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					              PO BOX 2549 • FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA 22031-0549
              Spring 2002 • Volume 5 Number 1



                                           LEADERSHIP
                    Uncommon Reminders for Bringing Out the Best in Others and Ourselves
                                             (Presented by Robert K. Cooper, PhD)
     Leadership is the act of making a difference. It’s the           Leadership values even the smallest moments of
ability to achieve results - through people.                    inspiration. It’s facing the truth about weaknesses, first in
     Leadership is - who you are when no one else is looking.   yourself, and second in others, and managing these
It’s knowing what you’re best at, what brings a light to        weaknesses out of the way. It is learning from every
your eyes, what you most love to do, and then doing it.         stumble and setback. No blaming. No defensiveness.
     Leadership is honoring the greatness, and uniqueness,            Leadership is trusting enough to be trusted. It is having
in others. It’s knowing how deep the place is from which        a curious mind, a listening ear, and an open heart.
life flows. Leadership is connecting every day to your                Leadership is acknowledging that every day is a battle
deepest and most enduring values.                               for control; not for the world around you but for the response
     Leadership is doing whatever it takes to Honor your        to it. Envisioning how your choices and actions today may
word, Care for your family, Make a difference through           influence the next ten years.
your work, and Give hope to the people around you.                    Leadership is never forgetting from how far back a
Leadership is experiencing life by not looking in from the      human being can come and still make a difference. It is
rim – but from Front and Center.                                knowing that your path has a purpose beyond where it leads.
     Leadership is making adversity your ally. Greatness is     Leadership is knowing that the biggest risk in life is not to
born during tough times and unexpected circumstances.           risk at all.
Knowing that from time to time you have to look backward              Leadership is being fun to be around. The way you
to see forward.                                                 used to be when you had no money!
     Leadership is excelling instead of competing. No one             Leadership is knowing that home is where the great
has to lose for you to win.                                     are small and the small are great. It is doing all you can to
     Leadership is knowing when to come up for air. It’s        have the heart of a lion, the skin of a rhino, and the soul of
having an irrational sense of hope; being grateful for every    an angel.
genuine effort and every act of kindness.                             Leadership is living so that when other people think of
     Leadership is knowing your mostly unused potential         Integrity, Enthusiasm, Commitment, and Caring, they think
and committing yourself to liberating the other 90% of your     of you.
hidden capacity. It’s knowing that every day you have the              Leadership is knowing you were born an original.
same number of minutes as Edison, Lincoln, Galileo,             You were born to make a difference in the world. You
Thoreau, King, DaVinci, Ghandi, Mandela, Mother Theresa,        can’t play it safe. You can’t sit this one out. The time is
Einstein.                                                       now. The leader is you.
     Leadership is aligning your daily efforts with big
dreams…and great goals. Leadership is glancing farther                                                  Table of Contents
                                                                     Leadership ........................................................................................ 1
ahead. It is viewing life as a laboratory instead of a stage.        In Memorial ..................................................................................... 2
Challenging times are meant to be a test of spirit, not              President’s Message ......................................................................... 3
                                                                     Making the Box Work For You ..................................................... 4
theatrics.                                                           SAFMLS Emeritus Corner .............................................................. 7
     Leadership is knowing that the gap between what can             Consultant’s Corner ........................................................................ 8
                                                                     Board Meeting ................................................................................. 9
be imagined and what can be accomplished has never been              SAFMLS Constitution ................................................................... 1 2
                                                                     2002 Annual Schedule ................................................................... 1 5
smaller. Leadership is learning faster than the world is             2002 SAFMLS Workshops ........................................................... 1 6
changing, constantly discovering and applying your                   Posters ............................................................................................ 2 2
                                                                     2002 SAFMLS Short Topic Presentations ................................. 2 7
strengths, talents, and passions.
Society Scope

      Society of Armed Forces                                        In memorial
    Medical Laboratory Scientists
                                                                Frank M. Townsend, MD
                                                              Dr. Frank M. Townsend died on October 31, 2001 at his Harwood Ranch
              Board of Directors                         in Gonzales, Texas. Dr. Townsend was 87. He was a pioneer of military
    President:     LTC Christian Whelen, USA             pathology and a longtime supporter of SAFMLS and military medicine.
    Vice President: LCDR Mike Finch, USN
                                                              His distinguished career in pathology began in the 1930s. He graduated
                                                         from San Antonio College in 1934 and later from the University of Texas. His
    Treasurer: LCDR Larry Ciolorito, USN
                                                         initial medical training was at Tulane University School of Medicine. He was an
    Secretary: Maj Brian Casleton, USAF                  intern in Pathology at the Southern Baptist Hospital in New Orleans and did a
    President-Elect: LtCol Dale Ferguson,                rotating internship at the New York Polyclinic Hospital. He American Board
    USAF                                                 of Pathology certified him in 1947. He began a long and distinguished military
    Past President: CAPT Greg Craigmiles,                career, beginning as a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Medical Corps in
    USN                                                  1941 and rising through the ranks to Colonel in the U.S. Air Force. He served
    Members-at-Large:                                    as Director, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology from 1959-1963 and Vice
    LTC David Craft, USA                                 Commander, Aerospace Medical Division, Brooks AFB, Texas (1963-1965).
    LTC Danny Deuter, USA
    LCDR Thomas Delucia, USN                             He retired from active duty in 1965.
    LCDR Cynthia Wilkerson, USN
    Lt Col Paula Simon, USAF
                                                              Three years later, the newly formed University of Texas Medical School in
    Capt Norman Fox, USAF                                San Antonio recruited him to organize the Department of Pathology. Dr.
    Ex Officio Members:                                  Townsend oversaw development of the department from three faculty members
    COL Noel Webster, USA                                to 55 members at the time of his retirement in 1986 were he was considered
    COL Renata Greenspan, USA
    CAPT Michael Brophy, USN                             the ‘Elder Statesman of the San Antonio School of Healthcare Sciences’ and
    CAPT Michael Nowacki, USN                            an avid supporter of military medicine.
    Col Daniel Brown, USAF
    Maj Mark Burton, USAF                                His military and medical awards and honors were many including the Ward
    Historian: Col Suellyn Novak, USAF
                                                         Burdick Award from the American Society of Clinical Pathologist and the
                                                         Department of Defense Distinguished Service Medal. Civilian honors included
    Webmaster:
    Capt Norman Fox, USAF
                                                         the establishment of the Frank M. Townsend Professorship Award at the UT
                                                         San Antonio Healthcare Science Center in 1986.
    Newsletter Editor:
    Maj Bailey Mapp, USAF                                     Those that had the pleasure of knowing him remember a man who exhibited
                                                         the true military qualities of integrity and honesty, and he was a Texas gentleman
                  Newsletter Staff                       in the classic tradition.
    Editor:
    Major Bailey Mapp, USAF
    mappb@afip.osd.mil
    301-319-0135 • DSN 285-0135

    Assistant Editor:
    Capt Richard Schoske

    SOCIETY SCOPE is published three times per year
    for $30 (nonmember rate) by the Society of Armed
    Forces Medical Laboratory Scientists (SAFMLS).
    Send SCOPE correspondence to 6736 Mockingbird
                                                             Visit our
    Woods Court, Lorton, VA 22079. Annual dues ($15)
    for SAFMLS membership address changes should be
    sent to Maj Brian Casleton, SAFMLS Secretary, 6163       WEBSITE
    Kari Drive, Melbourne, FL 32940.

    Advertising rates:
    Display ads- ½ page ad, $400; ¼ page ad, $200.
                                                                at
    Ads, articles or inquiries should be sent to:
    PS design & type, 3095 PS Business Center Drive,
    Woodbridge, Virginia 22192. Voice: 703-583-0781;
                                                           www.safmls.org
    Fax: 703-878-4987; e-mail: sales@psdesignco.com.


2
                                                                                                             Society Scope



                               President’s Message
                                                  by LTC A Christian Whelen
Make your plans for Spokane! Your planning committee has pulled off a remarkable task. Constrained by the demands
placed on all military laboratory scientists in the wake of terrorist attacks that included the intentional use of weaponized
biological agents, these outstanding volunteers have put together a world-class conference in a spectacular location. We
have a terrific program that will feature noteworthy presentations by a wide spectrum of scientists and speakers. We are
fortunate to have scheduled addresses by Brigadier General Farmer from the U.S. Army Northwest Regional Medical
Command and Rear Admiral West from U.S. Navy Reserve. Your host hotels, the DoubleTree & Ridpath, and the
Spokane Convention Center have outdone themselves. Committed vendors have stepped up during an economic downturn
to support the Society by showing products that can improve your research and services. Don’t miss out. Register on-line
today at www.safmls.com.

                            CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR
                           2002 SAFMLS BOARD POSITIONS
• Open Positions: Pres Elect, VP, Secretary, Enlisted              • The President-Elect will serve as a Society President the
  Member-at-Large, Army/AF/Navy Member-at-Large.                     year following the term of office of the current President,
• Nominees must be a regular member of SAFMLS                        and shall serve during this interim period as a non-voting
• Send the following to the SAFMLS Secretary, Maj Casleton,          member in all meetings of the Board of Directors, unless
  DSN 854-8194, (brian.casleton@patrick.mednet.af.mil):              the President-Elect qualifies as a voting member under
       o Nomination Letter                                           Articles IV or V or the Bylaws.
       o Letter of Intent (1 page)                                 • The Vice-President, in the event the President is unable to
       o Picture (electronic preferred)                              serve, shall assume all the President’s functions.
       o CV (1 page)                                               • The Treasurer shall be responsible for the financial affairs
• The Officers of the Society shall be, by order of succession,      of the Society and shall collect all money for the Society
  President, Vice-President, Treasurer and Secretary. A              and make all authorized disbursements on its behalf. He/
  conscious effort should be made to effect multiple agency          she shall prepare an annual financial report to be presented
  representation among the Officers of the Society and under         at the Annual Meeting. The Board of Directors shall
  no circumstances will the President be from the same               designate a Certified Public Accounting firm to assist the
  service for more than two consecutive terms.                       Treasurer in maintaining appropriate financial records,
• The Officers and a President-Elect shall be elected annually       conduct an annual audit and prepare tax returns. The
  from among the commissioned officers of the Society by             Treasurer’s account shall also be reviewed annually by a
  majority vote during the Business Session at each Annual           committee of at least three Members appointed by the
  Meeting, with the exception of the Treasurer and Secretary,        President.
  who shall be elected for a three-year term.                      • The Secretary shall keep minutes of the Annual Meetings
• The Officers shall take office at the conclusion of each           and meetings of the Board of Directors. He/she shall be
  Annual Meeting, and shall be responsible for the affairs of        responsible for all correspondence of the Society, including
  the Society during the following year, and for the conduct         certification of new members. The Secretary shall maintain
  of the succeeding Annual Meeting.                                  and manage the membership database.
• The President shall direct the activities of the Society and     • There shall be seven Members-at-Large, each elected for
  preside over the Annual Meeting. He/she shall appoint all          a period of two years. Six of the seven Members-at-Large
  committees except the Nominating committee. The                    shall be Commissioned Officer Members, with not more
  President will appoint a Member who will serve as                  than two members from any one service. In addition, one
  Chairman and who will then select four additional Members          term for each service will expire each year. The seventh
  to serve on the Nominating Committee. The President                Member-at-Large will be an Enlisted Member representing
  shall additionally serve as a non-voting member of the Board       any service. Each Member-at-Large will have one vote.
  of Directors during the year following his/her term of office.
                                                                                                                               3
Society Scope

