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Getting Started

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 68

									HVAC ePrimer Documentation Draft
                   January 2006




                          Page 1
HVAC ePrimer Documentation Draft

                                                         Table of Contents

1    Getting Started ........................................................................................................................ 3
  1.1     What you should know about HVAC ePrimer ............................................................... 3
  1.2     What’s installed with HVAC ePrimer ............................................................................ 3
  1.3     Limits for HVAC ePrimer 1.1 ........................................................................................ 3
2    Getting and Using Help .......................................................................................................... 3
3    Using HVAC ePrimer with a Physical Disability................................................................... 3
4    Installing and Removing HVAC ePrimer ............................................................................... 3
5    Overview of HVAC ePrimer .................................................................................................. 9
  5.1     Overall Structure ............................................................................................................. 9
  5.2     Primary intended users .................................................................................................... 9
  5.3     Other intended users ..................................................................................................... 10
  5.4     Pedagogical Model Used .............................................................................................. 10
6    Usage by Students and Guests .............................................................................................. 10
  6.1     The Login Screen .......................................................................................................... 10
  6.2     Use Overview................................................................................................................ 11
  6.3     Scenario Selection ......................................................................................................... 12
  6.4     6-step Learning Process ................................................................................................ 12
  6.5     Details of using forms ................................................................................................... 27
7    Use by Course Instructors ..................................................................................................... 32
  7.1     Form details for instructors ........................................................................................... 32
  7.2     Air Handling System (AHU) System Level View ........................................................ 33
  7.3     Creating PBCS Scenarios ............................................................................................. 35
  7.4     Weather Files ................................................................................................................ 35
8    Sharing Information with Other Users.................................................................................. 35
9    Using HVAC ePrimer on Multiple Computers..................................................................... 35
10 Reporting problems............................................................................................................... 35
11 International Features ........................................................................................................... 35
  11.1 Language features available .......................................................................................... 35
  11.2 Units and conversions available.................................................................................... 35
12 Development Process ............................................................................................................ 35
  12.1 Development project ..................................................................................................... 35
  12.2 Development team ........................................................................................................ 35
  12.3 Industry Advisory Panel ............................................................................................... 36
  12.4 NSF Funding ................................................................................................................. 36
13 End-User License Agreement ............................................................................................... 36
Help File ....................................................................................................................................... 37
Glossary ........................................................................................................................................ 40
HVAC ePrimer Classroom Handout............................................................................................. 43




                                                                                                                                     Page 2
1     Getting Started
1.1   What you should know about HVAC ePrimer
      This tool uses goal-oriented, problem-based case study methods to find solutions to complex
      system-level equipment problems. It assumes a team problem-solving approach and promotes
      team communications and interactions with course instructors.

      The HVAC ePrimer tool uses videos to present problem situations, which will facilitate
      understanding of the operating principles of HVAC system components. This tool allows users to
      diagnose basic equipment problems at the component and system level.

1.2   What’s installed with HVAC ePrimer
         Flash simulations
         Instructional video and audio files
         12 forms:
               o Need to Know Board
               o Troubleshooting Chart
               o Interview Form
               o Concept Map
               o Learning Log
               o Observation Form
               o Resource Template
               o Checklist - Critical Thinking and Team Interactions
               o Scoring Rubric for Evaluation of KSA PBCS
               o Talk Back Sheet
               o Reflection Essay
               o Instructor's Scoring Guide
         Multiple interactive problem scenarios
         Extensive context-sensitive information about systems and components

1.3   Limits for HVAC ePrimer 1.1

2     Getting and Using Help
      See Section 14 of this document for Help File and Glossary.

3     Using HVAC ePrimer with a Physical Disability
4     Installing and Removing HVAC ePrimer
      To download the ePrimer application:
      1. Browse to http://eprimer.org/download/
      2. Click on ePrimerInstaller_0_0_25.zip. This version number will change in the future.




                                                                                                Page 3
3. Click Open with "WinZip (default)"




4. Once the WinZip application starts, click "Use evaluation version"




                                                                        Page 4
5. Click on the ePrimerInstaller .exe file. The HVAC ePrimer Setup window will open.
6. Click "I Agree" to the License Agreement




                                                                                       Page 5
7. Click Next




8.Click Install



                  Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
      9.Click Close
      Upgrading from a previous version of HVAC ePrimer:
      To upgrade to the latest version of HVAC ePrimer, follow the steps as outlined directly above.

5     Overview of HVAC ePrimer
5.1   Overall Structure
5.1.1. SPARK simulator
      SPARK and its accompanying animations allow users to explore the details of HVAC system
      behavior based on detailed simulations.

5.1.2. Animation engines

5.1.3. Web-based application with local simulation

5.2   Primary intended users
      The primary users of HVAC ePrimer are students and instructors in 2-year technical degree
      programs in community colleges.




                                                                                             Page 9
5.3   Other intended users
      Other HVAC ePrimer users may include students and professors in:
      1. 4-year universities with technical HVAC programs
      2. Schools of architecture
      3. Field incumbents

5.4   Pedagogical Model Used
5.4.1. Problem-Based Case Study Scenarios

      Multiple scenarios available
      This HVAC ePrimer exercise is a problem based case study of a heating system, its air-handling
      unit (AHU), and its heating coil that are not performing properly on cold days in the winter.
      Occupants are complaining that it is too cold.

      New Scenarios can be created

6     Usage by Students and Guests
6.1   The Login Screen
      To start ePrimer:
      1. Go to your computer's desktop.
      2. Click on the ePrimer icon.




      3. After ePrimer launches, a LOGIN box will appear on screen. Type in your username and your
         password.




                                                                                          Page 10
      4. Click Login.
      5. At the 00 Main screen, several scenarios are presented. Click on the Start Scenario button to
          begin the scenario you would like to explore.

6.2   Use Overview
      To use HVAC ePrimer, select a Scenario within which to analyze the behavior of the Air Handling
      Unit. These scenarios are:
       Normal Mode
       Fault Mode
       PBCS Scenario: It's Too Cold
       PBCS Scenario: It's Too Hot (This scenario is in development.)
       PBCS Scenario: Temperature Vacillates (This scenario is in development.)
       PBCS Scenario: Hot South Rooms (This scenario is in development.)




                                                                                          Page 11
6.3   Scenario Selection
6.3.1. Normal Mode
      Use this scenario to experiment with the operation of a normal, calibrated AHU system.

6.3.2. Fault Mode
      This scenario allows users to experiment with different system faults, modifying each fault's
      severity and observing system behavior.

6.3.3. PBCS Scenario Mode
      In this scenario, users will try to discover why employees are complaining about a cold
      workspace. This scenario contains one or more faults; the challenge is to discover what these
      faults are.

6.4   6-step Learning Process
      The ePrimer software is a powerful educational tool when used in conjunction with the 6-step
      learning process. This learning process guides students as they problem-solve a malfunctioning
      HVAC system, simultaneously building individual critical thinking and teamwork skills. When
      HVAC ePrimer is used in a classroom setting, the 6-step learning process can be taught in six
      concurrent class sessions.




                                                                                              Page 12
      These steps used in each step are outlined below. The classroom forms used in each step are
      described in Section 7 of this document.



                                                       Review Problem
                                                       Solving Methodology

                                                      Identify Problem Scenario


                                                       Present
                                                       Situation

             Present
                                               1                       Analyze
             Findings                                                  Problem
                                6                               2



            Solve             5                                 3        Field
            Problem                                                      Insights

                                              4
                                       Collect More
                                       Information

6.4.1. Step 1: Present Situation
      The objective of Step 1 is to identify the central concern or question that needs to be resolved
      and to identify the criteria, conditions, and details that separate the acceptable solutions from all
      others. The information sources and tools used in this step are the PBCS Scenario video and
      Form 1.1 Learning Log.




