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									University of Illinois at Chicago




        Results Report
         August 2000
                        University of Illinois at Chicago
                             Results Report 2000
Executive Summary

Through the efforts of its faculty, staff and students, the University of Illinois at Chicago
continued to advance the six goals of The Illinois Commitment during FY 2000. Campus funds
supported programs such as the “Big-City” Teacher and Administrator Preparation and
Professional Development Program, expansions of professionally directed programs in the
Colleges of Engineering and Business Administration, strengthening of undergraduate curricula,
technology and support for the library. FY 2001 state support for such programs allows for
further expansion to meet increased demand and to upgrade technology to maintain the
infrastructure needed to support teaching and research in the 21st century.

Goal 1: Higher Education will help Illinois business and industry sustain strong economic
growth.

      New graduate programs in Health Informatics, Mathematics and Information
       Science for Industry, and Management Information Systems were approved this
       past year to train professionals and meet occupational demand.

      The campus experienced and supported enrollment growth in the high demand
       areas of Information and Decision Sciences, Computer Engineering, Computer
       Science, and Finance.

            The campus saw an increase in Grants and Contracts expenditures of 15.8% over
       FY 1999.

      New research centers in Data Mining, Structural Biology, Rural Health
       Professions Education, and Environmental Science and Policy were established
       this past year.

      Recruitment of a leading scientist and support of research activities in the College
       of Medicine resulted in new developments in medical imaging technology, which
       led to novel approaches to support stroke recovery and to aid in the diagnosis of
       such disorders as depression, dementia, and Alzheimer disease. New cancer
       therapies as well as those for the prevention of heart disease were developed.


       Goal 2: Higher education will join elementary and secondary education to
       improve teaching and learning at all levels.

      The College of Education collaboratively designed and implemented the Mentoring and
       Induction of New Teachers Program (MINT) through a partnership with the Chicago
       Public Schools Teaching Academy for Professional Development, and the Chicago
       Teachers Union Quest Center, with $250,000 in program support from the MacArthur
       and McDougal Foundations. In FY 2000, the program served over 1,000 teachers from
       325 schools.

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   The College of Education is conducting an evaluation of the $49.2 million Chicago
    Annenberg Challenge in the Chicago Public Schools.

   UIC continued a National Science Foundation funded collaborative project that allows
    the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Education math and science faculty to
    cooperatively redesign mathematics and science education curricula.

   UIC received $1.2 million from the MacArthur Foundation to advance the preparation of
    quality teachers for Chicago’s students in underserved communities.

   UIC supported improvements in learning environments through the continuation of
    successful programs like the Principals’ Center, the Small Schools Workshop, and the
    Mentoring and Induction Program for New Teachers, as well as multiple outreach
    initiatives and partnerships.

   The College of Education integrated educational technology across the teacher
    preparation curriculum.


    Goal 3: No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college
    education because of financial need.

   AY 1999-2000 undergraduate tuition increase was held to 3%.

   The campus contributed $442,000 to fund the difference between the maximum ISAC
    award and the tuition and fee expenses for 3,245 students.

   The Office of Student Financial Aid managed more than $40 million dollars awarded to
    full-time undergraduates in need-based aid during the academic year; 65-70% of
    undergraduates received some type of aid. Approximately 35% of UIC undergraduates
    received enough aid in grants and scholarships to support all tuition and fee costs.

   UIC continued its Merit Tuition Awards program for transfer students, which provides 20
    tuition waivers to highly qualified students who transfer from community colleges.

   UIC continued its Four Year Graduation Program for all freshmen in eligible
    programs.

    Goal 4: Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens completing
    training and education programs.

   US News & World Report noted that UIC is one of the most racially diverse institutions
    in the country (5th out of 228 national institutions); 13.6 % of the student body is Latino,
    9.3% African American, 19.5% Asian Pacific US Islander, 7% foreign.

   UIC’s study abroad program attracted a high level of participation among minority
    students: 17.8% of participants are Latino, 5.5% are African American, 22.6% are Asian.

   70% of minority physicians practicing in the Chicago area are UIC College of Medicine
    graduates.

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      UIC and the City Colleges of Chicago completed articulation agreements in the areas of
       mathematics and biology and are currently finishing work on an English articulation
       project.

      In Academic Year 1999-2000, enrollment in online courses and programs more than
       tripled the previous year’s amount with 1,357 students. Ten different degrees or
       certificates can be earned through on-line programs at UIC.


Goal 5: Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations for
learning and will be accountable for the quality of academic programs and the assessment
of learning.

      Average freshman ACT scores and high school percentile ranks continue to rise and
       performance is continuing to improve each year.

      In FY 2000, the UIC Task Force on General Education issued a report identifying
       specific learning goals designed to provide students with a rich educational experience.
       Such goals include providing students with basic competencies in communication,
       critical thinking, multi-cultural perspectives, quantitative reasoning, computer literacy,
       and civic engagement.

      UIC conducted its third year of program reviews with external reviewers who assessed
       the effectiveness of campus attempts to meet the educational goals established for
       individual academic programs and made recommendations for improvement.

      In Fall 1999, sophomores and seniors at UIC participated in the National Survey of
       Student Engagement and their responses provided the campus with valuable information
       on student participation in the classroom and student satisfaction with their academic
       experience. The Enrollment Management Committee continues to analyze these student
       survey results in order to find new ways to address issues of recruitment and retention at
       UIC.

      UIC continued to expand opportunities for students in international programs, on-line
       education and research programs with senior faculty.

      Student housing has been made network-ready. Students have full access to all campus
       computer services and full Internet access from their campus housing rooms.


       Goal 6: Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve
       productivity, cost-effectiveness, and accountability.

      The South Campus development project offers a unique mix of educational,
       student and private housing, and retail land use. This year ground was broken for
       student housing including two-bedroom single-parent apartments. These
       apartments will offer a secure interior courtyard and play/activity rooms to help
       provide support systems for male and female single-parent students. Sales of
       private homes began as well.

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   The Outpatient Care Center opened in August 1999 bringing together nearly 30 clinics in
    one facility to greatly enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of service to patients.

   UIC participated in the review and development of the Enterprise Resource Planning
    system.

   A new web-based course approval system will be available for departments to use this
    fall. The system maintains data regarding all courses, and allows for the creation,
    revision, or deletion of individual courses.




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                     Illinois Commitment Goal One: Economic Growth
                    Higher Education will help Illinois business and industry
                                sustain strong economic growth.

UIC is committed to preparing students for the professions of the 21st century. The campus
provides opportunities for meaningful and professionally applicable learning experiences and
fosters the development of a foundation for lifelong learning skills. As such, the campus is
engaged in analysis and revision of current programs, as well as the development of new curricula
in emerging areas. Following are examples of FY 2000 accomplishments in areas related to
professional preparation:

       Three new programs were approved this past year to train professionals and meet
        occupational demand:
           o Master of Science in Health Informatics
           o Master of Science in Mathematics and Information Science for Industry
           o PhD in Management Information Systems

       Enrollment growth in high demand areas include:
           o 23% increase in the number of finance majors over last year,
           o 67% increase in the number of IDS majors over the last three years, and
           o 30% increase in the number of Computer Engineering and Computer Science
               majors over the last four years.

UIC is also committed to pursuing research opportunities that will help sustain economic growth
in the State. Each research opportunity has multiple implications. The direct benefits include the
provision of data for better decision-making by external agencies as well as contributing to a
body of knowledge for the advancement of a particular academic field. Indirect benefits include
the enrichment of the academic environment for students and faculty, and the fostering of the
exchange of information and avenues for collaboration upon which innovation thrives. Following
are examples of successes related to UIC’s effort to encourage opportunities for such research
accomplished in FY2000:

       Increase in Grants and Contracts expenditures by 15.8% over FY 1999

       Four new research centers and institutes established:
           o Center for Data Mining Research
           o Center for Structural Biology
           o Center for Rural Health Professions Education
           o Institute for Environmental Science and Policy

       Design phase of Medical Research Facility/Biological Research Lab (MRF/BRL)
        completed.

       Continued support for the UIC Library, which is the largest public research library in the
        Chicago Metro area.

       Biotechnology:
            o Recruitment of world’s leading scientist in research and development of medical
               imaging technology.