                   Making the Box Work for You
                                                by LT Jonathon Ware, MSC, USN
     In this day of decreasing resources and increasing you can automatically add it to your address book. Not only
workload, we need to make the computer work better for us. will it add it faster, but it will also reduce transcription errors.
It has been my experience that there are little tricks that If you right mouse click on the e-mail address you can check
some of us use everyday that would benefit all. Below are the properties of that address.
some of the tricks that I have found to be very useful.
     Not to insult anyone, we will start with the basics. The The Keyboard
desktop is what you see when you first start up or log onto             Now that you have mastered the mouse, you notice that
the computer (in picture 1 it has the background of a Guam it has a tendency to disappear when you need it. Here are
sunset). An icon is the item that you would click to open a file some helpful hints.
or activate a program (highlighted in picture one). The mouse           The window key accesses your Start menu. You can
is the item that looks like an arrow (my wife calls it the pointy- just press that key and then arrow up and over to the programs
clicky thing). Now that we have the basics under control lets that you want to open. The window and E key, when pressed
start with the mouse.                                              together, will bring up your windows explorer program. The
                                                                   window explorer allows you to see, copy, delete, or modify
The Mouse                                                          programs and files on the computer. If you are using a network
     The mouse is probably the most often used tool on the computer, some network officers disable this key.
computer, but many people do not realize its full potential. If         ALT- TAB will take you between the programs that are
you remember nothing else, remember to occasionally do a open. You will usually see an icon of each program in a
right mouse click and see what it does. If you right-mouse window in the middle of the screen. If you continue to hold
clicked on an icon on the desktop, it would look like picture 1. down the Alt button and press on tab, it will allow you to
                                                                   select a different OPENED program.
                                                                        ALT- F4 allows you to close a window. I use to use this
                                                                   all the time to quickly exit CHCS when using KIA or Smart
                                                                   Term. It also comes in handy if the computer is running really
                                                                   slowly and the mouse disappears!
                                                                        ALT and the first letter of a program name on the desktop
                                                                   will highlight that program for you. I mostly use ALT-M
                                                                   because there are usually several programs that start with
                                                                   “my” such as my computer, my documents, and my
                                                                   briefcase.
                                                                        CRTL-C and CRTL-V are probably the keys that I use
                                                                   the most. CRTL-C will copy what ever is highlighted and
                                                                   CRTL-V will paste it where you want it. This even works
                                                                   when the copy and paste functions will not work with the
                                                                   mouse. CRTL-A will allow you to select everything in the
                             Picture 1                             window. It could be the entire Word document or all files on
                                                                   a disk. The key Word there is everything in the opened
     If you notice, there are several options to choose from. I window. The only exception that I know for that is on Acrobat
selected the sent to option and now I have a list of places I Reader, then it only selects everything on the page.
can send the file. I can send it to a disk, the CD writer, e-           Except for DBSS users, most people press the PRINT
mail, or even file into my documents.                              SCREEN key and then realize that noting happens. If you
     In MS Word, if you right mouse click on a misspelled press the PRINT SCREEN key and the open MS WORD,
word (underlined in red), it will do a spell check on that Word. you can then insert the screen into a text document (like
If you right mouse click on a grammar error (underlined in picture 1 above). I used this whenever I had some weird
green), it will do that grammar check on that phrase. If you errors that would show up on my computer at work. I would
right mouse click on a picture on the Internet, you can save then e-mail it to the Information Management folks. This way
that picture to a disk.                                            they could see the error. It also works great for making SOPs
     One last mouse click helpful hint: When using MS Outlook or “go-bys”. I last used it to give my in-laws a “cheat sheet’
or Outlook Express, if you double click on the e-mail address, to download pictures from their digital camera.
4
                                                                                                                 Society Scope

     The TAB key allows you to jump to the next section of a              Two other great uses KIA or Smart Term are the history
form when completing information, such as on the Internet            and screen capture options. For those long QA reports that
or in DBSS. A Word of caution here is that it takes you to the       you pull up and only need the last couple of pages, you can
next section as based on the programming. If the programmer          spool the document and then reprint to your screen. The screen
did not put his items in order, then it could take you to any        capture option will allow you to save whatever goes across
blank, radio button, or data entry place in the window. Anther       the screen in a text file. From there you can use what you
item that is useful to know about completing forms is that           need, save the file to disk, import it into an Excel or Access
when they give you a drop-down menu, you can use the cursor          file, or e-mail to friends. You can also use the screen capture
keys to scroll through the list. For example, If I were in South     option in building your SOPs so that the technicians, HCPs,
Dakota, when the form asked for the state, I would press the         or Nurses can see exactly what the screen will look like when
“S” key. The first state that would appear would be South            they attempt to utilize your procedure. Picture 2 is one of the
Carolina, I would then hit the down arrow button and South           screen captures that we used in our OSO SOP for HCPs.
Dakota would appear.
Most people know that CTRL-ALT-DEL can restart your                   Select REQUESTING LOCATION:
computer. Thanks to the windows networking, that capability             LABORATORY, USNH//ICU
has been transferred. CTRL-ALT-DEL now allows you to                    1 ICUM E-3M WARD USNH                 GUAM M I AAHA
log-in or log-off. If you try CTRL-ALT-DEL and it doesn’t               2 ICUS E-3S      WARD USNH            GUAM M I ABCA
allow you to shut it down, try the window key and select              Choose 1-2: 1 E-3M DBAA                 Clinical Pathology
shutdown.
                                                                      Select CLINICAL SERVICE/MEPRS CODE:
                                                                      DBAA (CLINIC PATHOLOGY)// aaAAl
  Keys                Function                                        Please enter a valid MEPRS code. DBAA Clinic
  window              Opens start menu                                Pathology
  Window-E            Opens Windows explorer                          Select CLINICAL SERVICE/MEPRS CODE: DBAA
  Alt- Tab            Jumps between open windows                      (CLIMIC PATHOLOGY)// aaAA INTERNAL
  Alt- F4             Closes open window                              MEDICINE
  ALT (ALT-M)         Select item on desktop
                                                                                               Picture 2
  CRTL-C              Copy
  CRTL-V              Paste
                                                                     The Office Programs
  CRTL-A              Select all in window
                                                                          Here are some little items that MS Office can help make
  print screen        Takes picture of the screen
                                                                     your job easier.
  Tab and shift tab   Takes you to the next/ previous input option
                                                                          Use the Mail Merge function in MS Word to mass-
  CTRL-ALT-DEL        Log-off/ shutdown/ restart
                                                                     produce memo’s, letters, and envelopes. The cytology
                                                                     department in Guam used this function to send out Pap smear
TelNet                                                               results. Mail Merge would drop in the name of the patient on
    Most people are connecting to CHCS using either KIA              the letter, the cyto tech would then check off the diagnosis,
or Smart Term. There is this term called “macros” that you           and place the letter in the addressed envelope prepared by
should become familiar with. Macros are to programs what             using mail merge.
the old User defined keys (UDK) were to CHCS. One you                     The way that this works is by placing the information
record a macro, you can run it as often as you like. When we         (name, address) in appropriate labeled columns in an Excel
were looking at having the providers enter their own PPM’s           spread sheet. You then open MS Word, go under Tools, and
in CHCS, I created macros for Positive and Negative                  select the Mail merge option. Just follow the directions from
wetpreps, KOH’s, Occult blood, and ferns. We gave the                that point on. This is the way that I do our Christmas cards.
providers OSO access. All they had to do was go under OSO,                PowerPoint is another tool that can be very useful. Many
type on the patient’s name and then select the appropriate           people know how to create a basic slide, but do not realize
macro and the result would be automatically entered into             that you can insert entire files into the slide. You can add
CHCS.                                                                sound files to the slide, or even narrate the entire slide show.
    Macros are great for repetitive tasks such as logging into       This can be especially useful for laboratory week
CHCS (the IT guys love it when you do that) and pulling              presentations. You could just load the slide show on a laptop,
reports like QC, amendments, TAT, etc. If you knew someone           hook it up to a TV, and let it play.
who used macros, they could e-mail you the macro and you                  Front Page and Front Page Express allows you to build
could pull the same reports from your system.                        web pages. You can utilize them as forms and either have
                                                                                                                                   5
Society Scope
the results e-mailed to you or downloaded into an Access          amounts of paper. A scanner with a good optical character
database file. There is an example of that being used by staff    recognition (OCR) program is very useful in getting those old
education and training under the networking heading.              SOPs on disk so that you can modify them.
    For those that like to keep track of what they do day to           There are programs out that can allow you to make your
day, you can turn on the journal in outlook and it will keep      own computer based training (CBTs) CDs. These programs
track of the Word, Excel, Tasks, and e-mail files you did on a    will actually grade the tests and give you reports on each
particular day. You must have outlook open while you are          individual’s performance.
performing these tasks. There is also an option called rules           For those that use Business Objects Reports (like DBSS),
wizard that you can use to decrease the amount of e-mail in       you can e-mail the report to others and they can use it. For
your in-box. I had mine set up to delete all messages that did    example, if the Navy Blood Program wanted to know how
not have my name in the To, CC, or BCC box, except if it          many E-4 and below people donated blood; they could build
was from certain individuals such as the Commanding Officer.      the report and e-mail to all of the blood donor centers. The
This eliminated all of those bake sells and car washes from       blood donor officer would then open the report in Business
taking over my in-box.                                            Objects in DBSS, refresh the data and the report is done. S/
                                                                  he can save it as a BO report, drop into an Excel file, or a
The Network                                                       text file and then e-mail the report back.
      Depending on your relationship with the IT folks, you
can have unlimited fun within the network. If you can convince    Finding more help
IT to make you a super-user on your computer, you can share           No one can be an expert on all multiple programs and
files with anyone or everyone within the network. The great       technology. The easiest way to find out if you can do something
part is that you can choose whom to share a file with and         within a program is to click on the help button and search the
when. Add the different permissions level that you can set        index. If that doesn’t answer your question, Microsoft has a
for each individual, you can make life easier for a multitude     web site that contains loads of answers to frequently asked
of people.                                                        questions. Many Information Technology managers use that
      We have used the network for such things as SOPs,           web site often. Finally, my favorite place to locate information
databases for diabetic patients, OB databases (for hurricanes/    is Tech TV. The entire television channel and web site is
typhoons rosters) and to share other important (or important      devoted to making technology easier for us to use.
for the moment) files. It allows you to provide information to
people within your network without flooding the e-mail server.
Network uses that I have utilized recently include SOPs for
POCT, competency for HCPs performing PPM, slide show
for dining-out pictures, and annual required training. We
actually set it up where the annual required training was
performed on the Staff Education and Training computer.
We forward the network link to the HCPs via e-mail and
then they completed the training. The results were then
automatically placed into an Access database.
      One thing to remember about a networking file, just
because it is only a read only file does not mean you can not
copy and edit it. It means that you can not edit the file where
it is. All you have to do is save the file to your desktop or a
disk and then it is all yours to manipulate.

Using technology
     As we bring this introductory phase to a close, remember
to consider easy technology to complete those tasks that
currently take up a large majority of your time. For example,
utilize CHCS or web pages for QC review instead of spending
a day checking off paper logs at branch clinic. For those
remote locations, have them invest in a $78 scanner. That
way you can spend the time conferring with the lab
technicians, HCPs and clinic staff, versus going over vast
6
                                                                                                            Society Scope

                       SAFMLS EMERITUS CORNER
                                     Michael H. Caldwell, Colonel (Ret.), USAF, BSC


