out: Van Ness Feldman, Skadden, Chadbourne &
Parke, Dewey and White & Case.
NRC Practice - Firms worth a look: Winston & Strawn, Pillsbury, Dewey, Morgan Lewis, Kirkland
and Hunton & Lewis.
State Agency Practice - We know the most about the California energy regulatory structure. Larger
firms to consider for CPUC work include Winston & Strawn and Manatt Phelps, and boutiques in-
clude Goodin MacBride, and Ellison.

                                   Climate Change
Climate change practices are far more developed abroad (where emissions regulations and markets
already exist) than in the US, but this field is developing faster than probably any other in contempo-
rary American law. Climate change practice combines regulatory and financial aspects.
Regulation / Compliance
Where regulatory schemes exist, lawyers assist clients in complying with emissions and environ-
mental rules, and legal work can bare strong resemblance to more traditional environmental compli-
ance practice. In the U.S., many energy-intensive companies are presently focusing on pre-
compliance - setting baselines and analyzing options for emissions reductions in anticipation of fu-
ture legislation. Clients in this area often are not those developing renewable generation sources,
but instead can be as diverse as industrial production companies undergoing extensive energy effi-
ciency retrofits, companies developing landfill gas or dairy digester projects, oil refineries, natural
gas pipeline companies, and cement manufacturers.
Carbon Finance & Trading
Under cap and trade systems, companies or countries can only emit a specified amount of GHGs,
and such regulated entities buy carbon allowances or develop offset projects (“carbon finance”)
when doing so is cheaper than paying to reduce emissions themselves. The majority of the projects
are located in developing countries which do not have to meet any targets for GHG reductions, but
can develop projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to sell the credits to coun-
tries with existing targets. Lawyers help clients in determining appropriate projects, securing the fi-
nancing, navigating the different jurisdictional laws and regulations, and properly reporting the pro-
jects’ outputs to the emissions regulatory body. Regulated entities that emit less than expected can
also sell its surplus allowances to those unable to meet emissions caps. Climate change attorneys
assist clients in all aspects of negotiating and effectuating such trades.
Some firms: Clifford Chance, Van Ness Feldman, Beveridge & Diamond, Bingham McCutchen,
Akin Gump, Sonnenschien, Baker & McKenzie, Hunton & Williams, and Covington.
           Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
                                        www.akingump.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC; Houston, TX; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX; Los
  Angeles, CA; New York, NY; Moscow, Russia
Description: Akin Gump has a large traditional energy practice, as well as a growing climate and
  carbon finance practice. The firm’s climate lawyers advise clients on domestic and international
  policy issues, help with international compliance and domestic pre-compliance, represent invest-
  ment funds and private equity firms, help with global carbon offset projects, and provide litigation
  counsel on matters involving environmental impact statements, permitting, corporate disclosure
  and rulemaking. The energy group has extensive regulatory experience at state and federal lev-
  els, advocates for clients in policy formation and rulemaking proceedings, and assists clients in
  large transactional matters including M&A and project finance. The firm represents utilities, IPPs,
  cogeneration facilities, natural gas and crude oil suppliers, and nuclear energy companies.


                                     Allen & Overy
                                        www.allenovery.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: New York, NY; London, UK; Brussels, Belgium; Beijing,
  China; Shanghai, China; Hong Kong; Paris, France; Frankfurt, Germany; Milan, Italy; Amsterdam,
  Netherlands; Tokyo, Japan; Singapore; Madrid, Spain; Dubai, UAE
Description: Allen & Overy, a UK firm, is one of the undisputed leaders in global project finance.
  They also have substantial expertise in transactional work for the established energy sector, in-
  cluding M&A, securitization, privatization, real estate, tax, and environmental compliance.


                                Alston & Bird LLP
                                          www.alston.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA
Description: Alston & Bird’s has a very prominent climate change and carbon management team,
  with particular strength in international carbon trading and advising on carbon-capture projects
  throughout the world. The team also provides risk consultation, as well as legislative and regula-
  tory advocacy. Clients include hedge funds, energy-intensive companies such as airlines, existing
  energy (usually oil and coal) companies and new enterprises that have been specifically organ-
  ized to exploit trading and development opportunities in carbon mitigation and capture. The firm
  also has a substantial renewable energy and cleantech practice, especially in project finance /
  development (with particular focus on wind, ethanol, biomass, solar, and coal-to-liquid sectors),
  and regulatory work at state, federal and international levels.
                                    Andrews Kurth
                                       www.andrewskurth.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Houston, TX; Dallas, TX; Austin, TX; Washington, DC;
  London, UK
Description: Andrews Kurth has an extensive domestic energy practice, representing biofuels de-
  velopers and financers, oil and gas producers, onshore and offshore service companies, pipe-
  lines, power project developers, IPPs, cogenerators, energy marketers and exchanges, and end
  users. Andrews Kurth also represent investors, equity funds, venture funds and banks as they in-
  vest in clean and renewable technologies. The firm has strength in large transactional work, espe-
  cially project finance and development, and its energy regulatory and litigation practice is also no-
  table, at both state and federal levels.



                               Arnold & Porter LLP
                                        www.arnoldporter.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC (~40 of 380 attorneys); New York, NY;
  Los Angeles, CA; London, UK
Description: Among US firms, Arnold & Porter has one of the highest ranked climate change prac-
  tices, which focuses on state and federal regulatory programs, energy and transportation policy,
  land use, international trade, and litigation. It also has an established traditional energy practice
  (oil, gas, electricity and nuclear) and works with renewable and distributed energy generation. The
  firm’s expertise includes project finance, M&A, international arbitration, investigations under the
  Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, large corporate transactions, and complex litigation.



                                   Baker Botts LLP
                                         www.bakerbotts.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Houston, TX; Austin, TX; New York, NY; Washington, DC;
  London, UK; Moscow, Russia; Dubai, UAE; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Beijing, China; Hong Kong
Description: Baker Botts has one of the strongest traditional energy practices in the U.S., especially
  for representation of oil and gas companies. The various offices work closely together to finance
  and develop international projects, and to perform other large-scale transactions and M&A. The
  firm is also strong in dispute resolution, and in representing clients in regulatory and litigation pro-
  ceedings before FERC, state agencies and in federal courts. Baker Botts’ climate change practice
  draws upon its energy-industry strength to help companies with global compliance and domestic
  pre-compliance issues, carbon offset project development, offset purchases, credit exchange on
  carbon markets, and consideration of carbon capture and sequestration projects.
                                 Baker & McKenzie
                                          www.bakernet.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Diego, CA; Washington, DC; Houston, TX; Sydney,
  Australia; Melbourne, Australia; London, UK; Warsaw, Poland; Sao Paulo, Brazil; Tokyo, Japan;
  Juarez, Mexico
Description: Baker & McKenzie has a substantial (and highly ranked) project finance practice, in
  which the firm often represents alternative energy companies as well as the private equity funds
  and banks which sponsor the projects. Baker also does substantial M&A and large transactional
  work in the ECC sphere. The firm’s international offices have prominent climate change and en-
  ergy public markets practices, helping the companies they represent comply with regulations, re-
  spond to environmental risks and participate effectively in carbon markets.
Representative Cleantech Transactions (US): Nordic Windpower Limited - in its first round of ven-
  ture capital financing and acquisition of a Swedish-based wind turbine company, KMR Power Cor-
  poration - in connection with the refinancing of a large power project in Columbia, Sanwa Bank -
  in financing a waste tires-to-energy project. (International): Sydney Olympic Games - in drafting
  renewable energy supply agreements for the games, Mizuho Corporate Bank - in financing wind
  power plants in Japan, Gulf Yala Green - in the development of a 20MW bio-mass plant in Thai-
  land, C-Power - in project development and permitting of two off-shore wind farms.



                              Bingham McCutchen
                                          www.bingham.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~5 of 120 attorneys); Walnut Creek,
  Ca (~4 of 20 attorneys); Boston, MA; Los Angeles, CA; Washington, DC
Description: Bingham’s specialties in the ECC field include regulatory and environmental compli-
  ance, litigation, real estate / land use, corporate counseling and transactions of all types. The firm
  has specific industry expertise in electric power, petrochemicals and petroleum. It does additional
  work in project finance and M&A. Representative climate change matters include advising clients
  concerning the registration of emission reductions with the California Climate Action Registry, and
  trading within emissions markets such as EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme, RGGI, the Chicago
  Climate Exchange, and RECLAIM. Bingham takes part in state and federal legislation and rule-
  making, by monitoring, commenting on and promoting legislative proposals for GHG regulation.



   Practice Groups: Primary - Energy / Litigation; Secondary - Environmental / Gov’t; % of billable hours
    doing ECC work: 60%
   Representative Clients / Projects: State of California, Competitive Power Ventures, NextLight Re-
    newables, City and County of San Francisco
   Education: UC Berkeley - J.D. 1987
   Career Path: I began as an environmental litigator. I was introduced to energy law as Senior Deputy
    Legal Affairs Secretary to Governor Davis during the 2000-2001 California energy crisis.
                        Chadbourne & Parke LLP
                                       www.chadbourne.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Los Angeles, CA (~9 of 17 attorneys); New York, NY;
  Washington, DC; London, UK; Mexico City, Mexico; Almaty, Kazakhstan; Moscow, Russia; War-
  saw, Poland
Description: Chadbourne is one of the leaders in renewable energy project finance and other large-
  scale transactional matters, including private equity investments, capital market access, M&A and
  some VC deals. It has especially excelled in deals in the wind industry, both in the U.S. and
  abroad, but has considerable experience in traditional energy practice as well. The firm also has a
  strong reputation in international emissions and energy trading practice, and has drawn upon this
  experience to create a leading climate change practice.
Representative Matters: PPM Energy - monetizations of portfolios of large US wind farms; GE En-
  ergy Financial Services - equity investment in various renewable projects; Tenaska Power Fund -
  in acquisition of natural gas-fired power plants; WestLB AG - in funding of three ethanol plants in
  the Midwest; Leaf Clean Energy Co. - representing clean energy fund in VC deal; NGP Energy
  Capital - structure and formation of private equity fund targeting energy industry investments.


                                   Clifford Chance
                                     www.cliffordchance.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: New York, NY; Washington, DC; London, UK; Brussels,
  Belgium; Frankfurt, Germany; Beijing, China; Shanghai, China; Hong Kong; Singapore; Dubai,
  UAE; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Moscow, Russia
Description: Clifford Chance is a London-based firm, but has one of the biggest presences in the
  US Climate Change market, and is a true leader in emissions trading and carbon finance exper-
  tise worldwide. The firm represents project financers, developers, and investment funds on de-
  signing emissions trading systems, emission-reduction purchase agreements, risk analysis and
  other aspects of project development. It also helps with regulatory compliance issues, adaptations
  issues including real estate and land use planning, dispute resolution, risk assessment and corpo-
  rate restructuring. Clifford Chance additionally has an established international energy practice,


                    Cooley Godward Kronish LLP
                                          www.cooley.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Palo Alto (Silicon Valley), CA; San Francisco, CA; Broom-
  field, CO; Boston, MA
Description: Cooley assists cleantech companies in a wide variety of corporate matters — obtaining
  early stage funding, negotiating supply and distribution agreements, entering joint ventures or
  other alliances, obtaining and securing intellectual property, licensing and commercializing tech-
  nologies, and undergoing other complex technology transactions, and represents venture capital
  and private equity funds focused on cleantech investments. Cooley also represents clients in lar-
  ger scale transactional matters, including energy project finance (most notably gas turbine, landfill
  gas, waste-to-energy, hydroelectric, solar and wind), and M&A.
                          Covington & Burling LLP
                                              www.cov.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~4 of 35 attorneys); New York, NY;
  Washington, DC; London, UK
Description: Covington has a quickly-growing cleantech practice, most notably in the SF office. The
  east coast and London offices have impressive climate / carbon finance practices, where lawyers
  concentrate both on EU trading schemes and regional initiatives in the U.S, and help develop pro-
  jects largely in Asia and Latin America. The energy group, primarily in the DC office, represents
  investor-owned utilities, IPPs, local distributors, natural gas pipelines, marketers and traders, oil
  and gas producers, wind producers, electric co-ops, large end-users, financiers, project develop-
  ers, investors, transmitters, and others in regulatory / FERC, corporate, and legislative matters.


