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CIRAhistoryofactivities2009finaldraft

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					                   CIRA
CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND ACTION
                 @UNC-CH

Documentation of Activities from January 2009-December 2009




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Table of Contents
CIRA Affiliates November 2009 ............................................................................................................................ 4
CIRA Affiliate Interests in CIRA focus areas ........................................................................................................ 5
CIRA AFFILIATED COURSES ............................................................................................................................ 7
        Anthropology .................................................................................................................................................. 7
        City and Regional Planning ............................................................................................................................ 7
        Communication Studies .................................................................................................................................. 7
        Geography ....................................................................................................................................................... 8
        International Studies ....................................................................................................................................... 8
        Latin American Studies................................................................................................................................... 8
        Service Learning Courses ............................................................................................................................... 8
        CIRA endorsed Courses in the Social and Economic Justice Minor .............................................................. 8
University-Community Engagement Workshop Announcement: ........................................................................ 10
University-Community Engagement Workshop Registration: ............................................................................. 11
University-Community Engagement Workshop Confirmation Form: ................................................................. 12
University-Community Engagement Workshop Summary: ................................................................................. 13
CIRA Spring 2009 Celebration Announcement: .................................................................................................. 23
Cultural Tourism Announcement: ........................................................................................................................ 24
Cultural Tourism Agenda: .................................................................................................................................... 26
Cultural Tourism Summary: ................................................................................................................................. 27
Anthropology Department Colloquium Announcement:...................................................................................... 34
Community Engagement and Student Service: Student Meeting Agenda: .......................................................... 35
Community Engagement and Student Service: Student Summary....................................................................... 36
Community Engagement and Student Service: Faculty/Staff Invitation .............................................................. 39
Community Engagement and Student Service: Faculty/Staff Agenda ................................................................. 40
Community Engagement and Student Service: Faculty/Staff Summary .............................................................. 41
Community Engagement and Student Service: Community Invitation ................................................................ 48
Cary Boshamer Professor of AnthropologyCommunity Engagement and Student Service: Community Agenda
............................................................................................................................................................................... 49
Community Engagement and Student Service: Community Agenda ................................................................... 50
Community Engagement and Student Service: Community Summary ................................................................ 51
Community Engagement and Student Service: Comment Summary ................................................................... 60
Community Engagement and Student Service: Stakeholder Summary ................................................................ 63
Uptown Business & Professional Center Site Visit .............................................................................................. 76
AAA CIRA Reception .......................................................................................................................................... 77
CIRA Reception at the AAA Meeting in Philadelphia ......................................................................................... 77
Fall 2009 CIRA E-Newsletter ............................................................................................................................... 78
CIRA 2010 Initial Events...................................................................................................................................... 82
2010 Community Organizing Workshop .............................................................................................................. 83
CIRA Affiliate Grant Search Workshop and Affiliate Meeting February 5, 2010 ............................................... 84


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CIRA Affiliates November 2009

                                      Community Members
          Wanda Boone, One Durham Everybody Eats; Durham Together for Resilient Youth
                           Patricia ―Kerry‖ Brewer, Sustain Foundation
                                        John Cooper, MDC
                             Laura Dominkovic, Blue Ridge Ventures
                   Sarah Drewett. Chapel Hill & Carrboro Human Rights Center
                                  David Harper, Land in Common
                              Michal Osterweil, Carrboro Greenspace
                Shoshaunna Parks, Maya Area Cultural Heritage Initiative (MACHI)
                   Della Pollock, Jackson Center for Saving and Making History
            Sandy Smith-Nonini, yikes! ―Youth Involved in Keeping Earth Sustainable!‖

                                         Graduate Students and Post-Docs
                                Patricia ―Kerry‖ Brewer, UNC- Chapel Hill Student
                                          Jocelyn Chua, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                         Georgina Drew, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                      William Westermeyer, UNC-Chapel Hill

                                            Faculty/Staff
                Suzanne Gulledge, Professor, School of Education, UNC-Chapel Hill
                       Nora Haenn, Professor, North Carolina State University
             Joseph F. Jordan, Sonya Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History
                  Clara Sue Kidwell, American Indian Center at UNC- Chapel Hill
          Steve May, Professor, Department of Communications Studies, UNC- Chapel Hill
                      Debra Skinner, Frank Porter Graham, UNC – Chapel Hill
            Meenu Tewari, Department of City and Regional Planning, UNC- Chapel Hill
            Shoshaunna Parks, Research Archaeologist, Anthropology, UNC-Chapel Hill
                 Della Pollock, Professor, Communication Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill
                       Sandy Smith-Nonini, Anthropology, UNC- Chapel Hill

                                                      Alumni
                                                     Ana Araujo
                                      Alison Greene, UNC Alumni; Anthropology

                  Please note some affiliates may be listed in different affiliate sections.




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CIRA Affiliate Interests in CIRA focus areas

                               Collective Action/Community Empowerment
                                                Ana Araujo
             Wanda Boone, One Durham Everybody Eats; Durham Together for Resilient Youth
                                      Jocelyn Chua, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                             John Cooper, MDC
                                  Laura Dominkovic, Blue Ridge Ventures
                                     Georgina Drew, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                Alison Greene, UNC Alumni; Anthropology
                    Suzanne Gulledge, Professor, School of Education, UNC-Chapel Hill
                                       David Harper, Land in Common
                 Joseph F. Jordan, Sonya Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History
              Steve May, Professor, Department of Communications Studies, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                   Michal Osterweil, Carrboro Greenspace
  Della Pollock, Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, Communication Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill
                           Sandy Smith-Nonini, Anthropology, UNC- Chapel Hill
                Meenu Tewari, Department of City and Regional Planning, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                   William Westermeyer, UNC-Chapel Hill




                                             Cultural Heritage
             Wanda Boone, One Durham Everybody Eats; Durham Together for Resilient Youth
                                Patricia ―Kerry‖ Brewer, Sustain Foundation
                                      Jocelyn Chua, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                     Georgina Drew, UNC- Chapel Hill
                 Joseph F. Jordan, Sonya Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History
                      Clara Sue Kidwell, American Indian Center at UNC- Chapel Hill
   Shoshaunna Parks, Maya Area Cultural Heritage Initiative (MACHI), Anthropology, UNC-Chapel Hill
  Della Pollock, Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, Communication Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill
                                   William Westermeyer, UNC-Chapel Hill




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                                         CIRA AFFILIATES
                                           November 2009
                               Affiliate Interests in CIRA focus areas

                                            Food & Justice
                                               Ana Araujo
           Wanda Boone, One Durham Everybody Eats; Durham Together for Resilient Youth
                              Patricia ―Kerry‖ Brewer, Sustain Foundation
                                Laura Dominkovic, Blue Ridge Ventures
                              Alison Greene, UNC Alumni; Anthropology
                        Nora Haenn, Professor, North Carolina State University
                                    David Harper, Land in Common
                                Michal Osterweil, Carrboro Greenspace
Della Pollock, Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, Communication Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill
                     Sandy Smith-Nonini, yikes!, Anthropology, UNC- Chapel Hill
             Meenu Tewari, Department of City and Regional Planning, UNC- Chapel Hill
                                William Westermeyer, UNC-Chapel Hill



    Alternative Energies & Local Economies/Community Economic and Energy Development
         Wanda Boone, One Durham Everybody Eats; Durham Together for Resilient Youth
                             Laura Dominkovic, Blue Ridge Ventures
                                 Georgina Drew, UNC- Chapel Hill
                      Nora Haenn, Professor, North Carolina State University
          Steve May, Professor, Department of Communications Studies, UNC- Chapel Hill
                              Michal Osterweil, Carrboro Greenspace
                   Sandy Smith-Nonini, yikes!, Anthropology, UNC- Chapel Hill
                             William Westermeyer, UNC-Chapel Hill




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CIRA AFFILIATED COURSES

Undergraduate Courses Taught by UNC-CIRA Affiliated Faculty and Graduate Students.

Anthropology
051, Environmentalism and American Society, Dorothy Holland
092, Unitas, Alice Brooke Wilson, Malena Rousseau
093-001, Unitas, Alice Brooke Wilson, Malena Rousseau
194, Anthropology & Community Development, Charles Price
248, Anthropology and Public Interest, Karla Slocum
320, Anthropology of Development, Auturo Escobar
328, Environment and Population, Paul Leslie
443, Cultures and Politics of Reproduction, Michele Rivkin-Fish
444, Medicine, Politics, and Justice, Michele Rivkin-Fish
460, Historical Ecology, Carole Crumley
466, Alternative Economic Systems, Donald Nonini
468, Formation of the State, Carole Crumley
491, Political Anthropology, Donald Nonini
499 (062), Action Research, Charles Price
499 Situating Transformative Knowledge, Dorothy Holland
499-076, Culture and Consumption, Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld
499-077 Visual Anthropology, Jean Dennison
539, Environmental Justice, Flora Lu Holt
567, Urban Anthropology, Donald Nonini
599- 074, Inventing a Sustainable Agriculture, Sandy Smith-Nonini
599 Social Movements Research Workshop, Dorothy Holland

City and Regional Planning
053 The Changing American Job: First Year Seminar, Nichola Lowe
58 Globalization and the North Carolina Economy, Meenu Tewari
110 (059) Political Economy of Poverty and Inequality, Meenu Tewari
770 Economic Development Policy, Nichola Lowe
773 Urban and Regional Economic Development Seminar, Meenu Tewari
779 (63) Planning for Jobs: Labor Market Transformations and Employment Policy in the 21st Century,
Nichola Lowe

Communication Studies
312, Persuasion, Jessica Fifield
625, Communication and Nonprofits, Sarah Dempsey
629, Organizing for Social Change, Sarah Dempsey
668H, Ethnographic Return, Della Pollock

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Geography
460, Geography of Economics, Wendy Wolford
International Studies
380, Social Theory and Cultural Diversity, Michal Osterweil

Latin American Studies
697, Capstone Course, Michal Osterweil

Sociology
273 Social and Economic Justice, Charles Kurzman

Service Learning Courses
092, Unitas, Alice Brooke Wilson, Malena Rousseau
093 (001), Unitas, Alice Brooke Wilson, Malena Rousseau
499 (062), Action Research, Charles Price
599 (074), Inventing a Sustainable Agriculture, Sandy Smith-Nonini
312, Persuasion, Jessica Fifield
539, Environmental Justice, Flora Lu Holt

CIRA endorsed Courses in the Social and Economic Justice Minor
AFAM 430/AFRI 430/WMST 430, Comparative Studies in Culture, Gender, and Global Forces
ANTH 248, Anthropology and Public Interest
ANTH 322, Anthropology and Human Rights
ANTH 686, Schooling and Diversity: Anthropological Perspectives
ECON 267, Comparative Economic Systems
ECON 385, Women and Economics
PHIL 170, Social Ethics and Political Thought
PHIL 275/WMST 275, Moral and Philosophical Issues of Gender in Society
POLI 472, Problems of Modern Democratic Theory
POLI/WMST 265, Feminism and Political Theory
SOCI 122, Race and Ethnic Relations
SOCI 469, Medicine and Society
SOWO 491, Community Organizing for Social Change
SOCI/WMST 444, Race, Class, and Gender
AFAM/AFRI/WMST 430, Comparative Studies in Culture, Gender, and Global Forces
ANTH 142, Local Cultures, Global Forces
COMM/ENST 375, Environmental Advocacy
ECON 465, Economic Development
GEOG 458, Urban Latin America: Politics, Economy, and Society
PLCY 361/POLI 407, Health Policy and Politics
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SOWO 490, Public Service and Social Change
AMST 293, Appalachia and America: Special Topics
AMST/HIST 110, Introduction to the Cultures and History of Native North America
ANTH 103, Anthropology of Globalization
ANTH/PWAD 280, Anthropology of War and Peace
ECON 480, Labor Economics
ECON 586, Economics of the Family
ENST/INTS/PLCY 520, Environment and Development
GEOG 123, Cultural Geography
HIST 490, Special Topics in History—Ecological History in Africa
HIST 589, Race, Racism, and America: (U.S.) Law in Historical Perspective
HIST/WMST 362, Women in American History
POLI/WMST 217, Women and Politics
SOCI/MNGT 412, Social Stratification
SOCI/WMST 124, Sex and Gender in Society

Graduate Courses Taught by UNC-CIRA Affiliated Faculty
Anthropology 828, Complex Adaptive Systems in Anthropology, Carole Crumley
Anthropology 894, Issues in Cultural Heritage, Patricia McAnany
Anthropology 898-073, Moral Economies of Medicine, Michele Rivkin-Fish
Planning 823, Workshop in Economic Development, Dorothy Holland




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University-Community Engagement Workshop Announcement:

                    Please join us for the
                            CIRA
  CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND ACTION @UNC-CH
                   University-Community Engagement Workshop
            Building a Foundation for Shared Work, Research and Respect

                                           Friday, May 1, 2009 10am to 12:30pm
                                          At the Hyde Hall at UNC- Chapel Hill
As part of the efforts on campus to assist faculty, students and community who are interested in engaged scholarship
CIRA is sponsoring a hands-on workshop. This is unique opportunity will bring together community and university
members from around the state. Learn how shared resources, research and programming can lead to stronger
communities. Participants will be encouraged to share their own experiences, learn from others and leave with a deeper
understanding and commitment to united efforts. This is a perfect time to meet with other individuals interested in
identifying networking strategies and opportunities.

Professor Barbara Ferman of Temple University and Director of the University Community Collaborative of
Philadelphia (UCCP) will be the workshop leader.


    Registration is LIMITED to 20 community and 20 university participants.
              Registration will be on a first come – first serve basis.
    To register please fill out the attached form and email it to: cira@unc.edu
                                             SPONSORED BY:
                                                     CIRA
                CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND ACTION @UNC-CH
The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
     is an initiative bringing together university-based researchers with community-based leaders to
 collaborate on producing research/action projects to advance sustainable development and community
                         well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.

                                               Light refreshments will be served

               Please join us the same day for the CIRA CELEBRATION
                                from 1 to 3pm Hyde Hall.
                  Any questions, please contact Alicia_Altmueller@unc.edu or 919-619-6056
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University-Community Engagement Workshop Registration:


                                  CIRA
          CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND ACTION @UNC-CH
                        University-Community Engagement Workshop
                 Building a Foundation for Shared Work, Research and Respect
                                      Registration Form

Name:

Organization:

Address:

City:                                State:                                         Zip code:

Phone:                                                                              Fax:

E-mail:

Please take some time now to share your thoughts on the following to help us target your
specific interests during the workshop:
   1. What are the challenges do you see in university - community engagement?


   2. What would be helpful to you when trying to build these partnerships?


   3. What do you have to offer to others to help strengthen their experiences?


Email completed form to CIRA@UNC.EDU.

REGISTRATION IS LIMITED. Please reply by April 17. We will send you a registration
confirmation form with location and participants.