     Just four short years ago we visited Spokane for the first   SAFMLS and the people that are a part of the best networking
ever SAFMLS symposium in that beautiful city. Spokane             organization in the military. I have always credited SAFMLS
1997 was my last active duty symposium as I retired later         with what success I attained in the laboratory field and I
that year. This symposium will be my 27th SAFMLS both             have encouraged laboratorians to attend, participate, and take
active and retired. Although the 1997 SAFMLS meeting was          full advantage of the opportunity to exchange ideas, make
the end of my active duty attendance little did I know that my    contacts, and support the vendors. It is no accident that those
flight out to Spokane would be the beginning of my next career.   who take advantage of the SAFMLS opportunities typically
As luck would have it I was seated next to the President of       succeed both in the military and after retirement. I still
Global Focus Marketing and Distribution, a medical                participate by organizing an annual Emeritus workshop with
distributorship in Dallas, Texas. I do not remember that Mr.      a goal of introducing Society members to what they can expect
Jack Horner and I discussed our respective professions, but       in the civilian job world.
rather we conversed is generalities. I do remember mentioning          This year will be the third such workshop and not
that I was in the Air Force, traveling to Spokane for a           surprising the theme of this year’s workshop is ‘Networking’!
Laboratory meeting and that I would be retiring at the end of     Most career counselors, trade organizations, and company
the year. He did not mention his company or his position within   executives rate networking as the number one reason why
the company. All I remembered at the time was how                 job seekers land 80% of their job. For military retirees that
engaging, intelligent, and dynamic he appeared and that he        percentage goes over 90% according to The Retired Officers
asked me to remember his name by the nursery rhyme (Jack          Association (TROA) and the Non Commissioned Officers
Horner sat in the corner…). After the flight we went our          Association (NCOA). I have booked an impressive list of
separate ways much like airline travelers do thousands of         company executives and Emeritus members that will speak
times each day.                                                   on their version of networking techniques. Following their
     When I made my usual rounds through the exhibit hall,        testimonials and suggestions we will have a panel discussion
who did I run into but Mr. Horner. He was there as a consultant   to answer your questions on how to launch that post military
for a company that distributed through his company. We            career.
visited and I reviewed that companies’ equipment and again             Final Notes: The list of Emeritus (retiree) members
we went our separate ways. Several months later, just before      continues to grow. I encourage you not to let your membership
my retirement, I received a call from Jack. He recalled our       lapse once you retire. Those who do soon realize that they
meeting and asked what I was planning to do after my military     have lost a valuable networking resource—not to mention
retirement. He had remembered my name, retirement date,           losing touch with career-long friendships. The SAFMLS web
and phone number from the exhibit. I was impressed since          site now has a link to employment announcements (click the
he did not get my card or write anything down. “I’ve noticed      employment button). Currently the link comes to my email at
most military generals/chiefs and successful executives seem      CaldwellSPG@aol.com. Future plans are to link
to have that ‘name recall’ ability.                               announcements directly to the advertising companies. If you
     I guess you are wondering where I am going with this         know of a job or are looking for a job just send me an email.
Spokane recollection? Well, unknowingly I had been                I will get it posted or get you connected if I know of any
“networking” and even more surprising I had somehow made          opportunities. I encourage you to frequently review this link.
a favorable impression. Jack told me that he thought I should     Also I ask that you encourage your vendors to list job
consider consulting and even though he did not currently need     announcements. The major problem with the civilian
a consultant he would like me to meet a fellow company            laboratory industry is that most do not recognize the wealth
president that was looking for someone with federal               of talents that SAFMLS members process. In 2001 I
government contracting experience. That company became            successfully recommended five former military members to
the first of approximately thirty companies that my consulting    companies that I represented. I challenge you to mentor,
company (The Strategic Partnership Group, LLC) has                recommend those deserving, and develop your networking
represented over the last four years. Although my company         skills. One never knows where that opportunity might pop-
is not making me wealthy or famous at least my consulting         up! Maybe on the way to this years meeting! Hope to see
‘gigs’ get me a free ticket back to SAFMLS every year.            you in Spokane!
     For me there has always been something special about
                                                                                                                               7
Society Scope

Consultant’s Corner
                                                  by Daniel R. Brown, Col.

     The fall of 2001 will be imprinted in our memories for a    you were swamped with environmental samples or queries
lifetime. The September 11th terrorist attack will be one of     regarding what to do with these specimens. These same
those events that we’ll always associate with where we were,     questions and resulting confusion were evident at multiple
who we were talking to, and our feelings as we watched the       levels of our government among the many agencies involved.
strikes on the pentagon and the world trade towers, and the      Clearly, preparation is an important aspect of our business,
crash of United Airlines Flight 93. We’ll also remember the      but often in “real crisis” situations problems arise that were
surrealistic feelings following this tragedy, which were later   not envisioned. Clinical laboratorians were dealing with en-
compounded by the anxiety brought on by the anthrax mail-        vironmental sampling pressures throughout the United States
ings. All of us have been dramatically affected by this mo-      as evidenced in the article “Testing for terror: how labs should
ment in history and as members of our country’s defense          respond to biocrime” in the December 2001 issue of CAP
forces it will personally affect us for many years to come.      Today. Discussions will continue at multiple levels relative to
Although these events were very tragic, as medical labora-       environmental specimens and other issues as the network
tory experts we should take pride in our foresight                            matures and homeland security is better defined.
and preparation to respond to these terrorist                                      These discussions are underway within DoD
events.                                                                               from both a military operational perspec-
     During the past several years our                                                  tive and also within the context of how
SAFMLS meetings have highlighted                                                          military clinical labs will support and
issues and contained special sessions                                                      compliment homeland security.
on bioterrorism. Keynote speakers                                                           In the final analysis our military labo-
in the past few years have focused                                                           ratories performed admirably dur-
on asymmetric threats and the piv-                                                            ing the anthrax crisis. Some labs
otal role that laboratory profession-                                                         at Levels B, C and D in both re-
als play in force protection and                                                             search and clinical settings worked
homeland defense. Across the                                                                virtually around the clock process-
Army, Navy and Air Force I have                                                            ing and analyzing thousands of speci-
seen the enthusiasm of our laboratory                                                     mens, supporting both military and
experts in wanting to “do their part” to                                                homeland defense needs. These data
support this noble effort. Through the                                                are now being analyzed. Additionally,
hard work of numerous trailblazers, the Cen-                                        some of our military lab experts provided
ter for Clinical Laboratory Medicine (CCLM),                                  direct “hands on” support to CDC and also to
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, was identified by each      other public health laboratories swamped with specimens.
of the Service SG’s to serve as the coordination office and      Feedback from these agencies has been resoundingly posi-
liaison for DoD participation in the Centers for Disease Con-    tive in their appreciation for the support and expertise pro-
trol (CDC) National Laboratory Response Network (NLRN).          vided by military personnel. You are all true ambassadors of
     In 2001 the CCLM Gatekeeper, Col Forrest Kneisel, ef-       our profession.
fectively prepared scores of laboratories at Level A and many        I am confident that, together, we will continue to make
at or preparing to become Level B. A resounding debt of          great strides in supporting national and international efforts
gratitude goes to Col Kneisel for his diligence and support of   to counter bioterrorism. In the few short months of our offi-
our laboratories in becoming part of this network. Across        cial participation in the NLRN we have made dramatic
the board, this has been a phenomenal effort by the labora-      progress. Finally, such that I don’t overly belabor emphasis
tory community and is receiving well-deserved recognition        on bioterrorism, I thank each of you for your efforts in both
for its success.                                                 peacetime and operational laboratory medicine. Your day-
     During the crisis I know there were many questions gen-     to-day involvement in healthcare delivery is also tremendous.
erated and some confusion relative to roles and responsibili-    From our headquarters perspective you operate one of the
ties of our laboratories. First, I would say that these ques-    finest clinical laboratory operations in the world! You have
tions are a healthy aspect of our desire to understand and       our utmost admiration.
work together in improving processes at all levels. Many of

8
                                                                                                         Society Scope

         MID-YEAR 2001 BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING
                                                     19 Oct 2001
                                               Gateway Inn, Rockville MD

1. Call to Order: The meeting was called to order by the Society President, LTC A. Chris Whelen, MS, USA at 0800
EST.

2. Members Present:

        Officers:
        LTC A. Chris Whelen, MS, USA, President
        CDR Michael L. Finch, MSC, USN, Vice-President
        CDR Larry A. Ciolorito, MSC, USN, Treasurer

        Members-At-Large:
        LTC David W. Craft, MS, USA
        LCDR Cindy Wilkerson, MSC, USN
        LCDR Tomas P. Delucia, MSC, USN
        TSGT Charles A. Lattany III, USAF

        Non-Voting Board Members:
        CAPT Raymond G. Craigmiles, MSC, USN, Past-President/Navy Consultant
        LtCol Dale Ferguson, BSC, USAF, President-Elect
        Col Suellyn W. Novak, USAF, BSC, Historian
        LtCol Samuel J. Livingstone, USAF, BSC, Exhibits Program (via teleconference)
        Maj Bailey Mapp, USAF, BSC, Society Scope Co-Editor

3. Members Absent:

        Maj Brian G. Casleton, BSC, Secretary
        LTC Danny R. Deuter, MS, USA, Member-At-Large
        Capt Norman C. Fox, USAF, BSC
        COL Renata Greenspan, MC, USA, Army Ex-Officio
        COL James Bolton, MS, USA, Army Ex-Officio
        CAPT Michael A. Brophy, MSC, USN, Navy Ex-Officio
        CAPT Michael Nowacki, MC, USN, Navy Ex-Officio
        Col Daniel Brown, BSC, USAF, Air Force Ex-Officio
        Maj Mark Burton, USAF, Air Force Ex-Officio

4. Introduction: The meeting was held at the Gateway Inn, Rockville, MD. LTC Whelen welcomed everyone to the
meeting and introductions were made.

5. Review of Previous Minutes: The minutes from the 11 April 2001 Post-conference meeting were read, corrected and
approved. (CLOSED)

6. Treasurer’s Report: CDR Ciolorito gave the Treasurer’s report, included as attachment (a). The Society’s cash
balance as of 19 October 2001 was $171,317.17. A motion made and approved to accept the Treasurer’s report as
submitted. (CLOSED)

7. Secretary’s Report: LTC Whelen reported for Maj Casleton. The Society has 562 members. The BOD is waiting for the list of

                                                                                                                          9
Society Scope
eight applications for new membership and the Secretary’s                 11 April 2001). The BOD determined there was no
recommendation. BOD will vote via email. A motion was                     value added for this type of member category.
made and approved to accept the report as submitted.                      (CLOSED)
(OPEN; Close upon vote)                                              b.   Professional Meeting Planning Organization-LtCol
                                                                          Livingstone has been investigating a company, TRUE
8. SAFMLS Planning Committee Update: CDR Finch gave                       Foundation about planning the Society’s meetings.
   a report of planning committee activities.                             The Board wants to make sure that the BOD does
       a. The BOD discussed the convention schedule.                      not lose control. LtCol Livingstone stated the
            A motion was made and approved to make the                    company would be responsible for contacting the
            following changes to the schedule: (CLOSED)                   vendors, performing registration, contacting locations,
                 Opening Ceremonies-Monday morning, 18                    etc but the Board would still maintain control. This
                 Oct 02.                                                  item will be discussed again at the next Board meeting
                 Business Meeting-Tuesday morning, 19 Oct                 in Spokane. A recommendation is at least 2 years
                 02.                                                      away. (OPEN, LtCol Livingstone)
                 2 hour workshops-Wednesday morning, 20              c.   Next Year Meeting Considerations-Report by CDR
                 Oct 02.                                                  Finch. All items were addressed in item 8 above.
                 2 hour short topics-Wednesday afternoon,                 (CLOSED)
                 20 Oct 02.                                          d.   Acknowledgment of award recipients, planning
                 4 hour workshops-Wednesday afternoon, 20                 committee and volunteers-In the past, the Service
                 Oct 02.                                                  representatives have sent letters to the Award
                 The working schedule is included as                      winners, the Society President sent letters to the
                 attachment (b).                                          committee members and volunteers. A motion was
       b. LtCol Livingstone was asked about the possibility               made and approved to continue this practice.
            of extending the first day exhibit hours until 1630           (CLOSED)
            for both the vendors and posters. He will check          e.   On-line registration-Maj Mapp reported that the same
            with the vendors. The posters will be open until              organization would be providing support for the
            1630 on the first day of the exhibits. (OPEN,                 Spokane 2002 meeting. (INFO)
            LtCol Livingstone)                                       f.   Future Meeting Sites-(OPEN, LtCol Livingstone)
       c. A motion was made and approved to have the
            Society auto-schedule the opening ceremony,                         1) 2002 – Spokane, Washington (18-21
            business meeting and general session for all                        March 2002).
            registrants so that these activities will appear on                 2) 2003 – Reno, Nevada.
            their meeting schedule. (CLOSED)                                    3) 2004/2005 – A motion was made and
       d. The workshop application was reviewed. Minor                          approved to pursue having the meeting in
            changes were suggested. The application will                        Charleston, SC in 2004 and Jacksonville, FL
            be posted on the website. The deadline is 1 Dec                     in 2005. LtCol Livingstone will have a report
            01. (INFO)                                                          on these sites at the next BOD meeting.
       e. The Board of Directors post meeting will be at                        4) 2006 – Reno, Nevada.
            1730-1900 on the last day. The planning                  g. Status of exhibitors for upcoming meeting- LtCol
            committee will be invited to the dinner that                Livingstone reported that booth sales, so far, are slow.
            follows. (INFO)                                             Only 29 vendors have committed. He hasn’t heard
       f. The pre-meeting dinner will be at the hotel and               from any of the major vendors except Johnson &
            the post-meeting dinner at Shenanigan’s. (INFO)             Johnson Ortho Clinical Diagnostics. (OPEN, LtCol
                                                                        Livingstone)
9. Society Scope Update-Maj Mapp reviewed the contents
   of the upcoming Scope and the edition should be out in         11. New Business
   the next two to three weeks. The Society constitution
   and by-laws will be published in the meeting issue of the         a. Lifetime Achievement-(reference minutes from 7 and
   Scope. (INFO)                                                        11 April 2001) There was no recognized value of a
                                                                        lifetime membership category. A motion was made
10. Old Business                                                        and approved to propose a change the Past
   a. Lifetime Membership-(reference minutes from 7 and                 President’s Award to the Distinguished Service
10
                                                                                                   Society Scope