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            o   College of Medicine faculty research programs in neurosciences used MRI
                (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) technology to examine cell function in the human
                brain thus developing novel approaches to support stroke recovery, as well as
                conducted research which has led to new hardware and software for MR imaging
                and discoveries to support MR techniques which permit the diagnosis of
                disorders such as depression, dementia and Alzheimer disease.
            o   Research in the College of Medicine has led to the development of novel cancer
                therapies in the past year, including a method for identifying compounds that
                could be used to decrease the debilitating side effects of radiation therapy and a
                new approach that is used to identify genes associated with tumor sensitivity to
                anticancer drugs.
            o   UIC’s cardiac research program developed important new calcium blocking
                agents that can regulate the force of heart muscle contraction and prevent heart
                failure.

UIC Goals related to Economic Growth for FY 2001

UIC is committed to the economic growth of the state. Some specific activities planned for FY
2001 include:
    Campus will fund three additional Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty
        positions to meet growing student demand.

       In response to student demand, the College of Business Administration will add a faculty
        member specializing in e-commerce marketing.

       Site preparation will be completed and construction will begin on the MRF/BRL.
        Scheduled completion is Spring, 2003.

       Develop nationally ranked program in magnetic resonance imaging and important new
        technologies with commercial applications for clinical assessment of the human brain and
        heart in both healthy and diseased states. Such technology will present enormous
        opportunities for understanding and treating some of today’s most dire medical
        conditions.


                  Illinois Commitment Goal Two: Teaching and Learning
           Higher Education will join elementary and secondary education to improve
                              teaching and learning at all levels.

UIC is committed to improving teaching and learning at all levels. While the campus makes a
direct contribution by educating teachers through its teaching degree programs, it is also actively
engaged in the development of new programs for teachers and school administrators. In
partnership with other agencies, UIC faculty are working to determine whether the Illinois
Learning Standards and the Chicago Academic Standards for K-12 students adequately address
what knowledge and skills graduates need to possess.

The College of Education’s Big-City Teacher and Administrator Preparation and Professional
Development Program is working to develop and document the success of programs that address
the teaching and learning needs of high-poverty, predominantly African American and Latino
students in urban classrooms and schools. The “Big-City” program seeks to engage liberal arts
and sciences colleges and other external partners in re-conceptualizing subject matter pedagogy,


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including its alignment with new standards-based curricula in Illinois. Following are just a few
examples of UIC’s effort to improve teaching and learning.

       The College of Education collaboratively designed and implemented the Mentoring and
        Induction of New Teachers Program (MINT) through a partnership with the Chicago
        Public Schools Teaching Academy for Professional Development, and the Chicago
        Teachers Union Quest Center, with $250,000 in program support from the MacArthur
        and McDougal Foundations. In FY 2000, the program served over 1,000 teachers from
        325 schools.

       UIC Education Faculty continue in leadership roles: Chair of the Governor’s Task Force
        on Teacher Quality, Member of the National Reading Panel, as well as numerous chairs
        of and memberships on Illinois State Board of Education committees and panels.

       The College of Education and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Departments of
        Chemistry and Physics operate a physical sciences endorsement program for certified
        Chicago public school teachers, funded by the Polk Bros. Foundation.

       The College of Education is conducting an evaluation of the $49.2 million Chicago
        Annenberg Challenge in the Chicago Public Schools.

       The College of Education, the Small Schools Workshop, Achieving High Standards, and
        the Center for Literacy served as external school partners for individual Chicago Public
        Schools on probation.

       UIC continued to receive funding through the IBHE’s Higher Education Cooperation Act
        (HECA) Grant Program and the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professional Development
        Program to support projects for the professional development of teachers in mathematics
        and science education, the preparation of minority students as future teachers, and the
        preparation of high school students in math, science, and communication.

       UIC Office of Academic Affairs and College of Pharmacy collaborated with the Chicago
        Public Schools, the Greater Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce and other agencies to
        establish the Gage Park High School Institute of P.R.I.D.E. which is designed for
        students who wish to pursue middle management careers in the retail industry or to
        continue their education beyond high school to earn associate and/or baccalaureate
        degrees in business or business related disciplines.

       Additionally, the UIC Office of Academic Affairs and College of Pharmacy are member
        partners of the Chicago Public Schools Medical Career Academies Advisory Board. The
        Chicago Public Schools Office of Education-to-Careers is taking the lead to establish two
        Medical Career Academies in Chicago and the Advisory Board is providing consultation
        on curriculum, career-related activities, selection criteria of students, and site selection.
        The first group of selected students will begin their freshman year studies in Fall, 2000.

       UIC continued an NSF collaborative grant that allows the Colleges of Liberal Arts and
        Sciences and Education math and science faculty to cooperatively redesign mathematics
        and science education curricula.




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       The College of Education collaborated with near west side Crane High School on
        establishing a Chicago Mathematics, Science and Technology Academy. Resources from
        UIC’s NSF GK-12 Partnership Grant to improve math and science education will support
        teachers and students at Crane. Similarly, the College established a teacher development
        program at west side Manley High School.

       UIC received $1.2 million from the MacArthur Foundation to advance the preparation of
        quality teachers for Chicago’s students in underserved communities.

       UIC supported improvements in learning environments through the continuation of
        successful programs like the Principal’s Center, the Small Schools Workshop, and the
        Mentoring and Induction Program for New Teachers, as well as multiple outreach
        initiatives and partnerships.

       The College of Education began the process of becoming the top supplier of new teachers
        to the Chicago Public Schools (CPS); it is currently the second.

       The College of Education prepared proposals for submission to the IBHE P-16/HECA
        Grant Program.

       College of Education integrated educational technology across the teacher preparation
        curriculum.

UIC Goals related to Teaching and Learning for FY 2001

UIC will continue demonstrating its commitment to teaching and learning at all levels. The
programs and activities noted for FY 2000 will continue in FY 2001. UIC expects to improve,
refine and enhance these programs and activities in partnership with elementary and secondary
educators.


                       Illinois Commitment Goal Three: Affordability
            No Illinois Citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college education
                                    because of financial need.

Affordability Highlights, FY 2000

       UIC is firmly committed to providing the opportunity for a college education to all
        admitted students. As such, all students are advised of financial aid programs and are
        counseled to develop a package that best suits their needs and resources.

       AY 1999-2000 undergraduate tuition increase was held to 3%.

       Approximately 35% of UIC undergraduates receive enough aid in grants and scholarships
        to support all tuition and fee costs.

       The campus contributed $442,000 to fund the difference between the maximum ISAC
        award and the tuition and fee expenses for 3,245 students.




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       The Office of Student Financial Aid manages more than $40 million dollars that is
        awarded to full-time undergraduates in need-based aid during the academic year; 65-70%
        of undergraduates receive some type of aid.

       UIC continued its Merit Tuition Awards program for transfer students, which provides 20
        tuition waivers to highly qualified students who transfer from community colleges.

       Additionally, the campus continued the Four Year Graduation Program; all freshmen in
        eligible programs were given the opportunity to participate. While the formal program so
        far has limited participation, the campus is working to ensure that all courses needed for
        graduation are available to students in the right sequence and at the right capacity.

       Students are now able to get information regarding their student aid package through the
        campus telephone response system.

UIC Goals related to Affordability for FY2001

UIC will continue to participate in, and make available to students, financial aid programs to
assist students with financial needs. In addition, UIC will make student Financial Aid
information available via the web. Students with loans will be able to complete their required
financial aid counselor sessions via the web each academic year. They will also be able to access
their accounts to see how much has been paid and how much is still owed for the academic term.
In addition to providing important information regarding loan processing and payments, the
system will assist students with issues such as personal budgeting and establishing credit.

The campus plans to continue to seek scholarship and private funds to further support student aid
at UIC.


                    Illinois Commitment Goal Four: Access and Diversity
              Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens completing
                                 training and education programs.

Diversity Highlights, FY 2000

       The Midwest Region of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators
        honored UIC with the “Celebration of Diversity” Award for improving campus climate
        and celebrating diversity.

       US News and World Report noted that UIC is one of the most racially diverse institutions
        in the country (5th out of 228 national institutions); 13.6 % of the student body is Latino,
        9.3% African American, 19.5% Asian Pacific Islander, 7% foreign.

       UIC’s study abroad program attracted a high level of participation among minority
        students: 17.8% of participants are Latino, 5.5% are African American, 22.6% are Asian.

       70% of minority physicians practicing in the Chicago area are UIC College of Medicine
        graduates.