                             Light refreshments will be served
  Please join us the same day for the CIRA CELEBRATION from 1 to 3pm in Hyde Hall.
                 Any questions, please contact Alicia_Altmueller@unc.edu or 919-619-6056

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University-Community Engagement Workshop Confirmation Form:
                                   University-Community Engagement Workshop
                            Building a Foundation for Shared Work, Research and Respect
                                             CONFIRMATION FORM
Thank you for registering for the University-Community Engagement Workshop: Building a Foundation for Shared Work, Research and
Respect. This is sponsored by the Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina –
Chapel Hill. Designed for university researchers (faculty, students, and staff) and community partners, this workshop will
cover key aspects of university-community engagement such as: motivations and objectives; assumptions about each other;
university and community environments; power dynamics; communication and the like. The workshop will combine a sharing
of lessons learned with small group and participants will collectively examine, in depth, some of the key items above.

Registration:
Registration will begin at 9:30 am. Light refreshments will be served and we encourage all to arrive early to have the
opportunity to informally meet and network.

Time:
The workshop will be held on Friday, May 1, 2009 10am to 12:30pm in Hyde Hall at UNC- Chapel Hill.

Materials to Share:
We encourage everyone to bring information about your programs and organizations. We will have one table available for
everyone to share and put literature about their program. (Unfortunately, there is not enough space for everyone to have their
own table). But please feel free to bring materials to share with the workshop participants. We anticipate between 30-40
participants.

Directions:
Directions are on the second page.

CIRA Celebration to Follow:
We also hope you can join us the same day for the CIRA Celebration from 1 to 3pm Hyde Hall. The CIRA Celebration will
offer more networking opportunities with community and university members who are working on collaborative research and
action projects.

CIRA Mission:
The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina –Chapel Hill is an initiative
bringing together university-based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action
projects to advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.
CIRA is part of the larger efforts on campus to assist faculty, students and community who are interested in
engaged scholarship.

Questions:
If you have any questions, please contact Alicia_Altmueller@unc.edu or 919-619-6056.

                                                   We look forward to seeing you on May 1st!


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University-Community Engagement Workshop Summary:

                   University-Community Engagement Workshop
            Building a Foundation for Shared Work, Research and Respect
Friday, May 1, 2009 10am to 12:30pm at the Hyde Hall at UNC- Chapel Hill

Workshop Description:
As part of the efforts on campus to assist faculty, students and community who are interested in engaged
scholarship CIRA is sponsoring a hands-on workshop. This is unique opportunity will bring together community
and university members from around the state. Learn how shared resources, research and programming can lead to
stronger communities. Participants will be encouraged to share their own experiences, learn from others and leave
with a deeper understanding and commitment to united efforts. This is a perfect time to meet with other individuals
interested in identifying networking strategies and opportunities.

Facilitator:
Barbara Ferman is a Professor of Political Science and founder and Director of the University Community
Collaborative of Philadelphia (UCCP), at Temple University. She has published several books and numerous articles
on urban politics and policy, community development, housing, racial integration, youth employment policy, youth
civic engagement and the university as a civic actor. She has 20 years of experience working with community-based
and other non-profit organizations. As UCCP director, she has raised over $4 million.

CIRA:
The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an
initiative bringing together university-based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing
research/action projects to advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North
Carolina and beyond.

May 1, 2009 pre-registration responses:

       What are the challenges do you see in university - community engagement?

           o Timelines, language, expectations, ownership, commitment, follow-through, culture & history
             knowledge, funder expectations
           o Lack of communication: universities are very resourceful which could help improve particular
             community outcomes through public awareness, education and communication.
           o Collaborative efforts/community building: I think that it is important the universities and nonprofits
             join together in numerous ways such as public education outreach and awareness to further improve
             community well-being.
           o One recent observation of mine has been that initiatives taken by university students cannot have
             long-term involvement by the same people because the student body moves on. Partnering with the
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    community to launch community-based projects will give it a permanence that is missing in a
    transient group.
o   Issues related to scholarship and the academy. Finding time to develop and carry out research
    projects that are not traditional for university scholars. The uncertain value of such projects and
    their concrete products in the context of tenure and promotion in historically non-applied
    disciplines.
o   Negative outside perceptions of community engagement (biasness, etc.)
o   Creating and maintaining equity throughout the project between researcher and community partner.
    And knowing where to look for potential community partnerships.
o   Lack of communication
o   Community mistrust due to past experiences
o   Departments are “siloed” and therefore not working together to engage in the larger university
    community. Different departments may already be doing something in a community, and rather
    than working together, that area becomes „off-limits‟ to other departments. This limits the growth
    and development of which these areas are capable
o   Successfully engaging community members
o   Common language; ample/access to resources ; defining common interests/goals
o   Time constraints
o   Building unrealistic community expectations of what the University is able to do.
o   Navigating the academic infrastructure/systems (i.e. IRB, grants management, etc.)
o   There are several problems that make university – community engagement tricky. Typically in
    academia, a researcher comes up with a topic in the academic setting, writes a grant, and goes to the
    community for any length of time only after the funds become available. At this point the project
    has already been imagined in a particular way, with little community input. To have successfully
    engaged work the researcher would need to put more time and money into developing the project.
o   Another major challenge is that only certain community members have either the time or the
    interest to participate in most research projects. Too frequently these are academic affairs and even
    when they might be of ultimate importance to a community, many community members are not
    themselves engaged. One problem this leads to is that engaged research tends to focus on social
    movements and other activities where communities are already engaged, ignoring those communities
    that have not already mobilized for them. While work with these social movements is crucial,
    research also needs to take place in other environments.
o   Carving out Human rights can be considered as an epistemology, a radical critique, or embedded in
    community and groups. As such human rights are often accorded a niche in the university. UNC
    recognizes their importance in undergraduate education, but no where else. As far as the Center is
    concerned, we are “off the beaten track,” which has its advantages.
o   I see part of the challenge would be for the university? How does the academic community want to
    see community engagement implemented on campus and off?
o   Being familiar with the red and or green tape that precludes real development of projects there
    would have to be clear directives and benefits to all partners involved? One would expect much
    discussion and with real time implementation and outcomes?
o   The University requires “preceptors” to be employed at a community organization, to be able to
    work with graduate research students throughout internship. Often the community organization
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       does not have a qualified preceptor. This inhibits potential highly intimate work dynamic
       relationships between student and community organization and stunts growth, development and
       experience. Can this requirement be reinvented? There is little interaction between the University
       and community during internships. Can professors be more hands on with volunteering students
       and organizations?
   o   Generating real economic momentum in communities where it is most needed while shining the
       light on what a resilient local economy looks like for different regions. With so many aspects of
       “sustainability” being addressed by diverse and often uncoordinated efforts in different regions,
       there is a need for framing the overall sustainability discussion in a way that helps people within and
       outside of the movement to see the connections between seemingly disparate topics (like food
       deserts, tobacco, and community forestry).
   o    The tendency for folks within the academy to germinate ideas within the university that do not
       originate within and from a community perspective. Sometimes this can become a distraction from
       the work that community folks are already doing.
   o   Work germinated within the university often has a short time frame, a semester project or until
       something is published, etc. before the focus is shifted to the next project, thus the work is not
       sustained.
   o   Often work germinated in the university comes from a "needs" based perspective rather than an
       "assets" based perspective of community development and can especially be disconnected from the
       human assets and capacity of the community.
   o   The culture of the university is quite different from the culture of the broader community,
       community peoples' lives and work don't operate on a semester schedule or have summers off for
       instance.
   o   Students doing community engagement work through the university are often full-filling a class or
       even graduation requirement rather than engaging out of personal inspiration and initiative leading
       to less commitment, having less at stake and sometimes unfulfilled work.
   o   Communities sometimes feel like they are being put under the micro-scope by folks in the academy
       if, while well intentioned, they come into communities they are unfamiliar with, observe and make
       suggestions about what the community should be doing, then leave. Or inject temporary energy in
       to a community to implement short-term projects that further scholarship or resumes but is not
       sustained.
   o   Community workers often have difficulty turning studies and reports coming out of the university in
       to actuality with in their work.
   o   Hierarchical relationships and power dynamics often exist. Sometimes folks with status with in the
       university culture (multiple degrees, etc) understand themselves as "experts" and may discount the
       popular understanding of different issues that community folk have. This can also lead to the
       perception that academics are serving community folks, rather than collaborating with them on a
       horizontal playing field.
   o   The university culture can insulate academics from a lot of the struggles faced regularly within the
       community.


What would be helpful to you when trying to build these partnerships?
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o Information and ideas; creative thinking and models
o More support (experiences, etc.) from others who are similarly interested in this opportunity for
  scholarship
o Helping to locate like-minded community partners.
o Being aware of and in some cases openly acknowledging power dynamics and privilege is important
  to foster horizontal and collaborative working relationships. Understanding that academic projects
  are most helpful to community work when it enhances the work already being done. To have folks
  with the academic community to participate in activities taking place in and being lead by
  community workers and/or members at least as often as originating or facilitating their own
  community engagement activities. To lower the walls around the university by creating spaces and
  groups on campus that community folks can feel comfortable using and/or calling together around
  particular issues taking place in the community. Using language and ways of talking about things
  familiar to community. A focus on sharing popular or common experiences and stories more than
  on statistics when engaging community groups.
o More about community engagement strategies
o Know what is already being done in areas of the community
o Learn more about how to bridge cultural divides (between university and community as well as
  within the community)
o This is exactly the question we are trying to answer within our program, both for ourselves and for
  community members.
o Ideas about how to build them, define terms of them
o Time! Especially time to invest in the stages/processes of building relations, developing effective
  modes of communication, exploring partner needs, and constructing or co-constructing the
  research: refining questions, selecting methods and negotiating the practical and ethical terms of the
  engagement.
o Clear guidelines on how such work will be evaluated for tenure what kinds of output will be allowed
  to “count” and for how much.
o Research assistants, small seed funds and/or other kinds of material institutional support from the
  institution.
o The main things that would assist with the building of these partnerships are more time and money
  devoted to such scholarship. Time away from teaching is as crucial in the development stages of
  engaged research as it is in the research itself.
o Adequate resources to bring groups of people together for discussion.
o Tools for navigating these areas, stories from communities who have done so with their advice, a
  way to facilitate exchange and capacity building in communities and BETWEEN communities and
  same with/between university students (the latter being much simpler to manage)
o We would need to be careful before opening our doors to researchers.
o Dialog that is open, fair and clear within the partnerships would be helpful.
o Each organization comes to the table with there own agenda tackling that and putting one‟s agenda
  aside for the sustainability of partnerships is a challenge? Experience teaches us much however
  perhaps discussing real building steps for this process would be helpful?

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           o APPLES Learning Service Program is a nice model for undergraduate engagement on community
             projects. Is there a more thorough channel through which the University can educate and engage
             community organizations about partnership opportunities with graduate level students and course
             curriculum?
           o It would be helpful to work in partnership to generate and disseminate precise, compelling
             information about a variety of topics in NC.

What do you have to offer to others to help strengthen their experiences?
         o Personal experience in developing early relationships before research begins
         o Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) experience, working with community partners
             now in a collaborative way.
         o Community engagement experience in Latin America
         o Information and resources available through UNC (and Medical School). I believe we could find lots
             of areas for collaboration.
         o 5+ years experience in managing community-academic research projects
         o My ideas and experiences based on attempts at considering such partnerships.
         o A wealth of things that go wrong , some work on culturally appropriate logic models with a
             couple examples
         o Experience working in a variety of community action organizations. As well as on collaborative
             projects between university and community.
         o Being grounded in the community. Awareness and willingness to analyze power dynamics and work
             toward horizontal and collaborative relationships.
         o Background in experiential learning as well as academic culture.
         o My research on a specific Government Reform process taught me many important lessons about the
             challenges of doing any sort of community based reform or research. Frequently the community
             members have not had the time or resources themselves to form opinions about the direction they
             would like to go. Further this sort of community work also takes a great deal of time and patience
             to develop, particularly if consensus is a desire. There are also many power dynamics that make
             consensus practically impossible.
         o Our center has done two workshops with community groups.
         o Students learn a tremendous amount by volunteering.
         o Public education materials
         o To develop a collaborative action plan that will inform and improve community well-being.
         o I have experience organizing in this community for almost 25 years. I have leadership as well as
             democratic group participation skill, about 20 years of work in the non-profit sector.
         o Having been in the nonprofit business for 23 years, I have had the opportunity to succeed and fail in
             bringing community organizations to the table for the benefit of the community that we serve to
             design and or implement a project. To listen without bias and or intent and work continually in
             honing skill sets learned over the years in reading the local community that I have the privilege of
             serving. To always look outside of the local community regionally, statewide or nationally for those
             projects which have been successful in other communities and to bring them to the table for
             discussion and perhaps implementation?

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            o Our organization offers matriculated students and University staff opportunities to work on
              sustainable development and community food systems projects.
            o I designed and taught a field course at other university with a community-based understanding.

Highlights of Barbara Ferman’s comments:
Ask the obvious but not so obvious questions:
    Why are you doing this?
    Are you sure that is the reason?
    What are you good at; what are you not good at?
Carrying the baggage of the university (whether you want to or not)
Negotiating different incentive structures, cultures, expectations, priorities and timelines of the university and the
community.
Understanding power dynamics (it is not a level playing field)
Knowing how to communicate
What assumptions do we bring to the table and how do those get communicated?
The importance of paying attention to the “little things.”
Capacity Issues: Those of the research and those of the nonprofit.