   Award. Awardees would have their Society dues                              will present this information at the next
   waived as long as they maintained active membership                        meeting. (OPEN, CDR Ciolorito)
   in SAFMLS. The dues waiver would be retroactive.           d. Scholarship Proposal-LCDR Delucia proposed that
   This proposal requires a change to the Bylaws, and            the Society create a Scholarship open to children of
   will be presented to the membership for a vote at the         Society members. A motion was made and approved
   Spokane meeting. (OPEN, LTC Whelen)                           to form a fact finding committee, composed of the
b. There was a proposal to establish an emeritus board           Members-at-Large and chaired by the Treasurer, to
   member with voting status. There is already a non-            make a presentation to the Board at the next BOD
   voting emeritus member, and the BOD voted that                meeting. (OPEN, CDR Ciolorito, LCDR Delucia)
   this was adequate. (CLOSED).                               e. SAFMLS Coin-A motion was made and defeated to
c. Treasurer’s Issues-CDR Ciolorito reported:                    give all new society members a SAFMLS coin. A
            1) All Society accounts are at the Armed             motion was made and approved to have Col Novack
                Forces Bank. He will look at other               order 500 more coins to sell to members and to inquire
                institutions and make a recommendation           about redesign costs. Gifts for opening ceremony
                to the Board about moving the Society’s          presenters will be a coin paperweight with a plate
                accounts. (OPEN, CDR Ciolorito)                  engraved with the location and dates of the meeting.
            2) There is only one signature authority on          (OPEN, Col Novack)
                the account, the treasurer. A motion was      f. Vice-President-The Society will need a Vice-
                made and approved to add the President           President candidate to be voted upon at the next
                to the account. The treasurer will               meeting. A suggestion was made to look at a possible
                prepare a package to be used in case he          Army nominee. (INFO)
                is unable to perform his duties. The          g. Planning Committee Manual (Go-By, SOP) is needed
                President would have the authority, with         to capture the experience of previous planning
                BOD approval, to appoint an interim              committees. All members of the planning committee
                treasurer until an elected officer could         need to provide their input to CDR Finch to develop
                assume the duties. This proposal                 this manual to be passed on and used by future
                requires a change to the Bylaws, and             members of the committee. (OPEN, CDR Finch)
                will be presented to the membership for
                a vote at the Spokane meeting. (OPEN,      12. Meeting adjourned at 1200 (EST)
                LTC Whelen)
            3) CDR Ciolorito lead a discussion about       Respectfully submitted,
                the management of the Society’s funds.     //Original Signed//
                He will contact an accountant and ask      CYNTHIA E. WILKERSON, LCDR, MSC, USN
                for options for managing the funds. He     For the Secretary




                                                                                                                    11
Society Scope

                    SAFMLS Constitution and Bylaws
                            ARTICLE I                                     to the Bylaws, para 2.a.(1-3), voting members do not have to be
                              NAME                                        commissioned officers.
The name of this organization shall be “The Society of Armed Forces       3. The Officers shall take office at the conclusion of each Annual
Medical Laboratory Scientists, Inc.,” organized under the Non-Stock       Meeting, and shall be responsible for the affairs of the Society
corporation provisions of the Articles of Incorporation of the State      during the following year, and for the conduct of the succeeding
of Maryland.                                                              Annual Meeting.
                                                                          4. The President shall direct the activities of the Society and preside
                            ARTICLE II                                    over the Annual Meeting. He/she shall appoint all committees
                 PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES                                   except the Nominating committee. The President will appoint a
1. The corporation is organized exclusively for charitable, educational   Member who will serve as Chairman and who will then select four
and scientific purposes in relationship to the laboratory sciences.       additional Members to serve on the Nominating Committee. The
The primary objective is that of maintaining and enhancing high           President shall additionally serve as a non-voting member of the
professional standards through improved laboratory policies and           Board of Directors during the year following his/her term of office.
technology in support of the health care delivery systems of the          The President is responsible for financial transactions if the
Armed Forces, Public Health Services and Veterans Administration.         Treasurer becomes unable to perform these duties. The President
2. At least one scientific meeting shall be held annually and be          has the authority to appoint an interim Treasurer, with the approval
dedicated to scientific discussions concerning the upgrading of           of the Board of Directors, to serve until an elected Treasurer can
laboratory sciences and advanced methodologies.                           assume those duties.
3. The Board of Directors shall define and elaborate on the above         Rationale Note (not a part of the by-laws): As the Constitution is
via appropriate Bylaws, subject to approval by the voting members.        currently written, no individual has the authority to conduct the
                                                                          Society’s financial business if the Treasurer is deployed,
                            ARTICLE III                                   incapacitated, or otherwise unavailable. The modification allows
                           MEMBERSHIP                                     the President to conduct financial transactions only under these
1. Membership shall be open to qualified military (active and reserve     circumstances. It also allow the President to appoint an interim
component), Public Health Service and Veteran’s Administration            Treasurer, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors, until
personnel, and their affiliated scientists concerned with the support     the elected officer returns or a new Treasurer can be elected.
of health care via laboratory research and evaluation.
2. Membership criteria shall be established by the Board of Directors
and specified in the Bylaws. There will be no discrimination based        5. The President-Elect will serve as a Society President the year
on sex, religion, race, color or national origin.                         following the term of office of the current President, and shall serve
3. A membership committee, appointed by the President to determine        during this interim period as a non-voting member in all meetings of
eligibility, shall review all applicants for membership. The              the Board of Directors, unless the President-Elect qualifies as a
membership committee will send an applicant report to the Secretary       voting member under Articles IV or V or the Bylaws.
for presentation and acceptance prior to each Board meeting.              6. The Vice-President, in the event the President is unable to serve,
4. The Board of Directors will vote on all applicants for membership      shall assume all the President’s functions.
with a two-thirds majority of a quorum required for approval.             7. The Treasurer shall be responsible for the financial affairs of the
5. The term “member” refers to full membership.                           Society and shall collect all money for the Society and make all
                                                                          authorized disbursements on its behalf. He/she shall prepare an
                            ARTICLE IV                                    annual financial report to be presented at the Annual Meeting. The
                             OFFICERS                                     Board of Directors shall designate a Certified Public Accounting
1. The Officers of the Society shall be, by order of succession,          firm to assist the Treasurer in maintaining appropriate financial
President, Vice-President, Treasurer and Secretary. A conscious           records, conduct an annual audit and prepare tax returns. The
effort should be made to effect multiple agency representation among      Treasurer’s account shall also be reviewed annually by a committee
the Officers of the Society and under no circumstances will the           of at least three Members appointed by the President.
President be from the same service for more than two consecutive
terms.                                                                    8. The Secretary shall keep minutes of the Annual Meetings and
2. The Officers and a President-Elect shall be elected annually from      meetings of the Board of Directors. He/she shall be responsible for
among the memberscommissioned officers of the Society by majority         all correspondence of the Society, including certification of new
vote during the Business Session at each Annual Meeting, with the         members. The Secretary shall maintain and manage the membership
exception of the Treasurer and Secretary, who shall be elected for a      database.
three-year term. Rationale Note (not a part of the by-laws): According

12
                                                                                                                          Society Scope