  Description: Our cleantech practice focuses on emerging or established companies that are innovators
   in efficient uses of energy, water and materials, and in the mitigation or avoidance of contamination
   and other environmental risks. We represent early-stage venture and private equity investors in these
   companies, as well as cleantech entrepreneurial and expansion-stage companies in their ongoing
   businesses. We also represent financial intermediaries working with these companies in financing and
   capital markets transactions, and advise cleantech companies on their potential use and monetization
   of GHG emission reductions and other environmental credits. Our cleantech practice draws on others
   - in particular, Energy, IP, and Carbon Markets & Climate Change - integrating these capabilities with
   our transactional expertise and general knowledge of the venture and private equity markets. We are
   uniquely positioned to service the cleantech community: our venture and private equity teams have a
   track record of many years’ success in advising emerging companies in diverse areas of innovation.
   We combine this with leading capabilities in IP and with the insights of our industry and regulatory
   practices on the state, regional, federal and international policy environments in which cleantech com-
   panies are operating, as well as visibility into the venture community itself and the capital markets. We
   consider this to be an area with large potential for growth, a leading-edge practice with exceptional
   opportunities to leverage our collaborative approach for partnering with and servicing our clients.
  Representative Cleantech Clients / Transactions — SF Office: VantagePoint Venture Partners, a
   leading venture capital firm, as lead investor in the Series A financing of Cobalt Technologies, Inc, a
   biofuels company; Microfield, Inc., a leading provider of demand-response technology, in ongoing cor-
   porate transactional matters; New Luna, LP, a private equity fund focused on green real estate devel-
   opment, in forming the investment fund; Firm-Wide: Expansion Capital Partners, LLC, a cleantech
   venture capital firm, in its $4.5 million Series C Preferred Stock investment in Orion Energy Systems,
   Ltd.; Solar Century Limited, the UK’s leading PV supplier, on a Series B funding round by various ven-
   ture capital investors; Indian Energy Limited, a wind energy project in India, on a £10 million pre-IPO
   private placement; Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., a provider of thin-film solar modules and other
   alternative energy generation solutions, in ongoing corporate and securities matters.
  Representative Energy / Climate Advisory Projects Firm-Wide: American Wind Energy Ass’n in rule-
   making proceedings before FERC; Airtricity, an Irish wind developer, on federal regulatory policies
   and legislation impacting the wind industry; Misc.: advice to private equity firms / hedge funds about
   federal and state RPS; advocacy assistance on issues related to the UN Framework Convention on
   Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol; lobbying with respect to federal, state and EU climate change
   legislation; advice to companies on tax or regulatory benefits available for GHG reduction; advice to
   sovereign governments concerning implementation of GHG emission trading and credit certification
   schemes; transactional assistance and compliance advice to clients trading under the EU Emissions
   Trading Scheme and under cap-and-trade regimes that may go into effect elsewhere in the world; pat-
   ent and IP advice to clients who are acquiring or creating new emission reduction technologies.
                      Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
                                           www.dwt.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~5 of 40 attorneys); Seattle, WA;
  Washington, DC
Description:
expertise in the regulatory area, including participation in proceedings before FERC, state PUCs,
 and other agencies; in legislative counseling; complex litigation and facility licensing. Representa-
 tive clients include several municipal utility districts and investor owned utilities, Pacific Power &


                                Dewey & LeBoeuf
                                      www.deweyleboeuf.com

Office location: New York, NY; Washington, DC; Boston, MA; London, UK; Milan, Italy; Moscow,
  Russia; Paris, France; Warsaw, Poland
Description: Dewey has substantial experience in the traditional energy sector, representing com-
  panies and investors in the development of electric generation, and storage and transmission fa-
  cilities, various types of financing, and M&A. Dewey’s energy regulatory lawyers represent clients
  before state PUCs, the FERC, the Dep’t of Energy, the Dep’t of State, the Commodity Futures
  Trading Comm’n, the Dep’t of Transportation, the Nuclear Regulatory Comm’n, Congress, oil and
  gas permitting bodies and environmental regulation agencies.


                           Dorsey & Whitney LLP
                                         www.dorsey.com

Office location: Minneapolis, MN; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; Anchorage, AK; Denver, CO
Description: Dorsey & Whitney has a long established energy regulatory practice, and represents
  clients before FERC, state PUCs, the Dep’t of Energy, the EPA and Congress. The firm also does
  substantial project finance work, - especially for crude oil, natural gas, LNG, wind power, ethanol
  and hydroelectric power.


                                Duane Morris LLP
                                      www.duanemorris.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~5 of 60 attorneys); Washington, DC;
  New York, NY; London, UK; Hanoi, Vietnam
Description: Duane Morris does substantial energy regulatory work - representing both private and
  public sector clients before the FERC, the Dep’t of Energy, the SEC, and state PUCs, and works
  closely with several energy trade associations. The firm also does substantial energy project de-
  velopment work, especially through its international offices.
                              Fenwick & West LLP
                                          www.fenwick.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Mountain View (Silicon Valley), CA; San Francisco, CA;
  Boise, ID; Seattle, WA
Description: Fenwick specializes in technology and life sciences. It represents a number of compa-
  nies developing clean technologies (including cellulosic ethanol; low-wind generators; high-
  concentration solar collectors, nuclear material management systems; and power supply, control
  and management circuits) in IP, corporate and financial matters. The firm also represents inves-
  tors (such as Kleiner Perkins, Khosla Ventures, NEA, Goldman Sachs, TPG Growth, Aqua Inter-
  national Partners and GFI Energy Ventures) on fund formation, due diligence and investments.


                              Foley & Lardner LLP
                                            www.foley.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Madison, WI; Milwaukee, WI; Chicago, IL; Washington, DC
Description: Foley has one of the strongest practices in the Midwest for both energy transactional
  work and regulation. Its expertise includes M&A, securities offerings, compliance issues, regula-
  tory approval, project siting, and energy efficiency counseling. The firm commonly represents pro-
  ject developers (for traditional and renewable generation projects), public utility companies, en-
  ergy holding corporations, and independent power producers.


                         Fulbright & Jaworski LLP
                                          www.fulbright.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Los Angeles, CA (~7 of 70 attorneys); Houston, TX (~90 of
  300 attorneys); Austin, TX; San Antonio, TX; Dallas, TX; Denver, CO; New York, NY; Washington,
  DC; Hong Kong; Dubai, UAE; London, UK
Description: Fulbright has a very large and extensive energy practice spanning nearly every aspect
  of the traditional energy industry in transactional, regulatory, dispute resolution and litigation mat-
  ters. The firm’s expertise includes representation before FERC, other federal agencies, and state
  commissions; project finance and development; M&A; and corporate litigation.



                    Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP
                                        www.gibsondunn.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Los Angeles, CA; Orange County, CA; San Francisco, CA;
  Dallas, TX; Washington, DC; New York, NY; London, UK; Singapore; Brussels, Belgium
Description: Gibson Dunn is acquiring substantial experience in climate change litigation, in which
  the firm often represents large corporations, especially automakers. Lawyers in the firm also coun-
  sel clients on various climate-related matters such as GHG legislation, regulatory schemes and
  compliance issues. Gibson Dunn maintains a strong energy project practice as well, encompass-
  ing finance, development, construction and operation.
                            Goodwin Procter LLP
                                    www.goodwinprocter.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Boston, MA; Washington, DC
Description: Goodwin Procter serves national and international companies as they acquire, expand,
  develop and operate power-generation projects and facilities. The firm’s expertise includes siting
  and permitting of facilities, negotiating energy-related services and agreements, and environ-
  mental due diligence and compliance, with particular strength in the nuclear and electric power
  sectors. It also participates in regulatory proceedings before FERC and state PUCs.

                           Greenberg Traurig LLP
                                          www.gtlaw.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Denver, CO; Houston, TX; Albany, NY; Washington, DC;
  Miami, FL; Palm Beach, FL
Description: Greenberg Traurig has substantial practices in project finance (for both traditional and
  renewable energy projects); energy company M&A; oil and gas exploration, production, transpor-
  tation and storage; corporate governance relating to climate change and emissions compliance;
  ADR; and representation before FERC, state PUCs and other regulatory bodies.

          Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve
               Franklin & Hachigian, LLP
                                         www.gunder.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Silicon Valley, CA; San Diego, CA; New York, NY
Description: Gunderson Dettmer specializes in representing entrepreneurs and emerging growth
  companies in every stage of development, as well as the venture capital and private equity firms
  that support their efforts. The firm represents a number of cleantech companies, and provides ex-
  pertise in IP transactions and strategy, tax, M&A, and finance.

                               Heller Ehrman LLP
                                      www.hellerehrman.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~5 of 170 attorneys); Menlo Park
 (Silicon Valley), CA (~5 of 85 attorneys); Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; London, UK; Hong Kong
Description: Heller Ehrman takes a truly interdisciplinary approach in its cleantech practice, combin-
 ing strength in emerging companies / Venture Law Group, energy regulation, IP prosecution and
 transactions, and project finance. In addition to helping create and fund new companies, the firm
 works with financial entities and established companies to finance and develop large-scale pro-
 jects, complete M&A deals, and assist with licensing and compliance issues. The various offices
 work very closely together, and any one deal may involve lawyers from multiple locations. The SF
 office also has an impressive energy litigation practice, and DC and Seattle support strong energy
 regulatory practices.
Representative Cleantech Clients: MMA Renewables, Enstor, Relion Hydrogen Fuels, Recurrent
 Energy, GreatPoint Energy, Brightsource Energy, Crosslink Capital, and Texas Syngas.
                                Hunton & Williams
                                           www.hunton.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC; Richmond, VA; New York, NY; Charlotte,
  NC; London, UK; Brussels, Belgium; Beijing, China
Description: Hunton & Williams is one of the leaders in climate change practice in the US, drawing
 on extensive environmental and energy experience. It represents clients in financing and develop-
 ing carbon projects, and advises them on entering emissions trading markets - both voluntary and
 official. The firm also advises on state and regional climate change initiatives, and has litigated in
 prominent climate change cases. The energy team represents public utilities, IPPs, RTOs, and
 ISOs in proceedings before FERC and other regulatory bodies and in a variety of transactional
 matters. Hunton & Williams is also known for its nuclear energy expertise; the firm has represented
 the US Dep’t of Energy in the licensing of Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository.


           Jeffer, Mangels, Butler & Marmaro LLP
                                           www.jmbm.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~6 of 23 attorneys); Los Angeles, CA
Description: Both the LA and SF offices of JMBM have substantial experience representing the in-
  terests of energy producers, distributors and lessors, in both regulatory and financial matters. The
  firm’s expertise includes: representation before various agencies and regulatory bodies such as
  FERC, DOE, CPUC and other utility commissions; LNG receiving and storage facilities; siting,
  permitting and closing power facilities; pipeline transactions and transmission tariffs; M & A and
  joint ventures; project finance including leveraged and synthetic leases; energy leasing, produc-
  tion and exploration agreements; patent applications, licensing, validity and infringement studies.
  The energy practitioners often work in government, land use, environmental and building materi-
  als practice groups as well.


                                         Jones Day
                                         www.jonesday.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Chicago, IL; Columbus, OH; Houston, TX; New York, NY;
  Washington, DC; Madrid, Spain; Singapore
Description: Jones Day has a prominent energy transactional practice; their clients include domes-
  tic and international electric and gas utilities, natural gas pipelines, independent power producers,
  electric transmission companies, developers and owners of wind power and other renewable en-
  ergy sources, construction, engineering and environmental firms, oil and gas companies, compa-
  nies trading electricity and natural gas, and financial institutions providing capital and related ser-
  vices to these industries. In addition to project finance, and other large-scale transactional work,
  Jones Day has a strong regulatory practice, especially in Washington DC
                              Kirkland & Ellis LLP
                                         www.kirkland.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC (~12 of 190 attorneys); Chicago, IL; New
  York, NY; London, UK
Description: Kirkland’s energy lawyers split their time between regulatory work (especially in FERC
  and NRC proceedings) and transactional matters (focusing on purchases and sales of plants,
  pipelines, and other energy assets). The firm’s climate change work draws upon its environmental
  expertise, and it has been heavily involved in issues concerning proposed federal legislation to
  control emissions. Kirkland is poised to substantially increase work in GHG compliance matters.


                                   K&L Gates LLP
                                         www.klgates.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: New York, NY; Newark, NJ; Boston, MA; Harrisburg, PA;
  Pittsburg, PA; Washington, DC; Seattle, WA; Dallas, TX; London, UK
Description: K&L Gates has strong regulatory and transactional teams serving energy clients such
  as investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities, IPPs, alternative energy project developers and
  producers, emerging businesses in the smart energy sector, power marketers, oil and gas produc-
  ers, coal bed methane producers, natural gas and petroleum product storage and transmission
  companies, members of the nuclear power industry, end users, municipalities, lenders, develop-
  ers and contractors. The firm also has a well-developed Climate Change Task Force which serves
  public and private sector clients, and is focused on both political and financial concerns.


                           Latham & Watkins LLP
                                            www.lw.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA; Los Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA; Or-
  ange County, CA; New York, NY; Washington, DC; London, UK; Singapore
Description: Latham & Watkins is one of the premier firms for project finance, especially for lender-
  side work. While their California offices have some of the best project finance practices on the
  west coast, the heart of their practice is in New York.


                   Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
                                         www.manatt.com


Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~5 of 60 attorneys); Los Angeles, CA
   (~20 of 185 attorneys); Orange County, CA; Washington, DC
Description: Manatt’s primary focus in this sector is on companies that develop, produce, market,
  transport and process energy resources. The firm advises them on all aspects of the industry,
  including business / transactional agreements, community relations, clean energy alternatives,
  environmental compliance / licensing / due diligence, litigation before FERC / CPUC / other regu-
  latory bodies and courts, policy, project finance and land use.
   Practice Groups: Primary - (Chair) Energy, Environment and Resources, including Climate Change
    Solutions Group and Solar and Renewables Project Development Team; Secondary - Appellate Prac-
    tice; % of billable hours doing ECC work: 100% (other than pro bono hours)
   Representative Clients / Projects: TransCanada Pipelines, Tesoro Refining and Marketing, County of
    Los Angeles, Hydrogen Energy Inc.
   The Future: Our practice will be evolving from one that represents and advises the fossil fuel energy
    business to one that works with renewables and alternative energy sources
   Education: Georgetown - J.D. 1976; University of Santa Clara - B.A. 1972
   Career Path: Following a judicial clerkship I worked for the FPC/FERC, rose to legal advisor to a com-
    missioner, 18 years as in house counsel for two utility companies and 10 years in private practice
   Words of Wisdom: What may have worked for me is not necessarily what will work for others. The
    legal field provides a career, not a mere job. A career path is more an accident than a plan imple-
    mented. Be prepared to change and adapt. Honesty and respect are hard won and easily lost and
    should be preserved at all costs – and there is no real excuse for lack of civility or respect to anyone.
    You are blessed with having become a lawyer and you should be prepared to share your knowledge
    with those in need. To do all that you will need to do will require a great deal of time and effort but do
    not forget that a well rounded person is one with both a career and a life, and both need nurturing.