                                                                                               Page 13
6.4.2.   Step 2: Analyze Problem
         The objective of Step 2 is to analyze the main concern or question that needs to be resolved in
         the scenario "It's Too Cold." The Need to Know Board, Concept Map, and Interview form are
         used in order to complete Step 2.

         To watch the scenario movie:
          To start the video, click on the triangular Play button in the lower left corner of the viewing
            screen.
          To pause the video, click on the double bars.
          To restart the video from the beginning, click on the gray button to the right of the Play button.
          To adjust the volume of the video, click on either of the speaker icons in the lower right corner
            of the viewing screen.




                                                                                                 Page 14
6.4.3.   Step 3: Field Insights
         The objective of Step 3 is to gather evidence to support or disprove ideas about how to resolve
         the problem. Forms 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3 are used to complete Step 3.




                                                                                            Page 15
The System Overview
In this view, you can adjust the air and water temperature, air and water flow rate, and coil size.
To do this, click within the text boxes to the right of the HC Inputs. To see the acceptable rang of
variables for each of these inputs, click on the "I" icons to the left of the HC Inputs.

To watch a normal-functioning system at work, click on the button to Start the Simulation at the
bottom of the HC Inputs. The Simulation Time begins to record the length of the simulation in
minutes and seconds. To stop the simulation, click on Stop Simulation.




                                                                                        Page 16
You can change the values of the HC Inputs while the simulation is running or after it has stopped
running. To change the values in either case, click within the text boxes to the right of the HC
Inputs and enter the new values. Then either click on Update Values or hit Enter on your
keyboard.




                                                                                      Page 17
To change the units between Inch Pound and Metric, click in the corresponding radio buttons (IP
for Inch Pound or SI for Metric). These buttons are to the right of the Simulation Time.

The External Charting option will open up the ePrimer simulation chart in a new window. Using
the buttons in this window, the data can be viewed based on the time it was posted (Show
Historical Data) and the charts can be printed out (Print). To close External Charting, click on the
X in the upper-right corner of the new window.




                                                                                        Page 18
Page 19
The Simulate Dynamic Weather option will . . . .

The System Data option will open up the ePrimer system variable summary in a new window.
Here you can see the name of each variable and its value in the units you have specified (Inch
Pound or Metric). To close System Data, click on the X in the upper-right corner of the new
window.




                                                                                  Page 20
Page 21
Now click on the heating coil to get the close up view.

The Heating Coil View
Just as in the System Overview, you can adjust the air and water temperature, air and water flow
rate, and coil size. To do this, click within the text boxes to the right of the HC Inputs and enter a
new value. To see the range of values that the program accepts, click on the "i" button to the left
of the corresponding HC Input.




                                                                                          Page 22
The Multi-story View
Like the other views, you can adjust the air and water temperature, air and water flow rate, and
coil size.




                                                                                    Page 23
6.4.4. Step 4: Collect More Information
      The objective of Step 4 is to check team resources for accuracy, reliability, and completeness.
      Make sure to have all the information necessary to develop a proposal for the solution to the
      situation.




                                                                                         Page 24
      Teams are encouraged to gather more information from other appropriate sources. These could
      be from web searches, interviews, articles, books, and other sources. Use Form 4.1.and 4.2 to
      complete Step 3.

6.4.5. Step 5: Solve Problem
      The objective of Step 5 is to assess students' progress, check understanding, and determine
      what each person knows, think they know, and still needs to know. Forms 5.1 through 5.4 are
      used to complete Step 5.




                                                                                        Page 25
6.4.6. Step 6: Present Findings
      The objective of Step 6 is to present each team's results in both written and oral form and to
      demonstrate the team's understanding of the situation. This is each team's proposal for the best
      solution. Use Form 6.1 to complete Step 6.




                                                                                          Page 26
         Each team should discuss their evaluation of the situation and its solution as a team. Use this
         team discussion exchange as a starting point for preparing the team's final PowerPoint
         presentation.

         Each team should be prepared to present a solution to the class using a PowerPoint
         presentation. It is recommended that all team members participate in making the oral
         presentation.

6.5      Details of using forms
6.5.1.   Opening the Forms
         The following instructions are for Normal Mode, Fault Mode, or PBCS Scenario Mode (It's Too
         Cold).

         To open the Interview Form, the Concept Map, or the Need to Know Board:
              1. Start ePrimer in any one of the three available modes.
              2. Click on 02 Analysis, found at the top of the program.
              3. Each form can be accessed in one of two ways: by clicking on the oval button to the left
                  of the program or by clicking on the corresponding tab at the bottom of the program.




                                                                                             Page 27
         To open the Critical Thinking Form, Scoring Rubric, or Talk Back Sheet:
              1. Start ePrimer in any one of the three available modes.
              2. Click on 05 Test Points, found at the top of the program.
              3. Each form can be accessed in one of two ways: by clicking on the oval button to the left
                  of the program or by clicking on the corresponding tab at the bottom of the program.

6.5.2.   Form details for students
                Form 1.1 Learning Log (Optional)
                Use the 1.1 Learning Log form to document the learning experience in Step 1. The
                Learning Log is used to document experiences with the HVAC ePrimer software and
                HVAC equipment.

                Form 2.1 Need To Know Board (Required)
                Use the “Need to Know Board” to review and analyze the problem.
                     List the facts of the situation
                     List assumptions and review them. Are they valid?
                     Write questions about the facts and assumptions, and identify current or future
                         resources used.

                Form 2.2 Troubleshooting Chart (Required)
                A blank Troubleshooting Chart and a completed example Troubleshooting Chart are
                provided. Develop a version of the Troubleshooting Chart that describes the structure of
                the major problem described in the video situation as you see it. Try to identify:
                      Major Symptoms or problems




                                                                                             Page 28
       Major Causes of each symptom
       All potential Faults that might contribute to the symptom

Form 2.3 Interview Form (Optional)
Use the interview form to plan, conduct, and document any interviews.
     Interviews are not required. However, they may be useful in this step in the
         exercise, or in later steps.
     Interviews can be important way of obtaining additional information that might
         help lead to appropriate solutions or proposals.
     This interview form can be used in this step, and also in later steps, as
         appropriate.

Form 2.4 Concept Map (Optional)
Concept maps can be useful for describing some types of problems. If the concept map
would be useful for this problem, then develop a version of the concept map that
describes the structure of the major themes of the problem situation as you see it. Use the
resource provided below and include:
     Major Issues
     Major Tasks
     Major Requirements
     Major Needs and Skills

Form 3.1 Learning Log
As in Step 1 and 2, use the 3.1 Learning Log form to document the learning experience in
Step 3.


Form 3.2 Observation Form
Each team uses this form to record observations as they perform the 5 sub-steps within
Step 3. Events to document on the Observation Form are:
       How the HVAC equipment in the ECT laboratory behaves as a result of the
        team's evaluation of its operation;
       How the heating coil in the HVAC ePrimer heating coil simulator behaves in
        normal mode in the software;
       The characteristics of the faults in the “fault” mode of the software.
       How the HVAC equipment in the ECT laboratory behaves as a result of the
        team's re-evaluation of its operation; and
       The team's observations in trying to solve the problem scenario using the
        software.

Form 3.3 Interview Form
Each team should use this form to plan and record any interviews that are conducted.
The Interview Form should include: person being interviewed; description of person's
history with the problem scenario; person's perspective about the scenario; and any
additional information the person feels is relevant to the PBCS.


Form 4.1 Resource Template (Required)
Complete a line item in this form for each new resource identified and used.

Form 4.2 Interview Form (Optional)




                                                                               Page 29
                Each team should use this form to plan and record any interviews that conducted during
                this step.


                Form 5.1 Checklist - Critical Thinking and Team Interactions (Required)
                Complete a line item in this form for each new resource the team identifies.


                Form 5.2 Scoring Rubric for Evaluation of KSA PBCS Outcomes (Required)
                Review and compete this form.