                            ARTICLE V                                     2. In such an event the President may designate three voting
                    BOARD OF DIRECTORS                                    members of the Board of Directors as a Board of Regents to conduct
1. Voting members of the Board of Directors will consist of the four      the affairs of the Society for the duration of the emergency.
elected Officers, Ex-Officio members, and Members-At-Large.               3. Such Regents shall have all the powers and responsibilities
Non-voting members include the President-Elect, immediate                 delegated otherwise to the Officers and Board of Directors. They
Past-President, Editor of Society Scope, Chairman of the Exhibits         shall function by majority vote in such manner as may seem to them
Program, Historian, and Webmaster.                                        most expeditious.
2. Two-thirds of the voting members assigned within the continental       4. In the event of the incapacity of any Regent by death, illness or
United States shall compose a quorum for meetings of the Board of         any other unforeseen event, he/she shall be succeeded in order of
Directors.                                                                rank by one of the remaining voting members of the Board of
                                                                          Directors.
                          ARTICLE VI
               AMENDMENTS AND BYLAWS                                                                     BYLAWS
1. This Constitution may be amended by request of two-thirds of a         1. Membership shall be open to commissioned officers and enlisted
quorum of the Board of Directors, and approved by three-fourths           personnel of the Armed Forces, members of the Office of Personnel
of the Members present at the Business Meeting.                           Management, Public Health Service, and Veteran’s Administration
2. Any Member may propose By-laws not in conflict with the                personnel, recommended by the Board of Directors, provided the
Constitution and, upon approval by three-fourths of the Regular           following criteria are met:
Members present at the next Business Meeting, they will become            2. Membership Categories:
binding on the membership.                                                     a. Members:
                                                                                  (1) Commissioned officers and enlisted personnel of the
                          ARTICLE VII                                     active and reserve components from one of the Uniformed Services
                     BUSINESS MEETING                                     or personnel in full employ of the Veteran’s Administration or Office
1. In all matters not covered by the Constitution, or subsequent          of Personnel Management.
Bylaws, the provisions of Robert’s Rules of Order will apply.                     (2) Qualifications in one or more of the recognized biomedical
2. During each Annual Society Meeting, a period of time will be           laboratory science disciplines (e.g. Biochemistry, Laboratory
reserved for a Business Meeting during which the business of the          Management/Administration, Medical Technology, Anatomical
Society will be transacted. Attendance will be open to all members        Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Toxicology, Microbiology, Cytology,
3. Only Members may vote during Business Meetings.                        Biomedical Research, etc.). Such qualifications shall require a
                                                                          minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree with at least 45 semester hours in
                             ARTICLE VIII                                 a laboratory science. Be in good standing professionally.
                    EXPULSION OF MEMBERS                                          (3) Only Members are entitled to vote on Society matters.
1. If it is alleged that any member has conducted himself/herself in           b. Associate Members:
a matter detrimental to the purposes and goals of this Society, any               (1) Enlisted personnel of the active and reserve components
member may bring the fact of the case to the attention of a member        from one of the Uniformed Services or personnel in full employ of
of the Board of Directors.                                                the Veteran’s Administration or Office of Personnel Management.
2. The member shall be given at least 60 days in which to prepare                 (2) Qualifications in one or more of the recognized biomedical
his/her response to the allegation, after which he/she shall be invited   laboratory science disciplines (e.g., Biochemistry, Laboratory
to appear before or present a written statement to a quorum of the        Management/Administration, Medical Technology, Anatomical
Board of Directors. If it is the unanimous opinion of the quorum of       Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Toxicology, Microbiology, Cytology,
the Board of Directors that the charges have been substantiated,          Biomedical Research, etc.). Such qualifications shall require a
the matter shall be presented at the next Business Meeting of the         minimum of at least a Medical Laboratory Technician certification
Society, and upon a three-fourths concurring vote of the Members          or equivalent with a minimum of six years of clinical laboratory
present, he/she shall be expelled permanently from the organization.      experience.
                                                                                  (3) An Associate Member will be a non-voting member of
                            ARTICLE IX                                    the Society.
            SUSPENSION OF REQUIREMENTS                                         c. Honorary Members:
1. Provisions of this Constitution, such as required Annual                       (1) Those recommended by the Board of Directors and
Meetings of the Society, shall be suspended during periods of War         confirmed by a three-fourths majority vote of Regular Members at
or other National Emergency. Such suspension shall be authorized          the Annual Business Meeting (e.g., distinguished scientists,
by the concurring vote of the Board of Directors polled by telephone      physicians or others associated with laboratory medicine.)
or electronic message at the request of the President of the Society.             (2) An Honorary Member will be a non-voting member of
The Secretary shall then notify the membership in writing within 30       the Society.
days.                                                                          d. Emeritus Members:
                                                                                  (1) Members, Associate Members and Honorary Members
                                                                                                                                             13
Society Scope
who have retired from professional employment because of length         President of the Society or by written request of four or more
of service or physical disability.                                      members of the Board.
        (2) An Emeritus Member will retain the same voting status       10. In the event of inability of both the President and Vice-President
as the member had before retirement.                                    to function as chairman, a quorum of the Board of Directors shall
3. There shall be seven Members-at-Large, each elected for a period     designate a President pro tempore who shall function as President.
of two years. Six of the seven Members-at-Large shall be                11. The Chairman, Exhibits Program (a.k.a. Vendor Coordinator) shall
Commissioned Officer Members, with not more than two members            be appointed by the President and shall be responsible for the site
from any one service. In addition, one term for each service will       coordination of the Annual Meeting to include facilities, public
expire each year. The seventh Member-at-Large will be an Enlisted       spaces and exhibitor participation. The Chairman shall maintain all
Member representing any service. Each Member-at-Large will have         contracts dealing with the Annual Meeting and bring those contracts
one vote.                                                               to all Board of Directors meetings. He/she shall be a Non-voting
4. The Ex-Officio members shall be the Surgeons General Military        member of the Board and will not serve for a specified term length.
Consultants in Laboratory Science and in Pathology from each of         The Chairman, Exhibits Program, will be a member of the Site
the three services. The Ex-Officio members will have full voting        Selection Committee.
privileges.                                                             12. The Chairman, Site Selection Committee, appointed by the
5. The Editor of SOCIETY SCOPE shall be appointed by the                President, shall submit the proposed locations for Annual Meetings
President to coordinate and publish the Society’s official              to the Board of Directors for approval. Selections shall normally be
publication. Since the SOCIETY SCOPE is a primary source of             made a minimum of three years in advance, by two-thirds majority
Society information, the Editor will keep in close communication        vote of a quorum of the Board of Directors. The President will be
with the Society Officers and will be responsible for recruiting and    authorized to sign all contractual arrangements once the Board of
publishing technical papers and administrative reports to foster        Directors approves the specific city, hotel, and/or convention center.
the society’s professional growth. The Editor shall serve as a          The Chairman, Exhibits Program, shall maintain contracts for the
non-voting member of the Board of Directors and may appoint             Annual Meeting.
other Society members to assist with publication (e.g., Advertising     13. The President will appoint the Chairman, Annual Program
Manager). Due to the continuity required of this office, the editor     Committee. The committee shall plan and propose to the Board of
of the SOCIETY SCOPE will not serve for a specified term length.        Directors the program for the Annual Meeting of the Society.
Length of term will depend on willingness to serve and quality of       14. The President will appoint the Chairman, Awards Committee.
service.                                                                The committee shall select the winners of all the competitive awards
6. The SAFMLS Web page manager (webmaster) shall be appointed           presented at the Annual meeting except the Distinguished Service
by the President to coordinate and maintain the SAFMLS Internet         AwardPast Presidents Award for Excellence. A committee composed
web page. The webmaster shall serve as a non-voting member of           of the former Presidents and chaired by the immediate Past President
the Board of Directors. The webmaster shall stay in regular             selects the recipient of this award. Rationale Note: The current
communication with Society officers to insure current, accurate,        wording is confusing. It implies that the award is only given to past
and relevant information is maintained on the SAFMLS web site.          presidents. The committee consists of past presidents and its stated
Due to the special skills and continuity required for this position,    purpose is to recognize “...substantial contributions above and
the webmaster will not serve for a specified term length. Length of     beyond normal...who has promoted and advanced the growth and
term will depend on willingness to serve and quality of service.        professional goals of SAFMLS...outstanding leadership in pursuit
7. The Society President shall appoint a Society Historian. The         of excellence for their country and service...
Historian will be responsible for collecting, preserving, and           15. Society dues shall be set by the Board of Directors, and paid by
publishing historical information relating to the activities of the     all Members, Associate Members and Emeritus Members.
Society. Additionally, the Historian will maintain a current written    16. Society dues will be payable by 31 December of each year.
history of the society. To assist with the collection of historical     Members who are in arrears 30 June of the following year will be
data, the Historian will have access to all Society minutes and         suspended from the Society.
records from board and annual meetings. The historian will also be      17. Application for membership or for change in category of
responsible for ensuring that photographic records are obtained         membership shall be made on a form approved by the Board of
and maintained from all Society meetings. Due to the continuity         Directors and shall be submitted in a manner specified on the form.
required of this office, the Historian will not serve for a specified   The application shall be accompanied by an annual dues payment.
term length. Length of term will depend on willingness to serve and     18. The Secretary and Treasurer will maintain an up-to-date roster
quality of service.                                                     of membership, including the addresses of the members.
8. The Board of Directors shall be empowered to transact all business   19. The annual scientific and exhibit program shall be open to
in the name of the Society between Annual Meetings by a two-            non-member military and civilian laboratory employees. The Board
thirds majority vote of a quorum of the Board to include the            shall determine any registration fees.
expenditure of more than 25 percent of the unobligated money in         20. The annual scientific program shall include a commercial exhibit
the Treasury of the Society.                                            program designed to bring the latest equipment, supplies and
9. Special Meetings of the Board of Directors may be called by the      methodologies to the attention of the membership.
14
Society Scope




           15
Society Scope

                                      2002 SAFMLS WORKSHOPS
Monday 18 March (2 Hour Workshops: 1000 - 1200)

#1 College of American Pathologists (CAP) Accreditation program and Inspector Training Program – Part 1. Robert Rickert, MD,
FCAP; Richard Patton, MD, FCAP; Edward Gruber, MT(ASCP), CLS(NCA).

This is part 1 of a two part workshop. This presentation will present an update on the current CAP checklists and provide an overview of
the College of American Pathologists Laboratory Accreditation Program (LAP), including: the history and goals of the LAP; the purpose
and advantages of CAP laboratory accreditation; the difference between the Standards and inspection checklists; the roles of the
pathologist and team members, and resources for a successful CAP inspection. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#2 Cystic Fibrosis, Implications of New Screening Guidelines. Anita Sanow, Capt, USAF, BSC.

The American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG), along with the College of Obstetrics/Gynecology(ACOG), formalized recommendations
in March/April 2001 for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carrier screening in response to an NIH Consensus Development Statement on “Genetic
Testing for Cystic Fibrosis” dated April 1997. While the recommendations seem simple enough, the actual implementation becomes very
complicated when the differences between molecular (DNA) and classical laboratory tests are examined. Most clinical laboratory tests
have clearly defined results: positive or negative; or a defined range (i.e. 80-120 mg/dl) in which the results would be considered normal if
they fall within the range, or abnormal if they fall outside the range. CF testing is very complicated and the results do not fall neatly into well
established parameters. The CF gene is approximately 250,000 base pairs (bp) long and over 900 mutations have been identified. Not all of
the mutations have been associated with disease states, and most of them are very rare. Interpretation of tests results are further
complicated by family histories and ethnic background, which if inaccurate, can give misleading risk factors. Because of the complexity of
the testing and interpretation, genetic counseling is often recommended depending on the various outcomes of the test. The purpose of
this workshop is to gain an understanding of CF as a disease state as well as gain an understanding of test requirements and interpretations.
ACMG/ACOG recommendations and their implications will also be reviewed and discussed. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)
Repeated on Wednesday

#3 Toys For Techs – Lab Innovations for the New Millenium. Rex A. Berggren, Maj, USA, MS; Jeff Lamothe, Maj, USAF, BSC; Allen
Frankenberry, LtCol, USAF, BSC; Ronald Rippetoe, Maj, USAF, BSC; Norman C. Fox, Capt, USAF, BSC; Frederic R. Hornick, MS, MT(ASCP).

Innovations are drastically changing the business of medicine, and the laboratory is following suit. We will present several initiatives that
have assisted our facilities in providing better patient care. Topics will include: Distance learning, remote training, CD applications, patient
notification systems and software solutions. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Tuesday

#4 The Impact of Clinical Microbiology on Routine Patient Care and in a Biowarfare Environment. David W. Craft, LTC, USA, MS.

This workshop initiated last year provides clinical updates and incorporates laboratory response network issues related to the capitol hill
anthrax investigation. The clinical microbiology laboratory provides valuable diagnostic and therapeutic information to the health care
provider. The workshop is designed to re-orient the general medical technologist and update the clinical microbiologist on just a few of the
many roles of the microbiology laboratory in patient care. The bench by bench review will include:
(1) blood culture optimization and reporting of results; (2) quantitative rules and pathogens commonly isolated on the urine bench; (3)
suggested samples and microorganisms commonly isolated on the wounds bench; (4) screening respiratory samples for acceptability and
the pathogens associated with upper and lower respiratory disease; and last but not least; (5) “stool” rules and pathogens isolated. The
bench presentation will transition to two case studies which encompass some common techniques found in the bacteriology and diagnostic
virology laboratory. I will conclude with a brief review of the anthrax outbreak in the District of Columbia and the requirements of a level A
or level B clinical microbiology laboratory in a biowarfare environment. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Tuesday

#5 What Every Laboratorian Needs to Know About Strategic/Business Planning.
Brian T. Ivey, LT, USNR, MSC; Michael L. Finch, CDR, USR, MSC.

The rapid and dynamic changes that have surfaced in the healthcare industry over the last decade have been no stranger to Laboratory
Medicine, specifically Laboratory Medicine in the Armed Forces. Congress has publicly recognized what most of us in the Military Health
System (MHS) have known for years; the MHS has been severely under budgeted. So, how do leaders and managers of clinical
laboratories continue to forge into the future with a decreased budget and a limited resource pool of Medical Laboratory Technicians and
Medical Technologists? There is not a single answer for each laboratory, but each must have a plan, a STRATEGIC PLAN, to deal with the
16
                                                                                                                      Society Scope

issues. John M. Bryson, Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations, believes leaders and managers should “develop
effective strategies to cope with changed and changing circumstances, and they need to develop a coherent and defensible basis for their
decisions.” They need to develop a strategic plan, or business plan, as the basis for day-to-day decision making and future planning.
Bryson defines strategic planning “as a disciplined effort to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an
organization is, what id does, and why it does it.” Regardless of why the strategic planning cycle is started, everyone should have a solid
foundation of the key components of strategic planning. This workshop is designed to provide the fundamental building blocks of
initiating, completing, and assessing a strategic plan. At the end of the workshop, each member should be armed with enough information
to initiate a strategic planning process in his or her own laboratory. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Wednesday

#6 Molecular Diagnostics of Infectious Diseases. W. Aldous, Maj, USA, MS; D. Heath, Maj, USA, MS; Debra Niemeyer, LtCol, USAF,
BSC.

Molecular diagnostics are becoming more generally accepted within the laboratory field. Because of their enhanced speed and sensitivity,
molecular techniques may often be able to provide a rapid diagnosis compared to conventional culture systems, which may be time
consuming, expensive, or unavailable. By utilizing DNA hybridization or nucleic acid amplification techniques, patient care can be
improved through the rapid detection and characterization of specific pathogens. Many molecular test kits and methods are now approved
for use and available on the market. The advantages of these molecular diagnostic kits are widely publicized, increasing the pressure to use
these tests instead of conventional methods. However, molecular tests are considerably more expensive than conventional culture
techniques and require specialized equipment and expertise. This presentation will review the basic principles of molecular biology
necessary to understand these molecular tests, discuss amplification techniques and nucleic acid hybridization, evaluate current FDA
approved tests and instrumentation available on the market, and demonstrate specific examples of differing techniques utilized for
diagnosis of the same pathogen. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#7 The Pathophysiology of Lipids: Understanding and Applying APT III.
David A. Smith, MAJ, USA, MSC.

In May 2001 the National Cholesterol Education Program of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of NIH published new quidelines for
the diagnosis and treatment of hyperlipidemia. These guidelines, The Adult Treatment Plan III (ATPIII) detailed new lipid reference ranges,
a new means to calculate the risk for a coronary heart disease and identified specific treatment recommendation based upon lipid levels.
This workshop will discuss the new ATPIII guidelines and the new 10 year CHD risk calculations. In addition, there will be a brief overview
of the pathophysiology of CHD with specific emphasis on the new ATPIII guidelines. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated Tuesday

Monday 18 March (4 Hour Workshops: 1300 - 1700)

#8 College of American Pathologists (CAP) Inspector Training Program - Part 2
Robert Rickert, MD, FCAP; Richard Patton, MD, FCAP; Edward J. Gruber, MT(ASSCP), CLS(NCA).