                           McDermott Will & Emery
                                               www.mwe.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Chicago, IL; Houston, TX; New York, NY; Washington, DC;
  Boston, MA; London, UK
Description: McDermott represents clients in all aspects of U.S. and international energy and de-
  rivative markets, and has substantial experience in large energy corporate transactions, M&A, and
  project finance. They also give regulatory and compliance advise for matters under FERC, state
  PUCs, the Dep’t of Energy, the EPA, retail energy markets, and emissions trading schemes.


           Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP
                                             www.milbank.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Los Angeles, CA (~17 of 70); New York, NY; London, UK;
  Singapore
Description: Milbank is one of the leaders in international project finance work, known especially for
  lender-side work, and has one of the strongest project finance practices in California. The LA of-
  fice focuses on renewables, whereas the NY office has a more traditional energy practice. Firm-
  wide, Milbank also represents energy companies and developers, private equity and hedge funds,
  and financial institutions in a variety of large scale transactional matters throughout the industry
  sectors of oil and gas, LNG, power generation, biofuels, wind and hydroelectric.
                                       Miller Nash
                                        www.millernash.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Portland, OR; Seattle, WA
Description: Miller Nash has one of the strongest regulatory practices in the Pacific Northwest. The
  energy practice additionally includes negotiations and financing for renewable generation facilities,
  helping to obtain and sell “green tags” or qualify for energy tax credits, ADR, permitting and siting
  for power projects, real estate and land use matters, and drafting and analysis of state legislation.


                   Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP
                                      www.morganlewis.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC; Los Angeles, CA
Description: The DC office of Morgan Lewis is known especially for its transaction and regulatory
  work representing oil, gas, nuclear and electric power clients. On the transactional side, lawyers
  assist clients to develop new energy projects - in both generation and transmission, license new
  facilities, and complete large commercial deals. They also advise clients on internal audits and
  various compliance matters, and represent them before FERC and in other ratemaking, trial and
  appellate proceedings. The L.A. office has a prominent renewables practice, most notably repre-
  senting wind power companies. The team is strong in project development and finance, environ-
  mental compliance, and real estate and land use matters.

                         Morrison & Foerster LLP
                                          www.mofo.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA; Palo Alto, CA; Walnut Creek, CA; San
  Diego, CA; Los Angeles, CA; Sacramento, CA; Denver, CO; New York, NY; Washington, DC;
  McLean, VA; Shanghai, China; Tokyo, Japan; London, UK
Description: MoFo’s cleantech practice includes about 100 lawyers (for at least part of their time)
  and serves companies (public, private, emerging) and investors (VC, private equity and invest-
  ment bankers) in IP and transactional matters. Expertise includes biofuels, solar, biological solu-
  tions, sustainable green programs, carbon markets and trading, organic products, carbon tracking
  and sequestration, waste reduction, water technology, energy efficiency, fuel cells and batteries,
  green building and green advertising. Representative clients include venture investors like Kleiner
  Perkins, Khosla Ventures, Mohr Davidow Ventures, and Goldman Sachs; established companies
  like EnerTech, emerging companies like Carbonetworks, Arcadia, AgileWaves, Photon Energy
  Systems and Range Fuels; the Biomimicry Institute; and the US Green Building Council. For more
  information, contact cleantech@mofo.com.
  The energy practice at MoFo represents generators, gas and energy traders and marketers, en-
  ergy service providers, investor-owned and municipal utilities, pipeline companies, industrial and
  commercial customers, investors, lenders, public entities and others in connection with the struc-
  turing, financing, regulatory approval and operation of power, natural gas, energy and infrastruc-
  ture projects, regulatory matters, and litigation.
Practice Groups: Primary - Financial Transactions and Cleantech; Secondary - Real estate finance; %
of billable hours doing ECC work: 30%
Representative Clients / Projects: Mineral Acquisition Partners, financing of wind energy and solar
energy projects
A Day in the Life: I represent financing parties (lenders and borrowers) in the financing of any number
of assets, including wind and solar power facilities. I structure the transactions, document and negoti-
ate them, and bring them to a closing. The size of my deals ranges from $2 million to $1 billion.
The Future: As our clients focus more of their time and resources on financing green construction,
 green businesses and renewable energy projects, we will work on more of those deals.
Education: Hastings College of the Law - J.D. 1986; UC Santa Barbara - B.A. Political Science
Career Path: I began my practice in 1986 at the law firm of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe, representing
financing parties in the lease and construction financing of wind, solar, hydroelectric, landfill and bio-
mass energy projects throughout the United States. I moved to the international law firm Graham &
James in 1990, and began representing lenders and borrowers in the financing of any number of as-
sets, including energy facilities, aircraft, transportation equipment and the acquisitions of manufacturing
companies and technology companies. In 1999, I moved to Morrison & Foerster, and have continued
working on financing transactions, including the financing of M&A transactions and wineries. In 2005
one of our clients, Mineral Acquisition Partners, raised a large fund that was partially dedicated to the
financing of renewable energy projects. Since 2005 I have worked on the financing of several wind and
solar projects for this client, throughout the United States.
Words of Wisdom: When you interview at a law firm, make sure they are doing the kind of work you
are interest in doing. Read the trade journals and other publications that your clients are reading, to
keep current on changes in law and technology. Have fun!




Practice groups: Primary - Cleantech and Patent / IP; Secondary - IP Litigation; % of billable hours do-
 ing ECC work: 40%
Representative Clients / Projects: Arcadia Biosciences, Abengoa, Mendel Biotechnology, UC Berke-
 ley, UC Davis; various IP due diligence for venture capitalists investing in Cleantech space
A Day in the Life: Counsel investors regarding IP due diligence issues in Cleantech ; Work with patent
 agents and associates on strategic patent application drafting; Assist IP litigators in patent litigation
 matters; Guide and counsel clients regarding Cleantech IP matters
The Future: I see tremendous growth in the Cleantech practice over the next few years. Many compa-
 nies and joint ventures are just being formed. Research is ongoing. This will lead to numerous patent
 filings, licensing work and ultimately patent litigation / prosecution.
Education: Golden Gate University of Law - J.D. 1996; UC Davis - Ph.D. in plant physiology 1988, M.S.
 in agronomy 1984; UC Berkeley - B.S. in biology 1981; Post-doc fellow in molecular biology at Harvard
 Medical School and Department of Molecular Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital
Career Path: While a post-doc at Harvard Medical School, I became frustrated with benchwork. I
 looked into alternate careers for those with scientific backgrounds. I spoke with a number of patent at-
 torneys, all of whom loved what they were doing. I applied for work at law firms in San Francisco, as a
 patent agent trainee. I received 3 job offers, all of which were contingent on my going to law school. I
 went to work for Limbach & Limbach in ‘92 and went to law school part-time. I worked as an associate
 at Limbach & Limbach from 1996-2000. I finished law school in 1996. I joined Morrison & Foerster in
 2000. I became a partner in 2003. I now manage a large group of associates and agents in the San
 Francisco Patent Department, and I am also on the firm’s Cleantech Steering Committee.
Words of Wisdom: Find your niche! This rapidly growing area which will require tremendous expertise.
Practice Groups: Corporate & Cleantech; % of billable hours doing ECC work: 95%
Representative Clients / Projects: Cleantech — Advanced Refining Concepts, Altra Biofuels, Agile
 Waves, Arcadia, Biosignal, Carbonetworks, Photon Energy Systems, and Veristeel. Sustainable and
 social enterprise — include Divinely D’lish/18 Rabbits, Mass Roots Project, Oliver Ranch, Revolution
 Foods, and Small Potatoes Urban Delivery. Representative non-profit clients include the Biomimicry
 Institute, Business for Social Responsibility, RSF Social Finance, Goodwill, and Pacific Forest and
 Watershed Lands Stewardship Council. Representative venture fund clients include Darwin Venture
 Fund-of-Funds and Pacific Community Ventures.
A Day in the Life: 6:00 am conference call (or run if I am lucky) — 7:00 am bottle to my baby — 8:00
 am Nanny arrives and I leave for work — 9:00 am to 6:00 pm At the Office. My working day is a mix-
 ture of (a) general corporate advice provided to a wide range of private companies and non-profits for
 whom I serve as outside general counsel, (b) advice to the Boards and management of public and pri-
 vate companies on issues related to sustainability and corporate social responsibility, (c) negotiation
 of equity/debt financing and M&A transactions, (d) pitching to, and meeting, with prospective clients in
 the Cleantech space, and (e) Firm, Corporate Group and Cleantech management (meetings, confer-
 ence calls, organization, delegation of work, review of materials). I provide legal services to between
 5 and 10 clients during any given day. — 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm Dinner and time with Family — 8:00 pm
 to 12:00 pm Respond to email and drafting of agreements .
The Future: The more that business recognizes that their balance sheet will be significantly affected by
 the undervaluation of natural resources and the effects of climate change, the more demand there will
 be for Cleantech legal services as well as the products and services of our clients. .
Education: Duke University - J.D. 1993, LLM 1993; Williams College - B.A. in Political Science / Econ.
Career Path: How did I get to MoFo? First, I never had an on-campus interview during law school. I
 was convinced that I did not want a job at any law firm (particularly not a large one). Second, after
 living for a few years in China, I earned my master’s in Chinese law at the East China Institute of Law
 and Politics. For a while, I was convinced that my first job should be working with US companies set-
 ting up shop in China. What changed my mind? After graduating from law school, a friend of my fa-
 ther’s explained to me that while I had many interests and passions, I had nothing of value to offer as
 a lawyer or a business consultant. Going to law school teaches you very little about the actual techni-
 cal practice of law (particularly on the transactional side). Therefore, I went to work at a large law firm
 in New York to get some experience and transferred to MoFo San Francisco in 1997. I promised my
 then boy-friend (now husband) that I would not stay for more than 2 years.
 Why did I join the Corporate practice? My first transaction in New York involved the financing for a
 fleet of fishing vessels, representing Chase Manhattan Bank. I loved it. However, I soon learned that
 debt transactions take months (if not years) to close and involve an incredible amount of paperwork
 (hundreds of agreements). Corporate, and particularly equity financing transactions, are much faster
 paced, often closing within 2 months of an initial term sheet. They also involve far fewer agreements.
 Given my short attention span and continuing desire to learn new things, I was drawn to the corporate
 practice. I also enjoy the “business side” of law, getting to know the commercial needs and strategic
 plans of my clients and understanding, structuring, negotiating & drafting complex equity transactions.
 How did I start in Cleantech? My interest in sustainability and Cleantech was sparked in 1999/2000
 when I read “Natural Capitalism.” After I made partner and had more control over my client base, I
 started representing sustainable and socially responsible companies on a pro bono basis and, through
 referrals, built a practice representing almost exclusively Cleantech clients.
Words of Wisdom: — Read Paul Hawken. — Choose your first job very carefully. — Don’t change jobs
 every year or two. Go to one place and stick with it for a while so you actually learn something.
 However, don’t feel pressured to join a big firm if you don’t think you will be happy.
Practice Groups: Primary - Cleantech, Enrivonmental, Natural Resources and Land Use; Secondary -
 litigation; % of billable hours doing ECC work: 90%
Representative Clients / Projects: Head of firm’s Green Chemistry Group. Represent Honda of North
 America in California greenhouse gas litigation. Represent Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control
 District in developing controls for the largest source of air pollution in the United States, the Owens Dry
 Lake Bed. Represented Port of Los Angeles on Clean Air Plan. Represented San Francisco Interna-
 tional Airport in remediation and environmental efforts.
A Day in the Life: My practice is always interesting and fast paced with great variety in clients and mat-
 ters. Most having cutting edge issues, that is, legal questions to which there is not clear precedent. On
 any given day, there will be conference calls with clients to provide legal advice and plan case strategy,
 revisions of legal briefs and working closely with young associates, and often travel for court appear-
 ances and negotiations with opposing counsel.
The Future: The future of our practice is as bright as anytime in my legal career. The Clean Tech prac-
 tice at MoFo is recognition of the fundamental changes and resulting explosive growth in environmental
 and clean technology law. We already have one of the leading practices in the country and I expect
 the size of our group to double within the next five years, if not sooner.
Education: UC Berkeley - J.D. 1985 (Go Bears!); Univ. of Utah - B.S. in Chemical Engineering 1982
Career Path: I was a chemical engineer before attending Berkeley Law, and then worked for a large
 environmental law firm for five years to gain experience. I served for five years as the senior environ-
 mental trial lawyer at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles before returning to private practice and
 ultimately becoming a partner at MoFo.
Words of Wisdom: This is the best time in the last 25 years to pursue a legal career in energy, climate
change and clean technology. If you are uncertain about whether the area is right for you, explore,
read and ask a lot of questions of people who are already in the field. If you know this is the area for
you, the most important thing you can do as a young lawyer is to get experience. There are many op-
portunities, in private practice, but especially in government where your intellect and energy can make
an enormous difference. Even an unpaid internship will expose you to a whole new world of opportuni-
ties, and whatever you can do to gain this experience will pay dividends in the long run in your career.