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Accessibility, FY 2000

      UIC and the City Colleges of Chicago have completed articulation agreements in the
       areas of mathematics and biology and are currently finishing work on an English
       articulation project. The focus has been on aligning course content and student learning
       objectives at both institutions.

      UIC is in the process of incorporating the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) into the
       Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) so courses may be automatically counted as a
       part of the DARS audit for transfer students.

      Additionally, UIC participates in the IAI majors panels, working with faculty members
       from both public and private colleges and universities to develop and articulate course
       content of lower division major (disciplinary) courses approved for transfer.

      While UIC’s location at the center of a large urban area makes education accessible to
       thousands of students each year, many Illinois citizens constrained by work, family or
       other limitations are prevented from enrolling in on-campus courses and programs. In the
       past, UIC has delivered off-campus instruction through various media; however,
       computer-based technology and communication through the internet has enabled the
       campus to expand these efforts to an even broader constituency.

           o   Currently, ten different degrees or certificates can be earned through online
               programs at UIC.

           o   In Academic Year 99-2000, enrollment in online courses and programs more
               than tripled the previous year’s amount with 1,357 students.

           o   UIC’s online programs draw students from many parts of the state of Illinois, the
               nation and the world. Students from as close as Rockford and Peoria, and as far
               away as New York, Canada, and Saudi Arabia have enrolled in UIC online
               courses and programs.

           o   UIC established an oversight committee to provide information and
               recommendations to the Provost regarding online education policy and program
               development issues. The committee also acts as a liaison to the university-wide
               online steering committee.

           o   Campus oversight committee members have contributed to the national
               debate regarding online teaching and learning through participation in the
               Council on Higher Education Accreditation and through national and
               international outreach initiatives; topics examined include online learning,
               accreditation of online programs, and online administrative systems.




                                                                                                    10
UIC Goals related to Access and Diversity for FY 2001

UIC counts its diversity among its greatest strengths as an institution; every effort will be made to
sustain this diversity. In addition, access to UIC will be enhanced by the following:

       Development of new online programs: a certificate in non-profit management and the
        MBA Core Curriculum.

       Continued work on articulation project with the City Colleges of Chicago in the area of
        English and begin work on articulation project in the Social Sciences.


                Illinois Commitment Goal Five: High Expectations and Quality
 Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations for learning and
     will be accountable for the quality of academic programs and the assessment of learning.

Higher Expectations for Learning, FY 2000

       The campus continues to attract increasingly better-prepared students each year.

       Average freshman ACT scores and high school percentile ranks continue to rise and
        performance is continuing to improve each year.

       Entering freshmen have much stronger scores in their composition and math placement
        exams.

       The GPPA Initiative (Guaranteed Professional Program Admissions) attracted 98
        students to UIC this past fall.

       There were close to 200 new freshmen in the Honors College.

       There were more than 220 students in the President’s Award Program.

Accountability for Quality of Academic Programs and Assessment of Learning, FY 2000

       In FY 2000, the UIC Task Force on General Education issued a report identifying
        specific learning goals designed to provide students with a rich educational experience.
        Such goals include providing students with basic competencies in communication,
        critical thinking, multi-cultural perspectives, quantitative reasoning, computer literacy,
        and civic engagement.

       UIC conducted its third year of program reviews with external reviewers who assessed
        the effectiveness of campus attempts to meet the educational goals established for
        individual academic programs and made recommendations for improvement.

       The campus continues to provide opportunities for students to assess and evaluate their
        academic experience. Course evaluations are now coordinated by the Office of
        Academic Affairs with the Student Government in order to provide better coverage of
        courses and to provide more timely feedback to faculty.




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      In Fall, 1999, sophomores and seniors at UIC participated in the National Survey of
       Student Engagement and their responses provided the campus with valuable information
       on student participation in the classroom and student satisfaction with their academic
       experience. The Enrollment Management Committee continues to analyze these student
       survey results in order to find new ways to address issues of recruitment and retention at
       UIC.

      Freshmen have higher first term GPAs and higher course completion rates than in
       previous years.

      Approximately 75% of the entering freshmen class returns for the start of their second
       year (up from 60% in the early 1980’s).

      An external evaluation team appointed by the Provost conducted an extensive review of
       PhD programs. The team found that programs in Philosophy, Mathematics, Molecular
       Genetics, Psychology, and Nursing Science currently display most of the qualities
       required for stature in a top-ranked university.

      UIC continues to expand opportunities for students in international programs, online
       education and research programs with senior faculty.

      New faculty orientation and mentoring programs continued in 1999-2000.

      The Study Abroad Office gained affiliate status with the Institute for the International
       Education of Students. This membership will provide discounts for students and priority
       registration for participation in programs.

      Continued renovations of existing classrooms to support multimedia teaching options.

      Student housing has been made network-ready. Students have full access to all campus
       computer services and full internet access from their campus housing rooms.

      Completed the model apartment for occupational therapy.

UIC Goals related to High Expectations and Quality for FY 2001

      UIC continues to attract and to enroll students who are better prepared for the academic
       rigor of higher education. In FY 2001, UIC will begin to work with our major
       undergraduate colleges on the Report of the General Education Task Force.

      The campus plans to create a multimedia room dedicated to film study, a large
       multimedia auditorium in Nursing, and four large multimedia lecture center classrooms.
       This will bring the total number of multimedia classrooms to 37.

      UIC will implement a centrally managed personal computer program for faculty, which
       will ensure renewal of equipment every three years, reduce disparity among departments,
       ensure uniform quality of equipment, provide economies of scale, and allow faculty to
       concentrate on teaching and research. The program includes a recycling component to
       avoid inefficiency and waste.



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       UIC will review the organization of the Graduate College with the intent of enhancing
        graduate education at UIC.


               Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity and Accountability
             Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve productivity,
                               cost-effectiveness, and accountability.

Productivity Highlights, FY 2000

       The South Campus redevelopment project offers a unique mix of educational, student and
        private housing, and retail land use. This year ground was broken for student housing
        including two-bedroom single-parent apartments. These apartments will offer a secure
        interior courtyard and play/activity rooms to help provide support systems for male and
        female single-parent students. Sales of private homes began as well.

       The Outpatient Care Center opened in August, 1999 bringing together nearly 30 clinics in
        one facility to greatly enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of service to patients.

       UIC developed and implemented an improved system for the protection of human
        subjects in research.

       UIC participated in the review and development of the planned university-wide
        Enterprise Resource Planning system.

UIC Goals related to Productivity and Accountability for FY 2001

UIC will continue to seek ways to improve productivity, cost effectiveness, and accountability.
Included in FY 2001 programs and activities are:

       Toward meeting the goal of providing enough on-campus housing to support 25% of our
        student body by 2012, the campus will expand capacity by 300 beds during FY 2001.

       A new web-based course approval system will be available for departments to use this
        fall. The system maintains data regarding all courses, and allows for the creation,
        revision, or deletion of individual courses.

       Continue participation in development and implementation of the Enterprise Resource
        Planning system.




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                             BEST PRACTICE
         HEALTH SCIENCES – TEACHING, RESEARCH AND PATIENT CARE


Located in the world’s largest medical district, and one of four universities nationally with a full
complement of health sciences colleges, UIC is uniquely placed to provide premiere health care
training supported by collaborative research. UIC houses the nation’s largest medical school and
offers degrees through its Colleges of Dentistry, Nursing, Pharmacy, Health and Human
Development Sciences and School of Public Health.

The health sciences colleges at UIC make a profound impact on the community and the state. One
of three Illinois dentists is a graduate of our College of Dentistry. The College enjoys
international renown for its specialty programs, research, treatment centers, and multidisciplinary
approaches. The College is also committed to the local community as evidenced by its outreach
efforts and community dental care.

One of six Illinois doctors is a graduate of UIC’s College of Medicine as are 70 percent of the
minority physicians practicing in Chicago. The College produces more medical school faculty
than all but five schools in the country.

The College of Nursing is consistently ranked as a top ten nursing program in the country as
reported by U.S. News & World Report. It houses the first World Health Organization
Collaborating Center for Nursing and Midwifery in the U.S., as well as the nationally renowned
Center for Narcolepsy Research.