                Form 5.3 Talk Back Sheet (Required)
                This form is used to document student reactions to this Problem-based Case Study. This
                input should play an important role in the course instructor's decision to modify, leave as
                is, or drop aspects of this Study.


                Form 5.4 Reflection Essay (Required)
                Each individual student will prepare a Reflective Essay that is one to two pages in length
                (double spaced). The purpose of this short essay is to give students an opportunity to
                reflect on the completed Problem-Based Case Study (PBCS). The reflective essay may
                address personal learning, a particular aspect of the PBCS, the group processes, or a
                combination of these.


                Form 6.1 Instructor’s Scoring Guide (Review is Required)
                Students should review the Scoring Guide for Observations to become familiar with what
                course instructors may be looking for. After reviewing this document, no action is needed
                on the part of the student.

6.5.3.   Saving Forms

         To save a draft of any form:
         To save final versions of any form: <SCREEN SHOT: 05 TEST POINTS main screen in the
         Normal Mode, mouse over the Save button (and forms filled in, if possible)>

         To email any form:

6.5.4. Printing forms
         To print any screen in this software;
             1. Go to the screen you would like to print
             2. Right-click anywhere within the software




                                                                                               Page 30
3. Left-click on Print...
4. When the Print window appears on screen, click on Print




                                                             Page 31
7 Use by Course Instructors
7.1   Form details for instructors
      Form 5.3 Talk Back Sheet
      This input should play an important role in the course instructor's decision to modify, leave as is,
      or drop aspects of this Study.

      Form 5.4 Reflection Essay
      Each individual student will prepare a Reflective Essay that is one to two pages in length (double
      spaced). The purpose of this short essay is to give students an opportunity to reflect on the
      completed Problem-Based Case Study (PBCS). The reflective essay may address personal
      learning, a particular aspect of the PBCS, the group processes, or a combination of these.

      Form 6.1 Instructor’s Scoring Guide
      Aside from reviewing this document, no action is needed on the part of the student.

7.1.1. Printing forms
      To print any screen in this software;
          1. Go to the screen you would like to print
          2. Right-click anywhere within the software
          3. Left-click on Print...
          4. When the Print window appears on screen, click on Print




                                                                                              Page 32
7.2   Air Handling System (AHU) System Level View
      This AHU can operate under a number of conditions. Seven options are described below to
      explain AHU operation under different conditions.




      Condition 1: Winter morning occupied room. Cold (blue) air comes in at the top and mixes
      with warm air that is returning from the space below (the "room"). The air is then "heated" by the
      heating coil. It is heated to a temperature that is higher than that desired in the space. At this
      scale, if the heating coil is "on" it should probably be glowing.

      The air travels through the ducts to the room where its mixes with the cooler room air. It is also
      moving slower in the room than in the ductwork. As the warm air moves through the room it
      becomes cooler as it heats the objects in the room. The somewhat cooler air is drawn into the
      plenum, and it returns to the AHU.

      Some air is exhausted to the left (the same amount that has come in from the outside, to maintain
      balance) or "returned " to the right, where it mixes with new outside air and the process
      continues.

      Condition 2: Winter morning pre-occupied "warmup" operation. This is similar to the
      previous condition, but since no one is in the space, there is no need for fresh outside air. All air
      can be re-circulated in order to warm the space faster; no outside air enters.

      The heating coil is "on" and heats the re-circulated "return" air. When the return air goes back
      through the plenum to the AHU, 100% goes to the right to be re-circulated. No air goes to the left.




                                                                                               Page 33
        Condition 3: Winter morning pre-occupied "purge" of outgassing pollutants within the
        space (from furniture, etc). This is similar to the first condition, but in this case we wish to
        exhaust all return air in order to exhaust all outgassed pollutants that may have built up over night
        in the space. Thus when the return air goes back through the plenum to the AHU, 100% goes to
        the left to be exhausted. None goes to the right to be re-circulated.

        All air at the heating coil is from the outside and must be heated. An option to accomplish this
        might be to purge first, with little or no heating, and then do morning "Startup" to warm the space.

        Condition 4: Summer afternoon occupied room. Hot outside air (red) comes in at the top and
        mixes with warm air that is returning from the space below (the "room"). The air is then "cooled"
        by the cooling coil to a temperature lower than desired in the space. At this scale, if the cooling
        coil is "on" it should probably be glowing.

        The air travels through the ducts to the room where it mixes with the warmer room air. It is
        moving slower in the room than in the ductwork. While in the room, the air picks up heat from the
        room and gradually gets warmer. The warmer air is drawn into the plenum and returns to the
        AHU.

        Some air is exhausted to the left (the same amount that has come in from the outside, to maintain
        balance) while some is "returned " to the right, where it mixes with new outside air, and the
        process continues.

        Condition 5: Summer morning pre-occupied "cooldown" operation. Since no one is in the
        space there is no need for and fresh outside air. The air in the space has become warm or hot
        overnight and needs to be cooled. All air can be re-circulated in order to cool the space faster.
        No outside air enters.

        The cooling coil is "on" (glows blue) and cools the re-circulated "return" air. When the return air
        goes back through the plenum to the AHU, 100% goes to the right to be re-circulated. No air goes
        to the left.

        Condition 6: Summer morning pre-occupied "purge" of outgassing pollutants within the
        space (from furniture, etc). In this condition we wish to exhaust all return air in order to exhaust
        all outgassed pollutants that may have built up overnight in the space. Thus when the return air
        goes back through the plenum to the AHU, 100% goes to the left to be exhausted. No air goes to
        the right to be re-circulated.

        All air at the cooling coil is from the outside and must be cooled. An option to do this might be to
        purge first, with little or no cooling, and then do morning "Cooldown" to cool the space.

        Condition 7: "Free Cooling" Economizer Mode. Cooling is needed in the space because
        internal loads (people, lights, equipment) are causing heat buildup, yet the outside air is cool
        enough to be used to provide this cooling.

Compressor-driven air conditioning can be avoided in this situation. 100% outside air is drawn in, which is
cool enough to cool the space. Both heating coil and cooling coil are OFF.

The cool air enters the room and cools the air in the space. While cooling the room, the air becomes a bit
warmer. When the warmed return air goes back through the plenum to the AHU, 100% goes to the left to
be exhausted. None of the air goes to the right to be re-circulated.




                                                                                                 Page 34
7.3     Creating PBCS Scenarios
7.3.1. Default PBCS files

7.3.2. Adding PBCS files

7.3.3. Editing PBCS files

7.4     Weather Files
7.4.1. Default weather files

7.4.2. Adding weather files

7.4.3. Editing weather files

8 Sharing Information with Other Users
9 Using HVAC ePrimer on Multiple Computers
10 Reporting problems
      If you encounter bugs with the HVAC ePrimer software, please report them using the following
      email address: info@deringergroup.com

11 International Features
11.1 Language features available
11.2 Units and conversions available
<SCREEN SHOT: 03 FIELD in heating coil view, mouse hovering over the SI Units radio button>
    The ePrimer software can be used in either Inch Pound (IP) units or Metric (SI) units. To toggle
    between these two units while working with the interactive HVAC system in either the Normal or
    Fault mode, click on the radio button in front of the desired unit system. All inputs and outputs within
    the program will automatically convert to either IP or SI.

12 Development Process
12.1 Development project

12.2 Development team
        This ePrimer software would not have been possible without the collaborative efforts of following
        organizations:
         Laney College in Oakland, CA
         Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA
         The Deringer Group in Berkeley, CA




                                                                                                Page 35
12.3 Industry Advisory Panel
     The Industry Advisory Panel for this project is comprised of at least 30 experts from buildings
     industry, State and local government, and utilities.

12.4 NSF Funding

13   End-User License Agreement
     Your access to and use of this software is subject to the following terms and conditions and all
     applicable laws. By accessing and using this software, you accept the following terms and
     conditions without limitation or qualification.