Practice Groups: Primary - Cleantech, Land Use & Environmental Law; Secondary - Litigation; % of
 billable hours doing ECC work: 30%
Representative Clients / Projects: Pacific Forest and Watershed Lands Stewardship Council; Tidal
 and Wave Energy Development for City and County of San Francisco
A Day in the Life: Respond to client calls and e-mails, conference calls with clients, agencies, and op-
 posing counsel, supervise litigation matters and revise motions and briefs, travel to meeting and
 agency and court proceedings, advance program of Cleantech Steering Committee.
The Future: The cleantech practice will be booming.
Education: UC Berkeley - J.D. 1994; Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy 2004; BA in History
 1990; Fellowship at U.S. Dep’t of State, Office of Marine Conservation
Career Path: Focus on environmental law since graduating law school.
Words of Wisdom: Read the newspaper everyday to stay on top of developments impacting cleantech.
   Practice Groups: Primary - Patents / IP and Cleantech; Secondary - Technology transfer; % of billable
    hours doing ECC work: 25%
   Representative Clients / Projects: Verenium Corp.; University of California
   A Day in the Life: Involved with all aspects of patenting cleantech IP.
   The Future: Cleantech practice will definitely be expanding, and broadening with new technology.
   Education: George Washington University - J.D. 1995; Johns Hopkins University - Ph.D. in molecular
    biology and immunology; Georgetown University - D.D.S; University of Delaware - B.A. in biology
   Career Path: There was demand for people who understand the science of cleantech and the law.
   Words of Wisdom: Read up on all the latest journals, write a blog on your thinking to date, get in-
    volved with environmental issues you believe in (politically, socially or business-wise).




  Practice Groups: Financial Transactions and Cleantech; % of billable hours doing ECC work: 20%
  Representative Clients / Projects: Financing of wind and solar projects and acquisitions.
  A Day in the Life: Draft contracts; Confer with clients and other attorneys on on-going transactions;
   Negotiate with opposing attorneys about contract provisions.
  The Future: I think cleantech will continue to grow and will require additional financing. Currently sig-
   nificant funding is being invested in research and in the next 5 years, there will be significant imple-
   mentation and development needs which will require financing which are often structured as loans or
   secured financing..
  Education: Santa Clara University - J.D. 2001, B.A. in History & Modern Languages 1995
  Career Path: When I was graduating from law school, a friend and former boss recommended I work
   with a debt group at a firm. After working in this practice area for a few years, it became apparent that
   it complements the cleantech practice which often requires financing and debt arrangements to im-
   plement the new clean technologies.
  Words of Wisdom: I would recommend learning about the substantive elements of various cleantech
   areas that interest you rather than trying to learn about all of them and then determine which tradi-
   tional areas of law intersect with those clean technologies.




                                Nixon Peabody LLP
                                        www.nixonpeabody.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~5 of 85 attorneys); Silicon Valley, CA
 (~3 of 8 attorneys); Rochester, NY; New York, NY; Washington, DC; Boston, MA
Description: Nixon Peabody has teams serving both cleantech and traditional energy industry sec-
 tors. The firm’s cleantech practice represents entrepreneurs, venture capital investors and private
 equity investors in project finance, corporate law, securities law, M&A, tax, and IP. Energy sector
 clients include utilities, independent power producers and developers, and the practice expertise
 encompasses project finance and large-scale transactions as well as litigation and arbitration.
                 Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP
                                              www.orrick.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~13 of 190 attorneys); Menlo Park
(Silicon Valley), CA (~20 of 126 attorneys); New York, NY; Washington, DC
Description: Orrick is very serious about positioning itself as a leader in all aspects of the new en-
 ergy economy. The Silicon Valley office has an extremely robust group focused on forming, financ-
 ing and counseling emerging companies, many of which are cleantech companies. The SF office
 has a similar practice group, but on a smaller scale. San Francisco and other offices also maintain
 more traditional energy practices, representing investor-owned, municipal and cooperative utilities;
 IPPs and merchant generators; underwriters; investment bankers; lenders and other stakeholders.
 The transactional practice encompasses M&A, financial restructurings, project finance, new power
 plant development and financing, and asset divestitures and acquisitions. The San Francisco office
 has recently acquired four partners recognized as industry leaders in energy project finance.
Representative Clients & Transactions: PG&E - in acquisition of combined cycle power plant;
 Green Power Investment Corp. - in establishing company which will be an investment vehicle for
 international wind projects; Nanosolar, AsokaUSA (power line networking), and Accelergy - in es-
 tablishing the companies, securing funding from Benchmark Capital, Mohr Davidow Ventures, Ad-
 vent, Mobius, nth Power, Technology Partners and others, and continuing guidance. Other clean-
 tech clients include: NanoExa, ThinSilicon, ZT3 Technologies, ClearFuels Technology, Recurrent
 Energy, Sensicore, Skyline Solar, and SunEthanol.


  Practice Group: Emerging Company Group; % of billable hours doing ECC work: 30-40%
  Representative Clients / Projects: Formation and venture financing of clients such as Advent Solar
    (solar manufacturing), ThinSilicon (solar technology) and Nanoexa (battery technology).
  A Day in the Life: My practice revolves around working with technology companies, with a focus on en-
    ergy technologies. I typically serve as general outside counsel for these clients and spend most of
    my day discussing the financing, business development or other issues they encounter with them and
    their investors. My day also typically includes negotiating one or more transactions in which my cli-
    ents are engaged and reviewing and revising the relevant transactional documents.
  The Future: I see my practice group expanding with a continuing growth of our cleantech practice.
  Education: Georgetown - J.D. 1998; Rutgers - B.A. 1992
  Career Path: I began my career at Orrick as a summer associate and have focused on working with
    technology companies since then. Prior to going to law school I held various positions in financial
    services industry, including working as a stockbroker and at a hedge fund. Naturally, that experience
    led me to become a lawyer.
  Words of Wisdom: My advice is the same as in any other field. First, find a practice that you are pas-
  sionate about and fully immerse yourself in the field. Second, be careful to maintain balance in other
  aspects of your life so you don't get lost or burnt-out and are able to bring your fullest talents to bear.
                                       Perkins Coie
                                        www.perkinscoie.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; Bellevue, WA; Boise, ID
Description: Perkins Coie has one of the strongest energy and climate change practices in the Pa-
  cific Northwest, representing large investor-owned utilities, independent power producers, power
  marketers and other energy companies generating geothermal, wind, coal, ethanol and biodiesel
  power. The practice has expertise in traditional and renewable project development, energy capi-
  tal markets and trading, regulation (before FERC and state PUCs), permitting, and litigation.


            Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP
                                        www.pillsburylaw.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA; Los Angeles, CA; Houston, TX; New
  York, NY; Washington, DC; McLean, VA; London, UK
Description: Pillsbury has one of the most respected nuclear energy practices in the US, as well as
  considerable strength in energy finance and project finance - especially for oil, gas and LNG com-
  panies, energy-related capital markets transactions, utility facility licensing, and litigation. Clients
  include Chevron, Qatar Petroleum, Golden Pass LNG, as well as various large utilities like FPL
  Energy. The firm’s practices in renewable energy and regulatory matters are growing rapidly. The
  climate group works to develop projects (in wind, solar, landfill methane, nuclear and ethanol), as-
  sists in LEED certification, helps corporate clients secure marketable credits, and lobbies on their
  behalf at the state, national and international levels.


                                   Reed Smith LLP
                                         www.reedsmith.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~7 of 85 attorneys); Pittsburgh, PA;
  Philadelphia, PA; London, UK; Hong Kong
Description: Reed Smith has a strong energy transactional group, with particular expertise in pro-
  ject development, project finance and energy commodities trading. Clients include oil and gas
  companies, natural resource developers, pipeline companies, independent power producers, fuel
  suppliers, and power purchasers. The firm also litigates on behalf of energy clients in state and
  federal courts, in arbitrations and mediations, and before regulatory agencies.


                                  Schiff Hardin LLP
                                        www.schiffhardin.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Chicago, IL; Boston, MA
Description: Schiff Hardin’s energy practice has been ranked highly, both for its regulatory work be-
  fore state commissions and federal agencies, and litigation in state and federal courts. The firm’s
  energy clients include electric utilities, municipal and cooperative electric suppliers, energy mar-
  keters, pipeline companies for natural gas and petroleum, and natural gas distribution companies.
                                Sidley Austin LLP
                                          www.sidley.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Los Angeles, CA; Washington,
  D.C; Hong Kong
Description: The firm has a strong project finance practice - for both traditional and alternative
  power production. Client’s include all types of project participants: developers, equity investors,
  construction contractors, service providers, senior lenders, subordinated lenders and multilateral
  credit agencies. Sidley’s energy regulatory practice focuses on issues involving the transmission
  of natural gas, crude oil and petroleum products.


      Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP
                                         www.skadden.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC; Houston, TX; New York, NY; London,
  UK; Hong Kong
Description: Skadden’s energy practice includes regulatory, litigation, finance and transactional ex-
  pertise, with particular strength in project finance and development. Clients include large energy
  companies and utilities such as National Grid, Great Plains Energy, EDP (a Portuguese utility),
  and Cheniere Energy (an LNG terminal facility and gas marketer) as well as project sponsors,
  lenders and equity investors. The regulatory practice is centered in Washington, DC and the prac-
  tice group includes a former General Counsel and a former Commissioner of FERC.



            Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP
                                      www.sonnenschein.com


Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~4 of 70 attorneys); Chicago, IL; New
  York, NY; St. Louis, MO; Washington DC
Description: Both Sonnenschein’s energy and domestic climate change practices are very strong.
  The firm represents energy companies and public entities in state and federal regulatory matters,
  conventional and renewable energy project financing, negotiations for power supply agreements,
  M&A, and environmental and emissions compliance. Clients include owners and operators of
  wind, solar, ocean wave technology, hydropower, geothermal, biomass, ethanol, and biodiesel
  energy sources, as well as municipalities and financial institutions.
   Practice Groups: Primary - Environmental, Secondary - Real Estate; % of billable hours doing ECC
    work: 75 - 85&
   Representative Clients / Projects: My primary focus is on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
    and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) work. I have worked on a wide variety of projects
    (energy facilities, water infrastructure, freeway interchanges, etc), and these days, they all require
    comprehensive NEPA and/or CEQA analyses of potential air quality and climate change impacts. I
    have also started working with a variety of clients (including large corporations, non-profits, and In-
    dian tribes) on projects and transactions involving carbon credits. Finally, I am doing some NEPA and
    Endangered Species Act litigation on behalf of hydropower interests in the Southeastern US, that is
    part of a three-state water war in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin.
   A Day in the Life: The thing I like best about my job is that there is no typical day…each project—and
    each project team--is truly unique. That said, on most days, I work very closely with environmental
    consultants and with lawyers from other disciplines (often real estate lawyers, litigators, or regulatory
    specialists). Most of this is done from my desk, but I also get lots of opportunities to go out, walk
    around, and take a look at project sites. Most of the projects are pretty controversial, and quite a few
    end up in litigation. In litigation-heavy periods, most of my work involves reading, researching, and
    writing. NEPA and CEQA litigation essentially involves a fixed administrative record, there is not too
    much in the way of discovery and pre-trial motions. Usually, these cases are resolved on cross-
    motions for summary judgment…it’s much more like appellate litigation than traditional civil trial work.
   The Future: When I was in school, environmental law usually meant contaminated sites/brownfields
    work or reviewing the environmental aspects of large corporate transactions. I think that is changing.
    Today, law firms are more open to the idea that environmental law includes a wider variety of things.
   Education: Boalt Hall - J.D. 2003; UC Berkeley Dept. of City & Regional Planning - M.C.P. 2003;
    Dept. of Political Science - M.A. 1999; Northwestern - Political Science and Urban Studies 1998
   Career Path: I’ve always been interested in land- and resource-use issues. In college, the professors
    who taught those classes were in the political science department. Naturally, I assumed that political
    science was the discipline for me, and I enrolled in the PhD program at Berkeley. Almost immedi-
    ately, I realized that life in academe was not for me (at least not at that point). So, after completing
    the first part of the PhD program, I moved to the Department of City and Regional Planning and to
    Boalt. My interests (land use, environment, natural resources, energy) remained the same, but I
    ended up as a lawyer rather than an academic. So far, things have worked out really well.
   Words of Wisdom: Stay interested and stay involved. The field is changing so fast that you should
    have an incredible opportunity to get involved in cutting edge work as soon as you start practicing.




                            Steptoe & Johnson LLP
                                             www.steptoe.com

Office with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC (~25 of 330 attorneys)
Description: Steptoe’s powerful energy team is based almost entirely in Washington, DC It repre-
  sents utilities, merchant generators, developers and private equity clients in regulatory matters be-
  fore FERC and state commissions, litigation, a wide range of transactions, and environmental
  compliance matters. The firm is especially well known for representing clients in issues involving
  transmission infrastructure projects and oil pipelines.
                                   Stoel Rives LLP
                                           www.stoel.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Sacramento, CA (~5 of 20 attorneys); Portland, OR; Seat-
  tle, WA; Salt Lake City, UT; Minneapolis, MN
Description: Stoel Rives serves the traditional energy industry, and additionally has dedicated
  cleantech and climate change practices. Their work includes project finance and development,
  M&A, power marketing, energy regulation at the federal and state levels, transmission, siting / li-
  censing / permitting for renewable and traditional energy generation facilities, real estate, fuel sup-
  ply, cleantech IP, emerging company financing, emissions permitting and environmental litigation.


     Thelen Reid Brown Raysman & Steiner LLP
                                         www.thelenreid.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~17 of 135 attorneys); New York, NY;
  Washington, DC
Description: Thelen is especially known for its work in the utilities sector, but also has extensive ex-
  perience in FERC and state agency regulatory matters, capital markets, M&A, tax, employment;
  project development and finance. The firm represents IPPs; companies involved with wind, solar,
  biomass and geothermal projects; oil and gas companies; and energy trading companies. Re-
  cently, however, the firm has lost many of its top project finance lawyers.