Comments from the Breakout Sessions:
Community:
  I.    Why do you want to work with the university
        a. To fill a need, we needed help
        b. To provide the opportunity for students to get experience
        c. For beneficial outcomes for both community and university
        d. Collaboration
        e. Help transform the culture of the university
        f. Resources - knowledge, research to accomplish our mission (not necessarily financial)
        g. Networking with other groups/universities
        h. Infrastructure
  II.   What do you have to offer
        a. Community
        b. Experience
        c. Permanence
        d. Communication Across demographics
        e. Real Life Growth
        f. Education
        g. Job Opportunities
        h. Professional /Leadership Development
  III.  How can you make it happen
        a. Engagement
        b. Community/University Dialogue
        c. Partnerships
        d. Better Matchmaking
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Student:
   I.     Why do you want to work with the community
          a. “With” the community – sometimes represent both, in between identities
          b. Better questions and data to support activist questions
          c. Teaching: Commitment to students and project
          d. Redistributing skills and resources
          e. Legitimating questions/knowledge
          f. Responsibility
                    i. To Resources of the university
                   ii. To particular community
                  iii. Can legitimate and highlight other knowledge
          g. Purpose of Research
                    i. Research/Meaning is Personal
                   ii. Struggles/Boundaries to Gathering Research
   II.    What do you have to offer that is of value
          a. Serving the Community from within the university
          b. Bring “Community into University”
          c. Popular Education – in/out shift transversal power
          d. Time (Complicated) – Fieldwork is often rushed
          e. Optimism – Relatively new to academia
          f. Connections to other networks
          g. Diversity (personal background)
          h. Skill Sets
          i. Critical Distance to Academy
   III.    How can you make it (Collaboration) happen
          a. Alternative Structures of Legitimacy for engaged, critical work
          b. Quick fund for short rapid response research
          c. Time
          d. Clearinghouse for research: questions, teaching strategically and RA‟s
          e. Rapid Publications Plan
          f. Confidence Connections of Community in Grad Students
          g. Collaborative with other researchers
          h. New Set of Peers to review (Quality and Activism)
          i. CIRA buy lunch once a month for student dialogue
          j. Fund CIRA for Rapid Collaborative Research meeting needs of community, students, faculty,
              researchers
Faculty/Staff
   I.     Why work with the Community?
          a. To improve health outcomes, i.e. NC TRACS
          b. Distribute Funds. i.e. NC TRACS
          c. Changing the legacy
          d. To learn needs of the community
          e. Promote economic and social justice thru community engagement
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           f. To identify critical aspects of community inclusivity
           g. Expand participatory democracy
           h. Give back to taxpayers
   II.     What can we offer
           a. Funds
                    i. Provide funds
                   ii. Grant-writing assistance
           b. Friendship
                    i. Invitation to open door to university
                   ii. Support/Encouragement
                  iii. Bridge Building: to policy makers and other researchers
           c. Free Labor
           d. Experience/Contacts with work in the community
           e. Research knowledge
           f. Professional Services
   III.     How to make it happen
           a. Active Listening and Learning
                    i. Communicate information
                   ii. Understanding and knowing the Community
           b. Partnerships
                    i. Clear Power-sharing
                   ii. Publicity: Disseminating and publicizing resources
           c. Start with Assets not Problems
           d. Identifying need that can or cannot be met
           e. Develop policy, program and/or plan
           f. Help identify Product outcome
           g. Transparency – making sure it is community owned


Outcomes/Next Steps:
    Networking: The conversations and networking will continue now that people have made connections. All
      participants at the workshop will receive participant contact information.
    Website: We will be developing a new component to the website over the summer that we will share with
      all. This will allow us to have online communications and allow affiliates to communicate about projects and
      research needs. Once we know our internal capacity, we will request affiliate feedback.
    Communications: We will set up a general CIRA listserv for all interested to encourage more
      communication, more sharing and more program opportunity.
    Outreach: We encourage all interested to contact us on topics over the summary that we might be able to
      work together (or help with) developing plans or new projects together.
    Affiliates: We have 10 new affiliates. We encourage all those interested to register as an affiliate. The register
      go to:


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http://cira.unc.edu/affiliates
Welcome new affiliates:
    David Harper, Land in Common
    Debra Skinner, Frank Porter Graham, UNC-CH
    Michal Osterweil, Carrboro Openspace
    Ana Araujo, UNC Alumni
    Suzanne Gulledge, School of Education, UNC-CH
    Alison Greene, Independent Scholar
    Clara Sue Kidwell, American Indian Center, UNC- CH
    Karen Mulcahy, East Carolina University
    Steve May, Department of Communications, UNC - CH
    Jean Dennison, Anthropology, UNC- CH

Evaluation Responses to date:
As we receive evaluation forms we will update this section on the website.

What worked best in this workshop?
   The opportunity to meet and interact with such a broad group of active people
   Open communication
   Barbara Ferman‟s comments
   Circling of everyone (seating)
   Food
   Networking Opportunities
   Informal Conversations
   Networking and brainstorming honestly about how to bridge the Research/Action gap
   The most successful part of the workshop for me was the group of people you were able to bring
      together.

What suggestion for improvement?
   To mix the groups rather than keeping the various groups separated (community, students and faculty)
   Questions that provide opportunity for less theoretical talk and more action specific
   A deeper, more grounded conversation would have been nice. I felt like many of the issues discussed were
      fairly basic and that many of the folks in attendance had experiences richer than the responses evoked by
      the workshop questions.
   Broader participation from community-based organizations, even if the location has to change.
   More discussion of specific ongoing projects so people could find ways to establish partnerships.
   In the future I think the workshop would benefit from less lecture and more group interaction. While the
      exercise was productive, it was also pretty basic. Most of the people there already knew why they did this
      work and that there were overlaps between the groups. I think a similar exercise could have been more
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       effective if it did not break us into groups of faculty, students and community, but allowed us to discuss
       across these easy divisions.
      One suggestion might be to organize community, student and faculty along topical interests and facilitate
       discussion or project development along these topics.

What other workshops or services would you like to see CIRA provide?
Workshops:
   Skill- based workshops where university and community groups can learn side-by-side
   Fundraising workshops: Grant writing, Collaborative grants within the university and community-university
   I would like more specifics on the community based participatory research model.

Services:
     Community-driven research…what it looks like in other parts of the country and what it could look like
        here. Asking community development organizations what their research needs are and whether
        UNC/CIRA is the right entity to provide that research
     Ideally CIRA could offer research services to community development projects before they start, ideally as
        an in-kind match for grant funded projects.


Are there workshops you would be willing to lead or help facilitate?
Participants have provided specific workshops (and skills) that they can provide


Attendees:
We had 39 participants attend the workshop.




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CIRA Spring 2009 Celebration Announcement:


                            Please join us for the Spring 2009
                                      Celebration of

                    CIRA
    CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND
              ACTION @UNC-CH
  The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an
initiative bringing together university-based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing
research/action projects to advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North
                                                 Carolina and beyond.



                                            FRIDAY, MAY 1, 2009
                                                1:00-3:00PM
                                                 Hyde Hall


CIRA is part of the larger efforts on campus to assist faculty, students and community who
 are interested in engaged scholarship. Come learn more about CIRA, what we are doing
and how you can get involved! Come meet other members of the community and university
              who are working on collaborative research and action projects.

                                              Light refreshments will be served

                 Any questions, please contact Alicia_Altmueller@unc.edu or 919-619-6056

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Cultural Tourism Announcement:


                          CIRA
  CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND ACTION @UNC-CH

The Center for Integrating Research and Action at UNC-Chapel Hill (CIRA) invites you to join us for a
"brainstorming" meeting on Cultural Heritage: Cultural Tourism.

Cultural Heritage has been one area that we have seen increasing interest in expanding and developing
coordinated efforts. Cultural Tourism is one way to express the cultural history and importance of a community,
not to mention the potential for economic development. With so much interest from such a diverse group of
parties, we felt it important to host a dialogue and see what common needs, interest and projects develop.

Clara Sue Kidwell, Director of the American Indian Center at UNC- Chapel Hill and a CIRA Affiliate will
"showcase" the work the center is doing on cultural tourism. The American Indian Center held a cultural
tourism workshop in June, and as a follow-up is developing a handbook on cultural tourism in American Indian
communities in North Carolina.

Your participation is key to developing strengthened dialogue and partnerships.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009 from 10am-12
Location: University Room, Hyde Hall

Directions:

http://iah.unc.edu/about/reserve-hyde-hall/contact/directions/directions


Please RSVP by August 25 if you plan to attend.

There will be an area available where participants may leave informational materials to share with the group.

If you have any questions or ideas, please not hesitate to contact us at cira@unc.edu or 919-619-6056.




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Resources:


Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA)at UNC - Chapel Hill:


http://cira.unc.edu/



American Indian Center:


http://americanindiancenter.unc.edu/



National Assembly on State Arts Agency: This is a great resource for
learning more about cultural heritage. In addition, on the bottom of the
first page there is an online resource list.

http://www.nasaa-arts.org/artworks/ct_contents.shtml



Cultural Heritage Tourism: This organization is a great resource for
planning and enhancing existing programs/projects around cultural
heritage tourism.

http://www.culturalheritagetourism.org/index.html



                  Any questions, please contact Alicia_Altmueller@unc.edu or 919-619-6056




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Cultural Tourism Agenda:

Cultural Heritage: Cultural Tourism Meeting

                                          **** AGENDA****
                              Tuesday, September 1, 2009 10AM – NOON
                                     University Room, Hyde Hall
10:00AM -10:03AM Logistical Welcome – Alicia Altmueller, Associate Director, CIRA
10:03 – 10:15 Welcome, Dorothy Holland, Co-Director, CIRA
10:15AM-10:30AM Introductions
Each person will be given a piece of paper with three questions to answer.
    What is your name
    What organization/department do you represent
    Experience, expertise and/ or interest in cultural tourism
10:30AM -11:00AM Handbook on Cultural Tourism in American Indian Communities in North Carolina, Clara
Sue Kidwell, Director, American Indian Center at UNC
11:00AM-11:07AM Break
11:07 AM-11:30AM Break Out Session: Each group will review three questions
    How can cultural tourism support communities‘ cultural heritage?
    How can cultural tourism support job community development? (job creation, community relations, job
       creation/economic development – are there models, examples)
    What do we do next? What are people interested in? What do they see they want/can offer to a group?
       If you can continue to discuss this what area would be of interest?
11:35AM- NOON – Next Steps and Closing




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Cultural Tourism Summary:

                                                        Cultural Tourism Meeting

Tuesday, September 1, 2009 10 am to Noon at the Hyde Hall at UNC- Chapel Hill

Workshop Description:

Cultural Heritage has been an area that we have seen increasing interest in expanding and developing
coordinated efforts. Cultural Tourism is one way to express the cultural history and importance of a community,
not to mention the potential for economic development. With so much interest from such a diverse group of
parties, CIRA felt it important to host a dialogue and see what common needs, interest and projects develop.

Clara Sue Kidwell, Director of the American Indian Center at UNC- Chapel Hill and a CIRA Affiliate
"showcased" the work the center is doing on cultural tourism. The American Indian Center held a cultural
tourism workshop in June and as a follow-up developed a handbook on cultural tourism in American Indian
communities in North Carolina.

September 1 meeting gave way to a unique opportunity bringing together over 30 community and university
members from around the state. Participants had opportunities to share their own experiences, learn from others
and leave with a deeper understanding and commitment to united efforts.

Highlights from Clara Sue Kidwell presentation and question session that followed:
Cultural Tourism Handbook highlights:
    Started with and includes surveys about community interest/feedback
    Community support is key to the success – but first community/initiative leaders must be located.
           a. Find community members that are interested in project and hold meetings.
           b. Once members are oriented, offer grant-writing workshop to help them find resources.
           c. Larger community meetings are essential once leadership is in place
    Stirring up interest in community/public education -- one angle for doing that is promote tourism and
       economic growth follows
    Community Assets and inventory is central to understanding the capacity of supporting the project and
       understanding the entirety of what is available
    As a result of the conversations and process the American Indian Center is working to help with an artist
       coop with the assistance of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation
   Questions:
    How does American Indian education happen at UNC?
           o Events, media/promotional materials.
           o Statewide bus tour for new faculty members to give them cultural background of the state.
           o October 26th Native American foods event
           o November is Native American Awareness Month
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      In Southern Cultures Journal (winter 2008 issue, see attached) there is an article by Rayna Green called
       ―Mother Corn and the Dixie Pig‖ – call to action on the cultural tourism front. Mother Corn and the
       Dixie Pig: Native Food in the Native South Southern Cultures - Volume 14, Number 4, Winter 2008, pp.
       114-126
      What's first in organizing a group around cultural tourism?
           o Identifying people and culture, publicizing and money. Biggest challenges facing groups is a lack
               of resources (know-how and funds.)
      How can they incorporate universities/students?
        Examples of ways student can assist
        APPLES involvement – students can help with alternative breaks.
        Coordinated effort for: staffing events; finding contacts in the community; public health projects;
           promoting/soliciting feedback; building homes, etc. to better communities.
        Education: Move toward more long term engagement of students. Cultural identity is a pathway to
           inter-cultural understanding. Wants to see institutions moving beyond alternative breaks and towards
           in-semester work as part of class requirements. Cultural heritage/tourism as place-based education.
           For example, the Alaska Native Knowledge Network that was organized for K-12 schools statewide.
        Collaboration/shared resources are important. Interested professors could solicit independent study
           opportunities to students who would in turn work in the community. Professors identify the projects
           and offer them to interested students. A start might be to locate professors who would be interested
           in community projects so they can be advisors for independent study projects or identify students
           who would be good candidates. Difficult for organizations to find supporters who are in academic
           world. Sense of process is needed by the community groups so they can know what's expected of
           them (resources, time). An inventory of resources, people and projects is needed, including cultural
           resources that might need attention which could be candidates for future initiatives.
        Envisions working with students on videos and podcasts for the Web. Are there other ways to engage
           students? Problem is the lack of time that paid staff has to dedicate to projects/training.

