Home Away From Home During Hurricanes by devidmark

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									              Home Away From Home During Hurricanes

In 2004 and 2005, Aubrey Brown was living a quiet life in Clanton, Ala., passing the time
spinning his wheels to create pottery to sell at craft shows around the region. But it was during
those two years that Brown and his wife came under the attack of unwelcome visitors on three
separate occasions. The intruders pounded on the doors and windows, bellowing out their
insatiable demands and leaving chaos and destruction in their wake.
To be fair, it wasn’t just the Brown family who found themselves at the mercy of these
adversaries. Their whole community and most of the state were frantically doing everything
they could to protect themselves from the treacherous reach of Hurricanes Ivan, Dennis, and
Katrina.
Like everyone else, Brown gathered supplies and battened down the hatches in preparation of
the storms—but as many of his neighbors made their way to the local shelter, Brown moved
his family into their steel shed, which housed their motor home.




“My SteelMaster shed can withstand 140 mph winds, which is more than I can say about my
house,” says Brown. “Before each storm hit, I stocked the motor home with bottled water and
food, gassed up the tank, made sure the generator was working, and then my wife and 82-
year-old mother and I hunkered down until the hurricanes passed.”
As the family watched shingles fly off the roof of their workshop and trees bow in half to touch
the ground, Brown said they had nary a worry from their vantage point inside the steel shed
that he bought years before from SteelMaster Buildings in Virginia Beach, Va.
“My wife and I travel a lot in our 32-foot motor home from craft show to craft show, so I
bought the RV shed to house it in and keep it out of the sun during the off season,” says
Brown. “I also store all of my welders and cutting torch and tools for mechanical and farm
repair in the shed. Anytime the weather is too cold or raining, I just back the motor home out,
pull in what needs to be repaired, and fix it. When it is real cold, I lower the 12 by 12 door and
use a patio heater to work in comfort.”
The versatility of a SteelMaster building and roofing system goes a long way with the
company’s thousands of customers, many of whom have worked along with SteelMaster
engineers to custom design their building to meet their very specific needs.
“SteelMaster offers unique custom solutions for building applications such as architectural
design, affordable steel housing, athletic facilities, retail stores/business facilities, as well as
specialty buildings such as bus stops, smoke shacks, doggie dorms, churches, and so much
more,” says Michelle Wickum, the director of marketing for SteelMaster. “Regardless of what
purpose our buildings and roofing systems serve, each and every one provides security and
durability against fire, snow, and hurricane-force winds, as was the case with the shed that Mr.
Brown and his family sought shelter in.”

SteelMaster’s steel and metal pre-engineered buildings are designed for a broad range of
residential and commercial applications including homes, farm buildings, garages, workshops,
agricultural storage, Quonsets, airplane hangars, RV storage, roofing systems, carports,
military buildings, commercial warehousing, and industrial storage as well as a wide variety of
custom building applications including athletic facilities, retail stores, churches, bus stops,
smoke shacks, doggie dorms, and correctional facilities.

For More Information About   Steel Building Visit SteelMasterUSA.Com

								
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