     Unless otherwise stated, the contents of this software including, but not limited to, the text and
     images contained herein and their arrangement are the property of The Deringer Group, Inc.

     Nothing contained in this software shall be construed as conferring by implication, estoppel, or
     otherwise, any license or right to any copyright, patent, trademark or other proprietary interest of
     The Deringer Group, Inc. or any third party. This software and the content provided in this
     software including, but not limited to, graphic images, audio, video, html code, buttons, and text,
     may not be copied, reproduced, republished, uploaded, posted, transmitted, or distributed in any
     way, without the prior written consent of The Deringer Group, Inc.

     The information provided in this software is free of charge, for informational purposes only and
     does not create a business or professional services relationship between you and The Deringer
     Group, Inc. No judgment or warranty is made with respect to such other services or sites and The
     Deringer Group, Inc. takes no responsibility for such other software or services. Any use you
     make of the information provided in this software, or any software, website, or service linked to by
     this software, is at your own risk. You are responsible for complying with the laws of the
     jurisdiction from which you are accessing this software and you agree that you will not access or
     use the information in this software in violation of such laws.




                                                                                             Page 36
Help File
HEATING COIL
TairEntHC - Air Temperature entering, drybulb (before coil), output, public
UAHC - Coil overall heat transfer coefficient x coil area, input, public
mAirEnt - Air flow rate, output, public
TLiqEntHC - heating coil entering water temperature, input, public
TAirLvgHC - heating coil leaving air dry bulb temperature, output, public
TLiqLvgHC - heating coil leaving water temperature, output, public
qSenHC - heating coil Sensible heat transfer rate. Positive for air cooling, output, private
TwAirEnt - Air Temperature entering, wetbulb (before coil), output, private
Valve-Heating
posValveHC - nHeating coil Valve position, between 0-1, output, public
mLiqOpenValveHC - Heating coil Mass flow rate for open valve, input, public
mLiqHC - Heating coil Liquid flow rate, output, public
PID-heating coil valve
KpHC - Proional constant, input, public
KiHC - Integral constant, input, public
KdHC - Derivative constant, input, public
frH - Enable PID signal forward or reverse, input, public
Faults heating coil
StuckValveHC - Valve is stuck in some position, input, fault
DriftedsensorHC - Sensor has drifted some number of degrees, input, fault
BootLeakageHC - input, fault
OversizedValveHC - Valve is oversized by ????, input, fault
LeakyValveHC - Valve is leaking some amount ???, input, fault
ObstructedPipeHC - Pipe is obstructed by ????, input, fault
UndersizedCoilHC - input, fault
FouledCoilHC - Coil is fouled and air flow is reduced by ???, input, fault

COOLING COIL
TAirLvgCC - Cooling coil leaving air dry bulb temperature, output, public
TwAirLvgCC - Cooling coil leaving air wet bulb temperature, output, public
TLiqEntCC - Cooling coil entering water temperature, input, public
TliqLvgCC - Cooling coil leaving water temperature, output, public
mLiqOpenValveCC - Cooling coil Mass flow rate for open valve, input, public
UACC - Cooling Coil overall heat transfer coefficient x coil area, input, public
qSenCC - Cooling coil Sensible heat transfer rate. Positive for air cooling, output, public
qLatCC - Cooling coil Latent heat transfer rate. Positive for air cooling, output, public
qTotCC - Cooling coil Heat transfer rate. Positive for air cooling, output, public
Valve-Cooling
ValvePosCC - Cooling coil Valve position, between 0-, output, public
ValveMLiqOpenCC - Cooling coil Mass flow rate for open valve, input, public
mLiqCC - Cooling coil Liquid flow rate, output, public
PID-cooling coil valve
KpCC - Proional constant, input, public
KiCC - Integral constant, input, public
KdCC - Derivative constant, input, public
biasCC - Constant for VAV damper starting point, input, public
frCC - Enable PID signal forward or reverse, input, public
Faults cooling coil
StuckValveCC - Valve is stuck in some position, input, fault
BootLeakageCC - Boot leakage of Coiling Coil, input, fault
OversizedValveCC - Valve is oversized by ????, input, fault




                                                                                               Page 37
LeakyValveCC - Valve is leaking some amount ???, input, fault
ObstructedPipeCC - Pipe is obstructed by ????, input, fault
UndersizedClgCoil - Undersized Cooling Coil, input, fault
FouledClgCoil - Coil is fouled and air flow is reduced by ???, input, fault

FAN SYSTEM
Fan-Supply Fan
TairSup - Supply air dry bulb temperature, output, public
mAirSup - supply fan air flow rate, output, public
powerTotSfan - supply fan motor power consumption, output, public
nSfan - supply fan fan speed, output, public
pStatSfan - supply fan static pressure setpoint, output, public
pSfan - supply fan total pressure increase across fan, output, public
effShaftSfan - supply fan fan efficiency, output, public
PID-Supply Fan
KpSfan - proional constant, input, public
KiSfan - integral constant, input, public
KdSfan - derivative constant, input, public
biasSfan - constant for VAV damper starting point, input, public
frSfan - enable PID signal forward or reverse, input, public
Fan-Return Fan
TAirRet - Return air dry bulb temperature, output, public
mAirRet - Return fan air flow rate, output, public
powerTotRfan - Return fan motor power consumption, output, public
nRfan - Return fan fan speed, output, public
pStatRfan - Return fan static pressure setpoint, output, public
pRfan - Return fan total pressure increase across fan, output, public
effShaftRfan - Return fan fan efficiency, output, public
PID-Return Fan
KpRfan - proional constant, input, public
KiRfan - integral constant, input, public
KdRfan - derivative constant, input, public
biasRfan - constant for VAV damper starting point, input, public
frRfan - enable PID signal forward or reverse, input, public
Faults Fan system
RangeErrorVFD - Range error in variable-frequency drive, input, fault
TotFanFailure - Complete failure e.g. seized, broken belt, power tripped, input, fault
WrongFanType - Wrong type of fan, input, fault
FanTooSmall - Undersized fan, input, fault
StuckFanSpeed - Stuck at intermediate speed, input, fault
DeafVFDorIGV - VFD or inlet guide vanes fail to respond to changing control signal, input, fault
FailedFanSensor - Sensor offset/failure, input, fault
PoorLoopTuneFan - Poor loop tuning, input, fault
BadFanRotationnDir - Incorrect rotation direction or wrong fan installed, input, fault

MIXING BOX
TAirOut - Outside air temperature, input, public
TwAirOut - Outside air wet bulb temperature, input, public
posDamper - Damper position(-) (change from 0 to 1, 1 = 100% outside air, 2 = 100% return air), input,
public
PID-Mixing Box
TsMX - Mixed air set point temperature, units: deg_F or deg_C, input, public
KpMX - Proional constant, input, public
KiMX - Integral constant, input, public
KdMX - Derivative constant, input, public
biasMX - Constant for VAV damper starting point, input, public




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frMX - Enable PID signal forward or reverse, input, public
Faults Mixing Box
LeakOADamperMB - Leakage of outside air damper, input, fault
BadPosOADamperMB - Incorrect minimum position of outdoor air damper, input, fault
StuckOADamperMB - Outside or exhaust dampers stuck, input, fault
LeakRetDamperMB - Leakage of return air damper, input, fault
StuckActuatorMB - Damper(s) or actuator(s) stuck, input, fault
DeafActuatorMB - Actuators fail to respond to changing control signal, input, fault
BadSensorMB - Sensor offset/failure, input, fault
HysterDamperMB - Hysteresis in actuator(s) or damper linkage(s), input, fault
MismatchDampActMB - Damper and actuator mismatch, input, fault
ExcessNonLinearMB - Excessive non-linearity, input, fault
BadLoopTuneMB - Poor loop tuning, input, fault
ReverseActionActMB - Reverse action actuator, input, fault