Comments from the Breakout Sessions:
Group 1: Front l (Sarah Drewett and Alice Brooke Wilson helped to facilitate)
Group 2: Back Right (Carolyn Byrne helped to facilitate)
Group 3: Back Left (Leslie Parkins and Bill Westermeyer helped to facilitate)
   IV.    How can Cultural Tourism support community‘s cultural heritage?
          a. Group 1:
                  i. PRIDE in heritage/community
                 ii. Encourage Cultural Inventory process
                iii. Provide jobs
                iv. Technology podcasts, videos – PEOPLE TELL THEIR STORIES in their own words
                     (e.g. NC Arts Council website, note the section on Happy Valley)
                 v. CONTROL over images, stories by community
                vi. Concern: What do you do when cultural heritage does not represent communities‘ own
                     self-image? (e.g. Maya)
               vii. Define ―cultural heritage‖ (reference Alaskan example)
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                         1. Learning ―Through Culture‖ NOT ―About Culture‖ (the cultures are still alive)
              viii. Education – internal and external (for locals and tourists)
                ix. Collaboration – African American, White Ethnic, Latino/a, American Indian – histories
                     are intertwined across N.C.
                 x. Identity Problems
                xi. Keep in mind ways to separate Fact from Fiction
               xii. Define Tourist – internal vs. external
          b. Group 2:
                  i. Be sure communities aren‘t exploited – reference the American Indian Center‘s Cultural
                     Tourism Handbook
                 ii. Needs to be a community process
                         1. Two-way street
                         2. How to bring resources in a non-threatening way – i.e. without ―non-community‖
                             member taking over
                         3. Communities become conscious of cultural resources
                         4. Context and sensitivity
                         5. Interviewing and recording/capture information
               iii. Create an infrastructure
          c. Group 3:
                  i. Awareness of own culture
                 ii. Identify story/stories of the communities
               iii. Draw attention to less advantaged communities
                iv. Bring out different facets, controversies
                 v. Preserve threatened cultural resources
                vi. Preserve small enterprises, stories, communities
               vii. Consolidation of resources in one place
              viii. Provide facilities, occasions, audiences for enactment of cultural activities/traditions
Question 2: How can cultural tourism support job community development?
          k. Group 1:
                  i. Different types of jobs (tour buses, guides)
                 ii. Create locally owned/operated sustainable businesses and job opportunities
               iii. Fostering respect for local community (example of second-home owners in Watauga
                     County who lack respect for local community)
                iv. Chamber of Commerce/business can understand cultural tourism/heritage
                 v. ―traded sector‖- outside money coming in
                vi. Farm camp – appreciation
               vii. Local aspect/local business promotion
          l. Group 2:
                  i. Creating infrastructure for entrepreneurial projects
                 ii. Sustainable
               iii. Pride in community
                iv. Work closely with community businesses
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                  v. Ripple effect: pow-wow then pow-wow and museum brings about educational
                      opportunities and shows more of the community
                 vi. Grant funding to jumpstart projects
                         1. Local businesses are likely to support if revenues increase
                vii. Develop services that are sustainable
                         1. Population will return as more revenue opportunities
               viii. Reminder: This does not immediately generate jobs
                 ix. Must have community buy-in, likely will start with volunteers, delay in gratification
           m. Group 3:
                   i. Develop areas with sparse population and attractions encourage entrepreneurship and
                      challenges of smaller start-ups
                  ii. Provide jobs across the board

Question 3:
  IV.     What do we do next? What are people interested in?
          a. Group 1:
                  i. Circulating ideas and finding resources
                 ii. Student labor – how can community tap into the student/university resources
                iii. Inventory of needs and pathways to resources
                iv. Assets from Higher Education
                 v. Does University have a list of ―what works‖ - impossible for people outside the
                     university to understand the university
                vi. Relationship needs to be built between the state of North Carolina‘s cultural tourism
                     projects and university‘s covenant to help NC communities
               vii. Increase profile of American Indians on campus – continuity of engagement
              viii. Funding:
                         1. Collaborative funding opportunities
                         2. Some limits of grant-funded projects
                         3. Grant-Writers and professional schools help communities
                ix. Education within university
                         1. Promote more community projects within classroom
                         2. Curriculum based engagement
                         3. Connect full-circle education
                 x. Partnerships needed
                         1. Grant writer
                         2. Researcher
                         3. Technical Advisor
                         4. Planning-Marketing
                xi. Inclusion of Under-Representation
               xii. University Limitations:
                         1. Not a consulting firm
                         2. Ebb and flow of semester
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               3. Graduation
               4. Centers and Institutes transcend this, but are currently under budgetary attack
    xiii. More educational work on campus
               1. Promote ―consequential education‖
                        a. Positive consequences for a community increases learning
                        b. Engagement increases learning
b. Group 2:
        i. Interest in coordinating university (faculty/student) effort
               1. Adventurous Projects
       ii. Service-Learning
     iii. University‘s communication with other university
               1. Why is it difficult
               2. How can we work together
               3. Collaborating to share resources
      iv. Asset map at UNC needed – committee –
               1. post on website
       v. Engage Land preservation
               1. Reconnect cultural and environmental heritage
      vi. Post Grant opportunities on website
     vii. Being systematic about collection. Recording and disseminating information
    viii. Reaching out to communities
               1. New Deal Settlement
               2. CSA‘s
               3. Southern Oral History Program
      ix. Meet again
               1. Form subcommittees
               2. Sharpen focus
               3. Resources on campus
               4. Begin to process outreach to new communities
               5. Long term Goals-
                        a. Networking (Facilitation)
                        b. Coordinate Conversation
       x. UNC Special Collections Library (Wilson) has been chosen by State Library as
           digitization center for archives around the state – could coordination with community
           projects to preserve and host history documents, photos, etc.
c. Group 3:
        i. Build an attraction that is interactive and dynamic/changing ; collaborated with students,
           enthusiastic people
       ii. Identify the resources , leaders of the community and university
     iii. Strategy to acquire funding
      iv. Coordination of partnership


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                               1. Collaboration between state agencies, community and university/community
                                  experts
                               2. How to make university/community collaborations easier through web, university
                                  and other resources
Outcomes/Next Steps:
The four strongest outcomes we heard from the meeting were:
    continuation of this dialogue,
    reaching out to additional communities
    working on more community/university partnerships
    funding opportunities


Initial Ways to begin to address the next steps:
Continuation of this dialogue
           o Share Attendee List (and current list of interested parties) to be sent out on Monday, September
               7.
           o Cultural Tourism Listserv culturaltourism@listserv.unc.edu Developed to allow for continual
               conversations. Please email cira@unc.edu to be added to the list (if you have not received an
               email and are interested in doing just that).
           o Second meeting has been strongly encouraged – there are several options pending
                    This conversation needs to be continued
                    This meeting would cover the development of committees and funding options

Reaching out to additional communities, including but not limited to:
          o Farm Tours, Vineyards
          o Latino populations
          o Appalachian populations of North Carolina.
          o Arts Community
          o Additional universities and colleges

Working on more community/university partnerships
         o APPLES is a great way to work within the service learning aspect of the university
         o Online Resources CIRA has set up a section of their website to host cultural heritage/tourism
            resources:
                 http://cira.unc.edu/resources/cultural-heritage
                 http://cira.unc.edu/resources/alternative-economies-energy
         o University recommendation to review internal assets

Funding opportunities
         o Begin to establish ways in which partnerships can develop into larger funding opportunities
         o Share funding opportunities when found

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Attendees:
We had 32 individuals attend the meeting.

Thank you to Clara Sue Kidwell for presenting the cultural tourism handbook for the NC American Indian
communities.
Thank you to Alice Brooke Wilson, Bill Westermeyer, Sarah Drewett, Leslie Parkins and Carolyn Byrne,
APPLES for facilitating the break out groups.
Thank you to the participants both local and those that traveled into the meeting. We want to especially thank
those from outside of UNC Chapel Hill for making the trip to UNC‘s campus.

Thank you for your participation.




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Anthropology Department Colloquium Announcement:

                                 Department Colloquium:
                              An Introduction/Discussion of:

                    CIRA
    CENTER FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND
              ACTION @UNC-CH
The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is an
initiative bringing together university-based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing
research/action projects to advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North
Carolina and beyond.


                                           Monday, September 14, 2009
                                             Alumni Building 308
                                                    3:15 pm


 Come learn more about CIRA--a center located in the department--its activities and how
                               you can get involved!

                                                            Reception Follows

                 Any questions, please contact Alicia_Altmueller@unc.edu or 919-619-6056
                                                              Printed on CIRA Paper




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Student Meeting Agenda:

    ―Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between University and Community‖
                                   Student Leaders Meeting

                                            Student Union, Multi-Purpose Room
                                                Thursday, October 15, 2009
                                                          4-6pm

                                                         ***** AGENDA*****

    3:45pm-4:00pm Registration and informal networking
    4:00pm-4:15pm Welcome and Logistics (Purpose of the meeting), Dorothy Holland, Co-Director of
    CIRA and Lead Researcher
    4:15pm-4:30pm Introductions
    Each person will be given a piece of paper with three questions to answer.
     What is your name
     What is your major and/or department
     Experience, expertise and/ or interest in service learning
    4:30pm-5:00pm Walk, Talk and Write Round: Each participant will walk to the 6 different flip charts.
    Write your individual responses to the following six questions onto the flip charts. If your comment is
    already listed – put a ―sticky flag‖ next to the comment. Write up to three responses to each.
    What are the challenges of working as a student volunteer, intern and/or on a class project within
    community groups?
    What do community groups need to know about working with University students?
    What do faculty members need to provide to students to help them work within a community group?
    What could faculty and community groups do to make the experience for all involved better?
    What are some examples of successful volunteer experiences for you?
    What are ways to ensure that student projects can continue to strengthen a community after the student
    leaves?
    What is the most important factor that makes these experiences successful?
    5:00pm-5:10pm BREAK
    5:10pm-6:40pm Top 5 Round: We will break into 3 smaller groups. The smaller groups will come up
    with the Top 5 responses to two of the questions posted on the flip chart.
    5:40pm-6:00pm Summary and Wrap-up


    This meeting is co-sponsored by APPLES.


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Community Engagement and Student Service: Student Summary

Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between, University and Community

                                                                Student Meeting

Thursday, October 15, 2009 4pm-6pm at the Multi-purpose Room, Student Union at UNC- Chapel Hill

Meeting Description:
The ultimate goal is to bring together community leaders, students and faculty to learn about and improve upon
community and university experiences with student internships and class projects. As a student who has
involved in service learning and/or engaged scholarship, we looked toward your perspective as a major
contribution to this dialogue.

The meeting consisted of three sections: introductions; walk, talk and write and open discussion session. Six
questions were posed for the students to respond to and their responses were compiled to be part of the final
meeting.

Background Information on the Project:
The project will host four meetings: One meeting will bring together a group of students to discuss their own
goals and experiences in participating in community projects. A second meeting will consult with community
based organizations and non-profits about how student interns and volunteers can best serve communities and
learn from the experience. Another will bring together a group of faculty/staff to discuss their goals and
experiences with student participation in community projects. The fourth and final meeting will be a joint
meeting of the first three in order for faculty/staff and students to learn from and exchange ideas with
community leaders and vice versa.

The project is being undertaken by Dorothy Holland, in her role as a Co-Director of CIRA and recipient of a
teaching award and small grant from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. The Center for
Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at UNC - Chapel Hill is an initiative bringing together university-
based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action projects to
advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.

APPLES is co-sponsoring these meetings. APPLES is a student-led program that builds sustainable, service-
learning partnerships among students, faculty and communities. By engaging all partners in an enriched,
community-based curriculum, our experiential programs foster socially aware and civically involved students.

Question 1: What do community groups need to know about working with students?
                ix. Time Commitment
                 x. Transportation (to community sites) may be an issue
                xi. Students will want to add to the project not just take directions
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                 xii. We are not trying to do mission work and positive relationships are more important to
                      those involved. The community in not a ―cause‖
                xiii. We might think very differently to begin with but we want to transform and learn to come
                      together
                          1. We are stuck in our heads, but it is not too late

Question 2: What are ways to ensure that student projects can strengthen a community after the student leaves?
               iii. Gain energetic members in earlier years who will continue projects
                iv. Try to get lots of the campus involved
                 v. Provide the community with sustainable tools/resources
                vi. Have the community group establish the scope of the project
               vii. Begin the project with strong collaboration with the community and strengthen that
                     partnership throughout.
              viii. Start with an assets based approach and build on what the community already has

Question 3: What is the most important factor that makes these experiences successful?
                 v. Listening and being able to scrap your specific agenda in order to be present in the given
                     circumstances
                vi. Understanding where different groups are coming from and being willing to compromise
               vii. Enthusiasm and knowledge of a project‘s impact
              viii. Commitment to see projects through
                         1. Dialogue and communication among everyone involved
                ix. Suspending our disbelief, taking everything as it comes in the moment – not thinking too
                     much

Question 4: What could faculty and community groups do to make the experience for all involved better?
                  i.  Clear communication and expectations
                          1. Communicate clear expectations/goals clearly and realistically
                          2. Memo of Understanding
                 ii.  Be open to new plans and ideas
               iii. Raise awareness of project to rest of campus
                iv.   Funding Support
                 v.   Schedule instances of Play and Fun

Question 5: What are the challenges of working as a student volunteer, intern and/or on a class project within
community groups?
                  i.   Having People Take you seriously
                 ii.   Scarcity of time - Regular time commitment – balancing schoolwork and other
                       engagements
               iii. Many communities do not see the university as an open or welcoming community
                       therefore how do we enter and connect as an extension of this institution?
                iv.    Matching community groups expectations with students expectations and abilities
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                   v.       It is hard to honor their trust

Question 6: What are some examples of successful volunteer experiences for you?
              i.  Being given a doable, short-term project that I can manage and complete
             ii. Short-term – 1 day event - offers immediate results, chance for student to get involved at any
                  level interested – perhaps continues relationship…
           iii. Building new relationships
                      1. Being welcomed and embraced on a turf (space) that is not my own
                      2. Starting something completely new that makes a difference in the end
            iv.   Times that I am completely surprised and confounded (confused)
Attendees:
We had (7 students, 6 undergraduate and 1 graduate) individuals attend the meeting. Two known factors
impacted participation: mid terms and flu
Evaluation: 3 responses:

Evaluation Question 1: Do you feel the faculty/staff perspective on student service was expressed in this
meeting?
    Very much so
    Yes
    Yes, as a new student organization project the ideas of our group were explored and with much input
      from others.
Evaluation Question 2: What suggestions for improvement would you have for this meeting?
    Maybe provide a more thorough explanation of CIRA at the beginning
    More knowledge about the meeting to encourage more participation
    More advertising around campus to increase enrollment
Evaluation Question 3: Is there anything else you would like to share about community engagement and
student services?
    This seminar was very helpful in learning about community engagement
    I was encouraged to hear from others more experienced than I. The various community service
      opportunities talked about were encouraging.
    Most of my peers want to get involved in service but have trouble finding opportunities. Increased
      awareness about projects would be good and lots of projects with flexible time commitments.
Evaluation Question 4: Additional Comments
    Thank you

Conclusion:
The work completed in this meeting will be part of the efforts that will be presented on November 4. Thank
you for your participation




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Faculty/Staff Invitation
October 13, 2009

Dear Faculty/Staff Member,

I am writing about a project I hope you will consider joining. The ultimate goal is to bring together community
leaders and faculty to learn about and improve upon community and university experiences with student
internships and class projects. As a faculty member who has involved students in service learning and engaged
scholarship, we hope you will contribute your perspective.

The project will host four meetings: One meeting will consult with community based organizations and non-
profits about how student interns and volunteer assistants can best serve communities and learn from the
experience. A second will bring together a group of faculty to discuss their goals and experiences with student
participation in community projects. A third will bring together a group of students to discuss their own goals
and experiences in participating in community projects. The fourth and final meeting will be a joint meeting of
the first three in order for faculty and students to learn from and exchange ideas with community leaders and
vice versa.

The community/university dialogue is designed to support the goals of engaged scholarship and CIRA, the
Center for Integrating Research and Action, an initiative at UNC that I co-direct. CIRA is dedicated to bringing
together university-based researchers and community-based leaders to collaborate on research/action projects to
advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina. Assistance
from students can be very valuable for community organizations and extremely beneficial for student learning.
This project to foster an exchange of perspectives is funded by a small grant I will receive this fall as a part of a
Chapman fellowship from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. As a co-sponsor,
APPLES suggested you that you might be interested in participating in this project.

We have set the dates for these meetings.
Faculty Meeting: October 19 Time: 10-12 noon
Community-University Meeting: November 4 10-12 noon

We look forward to hearing from you. Please tell us your availability for these dates by September 1, 2009. If
you have any questions or ideas, please not hesitate to contact Dottie Holland (dholland@unc.edu) or call Dottie
or Alicia at 919-619-6056.