This presentation is a supplement to Part 1 which provides an overview of the College of American pathologists Laboratory Accreditation
Program (LAP), including: the history and goals of the LAP; the purpose and advantages of CAP Laboratory Accreditation; the differences
between the Standards and inspection checklists; the roles of the pathologist team leader and inspection team members, and resources for
a successful CAP inspection. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#9 Armed Services Blood Program Update. G. Michael Fitzpatrick, Col, USA, MS; Ronny G. Alford, Maj, USAF, BSC.

Workshop attendees will be introduced to military blood banking in support of contingencies including: pre-deployment and deployment
of blood and specific lessons learned. Attendees will also receive updates on service and theater specific programs, quality assurance
issues, and governing instructions and publications. The status of blood research and development of the Defense Blood Standard
System will also be presented. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#10 What Are You Going To Do When You Grow Up? (2002 Edition).
Michael H. Caldwell, Col (retired)

This workshop is the third in a series of workshops presented by Emeritus SAFMLS members for the benefit of active duty members. This
edition will concentrate on short presentations by a cadre of former active duty SAFMLS members that are working in various post federal
retirement professions. Career opportunities that are available for military and government retirees and pre-retirement preparation will be
the focus of this workshop. An expanded (by request of last years participants) panel of CEOs/Executives as well as Emeritus members
now employed in the corporate world or those managing their own companies will be present to offer career advice and to answer
                                                                                                                                         17
Society Scope
attendees’ questions. The workshop will conclude with a teleconference of Emeritus members now in the corporate world that could not
attend the 2002 SAFMLS meeting (SAFMLS Emeritus members, et al). (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#11 Clinical Laboratory Management Skills. Lucia More, Maj, USAF, BSC; Daniel Brown, Col, USAF, BSC; Suellyn Novak, Col, USAF,
BSC; Michael Caldwell, Col (ret), USAF, BSC; LtCol Paul Barnicott, USAF, BSC; Paula Simon, LtCol, USAF, BSC; Kimberly Robinson, Maj,
USAF, BSC.

This workshop is targeted for lab officers relatively new to the Air Force. It is intended to provide tools for becoming more effective,
confident leaders. Topics covered will include communication skills, job responsibilities, officership, leadership skills, team building,
career management, professional development, and stress management.
(OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#12 Case Studies in Microbiology. Richard Mello, Major, USAF, BSC; Mark Burton, Major, USAF, MC; Eric Fillman, Capt, USAF, MC;
David W. Craft, Lt Col, USA, MSC; David K. Turgeon, Lt Col, USA, MSC; Steven Mahlen, Capt, USA, MSC; Peter J. Weina, Lt Col, USA,
MSC; William Nauschuetz, Lt Col, USA, MSC; Steve Putbrese, Lt Col, USAF, BSC; Mike Dempsey, Capt, USAF, BSC; Sherry Trevino, GS,
USAF

Interesting cases diagnosed at the major Army (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tripler Army Medical
Center, Brooks Army Medical Center) and Air Force (Wilford Hall Medical Center) clinical microbiology laboratories will be presented.
Participants will be given a patient history and the preliminary microbiology and/or pathology findings for each case presented. They will
be asked to make suggestions on follow-up testing to identify the microorganisms involved. A brief discussion will follow. (OPEN
ENROLLMENT)

Tuesday 19 March (2 Hour Workshops: 1500 – 1630)

#13 Dendritic Cells: Cliinical Applications of Antibody-Targeted Vaccines. Robert A. Bowden, MAJ, USA, MSC; Donna S. Whittaker,
MAJ, USA, MSC; Tibor Keler, Ph.D. Medarex, Inc.

Dendritic Cells (DC)are potent mediators of the immune response. Properties of DC include the ability to 1)capture, process and present
self and foreign antigens 2) migrate to lymphoid tissue and 3) effectively stimulate primary and secondary T cell responses. Until recently,
the paucity of DC in tissues has limited the full characterization of these cells. Improved methods to culture and expand DC ex vivo has led
to clinical based strategies using DC in transplantation, vaccination, autoimmunity and cancer immunotherapy. This workshop will present
background information on DC and their role in mediating the immune response. Additionally, cutting edge research using DC in the
vaccination against militarily relevant pathogens will be discussed. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#14 Current Issues Facing DoD Cytology Services. Karen Nauschuetz, LTC(P), USA, MC; Jeff Smith, CPT, USA, MSC; Alex Kayatani,
CPT, USA, MSC; Michael Jee, SFC, USA.

Pap smear screening has undergone a number of significant changes in the past decade to include the use of new technologies such as
liquid based cytology, ancillary testing and updates in the terminology used for the interpretation of Pap smears. We will detail the
initiatives taken to implement liquid based cytology in the laboratory. It will include a review and comparison of conventional and
monolayer techniques, basic cell morphology, and a review of the new Bethesda system terminology used in classifying the cellular
abnormalities. The importance of ancillary testing for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA will be discussed. The hurdles we need to
overcome in the consolidation of Pap Smear screening for the Department of Defense will also be addressed.
(OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#15 Laboratory Accreditation: Tools and Resources Available to Avoid The Unexpected Hurdles. Dennis Lahl, HMC, USN; SFC
Rodriquez, USN.

Designed to cover a wide variety of topics to assist Laboratory Directors and staff to successfully complete an Accreditation inspection.
Items to be covered include: checklist updates, common missed questions, proficiency testing tracking and compliance and personnel
requirements. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#16 The APTIMA COMBO 2 Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria
Gonorrhoea, Mike Solomon. MPH, Gen-Probe


18
                                                                                                                          Society Scope

The APTIMA Combo 2 Assay is the only second generation assay for the detection and differentiation of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and
Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) available today. The assay uses a combination of three technologies to provide high sensitivity and specificity.
Target capture is used to isolate and purify target rRNA from the sample matrix and Transcription Mediated Amplification (TMA) is used
to amplify the target sequences. The third technology, Dual Kinetic Assay (DKA), is used simultaneously to detect and differentiate CT
and GC in the same reaction tube. Combining these three technologies allows the use of female endocervical and male urethral swab
specimens, as well as male and female urine specimens. All specimens can be collected from symptomatic or asymptomatic patients. The
ability to detect two organisms from a single tube combined with the available automation options, allows for high throughput testing in
a cost-effective manner. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#17 PCR: The Rest of the Story. Daniel H. Atchely, Major, USAF, BSC; Thomas F. Gibbons, Capt, USAF, BSC.

Developing a TAQMQN PCR assay requires several steps, each utilizing specific tools. The PUBMED website is commonly used to
conduct a literature review. The goal is to identify a gene sequence which is specific and unique for the organism of interest. Once the gene
is selected, we check the specificity of the sequence using the BLAST function of PUBMED. Next, PRIMER EXPRESS is used to design
the forward primer, the reverse primer and the probe. The last major step in the development process is optimization. During optimization
the best matrix of constituents used in the master mix for TAQMAN PCR is selected, and test runs for sensitivity and specificity are also
accomplished. This workshop is designed to review and expound on the topics learned during the 2 week BAT training course at Brooks
Air Force Base, and may be useful to anyone with basic knowledge of PCR. This presentation emphasizes the science of TAQMAN PCR,
and the process for developing a primer and probe set for TAQMAN PCR. We will also cover ways to increase your knowledge in the area
of Molecular Biology utilizing distance-learning tools. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#18 The Pathophysiology of Lipids: Understanding and Applying APT III.
David A. Smith, MAJ, USA, MSC.

In May 2001 the National Cholesterol Education Program of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of NIH published new quidelines for
the diagnosis and treatment of hyperlipidemia. These guidelines, The Adult Treatment Plan III (ATPIII) detailed new lipid reference ranges,
a new means to calculate the risk for a coronary heart disease and identified specific treatment recommendation based upon lipid levels.
This workshop will discuss the new ATPIII guidelines and the new 10 year CHD risk calculations. In addition, there will be a brief overview
of the pathophysiology of CHD with specific emphasis on the new ATPIII guidelines. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#19 Air Force Medical Laboratory Training: The New Course. Colleen Halupa, Capt, USAF, BSC; Paul Nelson, 2Lt, USAF, BSC;
Timothy McInnes, CMSgt, USAF; Karla Puterbaugh, MSgt, USAF; Karen Root, TSgt, USAF.

This workshop will address current AF enlisted training issues to include the revised Career Field Education and Training Plan (CFETP) as
well as the complete rewrite of the Phase I and Phase II Medical Laboratory Apprentice Courses. This workshop will describe how the
CFETP is translated into curriculum, the rules of AETC and how they govern curriculum changes, and what AF medical laboratory
technicians will be taught in the future. The new 7-skill level computer-based instruction (CBI) course will also be discussed. (OPEN
ENROLLMENT)

#20 Toys for Techs – Laboratory Innovations for the New Millenium. Rex A. Berggren, MAJ, USA, MS; Jeff Lamothe, Maj, USAF, BSC;
Allen Frankenberry, LtCol, USAF, BSC; Ronald Rippetoe, Maj, USAF, BSC; Norman C. Fox, CAPT, USAF, BSC; Frederic R. Hornick, MS,
MT (ASCP), DA Civilian.

Innovations are drastically changing the business of medicine, and the laboratory is following suit. We will present several initiatives that
have assisted our facilities in providing better patient care. Topics will include: Distance learning, remote training, CD applications, patient
notification systems, and software solutions. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Monday

#21 The Impact of Clinical Microbiology on Routine Patient Care and In a Biowarfare Environment. David W. Craft, LTC, USA,
MSC.

This workshop initiated last year provides clinical updates and incorporates laboratory response network issues related to the capitol hill
anthrax investigation. The clinical microbiology laboratory provides valuable diagnostic and therapeutic information to the health care
provider. The workshop is designed to re-orient the general medical technologist and update the clinical microbiologist on just a few of the
many roles of the microbiology laboratory in patient care. The bench by bench review will include: (1) blood culture optimization and
reporting of results; (2) quantitative rules and pathogens commonly isolated on the urine bench; (3) suggested samples and microorganisms
commonly isolated on the wounds bench; (4) screening respiratory samples for acceptability and the pathogens associated with upper and
lower respiratory disease; and last but not least; (5) “stool” rules and pathogens isolated. The bench presentation will transition to two
                                                                                                                                             19
Society Scope
case studies which encompass some common techniques found in the bacteriology and diagnostic virology laboratory. I will conclude
with a brief review of the anthrax outbreak in the District of Columbia and the requirements of a level A or level B clinical microbiology
laboratory in a biowarfare environment. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Monday

Wednesday 20 March (2 Hour Workshops: 0730 – 0930)

#22 The B-Lactamases: ESBLs, AMPCs and Carbapenemases. Steven Mahlen, CPT, USA, MSC.

b-Lactamases are enzymes produced by many different bacteria that degrade b-lactam antibiotics and render them ineffective for treatment
of infections. There are several types of b-lactamases, including the extended spectrum b-lactamases (ESBLs), the chromosomal- and
plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes, and the carbapenemases. All of these enzymes are clinical threats. This workshop will focus on
describing each of these types of b-lactamases, how to detect them in a clinical laboratory, and treatment alternatives for infections
involving bacteria producing these enzymes. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#23 Infectious Diseases from the “Stans”, with Emphasis on Blood and Tissue Protozoans. Wil Milhous, COL, USA, MS; Ptere Weina,
LTC, USA, MC; Bruno Petruccelli, LTC, USA, MC.

An overview of infectious disease threats from the “Stans” will be presented to the audience in order to give and appreciation of the kind
of threats we face with our troops currently deployed. This overview will give the audience and appreciation of CHPPM’s perspective on
diseases of military importance and significance. This rapid overview will be followed by specific consideration of to blood and tissue
protozoal diseases of great importance to the health of our troops.