VAV BOXES
PosVAV - VAV damper position, output
preVAV - Air pressure in front of the VAV box, output
mVAV - VAV air flow rate, output
posMinVAV - VAV minimum position, input
Faults VAV boxes
StuckDamperVAV - Damper and actuator stuck, input, fault
LeakyDamperVAV - Damper leakage, input, fault
BadDmprPosSignalVAV - Fault indicator of damper position, input, fault
BadFlowerMeasVAV - Incorrect flower measurement (offset/failure), input, fault
BadZoneMeasVAV - Incorrect zone temperature measurement (offset/failure), input, fault
DeafActuatorVAV - Actuators fail to respond to changing control signal, input, fault
BadLoopTuneVAV - Poor loop tuning of VAV box controller, input, fault
BadReheatCoilVAV - Faulty reheating coil (same as coil section above) , input, fault
TooHighInletAirSP_VAV - Inlet air static pressure too high, input, fault
TooLowInletAirSP_VAV - Inlet air static pressure too low, input, fault
BoxTooBigVAV - Oversized VAV box, input, fault
BoxTooSmallVAV - Undersized VAV box, input, fault
BadMinPosDamperVAV - Incorrect minimum position of air damper, input, fault

DUCTWORK
mAirEnt - Entering air flow rate, output
mAirLvg - Leaving air flow rate, output
preEnt - Entering air pressure, output
preLvg - Leaving air pressure, output
Faults Ductwork
DuctExcessLeak - Excessive leaking, input
DuctPoorInsulation - Poor insulation, input

FILTER
mAirFlt - air filter mass flow rate, output
preDrop - air pressure drop across the filter, output
Faults Filter
FilterPartlyClogged - Partially clogged, input
BadDPSensor - Incorrect/mal functioning DP sensor, input
LeakyFilter - Leakage through or around, input

SYSTEM
PAtm - Atmospheric pressure, input
TsupS - Supply air temperature set point, input




                                                                                         Page 39
Glossary
ASHRAE - American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers

Air flow rate -

Analysis - a critical evaluation, usually made by breaking a subject down into its constituent parts, then
describing the parts and their relationship to the whole

Aspects - characteristics

Assessment - measurements, considerations, or calculations

Assumption - hypothesis or well-reasoned guess

Boiler - a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated under pressure. The steam or hot fluid is
then circulated out of the boiler for use in various process or heating applications. A safety valve is
required to prevent over pressurization and possible explosion of a boiler.

Btu - British thermal unit; the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound avoirdupois
of water by one degree Fahrenheit

Bypass - a hand-operated valve that can be used to let more oxygen (or other breathing gas) into the
breathing system, by-passing the cylinder's flow rate control valve

C - Celsius; the freezing point of water is 0 degrees, and its boiling point is 100 degrees at standard
atmospheric pressure

CBE Problem-Solving Tool With Heating Coil Simulator -

CFM -

Coil -

Coil size (AU) -

Concept Map - used in Step 2 of the 6-step Learning Process; includes: The Problem as You See It,
Major Issues, Issues, Related Issues, Needs and Skills, Related Needs or Skills, Tasks, and Related
Tasks

Consensus - general agreement among the members of a given group or community

Criteria - a standard upon which a decision or judgment can be based

Critical thinking - analyzing or evaluating information; a process of reflecting upon the meaning of
statements, examining the offered evidence and reasoning, and forming judgments about the facts

Diagnosis - the process of identifying signs, symptoms, and results of various diagnostic procedures; the
conclusion reached through this process is also called a diagnosis

Double Entry Note Taking -




                                                                                              Page 40
Documentation - any material (such as text, video, audio, etc.) used to explain some attributes of an
object, system or procedure; documentation describes the either the structure and components or the
operation of a system

Dynamic weather -

Entering air temp - temperature of the air as it enters a heating/cooling coil; can be in inch pound or
metric units

Entering water temp - temperature of the water as it enters a heating/cooling coil; can be in inch pound or
metric units

External charting - this option opens up the ePrimer simulation chart in a new window; data can be
viewed based on the time it was posted (Show Historical Data) and the charts can be printed out

F - Fahrenheit; the freezing point of water is 32 degrees and the boiling point is 212 degrees Fahrenheit,
placing the boiling and melting points of water 180 degrees apart

Flash - a Macromedia product uses vector and raster graphics, a native scripting language called
ActionScript, and bidirectional streaming of video and audio; Flash is the authoring environment and
Flash Player is the virtual machine used to run the Flash files

Fault - a problem, defect, or error with the system

GPM -

I - Information

IP - inch-pound units

Interview form - documentation used in Step 2 of the 6-step Learning Process

Leaving air temp - temperature of the air as it leaves a heating/cooling coil; can be in inch pound or metric
units

Leaving water temp - temperature of the water as it leaves a heating/cooling coil; can be in inch pound or
metric units

Leaving air temp (actual) -

Leaving air temp (sensor) -

Logout - to exit or quit a program

M1 - M4 -

Need to Know Board - documentation used in Step 2 of the 6-step Learning Process

Normal Mode - normal calibration of a system

Output - results or yield

PBCS - Problem-Based Case Study

Problem-Based Case Study -




                                                                                                 Page 41
Proposal - suggestion

Proposed solution - suggestion for the resolution of a problem

Resources - forms, websites, journal articles, interviews

Scenario - a brief description of an event; an outline of a situation

Scoring rubric - a grading scheme

Sensible heat transfer - the transfer of thermal energy due to temperature gradient; the flow of heat
between regions that are not in thermal equilibrium

Sensor - a physical device that detects, or senses, a signal

Set-point - the point at which an electrical circuit is either activated or de-activated

SI - International System of Units, or metric units

Sim. Time - simulation time; the length of running simulation measured in seconds and minutes

Simulation - an imitation of some real device or state of affairs; simulations attempt to represent certain
features of the behavior of a system

Spark - a secure, formally-defined programming language designed to support the development of
software used in applications where correct operation is vital

Start Simulation - begin running a simulation based on the HC Inputs provided or entered

Status - condition or position

Submittal - an item to be handed in or given to another person

System data -

T1 - T4 -

Talk back sheet -

Tangible - something with a physical presence

Team approach -

Update Values -

3-way Control Valve - a device that regulates the flow of fluids (either gases, fluidised solids, slurries or
liquids) by opening, closing, or partially obstructing various passageways

Valve position -

Water flow rate - the strength or amount at which water is moving




                                                                                                 Page 42
HVAC ePrimer Classroom Handout
Step 1: Present Situation <SCREEN SHOT OF 01 SITUATION>

      Objectives:
      The objective of this phase is to identify the central concern or question that needs to be resolved
      and to identify the criteria, conditions, and details that separate the acceptable solutions from all
      others.

      Team Activities:
      Watch the video and understand the presentation of the problem, and then ask the following
      questions:
                What appears to be the problem?
                What do I know that relates to this situation?
                What do I already know that helps me understand the problem?
                What clues are being given?

      Information Sources and Tools:
      The information sources and tools are available for this step are the video and Form 1.1 Learning
      Log. Form 1.1 is optional form; submittal is not required.

      Submittals:
      For this first step in the exercise, each team should watch the video that explains the problem
      scenario. While there is no assignment to be submitted for this step, team members should make
      notes for themselves.

Step 2: Analyze Problem

      Objectives:
      To analyze the main concern or question that needs to be resolved. Questions to ask are:
              What is the real problem in this situation?
              What seems to be the most important information?
              What are the conditions that must be met to reach an acceptable resolution?
              What are my hunches? My questions? My resources for finding answers?
              Is my team communicating well?
              How do other members of my team see this situation?
              Am I listening to their point of view?
              Are they listening to my perspective?
              Is the team working well together?