Best wishes,

Dorothy Holland
Cary Boshamer Professor of Anthropology

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Community Engagement and Student Service: Faculty/Staff Agenda
    ―Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between University and Community‖
                                   Faculty and Staff Meeting

                                                           Hyde Hall
                                                     Monday, October 19, 2009
                                                          10am-noon

                                                         ***** AGENDA*****

    9:45am-10:00am Registration and informal networking
    10:00am-10:15am Welcome and Logistics (Purpose of the meeting), Dorothy Holland, Co-Director of
    CIRA and Lead Researcher
    10:15am-10:30am Introductions
    10:30am-11:00am Walk, Talk and Write Round: Each participant will walk to the 6 different flip charts.
    Write your individual responses to the following six questions onto the flip charts. If your comment is
    already listed – put a ―sticky flag‖ next to the comment. Write up to three responses to each.
    What do community groups need to know about working with the university?
    What are ways to ensure that student projects can strengthen a community after the student
    leaves?
    What are some examples of successful student projects you facilitated?
    What could faculty and community groups do to make the experience for all involved better? What
    is the most important factor that makes these experiences successful?
    What are the challenges of working with student volunteers, interns and/or on a class project
    within community groups?
    What do faculty members need to provide to students to help them work within a community
    group?
    11:00am-11:10am BREAK
    11:10am-11:40am Top 5 Round: We will break into 3 smaller groups. The smaller groups will come up
    with the Top 5 responses to two of the questions posted on the flip chart.
    11:40am- Noon Summary and Wrap-up


    This meeting is co-sponsored by APPLES.




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Faculty/Staff Summary

                                                            Faculty/Staff Meeting

Monday, October 19, 2009 10am-12pm at the University Room, Hyde Hall

Meeting Description:

The ultimate goal is to bring together community leaders, students and faculty to learn about and improve upon
community and university experiences with student internships and class projects. As a faculty/staff that has
been involved in service learning and/or engaged scholarship, we looked toward your perspective as a major
contribution to this dialogue.

The meeting consisted of four sections: introductions; walk, talk and write; priority setting and open discussion
session. Six questions were posed for the community leaders to respond to and their responses were compiled to
be part of the final meeting.


Background Information on the Project:

The project will host four meetings: One meeting will bring together a group of students to discuss their own
goals and experiences in participating in community projects. A second meeting will consult with community
based organizations and non-profits about how student interns and volunteers can best serve communities and
learn from the experience. Another will bring together a group of faculty/staff to discuss their goals and
experiences with student participation in community projects. The fourth and final meeting will be a joint
meeting of the first three in order for faculty/staff and students to learn from and exchange ideas with
community leaders and vice versa.

The project is being undertaken by Dorothy Holland, in her role as a Co-Director of CIRA and recipient of a
teaching award and small grant from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. The Center for
Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at UNC - Chapel Hill is an initiative bringing together university-
based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action projects to
advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.

APPLES is co-sponsoring these meetings. APPLES is a student-led program that builds sustainable, service-
learning partnerships among students, faculty and communities.. By engaging all partners in an enriched,
community-based curriculum, our experiential programs foster socially aware and civically involved students.

Question 1: What do community groups need to know about working with the university?
              xiv. Long Time frames [are necessary]esp. applying for funding support
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                 xv. Some academics do not see/understand the application of their work in the community-
                     the pursuit of new knowledge is enough
                xvi. Reminders that primary mission is student learning- to support that learning and not treat
                     them as just volunteers - for service learning course, the activities to some extent need to
                     align with some of the educational course objectives (faculty should share syllabus with
                     the community)
               xvii. Many faculty, staff and students don‘t know much about the community, its history and
                     strengths as well as its challenges
              xviii. Very different culture (community vs. university) strengths in both approaches
                xix. Community groups need to know the partnership will be mutually beneficial not just
                     meeting the respective needs of the faculty and students
                 xx. Time commitments, make sure to communicate about the boundaries of the project
                xxi. Resources
               xxii. The limits of what we can do – time frame, resources, expectations for research and other
                     duties that restrict our time working with community partners
              xxiii. Challenges faculty/university face in terms of engaged scholarship
               xxiv. Structure for project, problems and reporting
                xxv. Expectations
               xxvi. Faculty sharing syllabus (course goals)
              xxvii. Community awareness of time/resource commitment
             xxviii. Clear boundaries for the projects – exit strategy and graduate student engagement

Question 2: What are ways to ensure that student projects can strengthen a community after the student
leaves?
                ix. Create a base with community organization so future projects/students can participate
                    with same organization
                 x. Ensure community buy-in
                xi. Engage the students in identifying next steps and creating a ―portfolio‖ of the project.
                    The portfolio would include history and vision statement
               xii. Build in mechanisms for long-term, multiphase projects that new students can join
              xiii. Make part of the project some kind of concrete deliverable that the group can continue to
                    use/build on after that individual student leaves. i.e. Duke model where there is
                    institutional relationship continuation despite student turnover
               xiv. Assuring a dissemination plan of any outcomes is implemented
                xv. Build on student projects for continued engagement within community
               xvi. Think about the capacity of the community to continue project/implement intervention
                    before starting project
              xvii. Use digital media to highlight and feature key works
             xviii. Institutional Perspective—get acknowledgement from the university
               xix. Creating community partnership between community/faculty and staff
                xx. University support
                        1. Acknowledge work
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                         2. Engaged scholarship
                         3. Professional schools have a bit more structure for above while arts and science
                             still harder
                         4. Good scholarship/data on engagement supports work (Community based
                             research)
                         5. Guidelines for tenure- valid research
Question 3: What are some examples of successful student projects you facilitated?
                  x. Wilmington Housing Authority – UNCW Community Campus
                         1. Permanent ―campus‖ based at Hillcrest Public Housing site offers 20+ scholarly
                             engagement opportunities
                 xi. Middle School Curriculum linking archaeology and preservation to statewide education
                     standards and local history
                xii. Pre-service teachers as AVID tutors and as leader of an environmental training project in
                     Durham Middle Schools (Later replicated in Orange County Schools)
               xiii. Data collection for Guilford County Healthy Carolinians Community Health Assessment
                     of people in high poverty areas.
               xiv. Public Service Announcements based on student gathered data that play on student TV
                     with student health counseling and wellness
                xv. Interactive Theatre Carolina (ensemble based model)
               xvi. How do we define successful? – Student and community learning
              xvii. Created 6 neighborhood development (nhd) plans driven by community members for nhd
                     revitalization – given to local policy makers
             xviii. Service learning vs. volunteer
               xix. Preplanning
                xx. Task – Scholarly outcome
               xxi. Community buy-in partnership from start
              xxii. Identify and understand need 1st
             xxiii. Evaluation from the start
              xxiv. Good plan with flexibility
               xxv. Grassroots organizing
              xxvi. Cultural diversity – can also mean (need for learning) institutional culture (e.g., IRB
                     training
             xxvii. Financial conversation – huge issue – (i.e. understanding the 48% overhead required by
                     the university)
            xxviii. Clear agreement on tasks – training of all
              xxix. Meet all needs - Memos of Understanding
               xxx. Sometimes it is ok to opt out so each can find the best fit v. trying to force the fit

Question 4: What could faculty and community groups do to make the experience for all involved better?
What is the most important factor that makes these experiences successful?
                vi.  Be clear on expectations of faculty, students, community groups and make sure they
                     match
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                 vii.      Flexibility of students and willingness to help within the activities identified as
                           important by community
                viii.      Faculty/staff provide orientation and training on being a partner with community,
                           thinking through issues of power and privilege, appreciate community assets not just
                           problems
                  ix.      Develop new advisory boards that reflect community/researcher interests (project
                           specifics)
                   x.      Commitment to common, identified goals (mutually beneficial)
                  xi.      Community groups can help teach students/faculty/staff about their history context of
                           project and community strengths
                 xii.      Deepen relationships between community and students through peer-reach projects
                           (community/student team endeavors)
                xiii.      On-going conversation
                xiv.       Memos of understanding, orientation
                 xv.       Talk candidly and listen carefully, then reflect and check for understanding
                xvi.       Collaborate closely during planning phases as well as execution phases so that both
                           groups have their needs met mutually
                xvii.      Be clear on what student and community are gaining.
               xviii.      Find a small pot of funds for food, transportation, honorariums so that people feel
                           appreciated.


Question 5: What are the challenges of working with student volunteers, interns and/or on a class project
within community groups?
                vi.   Limited time –fit into a semester
               vii.   Transportation of students to community sites
              viii. Navigating timetables (semester based vs. year long)
                ix. Ebb and flow of student time/energy within a semester
                 x. Matching up community need and student goals
                xi. Clarifying legal issues - malpractice, liability of university should student be injured,
                      etc.
               xii. Variable student volunteer preparation and motivation
              xiii. Variable community capacity to host
               xiv. Transportation, parking travel
                xv. Matching up learning goals with community partner goals so that both groups get what
                      they need
               xvi. Proper training
              xvii. Students often lack experience in working within communities but don‘t get the
                      orientation/guidance to be a learner/partner
             xviii. Dealing with unexpected changes, unpredictable nature of working with community
                      partners and changes in project
               xix. Being flexible
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Question 6: What do faculty members need to provide to students to help them work within a community
group?
             v. Recognition that there are multiple types of knowledge – academic (knowledge) is not the
                only type
            vi. Background of information and preparation to serve; a clear explanation of the relation of
                their work to the course objectives
           vii. Training in shills to make the interaction successful, cultural sensitivity training if necessary,
                explicit teachings about expectations/collaboration skills
          viii. The community groups perspective (community should provide rather than faculty) on
                expectations, goals, limitations and responsibility of project. Also students should not
                promise too much. Be clear on what can be accomplished.
            ix. Help students think through the power and privileges they bring to community work – how to
                be students of the community and share power
             x. Help students think through what it means to partner with communities
            xi. Orientation and expectations, just in time training, activities and risks. Time to establish
                relationship with community partners
           xii. Cultural competency
                    1. Race, gender
                    2. Socio-history perspective
          xiii. Clear understanding of needs/goals of community organization
          xiv. Data Collection
                    1. Faculty Involvement (CIRA – potential for CIRA serving as connector among
                        groups/researchers/faculty – conducting outreach and forums
                    2. Good Model would be 287G local immigration policy work – Hannah


Summary:
In summary, there were several themes that continued to surface in each faculty group and report backs from
the groups.

Main points:
    Need for intensive communication between faculty and org before semester/project begins
    Need for continuity across semesters for the benefit of the organization
    Need for structure; reporting in a way that makes the data collected useful for future research. Right now
      the project ends, student submits evaluation or project based on the work and that‘s the end – no one
      sees it. [Maybe students could be required to submit something to APPLES.]
    An index of on-going research by topic and faculty member or forums on topics to help like-minded
      parties connect (faculty-faculty; faculty-org; faculty-student). This would foster collaboration and
      decrease overlap of research/projects. CIRA or another group as clearinghouse for this information or
      funding for faculty to coordinate forums/research groups. Problem with and need for continuity across

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       semesters (orgs and faculty spending time on training/logistics at the beginning of every semester that
       could be dedicated to projects)
      Need for student training and clear understanding (by student and faculty) of organizational goals and
       expectations and project boundaries (time and scope)
      A common theme was the need for faculty awareness of the organization‘s goals, programs and
       limitations. Organizations don‘t have time to hold the hands of students – it is not helpful to
       organizations to have student volunteers unless they are low-maintenance and self-motivated. It is also
       important that students are aware of the culture of an organization or of those served by the organization
       to avoid harm. Increased communication and understanding between the faculty member and the
       organization would make service-learning more beneficial for all parties. This communication would
       filter down to the students, helping students to choose opportunities to which they are best-suited and
       helping faculty guide students to appropriate opportunities.
      Need for active engagement by all three parties and authentic interest among students in creating the
       structure and goals of the project with respect to project boundaries (established by the faculty and the
       organization)
      There needs to be a way for students who work for the same project/org to communicate and provide
       feedback about the experience across semesters in a ―safe‖ and anonymous way.
      How do we make service-learning more compelling to undergrads? How can faculty members engage
       students in a more meaningful way? The experience to be authentically meaningful and valuable for the
       org and the student, aside from just the grade.
      Challenges of working with graduate students - often a strange dynamic is created when they work for
       orgs/communities. The students and their advisors sometimes provide resources that the community/org
       doesn‘t usually have access to, so they have a tendency to ask for advice or resources after the close of a
       project. Need a way to break from groups after the project is over without compromising the relationship
       formed between the group and the university.
      Several members of my group said that in their experience smaller units were more effective in
       connecting researchers to resources (funds). Possible task for Center for Public Service.
      Trainings from the university: understand IRB process – there is a community training program on their
       Web site. Grant-writing seminars and understanding of process/structure by those who sanction the
       work.


The work completed in this meeting will be part of the efforts that will be presented on November 4.

Attendees:
We had 17 individuals attend the meeting.


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Evaluation: 5 responses:

Evaluation Question 1: Do you feel the faculty/staff perspective on student service was expressed in this
meeting?
    Yes, very well
    Yes
    yes

Evaluation Question 2: What suggestions for improvement would you have for this meeting?
    None except lunch
    More time

      I thought it was a very well-organized meeting, perhaps 15 more minutes open-discussion topics

Evaluation Question 3: Is there anything else you would like to share about community engagement and
student services?

Evaluation Question 4: Additional Comments
    This was a very supportive-well run event
    Great workshop
    Some other good topics to consider: how can we promote action-oriented research and research
      dissemination on campus? We discussed service-learning but what about research by students in a
      community service setting? How can we take all the great research already happening on campus and
      help make it publicly relevant? How can we promote that agenda campus-wide?
    Thanks so much! Great session. Thanks especially for being good stewards of the resource of time.



Thank you for your participation.




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Community Invitation
Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialog Between, University and Community

                     Co-Sponsored Meeting of the Center for Integrating Action and Research

                                                               http://cira.unc.edu/

                                                                           and

                                                APPLES http://www.unc.edu/apples/



I am writing about a project I hope you will consider joining. The ultimate goal is to bring together community
leaders, students and faculty to learn about and improve upon community and university experiences with
student internships and class projects. As a community leader who has been involved with students through
service learning, volunteers and/or class projects, we hope you will contribute your perspective.

The project will host four meetings: One meeting will bring together a group of students to discuss their own
goals and experiences in participating in community projects. A second meeting will consult with community
based organizations and non-profits about how student interns and volunteers can best serve communities and
learn from the experience. Another will bring together a group of faculty to discuss their goals and experiences
with student participation in community projects. The fourth and final meeting will be a joint meeting of the
first three in order for faculty and students to learn from and exchange ideas with community leaders and vice
versa.


We are requesting your participation in two meetings:

Community Based Meeting: October 21 Time: 9:45am-noon

Community-University Meeting: November 4 Time: 9:45am-noon

Both meetings will be in the Carrboro Century Center.

Refreshments will be served at both meetings.