UIC’s College of Pharmacy is considered one of the top pharmacy schools in the nation. Faculty
obtained a five-year, $5.21 million grant to test plants from around the world for their ability to
prevent cancer. The College also received $7.9 million to create one of the nation’s first centers to
research botanicals for use as dietary supplements.

The College of Health and Human Development Sciences is the first in the country to offer an
interdisciplinary doctoral program in disability studies. The Department of Occupational Therapy
houses the first endowed chair in occupational therapy.

The School of Public Health is the only fully accredited school of its kind in the state. It houses a
renowned CDC Prevention Research Center, a WHO Collaborating Center for Occupational and
Environmental Health, and a national brain tumor registry for cancer research.

Recent accomplishments include the opening of the Molecular Biology Research Building
(MBRB) in 1996 and the Outpatient Care Center (OCC) in 1999. MBRB is a multidisciplinary
facility that accommodates 500 researchers and 50 faculty members in medicine and the basic
sciences. OCC successfully brought together, under one roof, nearly 30 clinics that offer patients
the services of physician directed, multi-specialty practices. Sheltered walkways provide comfort
for patients and visitors as they move from this facility to the rest of the Medical Center and the
parking structure. Campus has secured State funds for construction of the new Medical Research
Facility and Biologic Resources Lab (MRF/BRL).




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                                BEST PRACTICE
               URBAN MISSION – GREAT CITIES, BIG CITY TEACHERS,
                      COMMUNITY BASED SOCIAL WORK

UIC’s Urban Mission distinguishes it among land grant Universities. The Great Cities Initiative
was launched in 1993 with the goal of bringing together public, private, and non-profit sectors to
develop effective partnerships. Guided by this objective, UIC implements teaching, research and
service programs designed to improve the quality of life in Chicago. The Great Cities Institute
(GCI) serves as the focal point for initiatives in interdisciplinary and engaged research on urban
issues.

The UIC Neighborhoods Initiative has coordinated more than 40 interdisciplinary projects that
have resulted in improvements in housing, economic development, education, health and local
leadership in the nearby Pilsen and Near West Side neighborhoods. Employers and citizens have
benefited from the Workforce Development Partnerships Program that offers job skills training
through employment centers created at community colleges. The Small Schools Workshop serves
as a training, research, and technical assistance resource for restructuring Chicago Public Schools.

The College of Education’s Big City Teacher and Administrator program is dedicated to
increasing the number of exemplary teachers and administrators who serve predominantly
African American and Latino students in Chicago public schools and to developing programs that
address the teaching and learning needs of these urban students. As such, the College is
increasing the size of its faculty and operating budget to continue to meet new opportunities and
to effect change in K-16 education.

The Jane Addams College of Social Work is committed to the preparation and professional
development of social workers for professional practice in Illinois’ poor, chronically underserved,
inner city communities. This program will serve as a national model for replication by other
social work education and service programs. Changes to the current curriculum include student
internships in nontraditional community-based settings, distance education, and new courses on
community development and practice.

The South Campus redevelopment project, a $538 million public-private partnership, will create a
vibrant intellectual, social, and cultural environment for our students, faculty and staff, as well as
our residential neighbors. The 58-acre site will be home to 750 UIC students including single-
parent students, and to the College of Business and other academic facilities. There will also be
retail enterprises, parking facilities, and 850 private homes.




                                                                                                   17
18
                                           Appendix

                                 Summary Report on the
                        Annual Program Review Process for AY 2000

The University of Illinois at Chicago reviewed twenty-two (22) academic programs at the
baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels and one research and public service unit during the
academic year 1999-2000.

The summaries below reflect the findings, observations, recommendations and plans of action
contained in unit self studies, reports from internal review panels, and reports from external
reviewers who are experts in the disciplines under review. The following programs were
reviewed:

        Latin American Studies (B.A.)
        African American Studies (B.A.)
        Hispanic Studies (M.A.)
        Kinesiology (B.S., M.S., Ph.D.)
        Graphic Design (BFA, MFA)
        Industrial Design (BFA, MFA)
        Electronic Visualization (MFA)
        Photography/Film/Electronic Media (BFA)
        Film/Animation/Video (MFA)
        Photography (MFA)
        Studio Arts (BFA, MFA)
        Art History (B.A., M.A., Ph.D.)
        Theatre (B.A., M.A.)
        Music (B.A.)
        Center for Research on Women and Gender




                                                                                                 19
20
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (05.0107)
B.A. in Latin American Studies

Major Findings and Observations

      The Latin American Studies Program is at a crossroads and is in need of revitalization.
      Reviewers agree that the LASt curriculum is not well conceived and needs a thorough review,
       revision and reorganization of the requirements to reflect a more logical progression from
       introductory courses to advanced courses, including enhanced introductory courses, more
       upper division courses, and more programmatic cooperation with other departments.
      Focus the program, in part, on professional career options for which the LASt program is
       supposed to prepare students.
      Curriculum lacks internship and study abroad opportunities.
      Faculty has reached a low point in number (through retirements and departures) and will have
       to be rebuilt.
      Latin American Studies needs additional faculty from across several disciplines to fulfill its
       mission.
      The Latin American Studies Program has subsisted on minimal and inadequate resources.
      Latin American Studies lacks a development program and has attracted no outside funding.
      Latin American Studies also lacks an organized outreach program to the community.

Recommendations

      Vigorously recruit and hire new faculty from a large talented pool of candidates to
       provide adequate course offerings and to carry out the mission of the program.
      Develop a strategic plan and set of goals for the next 3-5 years that address the needs of
       faculty, students, and the program.
      Begin a renewal process immediately with a thorough review and revision of the
       curriculum with the goal of infusing greater coherence and organization.
      Seek increased funding from the university and external sources to put the program on
       solid footing; begin a development effort.
      Establish an outreach vision and program to capitalize on a strong reservoir of good will
       in Chicago’s Latino community.
      Take advantage of the dynamic growth of Latin American and Latino Studies to recruit
       more majors; UIC student interest in Latin American and Latino Studies is growing.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      A new director of the Latin American Studies Program was hired and assumed leadership
       on July 1, 2000. A priority of the new director is to build a consensual plan for the future
       of the program, developing strategies for its implementation.
      Goals will be set for future focus on programmatic development, addressing student
       educational needs, access to more resources and their strategic use, and greater
       credibility. Among some of the specific goals are seeking more faculty lines, forging
       stronger ties with faculty in other units, successful tenuring of junior faculty, continued
       growth in scholarly strength and recognition, and strengthening the program by aligning
       it more strategically with UIC’s agenda in a more organized, concentrated and concerted
       manner.




                                                                                                  21
   The Latin American Studies Program plans to meet educational needs of students by
     developing a balanced focus on and better articulation of the upper level of the
        program;
     developing an undergraduate research methodology course for majors;
     incorporating research training into courses;
     offering career-oriented academic paths and career development opportunities; assist
        students in career planning;
     developing and implementing an internship program
     identifying factors that support or inhibit graduation; and
     improving and expanding foreign exchange programs.
   Seek to become a Title VI Latin American Studies Program.
   Participate in development activities.
   Hire an assistant to the director to develop further funding sources.




                                                                                        22
AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (05.0201)

B.A. in African American Studies

Major Findings and Observations

      The African American Studies program has grown in size in the last decade, deepening
       its legitimacy within the University and growing in national visibility.
      The department has achieved a degree of stability that places it in an enviable position in
       relationship to many African American Studies programs and departments in the U.S.
       The program can be compared favorably to programs at UCLA, University of
       Massachusetts-Amherst, and the University of Maryland, College Park.
      The program is poised to make a leap to a nationally prominent position.
      The department now has the critical mass of faculty and has a potential premier group in
       African American Studies and cultural studies.
      Joint appointments lead to constructive bridges with other departments; they add depth
       and breadth to the curriculum.
      The department has established good working relations with the African American
       Cultural Center, and there exists collaborative opportunities with the Institute for the
       Humanities, the Great Cities Institute, and the new Institute for Research on Race and
       Public Policy.

Problems and Challenges

      Faculty leaves of absence, reduced teaching loads, and joint appointments can make it
       difficult to maintain a stable, identifiable faculty in some key courses. The high profile
       of African American Studies faculty members makes them very desirable to competing
       institutions.
      Increasing visibility of the African American Studies program among undergraduates
       (i.e., enlarging the pool of majors and minors) must be regarded as one of the
       department’s highest priorities.
      With joint appointments comes the challenge of developing a unified department.
       Budgeted tenure-track faculty members need to have a sense of ownership and
       participation in the business of the department.
      The department needs aggressive, visionary leadership.
      There is a lack of resources for basic supplies, travel, and equipment and services.
      The program supports 25-30 majors, but a smaller number of degrees is awarded.