      Team Activities:
      Complete Step 2 by the end of this class. To complete step 2, use Forms 2.1 and 2.2 to help
      each team to analyze the problem.

      Complete and submit Forms 2.1 and 2.2 by the end of the class. As an option, Forms 2.3 and 2.4
      may also be completed.

      Information Sources and Tools: <SCREEN SHOT OF 02 ANALYSIS>
      The following forms are available to use as Step 2 is completed.




                                                                                               Page 43
             Form 2.1 Need To Know Board (Required)
             Use the “Need to Know Board” to review and analyze the problem.
                   List the facts that you know
                   List your assumptions, and review them. Are they valid?
                   Write questions about the facts and assumptions, and identify resources you now
                      have or need to have.
                   Review as a team what you have written on this form.
             Form 2.2 Troubleshooting Chart (Required)
             A blank Troubleshooting Chart and a completed example Troubleshooting Chart are
             provided. Develop a version of the Troubleshooting Chart that describes the structure of
             the major problem described in the video situation as you see it. Try to identify:
                   Major Symptoms or problems
                   Major Causes of each symptom
                   All potential Faults that might contribute to the symptom
             Form 2.3 Interview Form (Optional)
             Use the interview form to plan, conduct, and document any interviews.
                   Interviews are not required. However, they may be useful in this step in the
                      exercise, or in later steps.
                   Interviews can be important way of obtaining additional information that might
                      help lead to appropriate solutions or proposals.
                   This interview form can be used in this step, and also in later steps, as
                      appropriate.
             Form 2.4 Concept Map (Optional)
             Concept maps can be useful for describing some types of problems. If you think that the
             concept map would be useful for this problem, then develop a version of the concept map
             that describes the structure of the major themes of the problem situation as you see it.
             Use the resource provided below and include:
                   Major Issues
                   Major Tasks
                   Major requirements
                   Major Needs and Skills

      Submittals:
      At the end of this class, submit completed Form 2.1 Need To Know Board, and Form 2.2
      Troubleshooting Chart. Also submit the optional forms if any have been used.

      After the class is over, the teams may continue to work on and refine any of the forms. But by the
      end of this class, submit at least draft versions of completed Form 2.1 Need To Know Board, and
      Form 2.2 Troubleshooting Chart.

Step 3: Field Insights <SCREEN SHOT: System view in Normal Mode>

      Objective:
      To gather evidence to support or disprove ideas about how to resolve the problem.

      Questions to ask are:
                Where will I go to find the information I need to answer the questions I have?
                Do I have all points of view on the situation?
                Would a different point of view about the situation help me to find the right solution?
                How will I keep track of the information I gather?
                How will I communicate what I learn to my team?




                                                                                              Page 44
Before beginning with the tasks of this phase, think about how you might refine the process of
how you work together as a team. What is working well? What is not? Implement any changes
that are appropriate or necessary.

Team Activities:
1. Evaluate the Heating Coil in the ECT Laboratory
Use instruments to assess the operation and performance of the heating coil in a small air
handling unit in the ECT Laboratory.

    1. Get familiar with the heating coil system in the ECT laboratory and draw a diagram of the
       system. Try to understand the functions of each component - how is heat transported
       from the boiler to the air supplied to the room and how is the coil controlled? Find the
       heating coil rating conditions from the catalog. The rating information should include
       entering and leaving air and water temperatures and flow rates.

    2. Measure the heating coil system performance under rating conditions
       a. Adjust the hot water supply temperature and make it equal to the rating hot water
          entering temperature.
       b. Raise the heating coil set point and force the heating coil valve fully open.
       c. Measure the pressure drop across the „circuit setter‟ and determine the water flow
          rate from the circuit setter calibration curve.
       d. Measure the air flow rate at the diffusers, adjust the fan speed and make the total air
          flow rate equal to the air flow rate at the rating conditions.
       e. Wait until system is stable and measure the entering and leaving air and water
          temperatures.

    3. Data analysis
       a. Does the measured performance match with rating condition in the catalog? If not,
          why?
       b. Try to do a heat gain calculation on airside and heat loss calculation on the
          waterside. Do they match with each other? Do they match the catalog data?

2. Software “Normal Mode” analysis
Use the “HVAC ePrimer” Problem-Solving Tool with its Heating Coil Simulator to explore how the
heating coil behaves in normal mode, and with various “faults” and “problems.” To prepare to use
the software, do the following:
          Go to Step 3 of the HVAC ePrimer software.
          Click on the heating coil to get the close up view.
          Click on the button to Start the Simulation.
          Start from the normal mode with no fault in the heating coil system, and work to
           understand the basic physics of the heating coil system.
            (a) Leaving air temperature set point: Change the leaving air temperature set
                point, first increase the temperature, and wait until the system is stable. Examine
                and understand how the system meets the new set point. Now repeat the
                exercise          with      a        lower      set         point      temperature.
                <SCREEN SHOT OF 03 FIELD SYSTEM VIEW WHILE SIMULATION IS
                RUNNING>
            (b) Heating Coil UA: Change the heating coil UA value and observe the impact of
                the high and low UA‟s on the system.                       Try to explain why.
                <SCREEN SHOT OF HEATING COIL VIEW>
            (c) Air Flow Rate: Change the Air Flow rate and see what the impact is on the air
                and water temperatures and the valve control. Repeat the action on the water
                flow rate. Try to explain why.




                                                                                       Page 45
             (d) Entering air temperature: Change the entering air temperature before the coil
                 and    see      how      the     system  responds     to     the    change.
                 <SCREEN SHOT OF 03 FIELD SYSTEM VIEW WHILE SIMULATION IS
                 RUNNING>
             (e) Entering water temperature: Repeat the above action on the water entering
                 temperature. Try to explain why.

2. Software “Fault Mode” analysis <SCREEN SHOT: 03 FIELD System view in Fault Mode
    with HC FAULTS tab open and simulation running>
<SCREEN SHOT: 03 FIELD Heating Coil view in Fault Mode with HC FAULTS tab open and
simulation running>
 After the exercises on the normal modes, restore the inputs back to default values, click on the
 fault tab in the upper left area of the software window and enter the faulty definition input area.
 Explore the system in fault modes and understand the impacts of these common faults on heating
 coil performance. If you cannot remember the default input values, restart the software and go to
 fault mode directly. Move the curser to the information icon on the left side of the screen of each
 fault and read the description of the faults first, then do the following exercises for each fault.
    1. Fouled coil: Start the simulation.         Move the fouled coil slider to the mid position,
       update the value, and observe the changes in the system. Repeat all five steps (a, b, c,
       d, e) described above in “normal mode” and compare the performance differences of the
       faulty and the normal modes.
    2. Obstructed pipe: Move the obstructed pipe slider to the mid position and observe the
       changes in the system. Repeat all five steps (a, b, c, d, e) described above in normal
       mode and compare the performance differences of the faulty and the normal modes.
    3. Valve leakage: The maximum valve leakage is 20%. Move the leaky valve to the mid
       position and observe the changes in the system. Repeat all five steps (a, b, c, d, e)
       described above in normal mode and compare the performance differences of the faulty
       and the normal modes.
    4. Stuck valve: Check the check box and enable the fault. Move the stuck valve to the
       zero, mid, fully positions sequentially and observe the changes in the system. Repeat all
       five steps (a, b, c, d, e) described above in normal mode and compare the performance
       differences of the faulty and the normal modes. Pay attention to the real valve position
       and valve position control signals.
    5. Drifted sensor: Move the slider to left and introduce few degrees of offset of a drifted
       sensor. Repeat all five steps (a, b, c, d, e) described above in normal mode and
       compare the performance differences of the faulty and the normal modes.
    6. Boot leakage: Move the slider to the mid position and observe the changes in the
       system. Repeat all five steps (a, b, c, d, e) described above in normal mode and
       compare the performance differences of the faulty and the normal modes. Pay attention
       to the real valve position and valve position control signals.
4. Re-evaluate HVAC Equipment in ECT Laboratory
Once again, use the air handling unit in the ECT Laboratory to explore how the heating coil
behaves in actual equipment, except that this time the unit will be set up with the fault that is
causing the problem in this exercise. The HVAC ePrimer software also has the same fault in the
“Problem Scenario Mode” described immediately below. Repeat sub-step 1 from above (Evaluate
the Heating Coil in the ECT Laboratory) to determine what has changed in the operation of the
coil.