                              Vinson & Elkins LLP
                                       www.vinson-elkins.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Houston, TX; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX; Washington, DC;
  New York, NY; London, UK
Description: Vinson & Elkins has long been one of the world’s leaders in traditional energy practice,
  with industry experience in oil and gas field services, exploration and production; LNG; pipelines;
  refining and petrochemicals; wind; and biodiesel. The firm does substantial work in carbon finance
  and climate change compliance, energy capital markets, project finance and development, arbitra-
  tion among energy companies, M&A, and tax.

                                 White & Case LLP
                                         www.whitecase.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: New York, NY (~30 of 390 attorneys); Washington, DC; Abu
  Dhabi, UAE; Dusseldorf, Germany; London, UK; Moscow, Russia; Paris, France; Prague, Czech Republic;
  Singapore; Tokyo, Japan
Description: White & Case has one of the leading international project finance practices, and the
  firm is known especially for its sponsor-side work. They have additional expertise in M&A and
  other large transactions in the oil and gas, power generation, and energy infrastructure sectors.
               Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati
                                           www.wsgr.com

Other offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~15 of 50 attorneys); Palo Alto
  (Silicon Valley), CA (~15 of 400 attorneys); Austin, TX; Seattle, WA
Description: Wilson has one of the strongest cleantech and renewable energy practices in the Bay
  Area. They represent entrepreneurs and other companies who are developing renewable energy
  technologies in the wind, solar, ocean, biomass, biofuel and geothermal sectors; fuel cell, battery
  and other energy-storage technologies; distributed power generation systems; software, sensors
  and controls; and grid management / interface enhancements. The practice includes transactional
  expertise in carbon counseling, IP counseling, patents, VC finance, project finance, M&A and real
  estate. Wilson also sponsors and provides legal counsel to the California Clean Tech Open.
Representative Clients and Transactions: Evergreen Solar's joint venture with Germany-based Q-
  Cells AG, Catalytica's acquisition of SCR-Tech, Silicon Energy's sale to Itron, and Capstone Tur-
  bine's strategic alliance with United Technologies Corporation.


                            Winston & Strawn LLP
                                         www.winston.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~4 of 75 attorneys); Los Angeles, CA;
  Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Washington, DC; Paris, France
Description: Winston has notably strong practices in renewable energy (mostly in California), nu-
  clear and hydroelectric generation (in the east coast offices), and FERC regulation (in DC). In the
  renewable sector, the firm often represents trade associations which means that the attorneys are
  often deeply involved in policy formation and analysis, as well as state and federal regulatory
  processes. Winston also does a great deal of renewable and cogeneration project development,
  which involves extensive permitting, siting and compliance issues, and is working to grow its pro-
  ject finance practice. The energy practice groups relies frequently on the firm’s tax, real estate and
  employment expertise.
                              Alcantar & Kahl LLP
                                          www.a-klaw.com

Office locations: San Francisco, CA (~6 of 6 attorneys); Portland, OR
Description: Alcantar & Kahl works solely in the energy sector. For over two decades, the firm has
  represented businesses throughout the Western US before FERC and state regulatory commis-
  sions (including the CEC, the CPUC, the PUC of Nevada, the Washington Utilities and Transpor-
  tation Commission, and the Mississippi Public Service Commission), as well as in negotiations
  and litigation to protect and advance the clients’ energy concerns. It has industry expertise in co-
  generation, interconnection and grid access, and natural gas product, use and delivery. Attorneys
  at Alcantar & Kahal also frequently engage in stakeholder discussions, policy hearings and de-
  bates before legislatures, state commissions, and ISO boards.


                                  Ater Wynne LLP
                                        www.aterwynne.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Portland, OR; Seattle, WA
Description: Ater Wynne specializes in regulatory compliance (federal and states in the Pacific
  northwest), project development, ADR and litigation. It typically represents investor-owned utilities,
  energy cooperatives, people’s utility districts, industrial energy users and alternative energy devel-
  opers such as: Columbia River People’s Utility District, Golden Valley Electric Ass’n, Idaho Power
  Co., Railbelt Utilities Group, Renewable Power & Light, Inc., and Prometheus Energy Co.




                         Beveridge & Diamond PC
                                          www.bdlaw.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~2 of 10 attorneys); Boston, MA; New
  York, NY; Washington, DC
Description: Beveridge & Diamond exclusively practices in environmental law, land use, and related
  litigation. In its climate change practice, the firm advises and represents major industry associa-
  tions and corporations in the energy, transportation, and consumer-product sectors on GHG emis-
  sions inventories, control measures, and credit and trading issues, and participates in rulemaking
  proceedings under AB 32 and RGGI. The renewable energy practice includes siting, state and
  federal permitting, contracting, and operational compliance for projects such as solar cell produc-
  tion, waste-to-energy facilities, cogeneration units, biofuels, biosolids and carbon sequestration.
                               Day Carter Murphy
                                    www.daycartermurphy.com

Office location: Sacramento, CA (~7 of 8 attorneys)
Description: Day Carter Murphy’s practice concentrates on natural resource issues, and serves a
  range of public power providers and source companies providing gas, geothermal, wind, solar,
  biomass, oil and hydroelectric power. It represents clients before the CPUC on all regulatory and
  development matters, helps with power plant and transmission line siting, negotiates power
  wheeling and power purchase agreements, and manages project financings.



                                    Downey Brand
                                      www.downeybrand.com

Office location: Sacramento, CA (~3 of 15 attorneys)
Description: Downey regularly represents clients before the CPUC in regulatory proceedings, and
  before the CEC for project permitting and licensing, and the firm has additional experience with
  transmission, land use and compliance issues. Clients include large gas power stations, small dis-
  tributed generation facilities, and geothermal, wind, solar, biomass and hydroelectric assets.


     Duncan Weinberg, Genzer & Pembroke, P.C.
                                           www.dwgp.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Jose, CA (~2 of 2 attorneys); Washington, DC (~15 of
  20 attorneys)
Description: DWGP provides project development support to energy service companies (ESCOs),
  advises municipal and rural utilities on all areas of energy law, represents companies and utilities
  in regulatory proceedings - with special expertise in matters involving natural gas, helps acquire
  hydroelectric and other power generation facilities, consults and litigates in licensing proceedings,
  and litigates in utility merger proceedings.


                       Ellison, Schneider & Harris
                                        www.eslawfirm.com

Office location: Sacramento, CA (~7 of 13 attorneys)
Description: The firm’s energy practice is focused on wholesale and retail issues impacting electric-
  ity and gas producers, suppliers and consumers. It counsels public agencies, industrial consum-
  ers, independent power producers, municipal utilities, irrigation districts and energy trade organi-
  zations concerning all regulatory matters and represents them in proceedings before the FERC,
  the CPUC, the CEC, the California Coastal Commission, and other state agencies and courts.
 Goodin, MacBride, Squeri, Day & Lamprey, LLP
                                              http://gmssr.com

Office location: San Francisco, CA (~6 of 13 attorneys)
Description: Goodin MacBride represents a full range of clients with matters before the CPUC, the
  CEC, the CARB and the Legislature. The firm provides advice on a broad array of energy mat-
  ters including climate change and greenhouse gas regulation; renewables incentive programs
  such as the California Solar Initiative and the Renewable Portfolio Standard; seeking necessary
  approvals for proposed projects; and general regulatory compliance.



  Position: Associate; Practice Group: Regulatory; % of billable hours doing ECC work: 100%
  A Day in the Life: I’m fortunate to work at a firm that is among the best at what we do but still places a
   high value on a collegial environment and maintaining a work-life balance. I typically work 9am - 5pm
   although days can be longer when there is a need. Being at a smaller firm has also allowed me to
   take a lead role on many matters. On a typical day, I’m drafting comments/briefs/motions for submis-
   sion at the CPUC or CEC in a variety of matters, drafting model legislation, advising clients on regula-
   tory strategy, and/or representing clients at various procedural meetings. Among the firm’s energy re-
   lated clients I have had an opportunity to work with most closely are the Solar Alliance, CURRENT
   Communications Group, North America Power Partners, Babcock & Brown, and PacifiCorp.
  The Future: Advising clients on climate change related matters is becoming an ever increasing part of
   our practice and I expect this aspect of the practices – both regulatory advising and compliance advis-
   ing – to only continue to grow as California continues to establish the regulatory and market-based
   structures needed to implement AB 32.
  Education: Boalt Hall - J.D. 2004, Illinois State - M.S. in Applied Econ. 2000, U. of Illinois - B.A 1997
  Career Path: I started law school a bit ahead of the curve as I had earned a Master’s in Regulatory Eco-
   nomics prior to starting law school. That background and some work in the telecommunications indus-
   try was invaluable in hitting the ground running when I started practicing regulatory law.
  Words of Wisdom: Regulatory practice groups are usually highly specialized and you’ll need to show
   that you have more than a general interest in the practice. To demonstrate that interest, summering
   with a regulatory agency, an NGO, and/or a firm with a solid practice in your area of interest is essen-
   tial. Moreover, a regulatory practice is, in general, highly interdisciplinary. A strong grasp of econom-
   ics can come in very handy on an almost daily basis. Even if you intend to practice in the corporate
   aspects of energy law, having a strong grasp of the regulatory side can be invaluable for your clients.




                                  Van Ness Feldman
                                                www.vnf.com

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Washington, DC (~65 of 70 attorneys); Seattle, WA
Description: VNF focuses exclusively on energy, infrastructure and environmental law and policy,
 representing clients such as investor owned utilities, owners of large public power generation and
 transmission facilities, alternative fuel companies, renewable project developers and municipalities.
 Its expertise includes regulatory and policy counseling, permitting, project development, environ-
 mental compliance, litigation, climate change and emissions trading matters and energy efficiency.
OTHER LEGAL
 EMPLOYERS
                 California Department of Justice,
                  Office of the Attorney General
                                               http://ag.ca.gov

Offices with substantial ECC practice: Sacramento, CA; San Francisco, CA; Oakland, CA; Los
Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA
Description: The Natural Resources Division, the Environment Division and an Energy Task Force
 all fall within the Public Rights Section of the AG’s Office, where lawyers are doing a great deal of
 work related to climate change. For example, they help evaluate and implement state policy on
 GHG regulation, defend California’s climate- and energy-related actions, and ensure that California
 meets the goals set by AB32. Their cases bring them into contact with the federal government,
 other state agencies and the legislature, local entities, and various corporations. With California at
 the forefront of climate change, renewable energy, and energy policy in general, lawyers at the
 AG’s Office have the opportunity to develop a diverse and robust energy practice. About 15-20 law-
 yers in the various locations of the AG’s Office working in these fields.




   Representative Projects: Defending California’s greenhouse gas emission regulations in lawsuits
    filed by the auto industry; challenging U.S. EPA’s denial of a preemption waiver for the greenhouse
    gas emission regulations; petitioning U.S. EPA to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the fed-
    eral Clean Air Act.
   A Day in the Life: Typical work is the typical work of litigation including everything from drafting plead-
    ings to meeting clients to making court appearances for oral argument or trial.
   The Future: I think that legal work regarding climate change is a growing area in general. For our of-
    fice in particular, there will be a lot of work in the next five years as the California Air Resources
    Board adopts regulations under AB 32.
   Education: Georgetown University Law Center - J.D. 1987; Yale University - B.A. 1982
   Career Path: Right out of law school I worked at a large private law firm in San Francisco for about
    two years. I left the law firm to work at the U.S. EPA Regional Office in San Francisco and I worked
    there for about ten years. I left the U.S. EPA for my current position at the Attorney General’s Office.
    Working in the area of climate change evolved from having previously worked under the Clean Air
    Act and representing the California Air Resources Board as a client agency.
   Words of Wisdom: You should pursue work that engages your interest and gives you some personal
    edification. A law job will involve a lot of hours, a certain amount of drudgery and sacrifice of per-
    sonal life, so you need to really like and believe in what you are working on to make it worthwhile.
            California Energy Commission (CEC)
                                            www.energy.ca.gov

Office location: Sacramento, CA (~19 of 19 attorneys)
Description: The CEC is California’s primary energy policy and planning agency; and will play a key role in
meeting emissions reduction goals. The Chief Counsel’s office has 7 primary responsibilities:
(1) CEC Policy and Rulemaking Proceedings: The attorneys assist Commissioners and staff in the
    preparation of several legislatively-mandated policy reports, and participate in hearings and
    workshops. Attorneys draft regulations for energy efficiency standards and other subjects, en-
    sure the adequacy of the supporting public record, and, post-adoption, help in enforcement.
(2) Powerplant Licensing Cases: Attorneys conduct discovery, cross-examine expert witnesses, help
    prepare staff witnesses' testimony, and file motions and briefs. A separate section provides legal
    advice to the decision makers. The office help sensure compliance with certification conditions.
(3) Proceedings at Other Agencies: The Office represents the CEC at other agencies, such as the
    CPUC and the FERC, in proceedings on electricity and natural gas utility rates and conservation
    programs, energy policy, resource acquisition, energy security, and other related matters.
(4) Legislation. The Office reviews all federal and state legislation affecting state energy policy. At-
    torneys draft legislation, analyze bills, and write and present testimony to legislative committees.
(5) Litigation: The Office represents the CEC in state and federal courts, both in defense of CEC de-
    cisions, and in matters such as suits against the Dept. of Energy on appliance standards.
(6) Contracts, Grants, and Loans for Efficiency, Renewable Energy and Energy Research Programs:
    Attorneys help draft, negotiate and implement the necessary supporting documents .
(7) General Legal Advice & Review: The CEC faces the myriad in-house issues encountered by any
    government agency, and the office advises Commissioners and staff on matters such as state
    budget and administrative rules, and sensitive personnel and conflict of interest issues.
Life In The Office: Attorneys enjoy a great deal of independence and responsibility; even new attor-
 neys often work with minimal supervision on controversial and complex cases. Some attorneys fo-
 cus on a specialized area, while others have more wide-ranging assignments; the Office strives to
 meet personal preferences while ensuring the best possible client service. The Office prides itself
 on the high quality of the legal counsel that it provides and its efforts to help employees achieve
 work-life balance. For example, while evening and weekend work is not uncommon, many attorneys
 use reduced or flexible work-time schedules, or telecommute one or more days each week.
Hiring: The Office accepts students for summer or semester intern/externships, and for permanent
positions subject to current need. Email Jonathan Blees (jblees@energy.state.ca.us) for info.