Recommendations

      Recruit a new head of the department with vision, commitment, and hands-on
       administrative experience who can translate extant potential into a realized whole. The
       new head should have a consultative leadership style.
      The new head will need resources immediately to impact the collegial life of the
       department.
      The new head should be selected with an eye toward consolidating emerging strengths in
       literature and cultural studies.
      The department needs to make 1-2 additional hires at 100% time in African American
       Studies. One new hire should be a historian and the other from the social sciences in
       order to elevate the social research and public policy profile of African American Studies.


                                                                                                    23
      The faculty could benefit from a retreat to deepen intellectual ties and provide a sense of
       collective identity. The retreat would allow time for serious discussion about revamping
       the curriculum, expanding interest in the undergraduate major, and dealing with other
       long-term planning issues.
      A graduate program in African American Studies might increase interest in the
       undergraduate major and change the way that the department is viewed.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The department is developing plans to solidify and increase the number of faculty
       members. An increase in the size of the faculty will help the department move toward
       implementation of plans to develop areas of departmental specialization, implement a
       graduate program, and attract more majors by establishing internships for undergraduates
       with local cultural organizations.




                                                                                                 24
HISPANIC STUDIES (05.0203)

M.A. in Hispanic Studies

Major Findings and Observations

      The M.A. program has become the dominant program in the greater Chicago area.
      UIC is the only Chicago-area university that has a fully-developed and adequately staffed
       graduate program in Spanish on a par with most CIC institutions.
      Although there are no particular problems with the M.A. program, the time may be
       appropriate to review the overall design of the program, including a careful overview and
       evaluation of the curriculum, procedures, and standards.
      Graduate students express a positive attitude toward the education they are getting. They
       demonstrate collegiality and esprit.

Recommendations

      The department needs to strengthen the linguistics component of the M.A. by hiring at
       least one additional faculty member. A strong program in linguistics will gain greater
       national recognition for the department and the university.
      The department should consider establishing an annual conference, a distinguished
       lecture series, an annual visiting faculty member to provide a mini-course, or something
       else unique to call attention to the accomplishments of the department and to provide
       graduate students with further exposure to major intellectual trends.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The department will concentrate over the next five years on recruiting more highly
       qualified graduate students.
      The department is developing a course in research methodologies and critical theory for
       first year graduate students.
      The department is exploring the possibility of adding a component for Spanish teacher
       certification in the Spanish Applied Linguistics option of the M.A.
      The department has launched a search for new faculty appointments in generative syntax.




                                                                                              25
26
KINESIOLOGY (31.0501)

B.S. in Kinesiology

Major Findings and Observations

      The School of Kinesiology is a strong school that can be even better, and can serve as a
       role model for universities throughout the world.
      The school, however, is at a critical point in its evolution. It needs to shift focus to
       capitalize on strengths, reduce some programs so that investment can be made in
       programs that are viable in today’s market.
      The school has too many curricular areas for the existing number of faculty members. It
       should develop an undergraduate option in movement science that would incorporate pre-
       professional training for physical therapy, occupational therapy, kinesiology, and athletic
       training.
      The Urban Youth Development program is a nationally recognized program that could
       have significant impact on policy development and community success for urban youth.
       The question is whether or not the program is appropriately placed in the School of
       Kinesiology.
       Athletic Training needs to revise its courses in order to prepare graduates for the national
       certification examination.
      The school has no plans to move Athletic Training toward a certified program.
      The area of Exercise Physiology is strong with good faculty. The area lost some faculty
       members that need to be replaced, especially in human performance.
      Having coaches teach in a kinesiology program is “old hat.” Teaching physical
       education and methods courses requires different knowledge and skills than coaching.

Recommendations

      The school should consolidate overlapping undergraduate programs by creating fewer but
       more concentrated options that correspond with the mission and goals of the school. The
       school should consider just two programs, one in health pre-professions and one in
       pedagogy.
      The school needs to restructure the undergraduate curriculum to be more consistent with
       the graduate education mission in exercise science/exercise physiology and motor control
       and learning, and to provide a clear and consistent pathway for graduate education at the
       master’s and doctoral levels.
      The school should strengthen the science option (exercise physiology) in the
       undergraduate program through a focused and rigorous core, including advanced level
       courses in exercise physiology.
      The school needs to review the didactic courses for currency and relevancy of content
       and appropriate rigor.
      The school should consider relocating the Urban Youth Development program to either
       Education or Social Work.
      The school needs to increase collaboration with other units in the College of Health and
       Human Development Sciences in providing educational offerings to kinesiology majors.
       For example, the school should establish a link with the Department of Disability and
       Human Development.




                                                                                                 27
Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The dean of the college is keenly aware of the concerns facing the school and intends to
       review each concern carefully.
      The school has formed a strategic planning committee with the following priorities:
        expand the exercise physiology specialization in the undergraduate program to
           include a pre-health professional track (work has already begun);
        re-conceptualize the Community Physical Education track of the B.S. program in
           order to address the growing demand for fitness professionals.


M.S. in Kinesiology

Major Findings and Observations

      Faculty members teaching in the Exercise Science area are of high quality, and there are
       solid faculty members in Motor Control and Learning.
      The Exercise Science area would benefit from additional content areas in exercise
       physiology. This will require hiring a new faculty member.
      The graduate students value their laboratory experiences, but courses need to be revised
       to meet their educational and career needs.
      The program in Fitness and Sport Management appears to be successful. Local industries
       and sports associations seek students who graduate from this program.
      Teaching and research laboratories are located in different buildings, causing problems
       for faculty and teaching assistants and encouraging isolation.

Recommendations

      The graduate program in Exercise Physiology should capture a broader range of human
       performance issues, particularly with clinical populations. It needs to have some applied
       and functional work with clinical populations.
      Exercise Physiology also needs to hire two faculty members in human performance, one
       of which should have an interest in collaborating with the clinical exercise physiologist in
       the Department of Disability and Human Development.
      The school needs to include graduate students in curricular planning and faculty hiring.
      The school should consider reducing the number of program options.
      The Sports Performance Laboratory should be moved from Athletics to the School of
       Kinesiology, or find ways to increase the school’s involvement in the lab.
      The school should provide opportunities for graduate students in exercise physiology and
       motor control and learning to interact through seminars.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      At the M.S. level, the school has consolidated the adult corporate fitness area and the
       physical education and sport management area into a single area called fitness and
       management.
      The school eliminated the sports psychology track in Kinesiology Studies area and
       renamed the area as urban youth development.




                                                                                                 28
Ph.D. in Kinesiology

Note: The Ph.D. in Kinesiology was approved by the Illinois Board of Higher Education in
November 1997. The first class was admitted in the fall of 1998. Because of the youth of the
program, the reviewers did not offer any major comments about it. A few minor observations
were made, as follows:

       The school should increase opportunities for Ph.D. students to participate in research
        earlier in their program of study by reducing the amount of time spent as teaching
        assistants.
       As was mentioned under the M.S. summary, the school needs to provide opportunities for
        doctoral students in exercise physiology and motor control and learning to interact with
        each other through seminars.




                                                                                               29
30
ART AND DESIGN

BFA in Graphic Design (50.0402)

Major Findings and Observations

      The graphic design program is healthy with enrollments at an all time high, primarily
       because graphic design has grown to encompass the web/internet as part of its territory.
      The program has developed many connections to industry that benefit both students and
       faculty.
      Graphic design is active in interdisciplinary activity and thinking.
      Overall, the Art and Design faculty is extremely strong, especially recent hires who are
       among Chicago’s most respected artists.
      Common to all of the Art and Design programs, the facilities are inadequate and out of
       step with peer institutions. Generally, there is a lack of equipment, lack of space, poor
       ventilation, and general disrepair.
      Technology issues are a pressing concern. Computer technology is badly needed in all
       programs.
      Reviewers commented positively on the new ambitious technology initiative by the
       school (see Actions Taken/To be Taken, below).
      Reviewers noted that the new director of the school has proposed to faculty plans to
       reorganize the school’s structure and curricula, placing electronic visualization at the
       center of its work. The goal is to bring the areas of art, design, and technology into a
       triangular structure that accords each area equal importance, and designed to bring these
       three areas into complex and continual interaction. As a result, students would learn the
       foundations of their practice, but strengths of combined disciplinary patterns would be
       encouraged.