Malaria has plagued military campaigns since recorded history. Resistance to current antimalarial drugs is increasing at an alarming rate
and is now present in many areas where military personnel may be deployed. All DOD Medical Treatment Facilities should consider malaria
in their differential diagnosis when evaluating post deployment fever producing illnesses in service members returning from endemic areas
such as Somalia. The clinical presentations of falciparum malaria may be vague and resemble a “flu-like” illness; and, as a result, malaria is
often misdiagnosed. Rapid detection of the malaria parasite and determination of species is critical to the effective management of malaria
infection and diagnosis and documentation of “drug resistant” malaria requires closer scrutiny of parasitologic and therapeutic criteria.

Leishmaniasis diagnostics have been performed at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research since 1983. Recently the laboratory was
certified by the College of American Pathologists and accredited by the DOD Clinical Laboratory Improvement Program as a high complexity
testing laboratory. A retrospective analysis of data generated in this laboratory from 1993 to the present revealed trends and information
allowing us to improve diagnostics in this laboratory for the future. In this session, the results of that analysis, as well as procedures for
submission of test samples from other DOD medical facilities in a new “outreach” program will be presented. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#24 Overview of JCAHO Laboratory Accreditation.            Joanne Born, MT(ASCP), JCAHO.

This workshop will present an overview of the JCAHO laboratory accreditation process including pre-survey preparation, on-site survey
activities, anf the accreditation report process. The presentation will also include a discussion of integration of standards under the
organizational functions of leadership, human resources, performance improvement, information management, environment of care, and
infection control as well as the technical functions of quality control and waived testing. This presentation intended for administrators,
laboratory staff members and point of care testing personnel. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#25 Automated Request and Reporting Between MTF. Peter Payne, Major, USAF, BSC.

The future of interoperability, the ability to pass patient demographics and reports between medical treatment facilities hinges on information
technology development. The laboratory is ready to lead connectivity through the latest information technology developments. This
workshop will describe the various models used to pass information in the healthcare arena. Specifically, the presentation will demonstrate
how the AF Epidemiology Laboratory has developed processes that connect EPI lab with its’ customers and possible uses for the
Composite Health Care System. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#26 MOS 91K Update. Christy Martinez, MSG, USA.

Workshop will provide current information to Active and Reserve component personnel on the Medical Laboratory Technician Course and
the MOS 91K to include the additional skill identifiers M2, M4 and P9. Presenter(s) will provide an overview of the MLT Course and
discuss current changes and updates to the program to include results of Critical Task Selection board; facilitate discussion on current and

20
                                                                                                                            Society Scope
future initiatives to improve MLT training to include implementation of training packages for soldiers in PROFIS status and for reserve
soldiers; facilitate question and answer session; present current data pertaining to Army-wide 91K structure and distribution in the Active
and Reserve Components. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#27 Design and Use of TaqMan and FRET Hybridization PCR for the Identification of Biological Agents Employing the Idaho
Technology R.A.P.I.D.
David A. Kulesh, Major, USAF, BSC; Debra Neimeyer, LtCol, USAF, BSC.

TaqMan® and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Hybridization Probes are incorporated into PCR assays allowing for the
“real-time” detection of target genes using the Ruggidized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device (RAPID). However, merely adding
these fluorescently-labeled probes to an already proven “standard” gel-based PCR reaction does not guarantee the assay will work in a
rapid-cycling, “real-time” PCR thermocycler. For a successful “real-time” assay several factors involving specific primers, probes and
amplicons must be considered very carefully: a) amplicon (target) length (in base pairs); b) melting temperatures (T ) of both primers and
                                                                                                                    m
probe; c) fluorescent labeling/quenching of the probes; and d) PCR cycling conditions. This workshop will be an in-depth analysis of the
factors necessary to design and use both TaqMan and Hybridization Probes for the accurate and timely detection of biological agents
using the RAPID. (Max Enrollment: 25)

#28 Laboratory Management 101. Eva K. Calero, CPT, USA, MSC; Michael Walter, CPT, USA, MSC.

Lab Management 101: This workshop is geared towards new lab managers. Lab Officers stepping into lab management assignments are
often unprepared and unaware of the diverse issues a manager is exposed to on a daily basis. This workshop is designed to make that first
time lab manager successful by discussing critical issues and providing take-home tools. Issues covered will range from accreditation and
personnel issues to financial management and smart public relations. (OPEN ENROLLMENT)

#29 Cystic Fibrosis: Implications of New Screening Guidelines. Anita Sanow, Capt, USAF, BSC.

The American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG), along with the College of Obstetrics/Gynecology(ACOG), formalized recommendations
in March/April 2001 for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carrier screening in response to an NIH Consensus Development Statement on “Genetic
Testing for Cystic Fibrosis” dated April 1997. While the recommendations seem simple enough, the actual implementation becomes very
complicated when the differences between molecular (DNA) and classical laboratory tests are examined. Most clinical laboratory tests
have clearly defined results: positive or negative; or a defined range (i.e. 80-120 mg/dl) in which the results would be considered normal if
they fall within the range, or abnormal if they fall outside the range. CF testing is very complicated and the results do not fall neatly into well
established parameters. The CF gene is approximately 250,000 base pairs (bp) long and over 900 mutations have been identified. Not all of
the mutations have been associated with disease states, and most of them are very rare. Interpretation of tests results are further
complicated by family histories and ethnic background, which if inaccurate, can give misleading risk factors. Because of the complexity of
the testing and interpretation, genetic counseling is often recommended depending on the various outcomes of the test. The purpose of
this workshop is to gain an understanding of CF as a disease state as well as gain an understanding of test requirements and interpretations.
ACMG/ACOG recommendations and their implications will also be reviewed and discussed. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Monday

#30 What Every Laboratorian Needs to Know About Strategic/Business Planning.

Brian T. Ivey, LT, USNR, MSC; Michael L. Finch, CDR, USN, MSC.
The rapid and dynamic changes that have surfaced in the healthcare industry over the last decade have been no stranger to Laboratory
Medicine, specifically Laboratory Medicine in the Armed Forces. Congress has publicly recognized what most of us in the Military Health
System (MHS) have known for years; the MHS has been severely under budgeted. So, how do leaders and managers of clinical
laboratories continue to forge into the future with a decreased budget and a limited resource pool of Medical Laboratory Technicians and
Medical Technologists? There is not a single answer for each laboratory, but each must have a plan, a STRATEGIC PLAN, to deal with the
issues. John M. Bryson, Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations, believes leaders and managers should “develop
effective strategies to cope with changed and changing circumstances, and they need to develop a coherent and defensible basis for their
decisions.” They need to develop a strategic plan, or business plan, as the basis for day-to-day decision making and future planning.
Bryson defines strategic planning “as a disciplined effort to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an
organization is, what id does, and why it does it.” Regardless of why the strategic planning cycle is started, everyone should have a solid
foundation of the key components of strategic planning. This workshop is designed to provide the fundamental building blocks of
initiating, completing, and assessing a strategic plan. At the end of the workshop, each member should be armed with enough information
to initiate a strategic planning process in his or her own laboratory. (OPEN ENROLLMENT) Repeated on Monday


                                                                                                                                                21
Society Scope

CLINICAL POSTERS:
C-1: “A DoD Global Influenza Surveillance Program” Linda Canas,* SSgt Adam McComb,* SSgt Angela Yuhas,*
SrA Tiffany Foston,* Veronica Ujimori,* Cassandra Schadler,* Lisa Bock*, *Epidemiological Surveillance Division,
Virology Laboratory, Brooks AFB, San Antonio, TX 78235-5241

C-2: “Comparison of 3 Enzyme Immunoassays for Giardia lamblia” Sylvia Trevino, Annette Davis, SSgt., USAF,
Laurie Stockard and Jennifer Rigney, SrA, USAF2601 West Gate Rd., Brooks AFB, TX 78235

C-3: “The Lab Response Network in San Antonio, Texas: Cooperation of Diverse Level B Labs” Gaddy, Charla1,
CPT, USA, Medical Service, Walters, Carol2, Maj(s), USAF, BSC, Nauschuetz, Bill1, LTC, USA, MS, Pollok,
Roger3, 1Microbiology Section, Department of Pathology and Area Lab Services, Brooke Army Medical Center,
Fort Sam Houston; 2 Epidemiology Surveillance Division, AFIERA, Brooks Air Force Base, TX3 Metropolitan
Health District, San Antonio, Texas

C-4: “Prevalence of Antibiotic Use in a Military Community as Determined by Urinary Antibiotic Activity Testing”
Michael Coombes SPC, Tom Ferguson MAJ MC, David Dooley Col MC, Paula Gray DAC Brooke Army Medical
Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr., Bacteriology Section/DPALS, 4th Floor RM 426-1, Ft Sam Houston TX 78234-
6200

C-5: “305 MDG (Walson Clinic) Lyme Disease Infectivity Rate, Fort Dix, New Jersey” Quick, Patricia A., Maj(s),
USAF, BSC, Roy, Mukesh N., Capt, USAF, BSC, Sampang, Conrado C., Maj, USAF, BSC
3458 Neely Road, McGuire AFB, New Jersey, 08641.

C-6: “Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Approach to Treat Group A Beta Streptococcus Pharyngitis: The Strep
Hotline” Martha D. Louzy, Civilian GS-9, US ARMY MEDDACRaymond W. Bliss Army Health Center, Department
of Pathology, Ft. Huachuca, AZ 85613-7040

C-7: “IS TELEHEMATOPATHOLGY AN EFFICACIOUS DIAGNOSTIC MODALITY FOR THE EARLY 21ST CENTURY?
ONE INSTITUTION’S EXPERIENCE WITH SIXTY CONSULTATIVE CASES.” Stephen I. Fisher, Maj, USAF, MC,
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology/Department of Hematopathology, 6825 16th St. NW, Bldg 54, Room 2051,
Washington, DC 20306-6000

C-8: “Comparison of Abbott AXSYM, and Bio-Rad TOX/SEE for Analysis of Drugs of Abuse in Urine” Laraine
Fuentes-Block and Marc Block, Great Lakes Naval Hospital, IL

C-9: “ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE MONITORING” Sherry Trevino,MT(ASCP),MPH, MSGT Kimmie S. Caudill,
Arturo S. Bejar, LTC (sel) Richard Melol, CDR Clara J. Witt, ilford Hall Medical Center, Microbiology Department
(MTLLM), 2200 Bergquist Dr., Ste. 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236
RESEARCH POSTERS:

R-1: “PCR Detection of Francisella tularensis in a Mouse Model” R. Bell, J. David, J. Thompson, R. Burgess,
T.L. Hadfield, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th Street and Alaska Ave NW, Washington DC 20906-6000

R-2: “Rapid Detection of Vascular Stomatitis Virus by Light-Cycler RT-PCR with Taqman Primer Probe Sets” Dongxiang
Xia1, William C. Wilson2 and Ted L. Hadfield1, 1. American Registry of Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of
Pathology, Washington, DC, 2. USDA Agricultural Research Service, Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research
Laboratory, Laramie, WY

R-3: “Sensitivity and Specificity of FRET Probes for Identification of Three Target Genes of Yersinia pestis” Binxue
Zhang, John C. David LCDR, Ted L. Hadfield, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th and Alaska Ave. N.W.
Washington, DC 20306-6000




22
                                                                                                Society Scope

R-4: “Bacillus anthracis Analysis Conducted at AFIP for the Washington DC Bioterrorism Release”
Dana R. Kadavy, T.L. Hadfield, J. David, R. Burgess, R. Bell, W. Thomas, M. Ekis, B. Zhang, M. Dempsey, M.
Dobson, C. Gagni, D. Xia, N. Bravo, ME D’Nicuola, J. McGraw, R. Crawford, E. Hilyard, R. Schoske, Armed
Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th and Alaska Ave. N.W. Washington, DC 20306-6000

R-5: “Comparison of CDC PCR Reagents and USAF Lyophilized Reagents for Bacillus anthracis” M. Dempsey1, C.
Gagni1, N. Bravo1, B. Zhang1, R. Crawford1, M. D’Nicuola1, R. Meyer2, T. Popovic2, R Weyant2, R. Schoske3,
T.L. Hadfield1, 1Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th Street and Alaska Ave NW, Washington DC 20906-
6000, 2Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta GA, 3American University, Washington DC