5. Software “Problem Scenario Mode” analysis
This time you will use the “HVAC ePrimer” in a different way. Your instructor has defined a
“problem scenario” for the heating coil in the Air Handling Unit. The challenge for you and your




                                                                                        Page 46
team will be to trouble shoot (diagnose) what the problems might be and to recommend actions to
resolve the problem.

    1.   Go to the “Main” (00) screen of the HVAC ePrimer software
    2.   Select the “Its Too Cold” Scenario
    3.   Go to the “Situation” (01) Screen
    4.   Listen and watch the video
    5.   Go to the “Field” (03) Screen
    6.   Click on the heating coil to get the close up view
    7.   Click on the button to Start the Simulation

Each team should try to determine what is causing the symptoms described in the video and to
identify a course of action of returning the system to normal operation.

Information Sources and Tools:
Use the following forms to complete Step 3.

         Form 3.1 Learning Log
         As in Step 1 and 2, use the 3.1 Learning Log form to document your learning experience
         in Step 3. Consider the following questions in documenting the learning experience:
               Document you general experience with the HVAC ePrimer software.
                     o Did your use of the HVAC ePrimer software support your starting ideas
                         about resolving the problem? If so why? If not why?
                     o Were the results from the software and hardware consistent? If not, why
                         not?
                     o Do you need to rethink what to do to resolve the problem? To expand
                         your investigation? Narrow it?
                     o Do you need to interview anyone at this point?
                     o Do you need to examine more resources? Books? ASHRAE documents?
                         Web searches? This would occur in the next phase of “Resource
                         Development”
               Document your general experience with the HVAC equipment. Consider the
                following questions in preparing the documentation:
                     o Did your use of the hardware support your starting ideas about resolving
                         the problem? If so why? If not why?
                     o Were the results from the software and hardware consistent? If not, why
                         not?
                     o Did your use of the hardware cause you to rethink what to do to resolve
                         the problem? To expand your investigation? Narrow it?
                     o Did your use of the hardware cause you to want to interview anyone at
                         this point?

         Form 3.2 Observation Form
         Each team should use this form to record observations as they perform the 5 sub-steps
         within Step 3.
               Evaluate HVAC Equipment. The team needs to document how the HVAC
                equipment in the ECT laboratory behaves as a result of your evaluation of its
                operation.
               Software “Normal” Mode. The team needs to document how the heating coil in
                the HVAC ePrimer heating coil simulator behaves in normal mode in the
                software.
                    o Can you change the input parameters to make the heating coil simulator
                        match the exact performance of the real hardware?




                                                                                    Page 47
                          o     Can you plot the relationship between the heating coil actions versus coil
                                valve position? Can you justify the relationship?
                                    o Can you do the same for supply water temperature?
                                    o For supply air temperature?
                                    o For water flow rate?
                           o Can you meet a supply air temperature set point of 100 F by changing
                                input parameters?
                           o Can you heat the air higher than the supply hot water temperature?
                     Software “Fault” Mode. The team needs to document the characteristics of the
                      faults in the “fault” mode of the software.
                           o Describe the impact of the fault on the behavior of the heating coil.
                           o What is the consequence of the faults, what is the damage, or energy
                                penalty you think the fault will lead to?
                           o Is there another fault that has a similar symptom?
                           o What type of action would you need to take in the field to fix this fault?
                           o Could you use the software simulator to determine the energy savings or
                                improvement in comfort by fixing the faults?
                     Re-evaluate HVAC Equipment. The team needs to document how the HVAC
                      equipment in the ECT laboratory behaves as a result of your re-evaluation of its
                      operation.
                     Software “Problem Scenario” Mode. The team needs to document its
                      observations in trying to solve the problem scenario using the software.

              Form 3.3 Interview Form
              Each team should use this form to plan and record any interviews that are conducted.

Step 4: Collect More Information

      Objectives:
      To check team resources for accuracy, reliability, and completeness. Make sure to have all the
      information necessary to develop a proposal for the solution to the situation.

      Questions to ask are:
                Are these resources reliable?
                Are they relevant?
                How can multiple perspectives impact the data gathered?
                What else do I need to take into account? How can I know?
                What do I need to do to prepare the resource information for my team?
                How will I record and present the information to my team?

      In addition to the software and HVAC equipment resources that you used in the previous phase,
      there are additional resources that you can explore to extend your understanding of heating coils,
      and to help you solve the case study problem given to your team. These may include textbooks,
      manufacturer‟s literature, and Web searches.

      Team Activities:
      Gather more information from other appropriate sources. These could be from web searches,
      interviews, articles, books, and other sources.

      Information Sources and Tools:
      Use the following forms to complete Step 3.

              Form 4.1 Resource Template (Required)




                                                                                              Page 48
              Complete a line item in this form for each new resource identified and used.

              Form 4.2 Interview Form (Optional)
              Each team should use this form to plan and record any interviews that conducted during
              this step.

Step 5: Solve Problem

      Objectives:
      To assess students' progress, check understanding, and determine what each person knows,
      think they know, and still needs to know.

      In-Class Activities:
      Review the information in the forms for this step, discuss them with the team members, and
      complete the forms. Use the information to help create an approach for preparing and presenting
      the team proposal.

      Information Sources and Tools:
      Use the following forms to complete Step 5.

              Form 5.1 Checklist - Critical Thinking and Team Interactions (Required)
              Complete a line item in this form for each new resource that you identify.
              Form 5.2 Scoring Rubric for Evaluation of KSA PBCS Outcomes (Required)
              Review and compete this form.
              Form 5.3 Talk Back Sheet (Required)
              Review and compete this form.
              Form 5.4 Reflection Essay (Required)
              Between this class session and the next, each student will prepare a Reflective Essay.
              The essay is one to two pages in length (double spaced) and done individually. The
              purpose of this short essay is to give an opportunity to reflect on the completed Problem-
              Based Case Study (PBCS). The reflective essay may address personal learning, a
              particular aspect of the PBCS, the group processes, or a combination of these. For
              example:
                   How did your group address obstacles and move past them?
                   How does your solution address the chief concerns in the problem?
                   Considering your group's working dynamics, what were some of the difficulties
                    encountered and how did you come to consensus?
                   What was the most significant thing you learned through working this PBSC?

      Submittals:
      By the end of this class, submit the completed forms that have been provided for use for Step 5.


Step 6: Present Findings

      Objectives:
      To present each team's results in both written and oral form and to demonstrate the team's
      understanding of the situation. This is each team's proposal for the best solution.




                                                                                             Page 49
Team Activities During Class:
Each team should discuss their evaluation of the situation and its solution as a team. Review the
“Instructor‟s Scoring Guide” in order to understand what the instructor is looking for.

Use this team discussion exchange as a starting point for preparing the team's final PowerPoint
presentation.

Each team should be prepared to present a solution to the class using a PowerPoint
presentation. It is recommended that all team members participate in making the oral
presentation.

Information Sources and Tools:
Use the following forms to complete Step 6.

        Form 6.1 Instructor’s Scoring Guide (Review is Required)
        Review the Scoring Guide for Observations to become familiar with what the instructor is
        looking for.

Submittals:
          A package of all forms that have been completed during the exercise.
          A copy of each team‟s PowerPoint presentation.