Recommendations

      The reviewers reported that the graphic design program is in good shape and offered no
       specific or substantive recommendations for change or improvement at either the
       undergraduate or graduate level.
      Recommendations regarding the upgrade of facilities and equipment are directed
       generally to the school for all of its programs.
      Recommendations on technology for all programs: The School of Art and Design should
       emulate computer science departments and professional multi-media production
       companies on how to design, run, and maintain digital media facilities.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The school has launched a technological initiative to make digital technology an even
       more thoroughly integrated condition of undergraduate learning.
      The school and college seek to build computer facilities that offer standard and special
       support within the arts.




                                                                                                  31
MFA in Graphic Design (50.0402)

Major Findings and Observations

      As with the undergraduate program, the reviewers were complimentary about the state of
       health of the MFA in Graphic Design.
      Reviewers expressed some concern that the Graphic Design faculty is teaching the Art
       and Design Colloquium on overload without compensation. They felt this was
       exploitative and interfered with faculty’s ability to do research and produce publications.
      Reviewers were also concerned about faculty giving up their office space to provide
       studio space for graduate students, causing faculty to share offices. This situation does
       not address faculty and student needs.

Recommendations

      Reviewers strongly recommend that the situation with offices be corrected quickly.
       Faculty members should have individual offices.




                                                                                                32
BFA in Industrial Design (50.0404)

Major Findings and Observations

      The Industrial Design program has declined in size over the past years and is in a weak
       position in terms of faculty and vision of its future.
      The program has lost faculty (now at 2 FTE) and not replaced them.
      Students are genuinely committed and enthusiastic about the program, but they suffer
       from poorly designed or poorly executed curricular sequences, which leave them
       unprepared to accomplish work at the levels expected in the junior and senior years.
      Access to computer laboratory is restricted because of limited hours of operation.
      Computer software is very much out of date.

Recommendations

      Reviewers suggest that the school accelerate the process of hiring additional new full-
       time faculty members.
      A search for a new head of the program is a high priority.
      Expand crossover efforts with other programs in the school in ways that can provide
       conceptual, critical, and other aesthetic approaches in Industrial Design. For example,
       critiques with faculty members and students from other programs would be helpful.
      Industrial Design should seek further integration with other schools and programs, e.g.,
       architecture and engineering.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      As noted under the summary for Graphic Design, the school is planning to reorganize its
       structure and curricula, with electronic visualization as its centerpiece. This initiative
       should help to revitalize the Industrial Design program.
      The Art and Design laboratories are being rethought and reconfigured.
      The director of the school is finding ways to effectively address the weaknesses of the
       facilities.


MFA in Industrial Design (50.0404)

Major Findings and Observations

      Comments made by the reviewers about the BFA program pertain also to the MFA
       degree.
      Industrial Design is the weakest of the Art and Design programs. It has atrophied over
       the last decade.
      A faculty that once had 5 FTEs is now down to 2.
      The program is acutely in need of revitalization, including replacing lost faculty,
       upgrading facilities, and developing solid pedagogical and organizational underpinnings.
      As the program now stands, students are not meeting minimum industry standards and
       are not competitive in the job market.




                                                                                                  33
Recommendations

      See those listed under the BFA in Industrial Design.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      See those listed under the BFA in Industrial Design. See also the reference to
       restructuring of Art and Design curricula under Major Findings and Observations under
       the BFA in Graphic Design.




                                                                                           34
MFA in Electronic Visualization (50.0499)
BFA in Photography/Film/Electronic Media (50.0699)
MFA in Film/Animation/Video (50.0602)
MFA in Photography (50.0605)


Note: Because these programs overlap at several points, the comments from the reviewers
pertain to both undergraduate and graduate levels.


Electronic Visualization and the Electronic Visualization Laboratory

Major Findings and Observations

      The Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) is a world-class research laboratory and
       educational program, widely respected in the field of computer art and computer science.
      EVL is a star program with unprecedented influence on the field of computer graphics.

Recommendations

      EVL should continue to be supported at the highest levels.
      EVL needs to be integrated more into other programs and vice versa. This requires
       expanded dialogue and curricular and other interaction.
      EVL and studio art and design programs must assume a leadership role in repositioning
       the pioneering history of computer art within the fine arts as well as design contexts.
       Media art scholarship nationally is struggling with related historical issues, and the
       School of Art and Design can be a major player in this area.
      Encourage increased involvement by faculty members in other programs that can engage
       the EVL actively in a dialogue concerning the arts, culture, and media technology.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The director of the school has already begun discussions with faculty members to
       investigate a restructuring of the curricula and making electronic visualization an
       integrating and centralizing component of all of the Art and Design programs.


Film/Animation/Video

Major Findings and Observations

      This program is healthy and has excellent faculty.
      The animation area is small and will shrink even further with the impending retirement of
       a senior professor.
      The program suffers the same problems as other Art and Design programs, i.e., lack of
       adequate facilities and equipment.




                                                                                              35
Recommendations

      The animation area needs to move quickly to replace the retiring faculty member.
      The animation program should be encouraged to develop courses to share its knowledge
       base of dynamic visual language, including gesture and transformation and animation
       history, that connect fine arts with design. These courses could be seen as part of a
       foundation for all programs engaging dynamic digital media.


Photography

Major Findings and Observations

      Photography is a field undergoing deep change because of the widespread development
       and use of digital imaging technologies.
      This new direction poses questions about the future development of photography in
       regard to teaching and associated equipment strategies; also thinking about the
       relationship between photography and other image-making areas.
      Reviewers expressed concern that graduate students do not have their own studios, and
       this situation is inhibiting their productivity.

Recommendations

      Photography needs to consider repositioning itself to develop deeper interactions with
       other areas of instruction in Art and Design, especially with the Electronic Visualization
       Laboratory and Film/Video/Animation.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      As previously stated, the director and faculty of the school are looking at restructuring the
       Art and Design curricula that would bring the various areas (and their students) into
       closer collaboration.




                                                                                                 36
STUDIO ARTS (50.0702)

BFA/MFA in Studio Arts

Major Findings and Observations

      While the Studio Arts curriculum seems to be extremely successful in training artists, it is
       one that undergoes little change from year to year. Few new courses are developed.
      Studio Arts seems to have the weakest intrinsic link to the school’s new technology
       initiative, since studio art employs methods, materials, and tools that do not intersect
       much with those of electronic visualization.
      Reviewers suggest that students might benefit from additional course work in art history.
      Students suggested that there be less emphasis on studio production and more on the
       development of an individual analytical and critical perspective from which the work is
       being produced.
      Studio facilities were considered below par by the reviewers.

Recommendations

      Faculty and students would benefit from a more flexible curricular structure that would
       allow and encourage development of new courses, both to introduce new material into the
       curriculum and to keep faculty engaged with new topics and research.
      One structural issue that the School of Art and Design might address is the separation of
       Studio Art from Photography/Film/Video/Animation. It now seems anachronistic since
       artists now work in and between all of these areas with real fluidity.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      Again, the director and faculty of the school are investigating a restructuring of the
       various Art and Design curricula that would respond to the reviewers’ second point
       above, i.e., interactive relationships among the various Art and Design areas as well as
       preserving disciplinary identity.

Additional Actions Under Consideration by the School

      The director is investigating the possibility of establishing a design center or visualization
       center. The purpose of the center would be to bring together top artists and designers to
       critically evaluate the directions of meaning communicated through visual information.
      The director also is looking into the possibility of creating a faculty technology resource
       center that would provide leading edge technologies and appropriate training in their use.




                                                                                                  37
38
ART HISTORY (50.0703)

B.A. in Art History

Major Findings and Observations

      With regard to all degree levels, the reviewers found art history to be a stellar department
       that represents the university to the city, region, and nation in important ways having to
       do with the institution’s cultural and educational mission.
      The department is in excellent condition, blessed with strong leadership.
      Enrollments in the B.A. program have been stable in recent years. Art history is also a
       service department that offers courses to satisfy the all-university general education
       requirement in the humanities.
      B.A. graduates are being accepted into graduate programs at prestigious universities,
       including Harvard, Chicago, Northwestern and Duke.
      Career advancement in art-related fields is enhanced by the availability of internships for
       art history students, the quality of the faculty, and the range of regular and special topics
       courses.
      Recruitment of minority students has been a difficult issue for the department, as it is for
       most institutions.
      Reviewers of the art history program expressed concern generally about the condition and
       needs of the facilities and services to students and faculty, especially with respect to the
       availability of computers, computer laboratory time, and the slide library.