R-6: “AFLP Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Associated with the Washington DC Bioterrorism Release” M. Dobson, J.
McGraw, TL Hadfield, D. Kadavy, J. David, R. Burgess, R. Bell W. Thomas, M. Ekis, B. Zhang, M. Dempsey, C.
Gagni, D. Xia, N. Bravo, ME D’Nicuola, , R. Crawford, E Hilyard, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th and
Alaska Ave. N.W. Washington, DC 20306-6000

R-7: “Sequence Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Isolates from the Washington DC Bioterrorism Release” J. McGraw,
M. Dobson, J. David, R. Burgess, R. Bell W. Thomas, M. Ekis, D. Kadavy, B. Zhang, M. Dempsey, C. Gagni, D.
Xia, N. Bravo, ME D’Nicuola, R. Crawford, E Hilyard, R. Schoske, TL Hadfield, Armed Forces Institute of
Pathology, 14th and Alaska Ave. N.W. Washington, DC 20306-6000

R-8: “Multicenter Evaluation of PCR Reagents for Bacillus anthracis” N. Bravo1, B. Zhang1, J. David1, M. Dempsey1,
C. Gagni1, R. Burgess1, W. Thomas1, M. Ekis1, ME D’Nicuola1, R. Crawford1, Kent Lohman2, L. Cooper2, O.
Johnson3, M Goode4, S. Shah4, P. Riley5, D. Calimlim5, and TL Hadfield1, 1Armed Forces Institute of Pathology,
14th Street and Alaska Ave NW, Washington DC 20906-6000, 2Brooks AFB, San Antonio, TX; 3Travis AFB, CA;
4SBCCOM, Edgewood MD, 5Lackland AFB, TX

R-9: “Effects of Carbohydrate and Tyrosine Ingestion on Endurance Exercise Performance” Troy D. Chinevere,
CPT, MS, BAMC, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, San Antonio, TX 78234

R-10: “C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Mediates ANP Inhibition of Gastric Mucosal Cell Proliferation and is
Down-Regulated by TGF-B1, protein Kinase A and Protein Kinase C Signaling Pathways” LTC William Gower,
Research Service (151), 13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612

R-11: “Dependence of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recovery from Desensitization on the Duration of Agonist
Exposure” Raven Reitstetter, CPT, MS, ARMY, Clinical Investigation, 3400 Rawley E. Chambers Ave., Suite A,
Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234-6315

R-12: “Detection of Influenza Virus from Throat and Pharyngeal Swabs with LightCycler RT-PCR”
M. G. Koenig, PhD and W. K. Aldous, MAJ, MS, USA, Microbiology Division, Department of Pathology and Area
Laboratory Services, Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Landstuhl Germany

R-13: “Real-Time Taqman PCR Detection of Salmonella in Suspect Foods from a Gastroenteritis Outbreak in Kerr
County, Texas” Luke T. Daum1, William J. Barnes1, James C. McAvin1, Margaret S. Neidert2, Lynn A. Cooper1,
William B. Huff1, Linda Gaul3, W.S. Riggins4, Sandra Morris4, Ann Salmen1, and Kenton L. Lohman1, 1Molecular
Epidemiology Branch, Epidemiology, AFIERA/SDE, Brooks AFB, San Antonio, TX; 2US Army, Texas Department
of Health Fellowship. 3Texas Department of Health (TDH), Austin, TX. 4Texas Department of Health (TDH),
Region 8, San Antonio, TX.

R-14: “A Real-Time PCR Assay for the Universal Detection of Influenza A Viruses” Luke T. Daum, Lynn A. Cooper,
Linda C. Canas, and Kenton L. Lohman, Molecular Epidemiology Branch, Epidemiology, AFIERA/SDE, Brooks
AFB, San Antonio, TX

R-15: “Rapid Detection of Streptococcus agalactiae in Neonatal Sepsis by Real-time Fluorescent Polymerase Chain
Reaction” Robert McGill, Velvet D. Clark, Camille L. Blackmon, Oswald L. Johnson, James W. Smith, Stephen
M. Golden, Brian Faux, David Stamilio, Clinical Investigation Facility, David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis
AFB, CA 94535-1800

                                                                                                               23
Society Scope
R-16: “Streptococcus agalactiae: Rapid Detection from amniotic fluid using fluorescent monitoring PCR” Oswald L.
Johnson, David Stamilio, Michelle Straka, Velvet M. Clark, Camille L. Blackmon, Stephen M. Golden, James W.
Smith, Clinical Investigation Facility, David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA 94535-1800

R-17: “Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Rapid Detection from clinical blood culture specimens using real-time fluorescent
PCR” Oswald L. Johnson, Velvet M. Clark, Camille L. Blackmon, James W. Smith, Clinical Investigation Facility,
David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA 94535-1800

R-18: “Detection of Bacillus anthracis in Veterinary Clinical Samples Using Field Deployable Real-Time TaqMan
PCR Technology” L. A. Cooper1, T. L. Hadfield2, W. Barnes1, K. L. Lohman1; Molecular Epidemiology Branch,
Brooks Air Force Base, San Antonio, TX, 2Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Division of Microbiology,
Washington, DC.

R-19: “Development of a Flow Cytometric Assay to Measure Influenza Vaccine Stimulated Intracellular Accumulation
of TNF-a and IFN-g in CD4+ T Helper Lymphocytes” Capt Maria Kohler, TSgt Rinda Delacruz, SSgt Michelle
Gahan, SRA Christopher Thompson and Lt Col James Smith, Clinical Investigation Facility, David Grant USAF
Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA 94535-1800

R-20: “JP-8 Exposure Effects on T-Helper and T-Cytotoxic Cells Cytokine Production in USAF Personnel” John L.
Chapman, CIC1; Maria R. Kohler, Capt2; Rinda A. Hamilton, TSgt2; Michelle A. Gahan, SSgt2; Jennifer A. Thornton,
PhD2; James W. Smith, Lt Col2 , 1US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO, 2Clinical Investigation Facility,
David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA 94535-1800

R-21: “Correlation of Influenza Antibody Titers and T-helper Cell Activation Following Vaccination” Maria Kohler,
Capt; Rinda Delacruz, TSgt; Michelle Gahan, SSgt; Holden Maecker, PhD; James Smith, Lt Col, Clinical
Investigation Facility, David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA 94535-1800




24
                                                                                                           Society Scope




                                     MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Name                                                        Rank/Grade                                  SSN

Br of Svc                                                                                               Corps
               Duty Status: Active______ Reserve/NG______ Civilian______ Retired______
Duty/Business Address                                                           Phone (                    )

Home Mailing Address                                                                          Phone (      )

Send Mail to (Check only one): Home______ Work______


                                                   EDUCATION
                                Dates                                                          Laboratory Science*
  Institution, City, State     Attended               Major                 Degree                Credit Hours




*Biochemistry, Laboratory Management/Administration, Medical Technology, Anatomical Pathology, Clinical Pathology,
Toxicology, Microbiology, Cytology, Biomedical Research, etc.

              CERTIFICATIONS, REGISTRATIONS, LICENSURES (DATES)




            MEDICAL LABORATORY WORK EXPERIENCE (Military/Civilian)
         Location                                 Position Title                                        Dates




                                                                                                                      25
Society Scope


                                       MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
     AGREEMENT: I hereby apply for membership in the Society of Armed Forces Medical Laboratory Scientists and
     agree to abide by its Constitution and By-Laws and to support its objectives. I understand that acceptance of my
     dues is contingent upon approval of my application by the Board of Directors.

     ANNUAL DUES: $15.00/year. Society dues are payable by 31 December of each year to maintain active member-
     ship and to continue receiving the Society Scope. Individuals requesting membership after 1 October will have their
     enclosed dues credited for the following calendar year.

     NOTE: Application for membership MUST include a recommendation from a SAFMLS member, so indicated by
     entry of the member’s printed name and signature in the space provided below.


     _______________________________________________
     ____________________________________
       SAFMLS Member’s Name (please print) and Signature                          Applicant’s Signature
     Send this application (with dues) to the Secretary”

                                             Maj. Brian Casleton, USAF, BSC
                                                   SAFMLS Secretary
                                                      P.O. Box 2549
                                                 Fairfax, VA 22031-0549
     Check should be made payable to “Society of Armed Forces Medical Laboratory Scientists” (SAFMLS)

       For Use of Board of Directors:
       Board Actions                                                            Date:
       ____________ Approved
       ____________ Disapproved
       Membership Category:           ______ Member            ______ Honorary          ______ Emeritus
       Comments:


                                                                        _____________________________
                                                                              Secretary, SAFMLS




                   Visit our
                   WEBSITE
                      at
                 www.safmls.org
26
                                                                                                                  Society Scope

                    2002 SAFMLS Short Topic Presentations
1.  The Value Of Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests For Chlamydia           Platelet Concentrates Stored At 4°C For 9 Days, Presenter:
    Trachomatis Screening Programs, Presenters: Bernardo                  Jose Quesada, Capt, USA, MS
    Delgado                                                         11.   Role Of Platelet-Activating Factor And Prostaglandin, E2 In
2. Changing Methodologies For Hepatitis C Virus Confirmation,             The Jet Fuel Induced Suppression Of Immunologic Memory,
    Presenter: David L. Escamilla                                         Presenters: Gerardo Ramos , Capt, USAF, BSC
3. Un Oil For Food Program, Presenters: Robert von Tersch, MAJ,     12.   Company Command – Is It For Me?, Presenter: Phillip D. Rooks,
    MS, USA, PhD, William K. Goldberg, MAJ, MS, USAR                      Capt, USA, MSC
4. Patient Access To Lab Results Via The Internet, Presenters:      13.   Aswbpl’s East Response After Wtc September 11 Attack,
    Jeff Lackey, CPT, USA, MSC                                            Presenters: Conrado C. Sampang, Maj, USAF, BSC, Teddy C.
5. Thin-Prep Pap Smears-Changing The Standard Of Care,                    Robinson, SFC, USA
    Presenters: Mercia Locke, MSgt, USAF, CT/ASCP, Winston          14.   Rapid Multiplex Pcr Strategy Using Capillary Electrophoresis
    Yapp, MSgt, USAF, CT/ASCP, Cynthia Marfisi, GS-11, CT/                For Analysis, Presenter: Richard Schoske, Capt, USAF, BSC
    ASCP                                                            15.   The Development of a Core Laboratory at Madigan Army
6. Extended Post-Thaw Storage Of Red Blood Cells Using A                  Medical Center, PRESENTERS: Jude M. Abadie, Capt, USA,
    Closed System And Addition Of Additive Solution, Presenter:           MSC Mikal L. Stoner, Capt, USA, MSC
    Michael J. Lopatka, MAJ, USA, MS                                16.   What Is 1000ul Minus 850 UL? Lead Testing Via Fingerstick,
7. Armed Service Whole Blood Processing Laboratory Frozen                 Presenters: Julie Zwies, Capt, USAF, BSC, Jon Shane, TSgt,
    Blood Initiative 2001, Presenters: Jose Montanez, Capt, USAF,         USAF
    BSC, Brian K. Smith, TSgt, USAF                                 17.   A Kiss On The Forehead Or Needle In The Foot, Which One
8. Automated Request And Reporting Between Mtf, Presenter:                Would You Use? The Bilichek Noninvasive Bilirubin System,
    Peter Payne, Major, USAF, BSC                                         Presenters: Julie Zwies, Capt, USAF, BSC, Jon Shane, TSgt,
9. Relocation And Move Validation Of A Blood Donor Center,                USAF
    Presenter: Elaine S. Perry, LTC, USA, MS                        18.   The Use Of Commercially Off The Shelf Software In Your Lab,
10. Effects Of Dmso, Dmso + Thrombosol, And Thrombosol On                 Presenter: Hassan Zahwa, Capt, USA, MS (Keller Army
                                                                          Community Hospital West Point, NY)




                                                                                                                                    27
Society Scope


                Calendar of
                        Events
     Event       Website          Date                  Location

     AABB        www.aabb.org     26-30 October 2002    Orlando, FL
     AACC        www.aacc.org     25-26 April 2002      La Jolla, CA
     ASCLS       www.ascls.org    26-28 February 2002   Honolulu, HI
     ASCP/CAP    www.ascp.org     12-15 October 2002    Washington, DC
     ASM         www.asm.org      19-23 May 2002        Salt Lake City, UT
     CLMA        www.clma.org     26-30 June 2002       New Orleans, LA
     SAFMLS      www.safmls.org   18-21 March 2002      Spokane, WA




28

				
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