  The Future: As energy and climate change issues become more prominent and complex, the work of
   the Commission will expand, become even more interesting and important, and require even more
   high-quality legal assistance.
  Education: Boalt Hall - J.D. 1976
  Career Path: I worked at the Commission as a summer intern between my second and third years at
   Boalt. I must have done something right, because when I graduated they asked me back.
  Words of Wisdom: Become an excellent lawyer, and have passion for the work. Although taking
   “relevant” courses (e.g., air quality law, admin) is helpful, your interest and your skills are paramount.
   The Future: Energy is among the most rapidly expanding and demanding fields in the world today; I
    can only see the need for talented energy attorneys expanding. There has never been a more inter-
    esting, more challenging, or more exciting time to be working in this field.
   Education: University of Oregon - J.D. 1982; UC Santa Barbara - B.A. 1976
   Career Path: I have worked at a few private firms in general civil practice and business litigation, as in-
    house counsel to a large corporate organization, and as a self-employed civil litigation attorney. I
    then spent 16 years at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitations before a legal
    colleague accepted a position at the California Energy Commission Office of the Chief Counsel and
    lobbied me to do the same. My interview with CEC’s Chief Counsel and two Assistant Chief Coun-
    sels was among the most pleasant and interesting in my lengthy career. I readily accepted the posi-
    tion when it was offered to me, and I regard that the best career move I have made.
   Words of Wisdom: Specific advice: In addition to undertaking an appropriately-tailored academic cur-
    riculum, do whatever you can to gain real world experience working for agencies, law firms or other
    organizations that practice in the field of energy, even if it means volunteering your time in order to
    bolster your resume. Don’t overlook international opportunities; energy is a world-wide concern, in
    addition to local. Energy is a particularly exciting, dynamic and fascinating field to get into at this
    time, and it needs creative fresh thinking to solve the problems and challenges we face. I am con-
    stantly humbled by the talent, intelligence and positivism of the subject matter experts, attorneys and
    other professionals I get to work with on a daily basis. I consider myself extremely fortunate to have
    this work, and I encourage law students to get involved and explore the many emerging opportuni-
    ties. General career advice: If at first you don’t land the ideal position, remember your career path
    with be a long one and may include many unexpected turns. Assume your current work may turn out
    to be a stepping stone to something different or better, and always do your best. Be conscious of
    developing the right balance (for you) between maintaining a rigid, single-minded determination
    about your career path, versus remaining flexible in exploring random career opportunities that may
    come your way-- although I didn’t get into the energy field until late in my career, all the varied ex-
    perience I gained in the preceding years has greatly benefited my current work. Studiously avoid
    burning your bridges: leave your former employers, associates and clients happy to have known you.
    Always treat your opponents with professionalism, kindness and courtesy (not wimpiness!); one of
    the best recommendations I ever received was from an opposing counsel with whom I had been
    locked in bitter litigation for over a year. No matter how demanding or interesting your career, strive
    to maintain a healthy balance with other aspects of your life (social, cultural, family, friends, etc.)




     California Environmental Protection Agency
                    Cal/EPA: http://www.calepa.ca.gov; CARB: http://arb.ca.gov

Office Location: Sacramento, CA
Description: Cal/EPA is the umbrella agency which includes the Secretary for Environmental Pro-
tection and his/her office, as well as several boards and departments including the California Air
Resources Board (CARB) and the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The agency is
responsible for implementing state policies to restore, protect and enhance the environment, and
ensure public health, environmental quality and economic vitality. Carrying out California’s climate
change legislation AB32 is currently one of Cal/EPA’s - particularly CARB’s - biggest tasks.
  California Independent System Operator Corp.
                                              www.caiso.com

Office location: Folsom, CA (15 miles east of Sacramento)
Number of lawyers in the office: 12 {3 with corporate general counsel duties: contract review, HR,
  etc.; 3 representing Cal ISO at state level; 6 representing Cal ISO at FERC proceedings}
Description: Cal ISO is a non-profit mutual benefit corporation established in 1998 pursuant to a
  California statute pertaining to electricity restructuring. The Legal and Regulatory Dept. consists of
  12 attorneys and approximately 5 support staff. All attorneys do varying degrees of work related to
  the CAISO Tariff which relates to use of the wholesale transmission lines on the CAISO-controlled
  grid and participating as purchasers/sellers in CAISO wholesale energy markets.
Hiring: The Cal ISO legal dept. hires summer interns - see postings on the website and inquire to
  the HR Department. Permanent hiring is done as needed; there is no routine or annual expansion.



   Practice Group: State level representation
   Representative Clients / Projects: I represent Cal ISO in proceedings at the CPUC related to GHG
    and in connection with the Cal ISO’s participation in AB 32 processes with respect to the electricity
    sector. I also work in Demand Response, which includes a component for integration of investor
    owned utility demand response programs into Cal ISO’s wholesale markets. As electricity demand
    increases in a certain area at a certain time, instead of starting up another generator unit, the Cal ISO
    would “dispatch” (i.e. call) on a block of consumers to curtail the level of their electricity usage.
   A Day in the Life: (1) Preparing comments, written witness testimony, or other items for filing in admin-
    istrative proceedings, such as rulemakings which recommend policies for retail electricity providers
    (utilities) or customers regarding such areas as GHG regulations under AB 32. (2) Meeting with other
    Cal ISO dept. representatives working on company-wide initiatives, such as modifying Cal ISO’s tariff
    to include new procedures and processes to allow demand response resources to bid into our day-
    ahead and real time markets to supply “negawatts.” (3) Reviewing rulings and orders issued by
    agencies such the CPUC. (4) Attending workshops in regulatory proceedings to obtain information
    from the regulator or participate in stakeholder discussion and feedback to the regulator for various
    proposals. (5) Providing day-to-day advice in response to inquiries from various dept. representa-
    tives—Cal ISO counsel act as legal advisors to various departments which are our internal “clients.”
   The Future: Wholesale energy markets will likely expand greatly when the Cal ISO completes its mar-
    ket redesign. Demand Response is receiving increasing interest by federal and state agencies, and
    by utilities and others as a generation-substitute resource. Increased focus on implementing renew-
    able resource deployment and developing/refining legal/operational/technological/policy areas as re-
    newable resources are integrated into existing energy infrastructure and energy markets.
   Education: UC Davis - J.D. 1986; A.B. Political Science - 1983
   Career Path: Private practice in litigation and transactional real estate work; then with a firm’s Energy
    Practice Group - representing developer-applicants for power plant siting applications; then moved to
    a CA energy agency doing public power financing and interaction with CPUC; then moved to Cal ISO.
   Words of Wisdom: There are many workshop venues and other public processes where environ-
    mental, energy, and cleantech policy issues are being discussed. Proceedings at the CPUC, CEC,
    and ARB offer great opportunity to learn about the evolving policies and many have public interest
    group party involvement—entities such as NRDC, Union of Concerned Scientists, and The Utility Re-
    form Network (TURN). These organizations may provide an opportunity for student participation.
   California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC)
                                            www.cpuc.ca.gov

Office location: San Francisco, CA
Description: The CPUC is an administrative agency that regulates large investor owned utilities Pa-
  cific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric, Southern California
  Gas and many other energy service providers, as well as water, telecommunication and some
  transportation companies. The Commission also carry out proceedings related to climate change/
  greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energy, energy efficiency, and many other energy areas. Its
  legislation workload is rapidly expanding as the number of statutes related to energy increases.
  Between 20 and 30 lawyers work full-time for the CPUC, either in the Legal Division, as Adminis-
  trative Law Judges, as one of the five Commissioners, or in a Commissioner’s office.
Hiring: The CPUC hires paid law student summer interns in the ALJ Division, the Legal Division,
  and in individual Commissioners’ offices. The Legal Division hires law students for permanent po-
  sitions following graduation, but the ALJ Division and the Commissioners’ offices hire only more
  experienced lawyers. Students graduating from law school and awaiting bar results can immedi-
  ately apply and subsequently get on a civil service list for entry level attorney positions. However,
  the current practice of the Legal Division is to offer jobs to attorneys after passing the bar exam.




  Caseload: My caseload used to consist in equal parts of energy and telecommunications work. With
    telephone deregulation, and increased prominence of energy/clean energy in California economy,
    most of my work is now in the energy sector, with some focus on water as well.
  A Day in the Life: Much of my day involves reviewing parties' input and writing decisions in large cases.
    I also hold evidentiary hearings, which can last several days or weeks; conduct mediations; hold pre-
    hearing/status conferences; meet with teams of experts within the agency to plan out what my deci-
    sions will say; and consult with the political appointee Commissioners that vote on my decisions.
  Education: UC Berkeley - J.D. 1986, A.B. Political Science 1981
  Career Path: Worked at a big San Francisco law firm (5 years), then in-house at a large San Francisco
    corporation (6 years), then at a legal nonprofit (2 years), and then came to the Commission (9 years).
  Words of Wisdom: Don't assume your first job is forever. I happened upon energy work fortuitously; I
   had worked at a large telecommunications company, and came to the CPUC to do telecom work.
   When I got here, California entered an energy crisis (2000-01), and they needed ALJs to focus on
   energy work. As telecom was deregulated and the work diminished, energy issues began to take
   center stage, so I made the transition and love it. By the same token, this is the time to get into en-
   ergy work; the issues have never been more prominent. Just be flexible.
  Representative Projects: Energy efficiency and renewable energy procurement requirements for CA
    energy utilities; GHG emissions performance standards for electric utilities’ baseload procurement
    contracts; Recommendations to California Air Resources Board for Cap & Trade for electricity deliv-
    ered for consumption in California under AB 32; Participation in the Western Climate Initiative.
  A Day in the Life: I supervise 10 attorneys, who specialize in litigation in energy matters and represent
    the following: 1) the Division of Ratepayer Advocates, which supports protecting the environment, but
    tries to limit the utilities’ unreasonable costs and profits in CPUC proceedings; 2) the Consumer Pro-
    tection and Safety Division, which investigates safety, reliability and unreasonable practices of the
    utilities and enforces violations of CPUC orders in CPUC proceedings or state superior courts; 3) the
    CPUC and California ratepayers in Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) proceedings in-
    volving electric or natural gas matters; and 4) the CPUC and California ratepayers in federal courts,
    including appellate review of FERC orders.
  Future: Due to the need to regulate California public utilities, which are monopolies, the CPUC is a se-
    cure place to work. This is particularly true, because the CPUC is special funded from a charge on
    utility bills, and, therefore, deficits in the State’s general fund do not threaten the CPUC’s budget.
    The major growth in positions at the CPUC (i.e., attorney and non-attorney positions) has been to
    address environmental problems, such as working to decrease greenhouse gas emissions.
  Education: UC Berkeley - J.D. 1979; Western Illinois University - B.A. 1976
  Career Path: After graduating from Boalt Hall, I spent my first two years at a small public interest law
    firm, which did, among other things, environmental law (but it no longer exists). In October, 1981, I
    was hired as an attorney at the CPUC, where I have worked ever since.
  Words of Wisdom: I highly recommend that they consider applying to the CPUC. The legal work at the
   CPUC is cutting edge, so it never gets boring, which is why that I have stayed here for 27 years. In
   addition, due to the extensive workload at the CPUC, new attorneys get tremendous experience and
   responsibilities compared to work during the initial years in large law firms. During my first year at the
   CPUC, three years after graduating from law school, I was writing briefs and doing oral argument be-
   fore federal courts on constitutional and federal preemption issues. My second year at the CPUC, I
   was representing the CPUC in the U.S. Court of Appeals. State government work does not pay well
   compared to what law firms or corporations pay attorneys. However, there is much more job satisfac-
   tion working for the public interest, and other benefits, such as a decent pension and health insur-
   ance. If the students have large student loans, then either they should try to get some relief from
   Boalt Hall’s program encouraging students to pursue public interest jobs, or they should look into the
   College Cost Reduction and Access Act (CCRAA), which will be implemented in 2009. See the fol-
   lowing link to learn more about the CCRAA: http://www.equaljusticeworks.org/resource/ccraa.




                     California Resources Agency
                                      http://www.resources.ca.gov

Office Location: Sacramento, CA
Description: The Agency is responsible for delivering resources to the state, and focuses more on
 adaptation to change and anticipation of future conditions, rather than mitigation, which makes it
 seem less bureaucratic than other state agencies. Among its six divisions is Energy & Climate
 Change, which participates in the state’s Climate Action Team and the California Solar Initiative.
 Lawyers on the Climate Team consider issues such as land use, water law and urban development
 to help write policy, adopt measures through the administrative process, and implement guidelines.
 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)
                                            www.ferc.gov

Office location: Washington, DC
Description: FERC is an independent agency that regulates the interstate transmission of natural
  gas, oil, and electricity; natural gas; and hydropower projects. Its top priorities are to promote the
  development of a strong energy infrastructure, support competitive energy markets, and prevent
  market manipulation. Attorneys work in the Offices of Administrative Litigation, the General Coun-
  sel, Enforcement, Administrative Law Judges; in each of the Commissioner’s offices; and in the
  various substantive division of FERC. Staff attorneys draft briefs and motions, and litigate cases
  before the ALJs. They also research and prepare cases under investigation for the Commission,
  draft orders and rulemakings, and provide general legal support for the entire organization.
Hiring: The Commission hires law students (2Ls preferred but 1Ls are considered) for paid and un-
  paid summer internships. ALJs at FERC also hire judicial clerks who often serve during the year
  following law school graduation. Visit the website’s “Careers” tab for more information.