Recommendations

      Both the external reviewers and the internal review panel had no specific
       recommendations for the undergraduate curriculum.
      The external reviewers recommended that in order to increase minority enrollments, the
       department make connections with junior and high school teachers, community college
       faculty, and with ethnic museums and projects.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The department has broadened its course offerings in non-Western and non-European
       areas.
      The department is exploring opportunities for more interdisciplinary collaboration within
       the College of Architecture and the Arts and with academic units outside the college.
      The department’s library holdings have increased by 10% per year for the last five years,
       for a total increase of 50%.
      Digital access has been provided to over 50 thousand art works in 39 North American
       libraries.
      The slide library has increased by 5600 slides annually, especially in newly developed
       areas of African and African-American art, contemporary art, American urban planning,
       Latin American art, and Southeast Asian art and architecture.
      The department will establish an art history major in the College of Liberal Arts and
       Sciences to satisfy the demand by LAS students for the program. The proposed program
       has been approved by the Chicago Senate and the University Board of Trustees.
      The department will offer an undergraduate honor thesis option for Art History majors.



                                                                                                 39
M.A. in Art History

Major Findings and Observations

      The Art History program fosters significant and commendable interdisciplinary activity
       within the university.
      The program provides educational outreach that takes advantage of the remarkable
       Chicago-area resources.
      Graduate students reported satisfaction with the faculty, their peers, and the academic
       preparation. The program makes good use of the city and its resources.
      The main concern centered on problems with the required comprehensive examination.
       Students reported that they were not given adequate information or guidance in preparing
       for the exam.
      Students indicated that they feel a lack of community among them.
      Teaching Assistants lack office space to meet with students.
      There is a lack of funds to provide a lecture series that would enhance the intellectual
       climate for students (and faculty) and the visibility of the department and university as a
       cultural center.

Recommendations

      The department needs to investigate problems surrounding the comprehensive
       examination. Other alternatives to the examination might be considered, such as having a
       course distribution requirement. Consider expanding the graduate student handbook to
       provide students with better direction on degree requirements and exam preparation.
      Students recommended implementation of an orientation meeting in the fall and period
       meetings thereafter that would foster unity among them and provide greater guidance
       through the program.
      The department should institute a lecture series by outstanding people that would draw
       attention to the department and the university, and provide more of an intellectual life for
       students and faculty.
      The department should consider also holding short-term seminars (two weeks) that allow
       students to work more closely with distinguished people.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      Additional resources will be sought to provide a greater intellectual community within
       the department for faculty and students in the form of invited lecturers and the
       organization of symposia and conferences.
      Other recommendations made by the reviewers as a result of the review process will be
       investigated by the department and action taken whenever possible and appropriate.




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Ph.D. in Art History

Note: The Ph.D. in Art History was approved by the Illinois Board of Higher Education in
August 1999 and has not yet established a history that requires programmatic review. However,
reviewers offered their observations and opinions as this new degree program is launched.

Major Findings and Observations

      The inception of the Ph.D. builds on the unique strengths of the Art History program in
       relation to Chicago demographics. It will also enhance the university’s analytical and
       creative contributions to this urban Midwestern community.
      The Ph.D. program will permit the university to strengthen ties and cooperation with
       leading artistic, architectural, and cultural institutions in Chicago and throughout Illinois
       by both attracting from and adding to members of the staffs of those institutions at the
       doctoral level.
      The university must ensure the necessary resources to make the Ph.D. program succeed.
       It will need adequate funding to attract outstanding graduate students and to hire
       additional staff to support the program.

Recommendations

      The department needs to explore the possibility of fellowships from within the university
       in order to attract exceptional graduate students.
      The department needs to alter the structure of Teaching Assistant assignments and pay
       rate to accurately reflect the work they do.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      With the approval of the Ph.D., the department has launched an active recruitment
       program for Ph.D. candidates.
      The department is working on the development of two new core courses for the program.
      The department will seek support to add new faculty positions devoted to such areas as
       museum studies, preservation, film and media studies, and Nineteenth century painting.
      Additional course offerings, seminars, workshops, and support of travel and research will
       develop along interdisciplinary lines.
      Expansion and refinement of course offerings is planned to meet the needs of doctoral
       students who are interested in careers in museums and preservation studies.




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42
THEATRE (50.0501)

B.A. in Theatre

Major Findings and Observations

      The theatre program is poised to be able to train students to think as artists with a unique
       point of view. With pre-conceived notions of theatre, students are open to developing
       modes of expression and giving voice to themes currently under-represented in the
       mainstream. As it now stands, the theatre program is not in the mainstream of theatre
       training.
      The UIC theatre program should not compete with established theatre training schools in
       the area.
      Theatre should build on current strengths and opportunities to create a vibrant program.
      Faculty, students, and staff are eager to pursue change and improvements in an effort to
       strengthen the current program.
      Program enrollments have remained relatively steady over the past five years.
      Senior staff has become disillusioned with reductions in staff, space, and money.

Recommendations

      The theatre program should consider organizing and expanding the curriculum to provide
       a good, solid grounding in all aspects of theatre in order to give students an in-depth
       experience in performance as well as a broad-based knowledge of all areas of production.
       This will allow students to make decisions about careers in theatre.
      The program needs to develop seminars on actual “business” of being in theatre.
      Theatre needs to encourage the development of interdepartmental courses and projects
       within the college and across the campus.
      Theatre should incorporate the latest theatrical technology into the program so that
       students will be better grounded in technological innovations and trends when they go
       into the profession.
      The program needs to hire faculty with different areas of expertise to broaden the reach
       of course offerings.
      Theatre should establish an internship program with theatre companies in Chicago. This
       will enrich the education of theatre majors.
      Theatre needs to establish outreach programs in high schools to provide students with
       opportunities to develop teaching skills through classroom exposure.
      The program should encourage strengthening connections to the surrounding community,
       campus community, and Chicago theatre community.
      The program needs to create a structure for student involvement and empowerment,
       including the creation of a student advisory board.
      Invest in adjunct faculty members and their feeling of ownership of the program. The
       program has some of the top theatrical professionals in Chicago with excellent academic
       credentials, and a substantial effort should be make to keep them and to utilize them in
       curriculum development, the operation of the program, and departmental governance.
      Symptomatic of both the B.A. and M.A. programs, extant facilities are inadequate. The
       program and department must seek the necessary funds to invest in equipment for
       performance space and classrooms in the daily operation of theatre; identify rehearsal
       space for student performances on campus; build new shop and lounge space; identify



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       and secure off-site storage space; and implement long-range planning for a performing
       arts facility as part of the development of the south campus.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      Recent approval has been give for a major renovation of the theatre facilities.
      Commitment of the dean to the theatre program is seen in the support she has given for
       the renovation project.
      Courses were added to the curriculum in fall 1999 to enhance the undergraduate program.
      Recruitment of a new chair of the Department of Performing Arts will be underway in the
       near future. New leadership should invigorate the programs in the department.
      The theatre program is seeking to replace a recently retired scholar.
      The faculty has been charged with clarifying both the program’s future and its direction
       in the future.


M.A. in Theatre

Note: Many of the observations and conclusions made by the reviewers about the B.A. program
pertain also to the M.A. program and will not be repeated here.

Major Findings and Observations

      There were ten (10) students enrolled in the M.A. program in the fall of 1999.
      The program currently has little critical mass; half of the students enrolled are part-time.
      The M.A. program has graduated ten (10) students over the last five years, or two (2) per
       year.
      The low graduation rate may stem from the fact that some students do not even attempt
       the thesis or thesis production requirement in order to complete the degree.
      The M.A. in Theatre is not a terminal degree and thus has little national impact.
      Graduates of the M.A. program continue their education (e.g., MFA and Ph.D.
       programs), teach in public schools, or participate in repertory theatre.