Background Information on the Project:

The project is being undertaken by Dorothy Holland, in her role as a Co-Director of CIRA and recipient of a
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teaching award and small grant from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. The Center for
Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at UNC - Chapel Hill is an initiative bringing together university-
based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action projects to
advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina.

APPLES is co-sponsoring these meetings. APPLES is a student-led program that builds sustainable, service-
learning partnerships among students, faculty and communities in North Carolina and beyond. By engaging all
partners in an enriched, community-based curriculum, our experiential programs foster socially aware and
civically involved students.


Stipend Opportunity:

Through this award and the co-sponsorship of APPLES, we are able to give a small stipend to a very limited
amount of community leaders. If you would like a stipend please respond as soon as possible. We are going to
give them on a first come, first serve basis. In addition, if you are traveling from greater than 1.5 hours away,
please tell us and we may be able to offer a travel stipend.

We look forward to hearing from you. Please tell us your availability for these dates by September 16, 2009. If
you have any questions or ideas, please not hesitate to contact Dottie Holland (dholland@unc.edu), Alicia
Altmueller (cira@unc.edu) or call Dottie or Alicia at 919-619-6056.


Best wishes,

Dorothy Holland

Cary Boshamer Professor of Anthropology




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Community Agenda

    ―Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between University and Community‖
                                     Community Meeting

                                                   Century Center, Carrboro
                                                  Wednesday, October 21, 2009
                                                         10am-noon

                                                         ***** AGENDA*****

    9:45am-10:00am Registration and informal networking
    10:00am-10:15am Welcome and Logistics (Purpose of the meeting), Dorothy Holland, Co-Director of
    CIRA and Project Leader
    10:15am-10:30am Introductions
    Each person will be given a piece of paper with three questions to answer.
     What is your name
     What organization are you representing
     Experience, expertise and/ or interest in working with university students
    10:30am-11:00am Walk, Talk and Write Round: Each participant will walk to the 6 different flip charts.
    Write your individual responses to the following six questions onto the flip charts. If your comment is
    already listed – put a ―sticky flag‖ next to the comment. Write up to three responses to each.
    What are the challenges of working with student volunteer, intern and/or on a class project within your
    group?
    What do university members (students, faculty and staff) need to know about working within your group?
    What do faculty members need to provide to students to help them work within a community group?
    What could faculty and community groups do to make the experience for all involved better?
    What are some examples of successful student projects you facilitated?
    What are ways to ensure that student projects can continue to help a community after the student leaves?
    What is the most important factor that makes these experiences successful?
    11:00am-11:10am BREAK
    11:10am-11:40am Top 5 Round: We will break into 3 smaller groups. The smaller groups will come up
    with the Top 5 responses to two of the questions posted on the flip chart.
    11:40am- Noon Summary and Wrap-up


    This meeting is co-sponsored by APPLES.




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Community Summary

Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between, University and Community

                                                             Community Meeting

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 10am-12pm at the Carrboro Century Center, Carrboro

Meeting Description:

The ultimate goal is to bring together community leaders, students and faculty to learn about and improve upon
community and university experiences with student internships and class projects. As a community leader who
has been involved in service learning and/or engaged scholarship, we looked toward your perspective as a major
contribution to this dialogue.

The meeting consisted of four sections: introductions; walk, talk and write, priority setting and open discussion
session. Six questions were poised for the community leaders to respond to and their responses were compiled
to be part of the final meeting.


Background Information on the Project:

The project will host four meetings: One meeting will bring together a group of students to discuss their own
goals and experiences in participating in community projects. A second meeting will consult with community
based organizations and non-profits about how student interns and volunteers can best serve communities and
learn from the experience. Another will bring together a group of faculty/staff to discuss their goals and
experiences with student participation in community projects. The fourth and final meeting will be a joint
meeting of the first three in order for faculty/staff and students to learn from and exchange ideas with
community leaders and vice versa.

The project is being undertaken by Dorothy Holland, in her role as a Co-Director of CIRA and recipient of a
teaching award and small grant from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. The Center for
Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at UNC - Chapel Hill is an initiative bringing together university-
based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action projects to
advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.

APPLES is co-sponsoring these meetings. APPLES is a student-led program that builds sustainable, service-
learning partnerships among students, faculty and communities. By engaging all partners in an enriched,
community-based curriculum, our experiential programs foster socially aware and civically involved students.


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Question 1: What do university members (students/faculty/staff) need to know about working with your
group?
               xxix. Understanding the culture, tradition and ways of other communities so students can blend
                       their knowledge without feelings being misconstrued so a potential pre-visit from
                       someone who has been there (some faculty have gone directly through undergraduate,
                       grad school and into teaching without going out into the world)
                xxx. The groups we work with have few obvious resources, so flexibility is critical around
                       time, transportation, etc. Volunteers must understand these challenges – dealing with
                       these issues – is the process. This is the work not just an impediment to the work. It is
                       about relationships.
               xxxi. Willingness to try new set-ups, situations… to share/teach and learn new things related to
                       community service
              xxxii. They need to be able to see value in the ideas of folks without lots of formal education
             xxxiii. That commitment to working with kids (or people in general) is key. They need to have
                       had some experience working with kids, preferably in an educational environment. They
                       need stamina and energy
              xxxiv. We have a lot going on other than working with students; (the) students need to be truly
                       interested and energetic to be a contribution. Longer time commitments are more useful
               xxxv. Obstacles: Local politics, time, money restrictions – Investment is (what) community
                       members make in students
              xxxvi. There are many facets to the wrap around process and many places to fit in
             xxxvii. We have a small staff so can use students in a variety of ways. But we have no office so
                       that presents challenges
            xxxviii. Helpful (for students) to learn and understand the individuals our agency supports and
                       advocates for – become familiar with the ―DD‖ community
              xxxix. We are volunteering our time to their students because we are committed to community
                       and education – its not that we are getting ―free labor‖ – it is an unexpected bonus if we
                       do
                   xl. Whatever program is being designed, faculty should always think about any possible
                       consequence when working with less privileged individuals (stigma, stereotyping and
                       psychological harm)
                  xli. We need a real relationship built on mutual understanding and common vision
                 xlii. Length of commitment – students help with networking, grants – this takes a year – at
                       least a year.
                xliii. We‘re not like an ATM machine where students put in their hours and get a check on
                       service learning.

Question 2: What are ways to ensure that student projects can strengthen a community after the student
leaves?
              xxi. Overall plan
             xxii. Student to student connection


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               xxiii. Establish projects that students can make meaningful contributions to but that can evolve
                      and develop after student leaves
               xxiv. This is a serious challenge. Students schedules are temporary and they have multiple
                      obligations
                xxv. Continuing to engage after they graduate- maybe paid positions
               xxvi. By developing an understanding about the future impact their projects will have in the
                      community. This will hopefully keep them engaged
              xxvii. Students can assist with infrastructure support (e.g. developing handbook) that transcend
                      their time with the organization
                           1. Video documentation – end product with video (to orient students who come
                              next) – needs continuity - sustainability
             xxviii. Contributing to existing work of the organization – long-term volunteerism
               xxix. Continue to build capacity by engaging the larger community as volunteers
                xxx. After a project is started would be great if the next semester‘s students could continue
                      and pick up where prior students finished
               xxxi. Students from clubs are likely to stay involved longer than students from courses
              xxxii. Transportation
             xxxiii. Knowledge transfer strategies—the university should put resources into supporting these
              xxxiv. It‘s best to have students who are either sophomores or juniors; the first year students are
                      having so many adjustments to make and the seniors are looking to the start of another
                      life
Question 3: What are some examples of successful student projects you facilitated? What is the most
important factor in their success?
               xxxi. College Planning Guide for people with physical challenges – worked because it was a
                      discreet project with clear goals.
              xxxii. Success factors
                           1. Life Experience before the involvement which shapes students maturity,
                              openness, flexibility, adaptability and entrepreneurial mindsets
             xxxiii. Parallel energy between student interest and our needs
              xxxiv. Student learning/embracing some of the life experience for the community served
               xxxv. Maymester classes, independent studies performances that focus on under-represented
                      group and issues – all successful a lot of motivation came from the visibility of the end
                      result
              xxxvi. Assisting SYFA‘s conference, working with orchard project with Hope Garden
             xxxvii. Student Mentoring Youth – Garden finding student‘s strength and letting them go –
                      checking in to see if needs are met
            xxxviii. Student Mentoring-Community Advocacy successful projects are those that bring a sense
                      of accomplishment and personal gratification for students and those that they work with
              xxxix. Students work as a teaching associates with after-school program
                  xl. Operation Front-Line- involvement met student requirement was the incentives
                 xli. Developing first stage of project that is built though our group and future students
                xlii. Community Project- has in place
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                         1. Job Description/Project Goals
                         2. Introduction to project and community
                                a. Project: A day in the life to provide vignettes (video or other form) of the
                                     nonprofit – so clearer understanding
                         3. Include Students in staff meetings
                         4. Orientation tour
                         5. Clear expectations
                         6. Professors need to do legwork
                         7. Real view Vs Idealistic View
              xliii. Student
                         1. Meets some requirement
                         2. Motivation/Personal interest
                         3. Have to have a good work ethic
              xliv. Understanding from University of culture, community and institution
                         1. History
                         2. Respect
                         3. Train Faculty
Question 4: What could faculty and community groups do to make the experience for all involved better?
               xix.    Communication and Expectation
                           a. Provide more information about community partner and expectations at
                              beginning of the interaction
                           b. Clear opportunities for contributing to organizations existing work. Regular
                              check ins and feedback on progress
                           c. Listen, respect and ―understand‖ strengths and community roles
                           d. Strong communication-measured goals
                           e. To make sure programs are developed in collaboration with the community as
                              opposed to imposing programs (or that projects come from the community
                              itself)
                xx.    Learn about the nonprofit/community
                           a. Learn the mission of the nonprofit
                           b. Tour nonprofit first
                           c. In depth dialogue, communication and relationship building to develop common
                              ground
                           d. Visit nonprofit and build relationship before asking nonprofit to volunteer time
                              training students
               xxi. Community group go to meetings held by university
              xxii. Community groups could invite faculty to visit programs to gain realistic idea of
                       organizations‘ work
             xxiii. Students
                           a. Asking students to identify what they can do/create projects with
                              faculty/community groups


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                                  b. Allowing students to communicate about roles/organizations/responsibilities to
                                     help them choose a good fit
                                  c. Student training students


Question 5: What are the challenges of working with student volunteers, interns and/or on a class project within
community groups?
                 xx. Student follow-through because they have so many commitments
                xxi. Commitment, scheduling and transportation
                           a. Being in remote rural area it isn‘t as attractive as being in a neighborhood. So
                               emphasizing to students the importance of sharing their fortunate education
               xxii. Bringing them up to speed to get to the point where they can creatively contribute
              xxiii. Scheduling meeting times that work for both. Transportation.
               xxiv. Student accountability responsibility and follow through
                xxv. Finding ways for students to truly be a contribution and not extra work/distraction
               xxvi. Short time commitments truly limit ability to be a contribution
              xxvii. To be effective we need students to commit for at least a semester
             xxviii. We have no office so students need to be able to work on their own- also not every
                       volunteer can handle working with children who may die young
               xxix. Setting clear expectations for students and forming a project that is both challenging
                       and rewarding for student
                xxx. Hearing what has been done and what is being done before advancing solutions/ideas
               xxxi. Time constraint- learning curve of students when students become familiar with agency
                       not much more time left in semester
              xxxii. To ensure students perceive their work as a collaboration to improve people‘s lives as
                       opposed to providing charity. It is about empowering the community
             xxxiii. Have time constraints that the community groups have to work within

Question 6: What do faculty members need to provide to students to help them work within a community
group?
           xv. Time and Support
          xvi. Clear expectations
         xvii. Existing relationship with community group prior to taking on a student
        xviii. Accountability to community group and opportunity for feedback on students performance
          xix. Structured communication between faculty and community group
           xx. Help contextualize nonprofit work and general economic analysis and de –romanticize
          xxi. Clear expectations, understanding of community partner – its needs and how it operates
         xxii. An overview of community culture and place specific traditions to help the students blend
        xxiii. The faculty need to go to the nonprofits and know their work
         xxiv. History of neighborhoods and community come with a ―Let me learn from your perspective‖
          xxv. Visit the agency – have faculty ―meet the staff‖


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         xxvi.    Orientation and training on organization, community and issues involved, i.e. community
                  econ. Development)
         xxvii. Give credit for service learning
        xxviii. Trust students to self-evaluate their experience (before and after project)
          xxix. Evaluate skill level – evaluation of skills fit before and after
           xxx. Long-term relationship with continuity
       Main Points
             Preparation – community group and faculty meet onsite and create structure/communication –
               what is possible
             Evaluation Process to ensure student and organization are well matched
             Creating ―bite-sized‖ projects that are possible within the time frame
             Some students have not had much experience interacting with different people of different races
               and classes and need anti-racism or other types of training

Summary:
In summary, there were several themes that continued to surface in each group and in the report backs of the
groups. Some highlights:
     Clear communications and implementation plan
          o Clear communication between faculty and organization including a mandatory on-site meeting
              before the project begins. Faculty should be made aware of any sensitivity issues and how these
              can affect student engagement and enrichment.
          o Time Commitments and understanding what is realistically possible within the time-frame;
              reasonable expectations by faculty for the student and the organization. At times there are
              problems with follow-through and longevity among student volunteers.
          o There should be a set procedure or standard process for all service-learning projects; a protocol
              that could provide a way to troubleshoot or address problems. Example of standards could
              include: Memo of Understanding that is signed by all parties at the beginning of the project.
          o Opportunities for meeting and sharing among university and community groups are important.

      Faculty roles:
          o Mediation – they should be fully aware of the organizations expectations and limitations so they
              can communicate them to students effectively. They should also be there to communicate the
              student‘s limitations and evaluate student choices/skill set to ensure good fit.
          o Aware of the time commitment required for orientation and training and ensure that students are
              also aware. It is not helpful if they have to spend too much time monitoring volunteers.
          o Desire for faculty engagement outside of service-learning projects, e.g., membership on boards,
              attending meetings, volunteering
      Student roles:

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           o Starting earlier in the semester. By the time students choose placement, fill out paperwork and
             schedule there is often only two months left for the volunteering. This means that orgs are
             spending time training for ~two months of commitment from the student.
           o Goals are the same for both students and organizations.
           o Independent studies were preferred to service-learning projects because students who chose
             independent studies were already interested in the organization‘s work, so the motivation was
             there.
           o Options for students: One tier is volunteer-only with a 30-hour commitment and the other is paid
             with a 60-hour commitment. I.e. She pairs up students from one group with students from the
             other, allowing low-tier students to see what the org has to offer and what it might be like if they
             were more engaged. She said this format has been successful in engaging new students at an
             appropriate (basic) level and ensuring that staff isn‘t spending too much time training/guiding
             volunteers. [This approach might lend itself to solving the communication-over-semesters
             problem.] ―bite-sized‖ tasks that are representative of the larger activities of the org have proven
             useful.