                                                                                     Page 50
1.1 Learning Log (Optional)
     For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises



           Date                                 Thoughts and Activities




     Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC


     Completed by: _________________________
     Team: ________________________________
     Date: _________
     Page ___ of ___




                                                                              Page 51
2.1 Need to Know Board
          Required for use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises

          Facts




   Assumptions




   Questions




   Information Sources and Tools




   Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC


   Completed by: _________________________
   Team: ________________________________
   Date: _________
   Page ___ of ___




                                                                            Page 52
2.2 Troubleshooting Chart
     Required for use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises




   Comment: Use the “Draw” feature and “Textboxes” in MS Word to modify and complete, or
   sketch the form in a free hand version
     Completed by: _________________________
     Team: ________________________________
     Date: _________
     Page ___ of ___




                                                                                     Page 53
2.3 Interview Form (Optional)
            For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises



            Person being interviewed (Name, position, address, telephone, cell phone,
            email, fax)




     Description of person’s history with the problem scenario




     Person’s Perspective about the Scenario




     Other Information from person – people, data, questions person might have




     Other Information from person – people
     Need to follow up with person Yes/No




     Completed by: _________________________
     Team: ________________________________
     Date: _________
     Page ___ of ___




                                                                                        Page 54
2.4 Concept Map (Optional)
     For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises




                                                        Process Approach:
                                                      Building Development

          Physical
          Approach



                                      Problem                        Process Approach:
                                                                     Building Operations
                                           Problem
        Organization
         Approach


                                              Behavioral
                                              Approach




    This is an example concept map.

    You can create a concept map for your team by recreating the model above on a separate
    sheet of paper. Or use the electronic tool called Cmap by downloading this free software
    from http://cmap.ihmc.us/download/.

    Feel free to add, delete, and re-arrange the bubbles on the form to suit your concept of what
    is needed.




                                                                                           Page 55
3.1 Learning Log (Required)
            For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises


                       Date                                 Thoughts and Activities




    Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC



    Completed by: _________________________
    Team: ________________________________
    Date: _________
    Page ___ of ___




                                                                                      Page 56
3.2 Observation Form (Required)
            For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises



           OBSERVABLE                      OFTEN            SOMETIMES        NOT YET
            BEHAVIORS




    Additional Notes: My overall impression
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________

    Patterns of behavior I observe emerging:
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________


    Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC

    Structured Observation of _________________________
    Completed by: ___________________________________
    Date: __________
    Page ___ of ___




                                                                                  Page 57
3.3 Interview Form (Optional)
            For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises


            Person being interviewed (Name, position, address, telephone, cell phone, email,
            fax)




     Description of person’s history with the problem scenario




     Person’s Perspective about the Scenario




     Other Information from person – people, data, questions person might have




     Other Information from person – people
     Need to follow up with person Yes/No




     Completed by: _________________________
     Team: ________________________________
     Date: _________
     Page ___ of ___
4.1 Resource Template (Required)
           For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises



    Identified Resource 1




    Identified Resource 2




    Identified Resource 3




    Identified Resource 4




    Identified Resource 5




    Identified Resource 6




    Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC

    Completed by: _________________________
    Team: ________________________________
    Date: _________
    Page ___ of ___
4.2 Interview Form (Optional)
            For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises


            Person being interviewed (Name, position, address, telephone, cell phone, email,
            fax)




     Description of person’s history with the problem scenario




     Person’s Perspective about the Scenario




     Other Information from person – people, data, questions person might have




     Other Information from person – people
     Need to follow up with person Yes/No




     Completed by: _________________________
     Team: ________________________________
     Date: _________
     Page ___ of ___
5.1   Checklist for Student's Critical
      Thinking & Team Interactions
      For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises

      Scoring Table: 5 - nearly all the time; 1 - rarely, if ever

       SCORING        THE STUDENT . . .
                      Is clear about the PBCS goals.
                      Understands her/his role in the group.
                      Speaks with clarity and directness.
                      Listens actively and avoids interrupting when others are talking.
                      Helps decide important issues by consensus.
                      Perseveres in the investigation without jumping to conclusions.
                      Monitors his/her own progress toward understanding and solution.
                      Asks questions that lead to clarification of concepts for the group.
                      Remains open-minded throughout the process.
                      Forms hypotheses based on observations and data; asks questions to inform.
                      Sees concepts at work in a problem, reflecting a "global" vision.
                      Recognizes the implications and consequences of her/his actions.
                      Maintains standards for his/her own thinking: accuracy, relevance,
                      preciseness, clarity, depth, and fairness.
                      Completed assignments as directed.
                      Used equipment as directed.

      Comments:




      Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC


      Student: _____________________________
      Instructor: ___________________________
      Date: ____________
5.2 Scoring Rubric (Review required)
           For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises


     As of 15 Nov the adaptation is not compete. This form will be provided separately
     in a few days.
5.3 Talkback Sheet - Page 1 (Required)
           For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises


     We need your reactions to this Problem-based Case Study. Your input will play an
     important role in our decision to modify, leave as is, or drop aspects of this Study. Please
     give us your candid reactions - we will take them seriously!

     The Course Content and Learning Experience

        1. How did you feel about this endeavor when you first read ab0ut what it involved?




        2. Now that you have completed the problem-based case study, what are your feelings
           about it?




        3. What did you learn from this experience?




        4. What effect, if any, is this type of learning experience likely to have on you in the
           future?




        5. What recommendations would you make for improving this learning experience?
5.3 Talkback Sheet - Page 2 (Required)
     The HVAC Equipment in the ECT Laboratory

        6. Did you have any problems using the HVAC Equipment or the instruments provided
           for evaluating the equipment?




        7. Was it easy to use? Why or why not?




        8. What did you like about the HVAC Equipment?




        9. If you were designing the equipment, what would you change about it?
5.3 Talkback Sheet - Page 3 (Required)
     The ePrimer Software

        10. Did you have any problems installing ePrimer?




        11. How did you find the "handling" of ePrimer? Was it easy to use? Why or why not?




        12. Did you find the text and links in ePrimer gave it a logical structure? Why or why not
            did using the software make sense to you?




        13. Did your learning through ePrimer happen in a logical way? What aspects of the
            software, if any, left you feeling confused about the lesson?




        14. What did you like about ePrimer?




        15. If you were designing ePrimer, what would you change about this software?




     Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org>

     Completed by: _________________________
     Team: ________________________________
     Date: _________
     Page ___ of ___
5.4 Reflective Essay (Required)
     For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises
     Prepare a 1 to 2 page essay
6.1 Instructor's Scoring Guide for Team
     Presentations
     For use with Problem-Based Case Study Exercises


  KEY INDICATORS        4 - ALWAYS        3 - MOSTLY   2- PARTIALLLY   1 - RARELY
                        COMMENTS          COMMENTS     COMMENTS        COMMENTS
  Information and Organization
  Presentation main
  points are clear and
  well developed.
  Information linked
  directly to presentation
  topic.
  Information is well
  organized.
  Presentation main
  points are clear and
  developed.
  PowerPoint Presentation
  Visual aids are creative,
  clear, and
  easy to read.
  Tools clearly enhance
  the effectiveness of
  the presentation
  Nonverbal Communication
  Uses body motions
  and gestures very
  effectively.
  Speakers appears
  comfortable and
  confident.
  Speakers maintain
focus through eye
contact and posture.
Team shows
awareness of the
situation.
Verbal Communication
The speaker's voice is
confident, steady,
strong, and clear.
The speaker uses
inflections to
emphasize key points.
The team responds
appropriately to
questioning by class.
PBCS terms are
included in the
presentation and used
appropriately.
Overall Presentation
This was an
informative, engaging,
and effective
presentation.

Adapted from: The Case Files <www.thecasefiles.org> Nashville State CC


Team Members: _________________________________________________________
Instructor: ___________________________
Date: ____________

								
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