Recommendations

      The external reviewers strongly recommend that the current M.A. program be eliminated
       and replaced with a 3-year MFA in Directing and Acting.
      A stronger undergraduate curriculum will help in the success of the MFA because it will
       make more classes available that can strengthen the offerings to graduate students.
      The MFA will also provide well-trained undergraduates with an opportunity to work on
       more productions guided by graduate students.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      As noted under the summary for the B.A. program, the faculty has been asked to review
       the theatre programs and to decide what direction they will take in the future.
      This initiative will gain additional momentum under a new chair of the Department of
       Performing Arts.




                                                                                                 44
MUSIC (50.0901)

B.A. in Music

Major Findings and Observations

      The music field, in terms of student demand in an academic setting, is experiencing a
       significant upturn and should remain strong over the next decade, especially in Illinois in
       the area of music education given the large number of anticipated teacher retirements.
      UIC’s music program is in the mainstream and has opportunities for distinctive growth
       given the university’s urban location and mission.
      The current music faculty members compare favorably with faculty in similar B.A.
       programs and are respected and productive scholars. Faculty members are active artists
       and scholars whose work has been recognized nationally and, in some cases,
       internationally.
      The faculty is strained with heavy teaching loads in order to sustain an appropriate
       musical learning environment for students.
      The balance of scholarship and teaching is typical of music faculties given the nature of
       performing ensembles, master/apprentice teaching modes, and other pedagogical
       traditions.
      Students are pleased with the quality of faculty and their course work, although some
       expressed a desire for more upper division courses, especially in music history.
      The music major student body is bright, focused, and committed.
      Reviewers were impressed with the new computer facility housed in the music program.
      The most critical needs are rehearsal and performance space. Current facilities are so
       substandard that the program will not be able to sustain itself in the near future.
       Renovation of facilities will increase the quality and value of the education received by
       students.
      The music program is severely under-funded. Instrument maintenance and repair,
       recordings and scores in support of education, and publicity materials are funded at less
       than minimal level.
      The music faculty needs to address how their scholarship as an intellectual construct can
       infuse undergraduate learning in a way that would enhance institutional goals.
      Reviewers reported that there would be potential benefit to establishing a music
       education program. Some students indicated that they planned to transfer because the
       music program does not have a music education track. Such a program would address
       both a local and national teacher shortage.
      The music program may want to consider reshaping the B.A. degree to attract new
       students.
      Students were unanimous in wanting an orchestral ensemble. Students feel that there is a
       sufficient number of non-music major instrumentalists available on campus to mount a
       viable ensemble.

Recommendations

      Music faculty and the dean should consider planning a one-day retreat, with an outside
       facilitator, to discuss the topic of scholarship and learning. Reviewers believe that from
       the retreat will come “the kind of imaginative thinking that can create a culture of success
       that is open to and eager for change.”



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      The music program should consider adding a teacher certification track to the B.A. in
       music as a step toward establishing a professional Bachelor of Music degree in music
       education.
      The music program ought to consider creating a B.A. with a pre-medicine track by
       establishing a tightly focused general education component that will prepare music
       students for entry to medical school or other related professional studies.
      The program should investigate opportunities to interface the B.A program with other
       disciplines in the college in a manner that links to its urban constituency. An
       interdisciplinary program might consider the variety of roles that artists play in the urban
       setting: arts and ethnic awareness, arts and intra-cultural communication, and arts and
       wellness.
      The music program needs to hire a faculty member in music theory. Such an individual
       could teach several required courses in music theory and, depending on the person’s
       expertise, conduct an orchestra, assist in the development of web-based tools, or teach
       courses in vernacular music to supplement the jazz program.
      A position should be created for a conductor whose responsibility will be to recruit
       players from the campus at large in order to establish an orchestra as part of the ensemble
       experience for music majors and to enhance the cultural life of the campus.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The music program will explore possibilities of expanding beyond its present student
       summer internships at the Grant Park Music Festival to include also the Chicago
       Symphony Orchestra and the Lyric Opera. Work-study opportunities are available, and
       students are encouraged to play in community orchestras and club bands.
      The program is planning its first evaluation of its advising procedures since it was made
       mandatory three years ago.
      The music program received $36 thousand from the college to create a state-of-the-art
       computer music laboratory facility. It is already in use in teaching composition and soon
       will be applied to instruction in theory, aural skills, and performance.
      The program is working to attract and retain well-qualified students. In addition to the
       program’s outreach efforts to undergraduate students, it plans to staff a booth, for
       recruitment purposes, at the next convention of the Illinois Music Educators Association.
      The program envisions growth in the recently instituted performance track to satisfy
       student demand.
      The music program is planning on developing graduate study in music education,
       conducting, and theory/composition. The program plans to meet with the College of
       Education to develop a program that best meets the needs of the city’s and state’s music
       teachers.
      The program will seek a senior theorist to complete the composition and theory faculty.
      The program will seek funds to renovate and upgrade performance rooms and
       classrooms.
      Any future funds would be devoted to the improvement of physical space. Other
       priorities include hiring new faculty in music education, theory and composition, and
       ethnomusicology/history.




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CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON WOMEN AND GENDER (60.0502)

Major Findings and Observations

      The UIC Center for Research on Women and Gender is the indisputable, widely
       recognized leader in research on women’s health among the more than 70 centers for
       research on women and gender that belong to the National Council for Research on
       Women.
      The center long ago played a leadership role nationally in setting the agenda for research
       and policy.
      The current program, funded under the National Center for Excellence in Women’s
       Health, is an outstanding example of collaboration among basic scientists, clinical service
       providers, health educators, and community partners.
      The program has carefully designed a conceptual framework and is successful in
       operationalizing and implementing that framework.
      The center has created a truly outstanding and wide-ranging set of projects in
       collaboration with a wide range of different community constituencies. The projects
       build on a deep reservoir of knowledge among university personnel about gender-related
       needs of Chicago area community members that is an invaluable resource for the future.
      The center created and administers a seed grant program to support university faculty
       research, especially those working in women’s health. The seed grant program has
       supported research on extremely important health problems.
      There is a healthy respectful collaboration between the center and the Women’s Studies
       Program that appears highly successful.
      The center has developed an effective program in evaluation research, assisting
       community agencies in evaluating their programs.
      The center has participated in the CIC Women in Science programs, established strong
       ties with scientists in an array of disciplines, and has been a contributor to a national
       faculty and curriculum development organized by the American Association of Colleges
       and Universities.

Recommendations

      The center should consider expanding programmatic endeavors in Women in Science,
       including such initiatives as K-12 education, especially to encourage girls and minorities
       to enter and succeed in scientific and technical fields; forging links with community
       colleges to reach minority women students in these fields; mentoring undergraduate,
       graduate, and faculty women in the sciences; evaluation of institutional climate for
       women in these fields; and support for women researchers in the sciences.
      The center should further its service and contracts in the Chicago region and across the
       state in developing technical assistance for community agencies desiring and needing to
       evaluate their programs. Current involvement in community evaluation needs to be
       organized and structured to permit a more coherent, ongoing effort.
      The center needs to strengthen its ties to the areas of humanities and social sciences. It
       should identify ways to reach out to diverse areas of research on women and gender.
      The center director needs the assistance of additional faculty members who can also take
       leadership in developing center-sponsored activities in a wider range of fields than is now
       possible.
      The university must increase its commitment to funding professional staff. This would
       strengthen the effectiveness and reputation of the center.


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      The center lacks budget for capital equipment or a mechanism for acquiring equipment.
       In order to maintain adequate technological capacity, provisions should be made for
       routine allocation or access to central resources for acquiring and upgrading hardware
       and software.

Actions Taken/To be Taken

      The center continues to pursue opportunities in collaboration and interdisciplinary work.
      The center will continue to build on the success of its research roundtables to develop
       multidisciplinary research teams.
      The center will continue to support the work of other units through co-sponsorship.
      The center received approval to hire an assistant director.
      The center has begun to formalize the Evaluation and Technical Assistant Program. A
       director has been appointed and there are plans to staff these efforts for a sustained
       program.
      The center will continue the successful Faculty Seed Grant funding at current levels.
      The center plans to initiate the Faculty Scholars Program.
      The center will also initiate a development effort to generate external funding, writing
       grant and contract proposals, and build a base of individual donors.
      The center will develop and maintain an online faculty research database so that faculty
       can identify research opportunities.
      The center seeks to become a recognized repository for research datasets. It plans to
       build capacity to store, access, and analyze datasets.




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