      Student Preparation
          o Greater understanding of what they can learn from participating in community efforts to address
               challenges they face
          o Better understanding of community assets
          o Increased awareness of systemic factors shaping problems affecting communities
          o Students (and perhaps some faculty) need a class showing the significance of non-profits and
               community organizing
      Call for continuity across semesters- Knowledge Transfer
          o Soliciting feedback from students and utilizing their creativity to orient next set of student. What
               do they think they could do for the organization? Students are motivated by a sense of
               accomplishment and contribution. Ask for their opinions.
          o Faculty asking students to evaluate or share their skills/skill-set to ensure appropriate placements
               that will benefit the organization. Faculty can ―de-romanticize‖ service work and arm students
               with an accurate view of what will be possible during project. This could reduce burn-out.
               Important to find the right fit (student org and faculty  org)
          o ―End goals‖ for the project/final product can be helpful, e.g., DVD documenting the project or a
               project summary of some sort. This could facilitate the knowledge-transfer across semesters.
          o Students could be required to come up with five ideas for future projects, students would be
               required in the following semester to meet with a student going into the same community

The work completed in this meeting will be part of the efforts that will be presented on November 4.
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Attendees:
We had 23 individuals attend the meeting. (4 were representing CIRA and APPLES during the meeting)

Evaluation: 17 responses: 17 community group representatives, and 1 also identified as a student with
experience as a student intern, service learning or class project with a community group and 1 also identified as
a university group

Evaluation Question 1: Do you feel the community perspective on student service was expressed in this
meeting?
    Yes – 14 said yes
    Absolutely
    Excellent voices from non-profits
    Well done with outreach to non-profits (NGOs)
    I was impressed with the width and variety of nonprofits represented today. I enjoyed hearing the brief
      introductions at the beginning.
    Community members had a lot to say
    It seemed like community engagement was limited to the APPLES program, Not much about
      Independent study
    I believe may experienced groups provided great information
    I felt heard –being able to brainstorm is helpful
    The various angles seemed to come together in needing focus and fit
Evaluation Question 2: What suggestions for improvement would you have for this meeting?
    More action items? Activation – suggestions of specific ways it would change
    None, if any involving more community representatives
    Time allowed increased to discuss the questions presented
    I liked how this came together but as always look for more time so can‘t wait for November 4.
    More time for networking
    Good set-up
    Any chance that a few students who have been involved with community organizing could attend a
      meeting? Might be helpful to hear that perspective in such a setting.
    Provide ideas about what faculty and students have said to be able to work from more specific
      experiences
    Long enough, time was used in a very good way
    Keep the time frame
    More time, add an hour
    Great format in the two-hour window
    Longer! Would be better.
    Well done
    Less time for answering the questions on the easels and more time for groups to discuss answers and
      common themes
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Evaluation Question 3: Is there anything else you would like to share about community engagement and
student services?
    Nice overlap in 3 group discussions
    I really hope something really does change from these meetings
    More later
    Nothing that has not been shared. This exchange is a very good thing that I hope you will continue.
    Please bring to faculty and university the idea of commitment from their side – a time requirement to
      add continuity
    Recommendations that were provided today could be put into a ―package‖ form and directed to UNC
      professors that they can use as a support for their next class
    Longer than 30 hour commitments are more useful
    Our group is very happy with our students, we owe many of our victories to them
    More informal university community involvement
    I think the conversation really needs to be between the faculty/university, students and the nonprofit
      community. Hopefully, this will happen on November 4.
    The same 3 or 4 themes came up in each group so there is great potential for making fundamental
      progress.
    A lot of ground was covered today
Evaluation Question 4: Additional Comments
    Thanks
    Thank you
    Please add something savory to snack table
    Looking forward to the notes.
    Thank you for working on unifying this complicated process
    Provide the contact email for agencies represented so that we can exchange information and provide
      support to each other if appropriate
    Thank you! Great experience, happy to be of service
    Overall good
Thank you for your participation.




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Comment Summary

    Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between, University and Community
                                 Comment Summary Sheet
                                 All Stakeholders Meeting
                Wednesday, November 4, 2009 10am-12pm at the Century Center

COLLABORATION/COMMUNICATION
Planning/Structure/Flexibility:
    Managing change, unpredictable nature of work with community partners;
    Community-Based Organizations (CBOs) could plan some activities that fit short time lines for students
      who are not able to make long term commitment;
    Deepen relationships between community and students through peer-outreach projects
      (community/student team endeavors);
    Flexibility and listening – be open to scrap your agenda and be present to circumstances;
    CBOs preparing their staff and clients to welcome and engage students in a meaningful way;
    Clarifying legal issues - malpractice, liability of university should student be injured, etc.

Expectations:
    Agreeing to boundaries and scope of the project so we can help manage student and CBO expectations;
    Matching up learning goals with community partner goals so that both groups get what they need.

Roles:
    Faculty potential to play coordination/mediation/matching role between students and CBOs;
    Students take the lead from CBOs;
    CBOs flexing to meet the needs of students.

Communication:
   Opportunities for more sharing between university and CBOs; Increased faculty/student knowledge of
    CBO goals, programs and limitations; Faculty contact and engagement with organizations before
    semester/project begins;
   Need for continuity across semesters for the benefit of the organization.

Attitudes/Philosophy:
    Students need to have balance of autonomy and humility;
    Mutually beneficial partnerships, on-going conversation;
    Talk candidly and listen carefully, then reflect and check for understanding;
    Faculty engaged with CBOs beyond engaged learning, e.g. board participation.

Time/Commitment:
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      How much training/orientation work on the part of CBOs?
      How much commitment and accountability from students?
      What system is in place for us all to be accountable to each other?
      Variable student volunteer motivation and variable community capacity to support/mentor.

Values:
    Assumptions about help and what is right, needed, important at any given time;
    What is the role of celebration, play and joy in the work?
    There are multiple types of knowledge - How to value and honor the experiences and perspectives of
      people with a range of formal education?

UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE
   Engaged learning projects less valued by University than other forms of research. Seek
    acknowledgement – students want credit, faculty want research recognition;
   Desire for a wide range of service-learning tasks in order to make best matches to student abilities and
    commitment;
   Students mentoring students, passing on engaged learning experience and advice to future wave of
    students;
   Faculty may not see/understand the application of their scholarship in the community;
   University clarity on engaged learning – how community projects compliment coursework?
   Community group want to join efforts with university but accomplish community needs.

MECHANICS/SYSTEMS
   Structure that supports reporting in a way that makes the data collected useful. At times, a project ends,
    student submits evaluation or project based on the work and that‘s the end – no one sees it;
   Mechanism for feedback from students to CBOs and vice versa– both short and long term;
   An index of on-going research by topic and faculty member or forums on topics to help like-minded
    parties connect (faculty-faculty; faculty-org; faculty-student). This would foster collaboration and
    decrease overlap of research/projects. Process to create shared expectations, define outcomes, clarify
    roles and responsibilities; Engage the students to create a ―portfolio‖ of the project with history, context,
    vision; concrete deliverables.
   Standardizing a process for all service-learning projects; a protocol that could provide a way to
    troubleshoot or address problems. Example of standards could include: Memo of Understanding that is
    signed by all parties at the beginning of the project;
   Better scholarship/data on engaged learning supports work (Community based research);
   Document the process/progress, using digital media to highlight and feature key works.

TRAINING/ORIENTATION
   Each of the 3 sectors need to deepen their awareness in order to work more effectively together.
   Community groups partnering with University to teach the history/context of project/community
     strengths and challenges.
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   Potential content includes collaboration with community, power and privilege (cultural differences, race,
    gender, class, socio-history perspective), understanding systemic oppression: how institutional, cultural
    and individual power and privilege impact communities and CBOs; IRB process, grant-writing, history
    and strengths of local communities, organizational culture in social services, advocacy, community
    organizing, non-profit sector, social services.
   Justice versus charity, theory of change – how do we believe that change will happen?




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Community Engagement and Student Service: Stakeholder Summary

Community Engagement and Student Service: A Dialogue Between, University and Community

                                                         All Stakeholders Meeting

Wednesday, November 4, 2009 10am-12pm at the Century Center

Meeting Purpose:
The purpose of this meeting was to share and synthesize the data from the three previous stakeholder meetings
with students, faculty and community based organizations (CBOs). The stated objectives were to:

      Share the unique stakeholder perspectives;
      Develop collective vision for engaged learning @ UNC and with communities in the area and beyond;
      Explore desired changes; and
      Discuss next steps.

Background Information on the Project:
The project will host four meetings: One meeting will bring together a group of students to discuss their own
goals and experiences in participating in community projects. A second meeting will consult with community
based organizations and non-profits about how student interns and volunteers can best serve communities and
learn from the experience. Another will bring together a group of faculty/staff to discuss their goals and
experiences with student participation in community projects. The fourth and final meeting will be a joint
meeting of the first three in order for faculty/staff and students to learn from and exchange ideas with
community leaders and vice versa.

The project is being undertaken by Dorothy Holland, in her role as a Co-Director of CIRA and recipient of a
teaching award and small grant from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. The Center for
Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at UNC - Chapel Hill is an initiative bringing together university-
based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action projects to
advance sustainable development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.

APPLES is co-sponsoring these meetings. APPLES is a student-led program that builds sustainable, service-
learning partnerships among students, faculty and communities.. By engaging all partners in an enriched,
community-based curriculum, our experiential programs foster socially aware and civically involved students.


Meeting Summary:
Dottie Holland introduced herself, welcomed the group, established the context and thanked all the participants
and meeting organizers. Dottie passed the baton to Evangeline.

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Evangeline Weiss of Open Source Leadership Strategies welcomed the group, introduced herself and went over
the objectives and agenda for the meeting.

Participants reviewed the distributed the summary sheets in small groups of six. Ideally, these groups consisted
of all stakeholders, though this may not have happened in each group. Participants were asked to introduce
themselves, read the summary sheet, and reflect on these 4 questions:

      What stands out to you from this summary?
      What questions does this information create?
      What inspires/concerns do you have for your stakeholder group based on this data?
      Any additional comments you want to include from your 1st meeting?

Groups shared their impressions of the data sheets for approximately 20 minutes.

VISION 2020
Groups were thanked for their dialogue about the past and present issues. Then, the focus shifted to VISION of
engaged learning for the future. We divided up the theme areas from the summary sheet and distributed one to
each group.

Group members were asked to consider a future ideal in which all the glitches and concerns from their previous
conversations were addressed. What would engaged learning look like at UNC and the surrounding
communities? How would it feel? Participants were invited to imagine a magazine cover with engaged learning
as a lead story and UNC being named as a top 10 University of Engaged Learning. Groups were asked to create
a mock up of the magazine cover explaining how engaged learning works in 2020.

After we examined the seven groups‘ magazine covers, we themed the data as areas of shared vision and
knowledge gaps:

Shared Vision Data:
    Engaged learning as an immersion experience (Study abroad in your own backyard, co-housing, longer
      term relationships)
    Local, NC focus
    Continuity – relationships over time
    Partnership/Collaboration in educating students
    Deeper understanding and sensitivity to one another‘s needs
    Lack of clarity about UNC administration‘s perspective
    Shared sense of the ideal undergraduate education

Knowledge Gaps:
   Not sure what the shared outcome is – each group has specific needs and expectations. More work is
     needed to define shared and unique needs and expectations

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      Under-explored 4th stakeholder group – clients and constituents of the CBO‘s. Client‘s of the CBO‘s or
       the community itself as a source of learning and partnership.
      Quantitative tools for matching students and CBOs.
      Institutional/Administrative buy in or legitimization and funding.

The seven themes were:
    Attitudes and Philosophy,
    Mechanics and Systems,
    Planning and Expectations,
    Roles and Communication,
    Time Commitment and Values,
    Training and Orientation,
    Undergraduate Experience


Small group Summaries and Pictures of the ―Newsweek Covers‖




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Vision Roles and Communication
 Full partnership with the people of the state. Equal partners working together so students get real world
   learning plus university knowledge.
 Every class has a service-learning component – modeled on the professional schools.
 Central coordinating position and data management.
 Problem-based curricula.
 Generates scholarship.
 Present in every community, every classroom.
 Sustained engagement with the community.




Vision for Planning and Expectations

Planning
    The CBO: student match should be mutual (not ―assigned‖); see this as a spectrum of color (like a
       rainbow) where people meet in a process of co-selection
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      Office of Student – Community Engagement with advisors whose jobs are to know the local nonprofits
       and act as liaisons. Have a faculty-CBO-student board of liaisons and organizers. They‘d ensure
       continuity, training and have CBO profiles and histories; have people in this office who are
       documentarians; create a library archive (use video) to show all perspectives on the
       issue/problem/organization. At end of semester, document and update this archive to produce a DVD for
       multiple educational uses.

Expectations
    Continuity of project; students continue ongoing projects from one year to the next
    Knowledge transfer: history of what‘s been done before, and history of the CBO
    Having some questions left open – have participants reflect on what could have been done and what
       remains open; conduct exit interviews with students on what remains undone;
    Define short term AND long term goals

Images:
    Color spectrum/rainbow: shows joy, mutuality

      What else we need:
      Greater university support for student and professor‘s engagement with CBO‘s; should become integral
       to learning
      Communication – needs to be direct and honest and ongoing

      Key Ideas:
      Collaboration over time, even as students move on
      Collaborative energy transcends the moment of engagement.
      Mutuality
      Hope, joy
      Continuity
      History / Memory




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Vision for Attitudes and Philosophy
 All CBOs have same vision to equip/develop a useable skill set.
 All student volunteers arrive at CBO with a completed skill set assessment.
 To prepare students for service ―standardized‖ topics are shared: privilege, power, community, diversity,
   ―real world‖ training (professional expectations).
 All voices are heard and respected.
 Peer-peer training is involved/employed. Utilize graduate students to mentor/train undergraduates. Provide
   ―bridge‖ for semester-to-semester experiences.
 Video library of experiences from youth and CBOs to document successful partnerships
 Shared grant funds between university and community. University has CBOs as Co-PIs or colleagues in the
   process. Collaborative and strategic with pursuing funds and resources
 Fear and Trust have been dealt with.
 University Supports this kind of work and doesn‘t penalize faculty for collaborating with communities.
 Boundaries of campus and community are blurred. Students, faculty, CBOs are taking responsibility for
   issues together.
 Hearing involvement from student groups and organizations shared success among student groups to
   strengthen ours.
 Understanding of collaboration extending beyond sharing resources to being shared trust, communication,
   etc.