                 Legislative Counsel of California
                               http://www.legislativecounsel.ca.gov


Office Location: Sacramento, CA
Description: The Office of Legislative Counsel offers nonpartisan legal services to California legisla-
  tors, including drafting and analysis of legislation, preparation of legal opinions on the interpreta-
  tion and constitutionality of existing law or of proposed legislation, attendance at legislative com-
  mittee hearings, and consultation with legislators and staff. The lawyers who work on the Energy
  & Resources Counsel in the office are likely to stay especially busy in coming years as California
  expands its energy and climate legislative structure.
Hiring: The Office hires legal interns each summer. Permanent position job turn-over is minimal; any
  avialble positions are listed on www.spb.ca.gov.


    National Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
                                            www.nrdc.org

Offices with substantial ECC practice: San Francisco, CA (~3 of 10 attorneys); Los Angeles, CA;
  Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Washington, DC; Beijing, China
Description: Among NRDC’s programs are Air & Energy, Nuclear, and Climate. Staff attorneys work
  on energy and climate change policy at the national, state and local levels, and work with key
  stakeholders including environmental, environmental justice, business, and consumer and low-
  income advocate stakeholders. Attorneys also represent NRDC in regulatory and legislative proc-
  esses, and litigate on behalf of the organization.
Hiring: NRDC hires law students for unpaid summer internships. Interns write briefs, draft com-
  plaints, prepare legal analyses, obtain affidavits, investigate corporate and government malfea-
  sance, and draft white papers and comments for submission to Congressional committees and
  administrative agencies. Although NRDC does not often hire recent law graduates for permanent
  positions, you can view the qualifications for what jobs are available at http://www.nrdc.org/jobs/.
        The Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP)
                                         www.raponline.org

Primary office locations: Montpelier, VT (~6 of 7 attorneys); Hallowell, ME (~3 of 3 attorneys)
Description: RAP is a non-profit organization that provides research, analysis, and educational as-
  sistance to public officials on electric utility regulation. The group leads workshops covering topics
  such as electric utility restructuring, power sector reform, renewable resource development, the
  development of efficient markets, performance-based regulation, demand-side management, and
  green pricing. RAP also provides regulators throughout the US and world with technical assis-
  tance, training, and policy research and development, and issues letters, reports, and conference
  presentations on current regulatory issues.


             The Utilities Reform Network (TURN)
                                            www.turn.org

Office location: San Francisco, CA (~6 of 8 attorneys)
Description: TURN is California’ s “utility watchdog” and advocates for consumer rights, affordable
  rates and a more livable California. It challenges large energy and telephone companies through-
  out the state in order to save money for consumers and small businesses; demands reliable ser-
  vice and environmentally sound policies; provides consumer assistance; and mobilizes people
  statewide to take action for change.


      United States Department of Energy (DOE)
              Main: www.energy.gov; General Counsel’s Office: www.gc.energy.gov

Office location: Washington, DC
Description: The DOE’s four principle programs are designed to increase production of domestic
  energy and renewable/alternative energy; enhance national security; safely dispose of radioactive
  wastes; and sponsor science & technology research to help find, produce or deliver energy. The
  Office of the General Counsel provides legal advice and counsel to the Secretary of Energy, Dep-
  uty Secretary, and all Departmental elements (except the National Nuclear Security Administration
  and the FERC), and for representing the DOE before Federal, State, and other governmental
  agencies and courts. Lawyers work for one of the four Deputy General Counsel (respectively in
  charge of Litigation, Energy Policy, Environment & Nuclear Programs, and Technology Transfer &
  Procurement), in the Office of Dispute Resolution or in the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance.
Hiring: The DOE accepts law students for summer and semester internships; see the General
  Counsel’s website or email gcintern@hq.doe.gov for more information. The DOE also hires both
  new and experienced lawyers for permanent positions; jobs are listed on www.usajobs.gov.
             United States Department of Justice
     Main: www.usdoj.gov; Environment & Natural Resources Division: www.usdoj.gov/enrd/

Office location: Washington, DC; San Francisco, CA; Sacramento, CA; Anchorage, AK; Boston,
  MA; Seattle, WA
Description: The DOJ’s Environment & Natural Resources Division advises the Attorney General,
  and litigates to enforce federal environmental or resources-related laws.
Hiring: The Division hires paid interns for 2L summer, or before the start of a judicial clerkship.


 United States Environmental Protection Agency
                                             www.epa.gov

Office location: Washington, DC; San Francisco, CA; Boston, MA; Seattle, WA; New York; NY;
  Philadelphia, PA; Atlanta, GA; Chicago, IL; Dallas, TX; Kansas City, KS; Denver, CO
Description: Environmental and energy issues are becoming increasingly intertwined. Lawyers for
  the EPA enforce federal environmental statues, give general administrative counseling, work with
  government grants and contracts in the environmental area, and contact with other governmental
  agencies in the same region as the local EPA office.
Hiring: Most regional offices hire law student summer interns, and some hire recent graduates
  through the Honors Fellowship program. Permanent positions are listed on www.usajobs.gov.
Position: Clean Energy Consultant for Exergy Consulting, Corte Madera, CA
Representative Clients / Projects: Quay Valley (large planned sustainable community), Pacific Gas
 and Electric Company (low-income energy efficiency, sustainable design)
A Day in the Life: Facilitate design charrettes for clean energy projects; help create clean energy plans;
 brainstorm possibilities for energy programs and help prepare regulatory filings; pull together the many
 professionals needed for a comprehensive sustainable design; represent clients before the California
 Public Utilities Commission and California Energy Commission; provide input to businesses trying to
 refine their own clean energy programs; meet with government officials regarding policy, legislation,
 and funding.
The Future: More of the same (I love what I do), adding collaboration with other practitioners in the
 field, possibly merging with or joining another firm.
Education: UC Berkeley - J.D. 1987; UC Santa Cruz - BA in Environmental Studies & History 1981
Career Path: Environmental studies major, 4 years as a paralegal (workers comp & criminal law), law
 school with a specialization in environmental law and Editor-in-Chief of ELQ, Law Clerk, US Court of
 Appeals, 9th Circuit (Hon. Harry Pregersen), 5 years Environmental Attorney – McCutchen Doyle,
 Brown & Enersen (focus on air quality and hazardous waste), In-House air quality attorney at PG&E,
 promoted into the business to run projects related to my law practice, promoted to Chief Counsel for
 one of the business units, promoted to Vice President Customer Service (also in charge of all retail
 clean energy projects, such as energy efficiency, solar, and demand response), left PG&E to form Ex-
 ergy Consulting, which specializes in sustainable development and retail clean energy projects.
Words of Wisdom: Stay open to unexpected possibilities. I never dreamed I would go into power gen-
 eration from air quality law, but it turned out to be great preparation for my solar energy and demand
 response work because I really understood power generation, transmission and distribution. I also
 never imagined I could be happy working for a utility (I wanted to do public interest work for the Natu-
 ral Resources Defense Council (NRDC)), but by working at PG&E I ended up running the energy effi-
 ciency programs that NRDC designed!
 Don’t label things as black and white – I probably did more good for the environment running multi-
 million dollar clean energy programs from within a corporation than I might have in a public interest
 organization given my personality (I prefer collaboration to an adversarial role).
 Keep an open mind about what you are good at and how you can be most effective. It takes many
 kinds of people working in many kinds of environments to create a good outcome for society. Some of
 the best environmental work I have seen was performed by unlikely people deep down in unexpected
 organizations, like the creative engineer who helped a peach canning factory develop state of the art
 efficiency, conservation and clean air vehicle programs. These are some of life’s unsung heroes.
 Continue to follow your own inner compass and it will lead you on an amazing journey. I am very
 happy and content with where I am today and could not have planned or predicted how I would get
 here in a million years. But by staying true to my own interests and using that to guide a “yes” or “no”
 at each fork in the road, I arrived at a great place and have had lots of fun along the way.
 Do things that are easy for you and bring you joy. I’m convinced that people are far more effective
 when they are having fun, loving what they do, and it comes naturally to them. Too often we think it
 has to be “hard”, but when it’s really hard chances are you aren’t suited to it. When you are suited to
 something it comes more naturally. Then you can use all your energy to shine and provide true excel-
 lence from a place of genuine contribution rather than labor over a calculated attempt to climb some
 imaginary ladder. — Good luck and best wishes!!
APPENDICES
ADR = Alternative Dispute Resolution
BERC = Berkeley Energy & Resources Collaborative
CARB = California Air Resources Board
CEC = California Energy Commission
CPUC = California Public Utilities Commission
ECC = Energy / Climate / Cleantech (This is not a standard acronym. It is used for convenience.)
FERC = Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
GHG = Greenhouse Gas
ISO = Independent Service Operator
IP = Intellectual Property
IPP = Independent Power Producer
LNG = Liquefied Natural Gas
NRC = Nuclear Regulatory Commission
PUC = Public Utilities Commission
M & A = Mergers & Acquisitions
RECLAIM = REgional CLean Air Incentives Market
RGGI = Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative
RPS = Renewable Portfolio Standard
RTO = Regional Transmission Organization
                                                       Introduction
Please note that this index does NOT provide a comprehensive list of private and public entities do-
ing ECC work in each city. The international section especially is woefully incomplete. Instead, this
index merely sorts the entries we have included by their location, in order to provide a starting point
for someone interested in working in a particular place.



                                                      United States
Albany, NY                                                                 Cooley Godward Kronish LLP ................................. 13
Dewey & LeBoeuf ....................................................15 Dewey & LeBoeuf.................................................... 15
Greenberg Traurig LLP............................................17 Goodwin Procter LLP ............................................. 17
                                                                           K&L Gates LLP ....................................................... 19
Anchorage, AK                                                              McDermott Will & Emery ........................................ 20
Dorsey & Whitney LLP ............................................15 Nixon Peabody LLP................................................. 25
US Department of Justice........................................44 Schiff Hardin LLP ................................................... 27
                                                                           US Department of Justice ....................................... 44
Atlanta, GA                                                                US Environmental Protection Agency ..................... 44
Alston & Bird LLP.....................................................10
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44 Broomfield, CO
                                                                           Cooley Godward Kronish LLP ................................. 13
Austin, TX
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP ....................10 Charlotte, NC
Andrews Kurth .........................................................11 Hunton & Williams ................................................... 18
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16 Chicago, IL
Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................30 Foley & Lardner LLP .............................................. 16
Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati ...........................31 Jones Day .............................................................. 18
                                                                           Kirkland & Ellis LLP ................................................. 19
Bellevue, WA                                                               McDermott Will & Emery ........................................ 20
Perkins Coie ...........................................................27 National Resources Defense Council ..................... 42
                                                                           Schiff Hardin LLP ................................................... 27
Boise, ID                                                                  Sidley Austin LLP .................................................... 28
Fenwick & West LLP................................................16 Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP ..................... 28
Perkins Coie ...........................................................27 US Environmental Protection Agency ..................... 44
                                                                           Winston & Strawn LLP ............................................ 31
Boston, MA
Beveridge & Diamond PC........................................32 Columbus, OH
Bingham & McCutchen ............................................12 Jones Day .............................................................. 18
Dallas, TX                                                           Fulbright & Jaworski LLP......................................... 16
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP ....................10            Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP ................................. 16
                                                                     Jeffer, Mangels, Butler & Marmaro LLP .................. 18
Andrews Kurth .........................................................11
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16      Latham & Watkins LLP............................................ 19
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16 Manatt, Phelps & Philips LLP .................................. 19
                                                                     Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP .................. 20
K&L Gates LLP .......................................................19
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44           Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP................................. 21
                                                                     Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................30
                                                                     Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP ..................... 27
Denver, CO                                                           National Resources Defense Council ..................... 42
Dorsey & Whitney LLP ............................................15 Sidley Austin LLP .................................................... 28
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16 Winston & Strawn LLP ............................................ 31
Greenberg Traurig LLP............................................17
Morrison & Foerster LLP..........................................21 Madison, WI
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44 Foley & Lardner LLP ............................................... 16

Hallowell, ME                                                           McLean, VA
The Regulatory Assistance Project..........................43 Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
                                                                        Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP ..................... 27
Harrisburg, PA
K&L Gates LLP .......................................................19 Menlo Park, CA (see Silicon Valley)

Houston, TX                                                                   Miami, FL
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP ....................10                     Greenberg Traurig LLP ........................................... 17
Arnold & Porter LLP.................................................11
Baker & McKenzie ...................................................12        Milwaukee, WI
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16          Foley & Lardner LLP ............................................... 16
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16
Greenberg Traurig LLP............................................17           Minneapolis, MN
Jones Day ...............................................................18   Dorsey & Whitney LLP ........................................... 15
McDermott Will & Emery .........................................20            Stoel Rives LLP ....................................................... 30
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP .....................27
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP ...........28                        Montpelier, VT
Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................30        The Regulatory Assistance Project ......................... 43

Kansas City, KS                                            Newark, NJ
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44 K&L Gates LLP ....................................................... 19