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Vision for Undergraduate Experience
 Student groups as a foundation, rather than exclusively faculty/course driven. Student groups (like clubs)
   would have continuity year-to-year and be a parallel organization to a CBO.
 Reward faculty who are willing to work with these groups (that they will not control or manage)
 CIRA has helped develop standards for evaluation of action research so that it can be assessed in the same
   way that publications, etc. are.
 In 2009, there was no mechanism for CBOs to give feedback about the quality/importance of faculty and
   student work with them. Now there is!
 There is a synergy in these student groups that create jobs, provide services to the university, connections
   with the business school, internships, and downtown growth.
 The "hands-on" experience of service learning is important to post-university success.
 Service-learning in/for K-12 schools inspires these students to attend college.




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Vision for Mechanics and Systems
 There are ―learning communities‖ that last longer than a semester;
 Students are paid to do community service;
 Great access for student interns to find a good situation organized departmentally? Or around a topic like
   agriculture with classes from different dept contributing classes;
 Students are passionate about projects, classes are chosen for relevance to a project; University used to be
   more rigid, not it‘s fluid.
 Learning clusters
 Students self-evaluate, CBO should evaluate and that‘s the grade, no writing component
 Students get training in Participatory Action Research (PAR) so they‘re doing research not on but with the
   community
 Community groups get paid; recognized as co-educators

Vision for Time Commitment and Values




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Vision for Training and Orientation




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Attendees:
We had 34 individuals attend the meeting.

Evaluation Results

Please tell us if you are here (check all that apply) 18 representing a community group, 3 faculty member, 4
university staff member,  a university group, or 2 as a student with experience as a student intern, service
learning or class project with a community group. 1 non-specific 1 graduate student. We received 25 evaluation
forms completed.

Do you feel the community perspective on student service was expressed in this meeting?
    Yes, although the two CBO members in my group were from the same organization (do
      CBO=community)
    Yes -18
    Almost to the point of over emphasizing the community perspective more than the university
    Not enough
    The community perspective was expressed but the perspective was obviously understated
    No
    Definitely
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      A much broader perspective was represented and greatly appreciated


What suggestions for improvement would you have for this meeting?
   More meetings
   Pre-knowledge
   Were groups well mixed?
   30 minutes longer time period
   Good facilitator – she was great
   None
   More time? Hard to take more time, but it felt rushed too – maybe send out the comment summary sheet
      ahead of time
   Perhaps more interaction between community agencies during the meeting time
   Discus with other agencies what has worked for you and what hasn‘t
   More time - 2
   Introductions
   None if any more time
   Mix groups to meet new people
   More student perspective
   None- very rich and effective use of time
   Just have more, ongoing to build momentum of what has begun
   Peer to peer training
   Not long enough! Good working in small groups but wish I got to meet and network with others
   Student groups and Community Based Organizations (CBOs)
   Probably wise to require everyone to read the summary beforehand and ever ―prime the pump‖ with first
      question so people are thinking before they arrive
   Change the groups at least once, so we can interact with different people
   Great – one of the better facilitated meetings I ever attended – I actually took notes on your facilitation
      techniques
   UNC administrators representing the nuts and bolts of how and why this process can change
   The meeting was well organized and well facilitated. As a community rep, I still felt I was a quest
   No- But there is a need to continue with these conversations
   NA


Is there anything else you would like to share about community engagement and student service?
     Service needs to be infused throughout the curriculum
     2020 exercise was great
     The topics and visions reflect an underlying assumption of the university as the expert and the main
       focus. Perhaps this is to be expected if the emphasis is on ―student‖ to engagement and service.

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      More support for student group driven projects, independent studies
      More engaged relationship by faculty with CBOs
      More of these forums need to happen to share and meet others
      There needs to be a training program for students and faculty who do research projects on the
       community to avoid any psychological harm to those who they are attempting to assist
      We have a long way to go, but it‘s exciting that CIRA is providing leadership and opportunity to take
       these first steps (It‘s hard not to be impatient because 2020 isn‘t now)
      Great input today
      So very important to continue program with students and agencies invent ways to incorporate faculty
       into ―agents‖ of agency – ―collective memory of organization‖
      CBOs need more information on what parameters and logistics of what is possible now with UNC
       students
      Yes, I ‗ll email it
      No- 3
      Adding 4th stakeholder of community is critical
      Keep us in the loop and do this again


Additional Comments:
   University has significant investment in outcomes relating to students and faculty
   Thanks. Great ideas, execution. Super facilitation
   Thank you
   General knowledge in advance of CBO‘s prior to experience
   Thank you for your work and efforts
   I found the discussion thoughtful and helpful
   Great Facilitator
   Facilitator was great
   Wonderful opportunity. I really appreciate contributing and being asked to contribute
   Thank you for having me
   Could there have been time allotted for very brief introductions
   I love group proposal – time to revolutionize the entire undergraduate experience such that students see
       themselves as learning from experts in CBOs and their clients and as going to college as a means to
       becoming engaged citizens with confidence in their ability to catalyze positive social change
   Good start – build on this
   Great group
   Potentially very useful start on dialogue
   Keep on truckin
   Evaluation idea: ask current CBOs who have students work with them – what % of the effort: actually
       generates knowledge you need? Just gets practical work done? Allows you to educate ―the public‖ about
       your mission – diffuse future benefit similar question of students = for how many did this just give you
       momentary feel good? How many a crucial part of your education?
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      One thing I'd like to emphasize discussed at length was the practical help piece: the toolbox for making
       sure that people had training available to them and their students about common privilege differential
       and how to navigate that. We talked about possibly using some grant money to develop a training
       sequence. The tools developed could be used thereafter. (This suggestion came via email from someone
       who could not attend the final meeting – but attended one of the earlier meetings.)



25 responses
These meetings are co-sponsored by CIRA and APPLES.




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Uptown Business & Professional Center Site Visit

                         WORKING AGENDA:
  SITE VISIT, UPTOWN BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL CENTER, NEW BERN, NC
                           November 23, 2009

11:30 - 2 PM. Discussion in Van
Charles Price‘s Role in Organizing Visit: Network connecting
        Jot a list of your skills & interests, which you can revise during and after the site visit. For example,
        cultural heritage; tourism (cultural); historic preservation; health; housing; research; evaluation research;
        race; environment; community development; organizing; visioning; etc. The skill set ought to be
        something that a community group could benefit from tapping into.

1. Depart 11am on Monday, November 23rd from Franklin Street.

2. Planned schedule of the day:
       2 PM (roughly) Lunch @ the Stingray in New Bern with the Uptown Business & Professional
       Association.

       3-3: 30 PM (roughly) The "Tour of Flames" by the Uptown Association. The Tour will also introduce us
       to the work and goals of the Uptown Association. We will hear their stories and seek to get a sense of
       how we or other faculty or graduate students might assist them.

       5 p.m. (roughly) We should spend some conversation on the Uptown Association‘s civic meeting, and
       what it might mean that we are present. If needed, we should strategize about engineering a desirable
       outcome.

       5:30 P.M. Suggestions for ―down time‖?

       6:30 p.m. ? Civic meeting time

       Depart by 7:30 p.m.

3. We can all be dropped off before Charles heads to return the van. A suggestion would be to park in the Park
and Ride area at Eubanks Road. (That is right off of 40 - Martin Luther King Blvd. On Eubanks Rd, 1/2 mile
west of MLK Jr Blvd)



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AAA CIRA Reception



CIRA Reception at the AAA Meeting in Philadelphia
Please join us during this year‘s AAA meetings for a reception celebrating the Center for Integrating Research
and Action (CIRA) at UNC-Chapel Hill. CIRA is an initiative bringing together university-based researchers
with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing research/action projects to advance sustainable
development and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond. We‘ve had a great
year of growth in our programs and partnerships and invite you to come celebrate with us!

                                                          Thursday, December 3rd

                                                                Time: 8:30-10pm

                  Location: Jim Peacock and Karl Heider‘s hotel room*, Philadelphia Marriott

                                                               (Conference Hotel)

                                               To learn more about CIRA, please visit

                                                               http://cira.unc.edu/

Best wishes,

Dorothy Holland, Jim Peacock, Charles Price, Don Nonini and other CIRA members

*To find out the room location, please check with the front desk or call 919-428-7295 on Thursday afternoon.



RSVP to Dana Powell at depowell@email.unc.edu by December 1st




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Fall 2009 CIRA E-Newsletter


       If you have problems reading this newsletter please view it on our website.

       http://cira.unc.edu/news/newsletter/fall-2009

       Research and Action News
       from the Center for Integrating Research and Action at UNC- Chapel Hill

       The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University
       of North Carolina –Chapel Hill is an initiative bringing together
       university-based researchers with community-based leaders to collaborate
       on producing research/action projects to advance sustainable development
       and community well-being and social justice in North Carolina and beyond.


       Highlights of CIRA activities from 2009

       First Associate Director Hired:

       Alicia Altmueller joined the CIRA staff in January 2009 after working in
       the nonprofit sector since 1989.
       Her past work includes community, youth and environmental organizing. At
       Alicia‘s last full-time position she worked as the Director of
       Technology Innovation at the Fund for the City of New York. In this role
       she coordinated several programs that helped organizations streamline
       operations, expand services and make best use of the latest technology
       through training, seminars & conferences and consulting. Each year,
       these programs trained over 3,000 nonprofit staff and served over 500
       agencies in New York City.
       Got an idea to share or want to learn more about CIRA- contact Alicia or
       stop by the CIRA office!

       http://cira.unc.edu

       CIRA Redesigned Website:

       http://cira.unc.edu/

       CIRA released a newly designed website. This website has many different
       features including upcoming events, affiliate information and recent
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publications and meeting summaries. One area that we will be expanding
upon this year is resource section for CIRA‘s areas of concentration.
Three students have worked hard at gathering and developing collections
of organizations and publications. Thank you to undergraduate students
Courtney Johnson and Eseon Kwon and to graduate student William
Westermeyer. To see the current resources or submit a new resource,
please go to:

http://cira.unc.edu/resources

23 New CIRA Affiliates:

We are pleased to announce 23 New CIRA Affiliates. Our affiliates come
from different sectors and represent various stakeholder groups,
including students, community and faculty members. For the complete list
please click on:

http://cira.unc.edu/affiliates/2009-cira-affiliates


To learn more about becoming an affiliate, please click on:

http://cira.unc.edu/affiliates


CIRA Affiliated Courses

We have over 75 Affiliated Courses listed on our website. These courses
are open to both undergraduate and graduate students and cross over many
different disciplines. If you currently or will be teaching a course
that would be a good CIRA affiliated course – please fill out the CIRA
affiliate form on our website.

http://cira.unc.edu/courses


Highlighted Fall Activity: Community Engagement and Student Activities

The project is being undertaken by Dorothy Holland, in her role as a
Co-Director of CIRA and recipient of a teaching award and small grant
from UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. APPLES
co-sponsored these meetings.
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The project hosted four meetings: One meeting brought together a group
of students to discuss their own goals and experiences in participating
in community projects. A second meeting consulted with community based
organizations and non-profits about how student interns and volunteers
can best serve communities and learn from the experience. Another
brought together a group of faculty/staff to discuss their goals and
experiences with student participation in community projects. The fourth
and final meeting was a joint meeting of the first three in order for
faculty/staff and students to learn from and exchange ideas with
community leaders and vice versa. To read the summary of the fall
activities please go to:

http://cira.unc.edu/news/community-engagement-and-student-service-fall-dialogue-summary


Looking Toward 2010:

Community Organizing Workshop January 14, 2010

The Center for Integrating Research & Action (CIRA) will sponsor a
community organizing workshop, January 14, 2010, 6-8 P.M. The workshop
will convene in the Faculty Lounge room of the Campus Y. A snack will
be served. The workshop will be facilitated by Ivan Parra, a lead
organizer for the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), one of the oldest
community organizing networks and training institutions in the United
States (ca. 1940).

The workshop will introduce participants to the IAF‘s approach to
community organizing, to local organizing activities in the Triangle
area, and to faculty, staff, and students at UNC-CH who are interested
or involved in the new IAF organization in Orange County, Justice
United. Community organizing has proven to a valuable multifaceted
strategy that cultivates learning and listening skills, develops
leadership, build‘s organizational and community capacity, grows power
in ordinary citizens, and that crystallized democracy by preparing
citizens to make intelligent decisions about factors that affect their
collective livelihood and well-being.

CIRA‘s support of the community organizing workshop is a part of its
plan to develop a focus on collective action and community empowerment.
Our definition of collective action and community empowerment includes
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community organizing, community building, community development, and
social movements. In general, we are interested in understanding how
people collectively address social concerns, and desire to carry out
research and provide assistance that supports community-oriented
empowerment efforts. To register please fill out the registration form.

http://cira.unc.edu/events/community-organizing-workshop



Keep up to date with CIRA:

Join Our Listserv:

http://cira.unc.edu/cira-listserv


Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=80013124764

Questions, comments or feedback - please contact us at 919-619-6056 or
cira@unc.edu




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CIRA 2010 Initial Events




CIRA is already planning events for 2010. Here is a look at the first of these events.




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2010 Community Organizing Workshop



The Center for Integrating Research & Action (CIRA) will sponsor a community organizing workshop, January
14, 2010, 6-8 P.M. The workshop will convene in the Faculty Lounge Room of the Campus Y. A snack will be
served.

The workshop will be facilitated by Ivan Parra, a lead organizer for the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), one
of the oldest community organizing networks and training institutions in the United States (ca. 1940).

The workshop will introduce participants to the IAF‘s approach to community organizing, to local organizing
activities in the Triangle area, and to faculty, staff, and students at UNC-CH who are interested or involved in
the new IAF organization in Orange County, Justice United. Community organizing has proven to a valuable
multifaceted strategy that cultivates learning and listening skills, develops leadership, build‘s organizational and
community capacity, grows power in ordinary citizens, and that crystallized democracy by preparing citizens to
make intelligent decisions about factors that affect their collective livelihood and well-being.
CIRA‘s support of the community organizing workshop is a part of its plan to develop a focus on collective
action and community empowerment. Our definition of collective action and community empowerment
includes community organizing, community building, community development, and social movements. In
general, we are interested in understanding how people collectively address social concerns, and desire to carry
out research and provide assistance that supports community-oriented empowerment efforts.

To register please fill out the registration form.




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CIRA Affiliate Grant Search Workshop and Affiliate Meeting February 5, 2010



                            Please join CIRA for our first affiliate workshop and meeting

                                             Friday, February 5, 2010 11am - 2:30pm

                                                       University Room, Hyde Hall

11:00am-11:30am Registration and Informational Networking

11:30am-12:15pm University-Community Grant Research Workshop
      Conducted by Elizabeth Allen of the Grantsource Library

      How to search for community-university joint funding
      How communities can make contacts for additional funding

12:30pm-2pm Lunch and Affiliate Meeting

2pm-2:30pm Information Networking

Lunch will be provided

To become an affiliate, please fill out the affiliate form.

To register for this workshop and meeting, please fill out the registration form.




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