Los Angeles, CA                                                               New York, NY
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP ....................10                     Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP .................... 10
Arnold & Porter LLP.................................................11        Allen & Overy .......................................................... 10
Bingham & McCutchen ............................................12            Arnold & Porter LLP ................................................ 11
California DOJ, Office of the Attorney General ........36                     Baker Botts LLP ...................................................... 11
Chadbourne & Parke LLP........................................13              Beveridge & Diamond PC ....................................... 32
Chadbourne & Parke LLP........................................13              US Environmental Protection Agency ..................... 44
Clifford Chance ........................................................13
Covington & Burling LLP..........................................14           Pittsburg, PA
Dewey & LeBoeuf ....................................................15        K&L Gates LLP ....................................................... 19
Duane Morris LLP....................................................15        Reed Smith LLP ...................................................... 27
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16               Portland, OR
Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve ...................17                     Ater Wynne LLP ...................................................... 32
Hunton & Williams ...................................................18       Miller Nash ............................................................. 21
Jones Day ...............................................................18   Perkins Coie ........................................................... 27
Kirkland & Ellis LLP .................................................19      Stoel Rives LLP ....................................................... 30
K&L Gates LLP .......................................................19       Alcantar & Kahl LLP ................................................ 32
Latham & Watkins LLP ............................................19
McDermott Will & Emery .........................................20            Richmond, VA
Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP...................20                      Hunton & Williams ................................................... 18
Morrison & Foerster LLP..........................................21
National Resources Defense Council .....................42                    Rochester, NY
Nixon Peabody LLP .................................................25         Nixon Peabody LLP................................................. 25
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP............................26
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP .....................27             Sacramento, CA
Sidley Austin LLP.....................................................28California DOJ, Office of the Attorney General........ 36
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP ...........28                  California Energy Commission ................................ 37
Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP .....................28               California Environmental Protection Agency ........... 38
Thelen Reid Brown Raysman & Steiner LLP...........30                    California Independent Systems Operator .............. 39
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44              California Resources Agency .................................. 41
Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................30  Day Carter Murphy .................................................. 33
White & Case LLP ...................................................30  Downey Brand......................................................... 33
Winston & Strawn LLP.............................................31     Ellison, Schneider & Harris...................................... 33
                                                                        Legislative Counsel of California ............................. 42
Oakland, CA                                                             Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
California DOJ, Office of the Attorney General ........36 Stoel Rives LLP ....................................................... 30
                                                                        US Department of Justice ....................................... 44
Orange County, CA
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16 Salt Lake City, UT
Latham & Watkins LLP ............................................19 Stoel Rives LLP ....................................................... 30
Manatt, Phelps & Philips LLP ..................................19
                                                                        San Antonio, TX
Palm Beach, FL                                                          Fulbright & Jaworski LLP......................................... 16
Greenberg Traurig LLP............................................17
                                                                        San Diego, CA
Palo Alto, CA (see Silicon Valley)                                      Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
                                                                        California DOJ, Office of the Attorney General........ 36
Philadelphia, PA                                                        Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve ................... 17
Reed Smith LLP.......................................................27 Latham & Watkins LLP............................................ 19
Morrison & Foerster LLP..........................................21 Stoel Rives LLP ....................................................... 30
                                                                             US Department of Justice ....................................... 44
San Francisco, CA                                                            US Environmental Protection Agency ..................... 44
Alcantar & Kahl LLP.................................................32 Van Ness Feldman .................................................. 34
Beveridge & Diamond PC........................................32 Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati........................... 31
Bingham & McCutchen ............................................12
California DOJ, Office of the Attorney General ........36 Silicon Valley, CA
California Public Utilities Commission .....................40 Cooley Godward Kronish LLP ................................. 13
Cooley Godward Kronish LLP .................................13 Duncan, Weinberg, Genzer & Pembroke, P.C ........ 33
Covington & Burling LLP..........................................14 Fenwick & West LLP ............................................... 16
Davis Wright Tremaine LLP.....................................15 Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve ................... 17
Duane Morris LLP....................................................15 Heller Ehrman LLP .................................................. 17
Fenwick & West LLP................................................16 Nixon Peabody LLP................................................. 25
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16 Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP............................ 26
Goodin, MacBride, Squeri, Day & Lamprey, LLP ....34 Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati........................... 31
Heller Ehrman LLP ..................................................17
Jeffer, Mangels, Butler & Marmaro LLP...................18 St. Louis, MO
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP............................26 Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP ..................... 28
Latham & Watkins LLP ............................................19
Manatt, Phelps & Philips LLP ..................................19 Walnut Creek, CA
Morrison & Foerster LLP..........................................21 Bingham & McCutchen............................................ 12
National Resources Defense Council .....................42 Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
Nixon Peabody LLP .................................................25
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP .....................27 Washington, DC
Reed Smith LLP.......................................................27 Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP .................... 10
Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP .....................28 Alston & Bird LLP .................................................... 10
Thelen Reid Brown Raysman & Steiner LLP...........30 Andrews Kurth ......................................................... 11
The Utilities Reform Network ...................................43 Arnold & Porter LLP ................................................ 11
US Department of Justice........................................44 Baker Botts LLP ...................................................... 11
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44 Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati ...........................31 Beveridge & Diamond PC ....................................... 32
Winston & Strawn LLP.............................................31 Bingham & McCutchen............................................ 12
                                                                             Chadbourne & Parke LLP ....................................... 13
San Jose (see Silicon Valley)                                                Clifford Chance........................................................ 13
                                                                             Covington & Burling LLP ......................................... 14
Seattle, WA                                                                  Davis Wright Tremaine LLP..................................... 15
Ater Wynne LLP.......................................................32 Dewey & LeBoeuf.................................................... 15
Davis Wright Tremaine LLP.....................................15 Dorsey & Whitney LLP ........................................... 15
Dorsey & Whitney LLP ............................................15 Duane Morris LLP ................................................... 15
Fenwick & West LLP................................................16 Duncan, Weinberg, Genzer & Pembroke, P.C ........ 33
Heller Ehrman LLP ..................................................17 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission................. 42
K&L Gates LLP .......................................................19 Foley & Lardner LLP ............................................... 16
Miller Nash ..............................................................21 Fulbright & Jaworski LLP......................................... 16
Perkins Coie ...........................................................27 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP ................................. 16
Goodwin Procter LLP ..............................................17
Greenberg Traurig LLP............................................17
Heller Ehrman LLP ..................................................17
Hunton & Williams ...................................................18
Jones Day ...............................................................18
Kirkland & Ellis LLP .................................................19
K&L Gates LLP .......................................................19
Latham & Watkins LLP ............................................19
Manatt, Phelps & Philips LLP ..................................19
McDermott Will & Emery .........................................20
Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP .................................21
Morrison & Foerster LLP..........................................21
National Resources Defense Council .....................42
Nixon Peabody LLP .................................................25
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP............................26
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP .....................27
Sidley Austin LLP.....................................................28
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP ...........28
Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP .....................28
Steptoe & Johnson LLP ...........................................29
Thelen Reid Brown Raysman & Steiner LLP...........30
US Department of Energy........................................43
US Department of Justice........................................44
US Environmental Protection Agency......................44
Van Ness Feldman ..................................................34
Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................30
White & Case LLP ...................................................30
Winston & Strawn LLP.............................................31
                                                        International
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates                                        Fulbright & Jaworski LLP......................................... 16
White & Case LLP ...................................................30 Heller Ehrman LLP .................................................. 17
                                                                       Reed Smith LLP ...................................................... 27
Almaty, Kazakhstan                                                     Sidley Austin LLP .................................................... 28
Chadbourne & Parke LLP........................................13 Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP........... 28

Amsterdam, Netherlands                                                     Juarez, Mexico
Allen & Overy...........................................................10 Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12

Beijing, China                                                               London, United Kingdom
Allen & Overy...........................................................10   Andrews Kurth ......................................................... 11
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11     Allen & Overy .......................................................... 10
Clifford Chance ........................................................13   Arnold & Porter LLP ................................................ 11
Hunton & Williams ...................................................18      Baker Botts LLP ...................................................... 11
National Resources Defense Council .....................42                   Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
                                                                             Chadbourne & Parke LLP ....................................... 13
Brussels, Belgium                                                            Clifford Chance........................................................ 13
Allen & Overy...........................................................10   Covington & Burling LLP ......................................... 14
Clifford Chance ........................................................13   Dewey & LeBoeuf.................................................... 15
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16              Duane Morris LLP ................................................... 15
Hunton & Williams ...................................................18      Fulbright & Jaworski LLP......................................... 16
                                                                             Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP ................................. 16
Dubai, United Arab Emirates                                                  Heller Ehrman LLP .................................................. 17
Allen & Overy...........................................................10   Hunton & Williams ................................................... 18
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11     Kirkland & Ellis LLP ................................................. 19
Clifford Chance ........................................................13   K&L Gates LLP ....................................................... 19
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16         Latham & Watkins LLP............................................ 19
                                                                             McDermott Will & Emery ........................................ 20
Dusseldorf, Germany                                                          Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP .................. 20
White & Case LLP ...................................................30       Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
                                                                             Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP ..................... 27
Frankfurt, Germany                                                           Reed Smith LLP ...................................................... 27
Allen & Overy...........................................................10   Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP........... 28
Clifford Chance ........................................................13   Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................ 30
                                                                             White & Case LLP ................................................... 30
Hanoi, Vietnam
Duane Morris LLP....................................................15 Madrid, Spain
                                                                           Allen & Overy .......................................................... 10
Hong Kong                                                                  Jones Day .............................................................. 18
Allen & Overy...........................................................10
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11 Melbourne, Australia
Clifford Chance ........................................................13 Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
Mexico City, Mexico                                                           Sydney, Australia
Chadbourne & Parke LLP........................................13              Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
Milan, Italy
Allen & Overy...........................................................10 Tokyo, Japan
Dewey & LeBoeuf ....................................................15     Allen & Overy .......................................................... 10
                                                                           Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
Moscow, Russia                                                             Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP ....................10 White & Case LLP ................................................... 30
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11
Chadbourne & Parke LLP........................................13 Warsaw, Poland
Clifford Chance ........................................................13 Baker & McKenzie ................................................... 12
Dewey & LeBoeuf ....................................................15 Chadbourne & Parke LLP ....................................... 13
White & Case LLP ...................................................30 Dewey & LeBoeuf.................................................... 15

Paris, France
Allen & Overy...........................................................10
Dewey & LeBoeuf ....................................................15
White & Case LLP ...................................................30
Winston & Strawn LLP.............................................31

Prague, Czech Republic
White & Case LLP ...................................................30

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11
Clifford Chance ........................................................13

Sao Paulo, Brazil
Baker & McKenzie ...................................................12

Shanghai, China
Allen & Overy...........................................................10
Clifford Chance ........................................................13
Morrison & Foerster LLP..........................................21

Singapore
Allen & Overy...........................................................10
Clifford Chance ........................................................13
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP .................................16
Jones Day ...............................................................18
Latham & Watkins LLP ............................................19
Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP...................20
White & Case LLP ...................................................30
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP ....................10                    Jones Day .............................................................. 18
Alcantar & Kahl LLP.................................................32       Kirkland & Ellis LLP ................................................. 19
Allen & Overy...........................................................10   K&L Gates LLP ....................................................... 19
Alston & Bird LLP.....................................................10     Latham & Watkins LLP............................................ 19
Andrews Kurth .........................................................11    Legislative Counsel of California ............................. 42
Arnold & Porter LLP.................................................11       Manatt, Phelps & Philips LLP .................................. 19
Ater Wynne LLP.......................................................32      McDermott Will & Emery ........................................ 20
Baker Botts LLP.......................................................11     Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP .................. 20
Baker & McKenzie ...................................................12       Miller Nash .............................................................. 21
Beveridge & Diamond PC........................................32             Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP................................. 21
Bingham & McCutchen ............................................12           Morrison & Foerster LLP ......................................... 21
California DOJ, Office of the Attorney General ........36                    National Resources Defense Council ..................... 42
California Energy Commission ................................37              Nixon Peabody LLP................................................. 25
California Environmental Protection Agency ...........38                     Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP............................ 26
California Independent Systems Operator...............39                     Perkins Coie ........................................................... 27
California Public Utilities Commission .....................40               Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP ..................... 27
California Resources Agency ..................................41             The Regulatory Assistance Project ......................... 43
Chadbourne & Parke LLP........................................13             Reed Smith LLP ...................................................... 27
Clifford Chance ........................................................13   Schiff Hardin LLP ................................................... 27
Cooley Godward Kronish LLP .................................13               Sidley Austin LLP .................................................... 28
Covington & Burling LLP..........................................14          Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meager & Flom LLP............. 28
Davis Wright Tremaine LLP.....................................15             Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP ..................... 28
Day Carter Murphy ..................................................33       Steptoe & Johnson LLP........................................... 29
Dewey & LeBoeuf ....................................................15       Stoel Rives LLP ....................................................... 30
Dorsey & Whitney LLP ............................................15          The Utilities Reform Network................................... 43
Downey Brand .........................................................33     Thelen Reid Brown Raysman & Steiner LLP........... 30
Duane Morris LLP....................................................15       US Department of Energy ....................................... 43
Duncan, Weinberg, Genzer & Pembroke, P.C ........33                          US Department of Justice ....................................... 44
Ellison, Schneider & Harris ......................................33         US Environmental Protection Agency ..................... 44
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission .................42                     Van Ness Feldman .................................................. 34
Fenwick & West LLP................................................16         Vinson & Elkins LLP ................................................ 30
Foley & Lardner LLP................................................16        White & Case LLP ................................................... 30
Fulbright & Jaworski LLP .........................................16         Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati........................... 31
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.........................................16           Winston & Strawn LLP ............................................ 31
Goodin, MacBride, Squeri, Day & Lamprey, LLP ....34
Goodwin Procter LLP...............................................17
Greenberg Traurig ..................................................17
Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve ...................17
Heller Ehrman LLP ..................................................17
Hunton & Williams ...................................................18
Jeffer, Mangels, Butler & Marmaro LLP...................18

				
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