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					Chapter Advisor Resource Manual
      Shaping People, Shaping Business




                                         1
                                                 Table of Contents

    Note: Some sections in the Chapter Advisor Resource Manual have a corresponding eLearning found on-line at
train.akpsi.org to enhance you understanding of the advisor role. Those sections are designated with the “*” symbol.

     Section One: The Basics of Advising

     Situational Advising…………………………………………………………………………………………………….……………..4
     Tips for Advisors…..………………………………………………………..…………………………..……...........................5
     Attributes of Good and Poor Advisors…………..………………………………….…………………………….………….6


     Section Two: Reference*
     AKPsi Historical Overview..………………………………………………………………………………………….…eLearning
     AKPsi Staff: Who Does What? ………………..……………………..…………………………..…….............................8
     RMT Structure and Responsibilities…………………………………………………………………………….… eLearning
     Running Effective Meetings…………………………..………………………………….……………………………..………….9
     Parliamentary Procedure at a Glance.…………..………………………………….……………………………..…………10


     Section Three: Calendar and Chapter Planning*
     Creating S.M.A.R.T. goals ..…………………………..………………………………….……………………………..……12-13
     The ACR ………………............……………………………………………………………………………………....…...eLearning
     Forms and Reporting.........……………………………………………………………………………….……….…..eLearning


     Section Four: Crisis and Risk Management*
     Risk Management…...........…………………………………………………………………………………………....eLearning
     Myths and Facts about Hazing…………………………………………………………………………………….…eLearning
     Alternatives to Hazing.........………………………………………………………………………….…………….….eLearning
     Discipline Process Flow Chart………………………………………………………………………………….….….eLearning
     Tips to help your chapter minimize risk……………………………………………………………………..……………...15


     Section Five: Resources
     Board of Director’s Statement of Policy…..…………………………..………………………………….………………….17
     Conflict Communication………………………………………………………………………………..….……….….eLearning
     Effective Delegation..…………………………………………………………..………………………………….………………….18




                                                                                                                       2
Section Six: Programming/Leadership Development
Core Values and Guiding Principles of Alpha Kappa Psi..……………………………………………..…………….19
Values Activity: Brotherhood……………………………………………..………………………………………………..20-21
Values Activity: Unity…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..22-24
Values Activity: Service………………………………………………………………………………………………………..26-30
Values Activity: Knowledge………………………………………………………………………………………………….31-37
Values Activity: Integrity………………………………………………………………………………………………………38-39




                                                                                     3
Chapter Advisor Resource Manual
 Section One: Basics of Advising




                                   4
                         Situational Advising
                                Based on concepts by Hersey and Blanchard

    Situational Advising allows you to change your advising style to match the developmental need of the
                                     individual or organization you advise.

Advising Style: how you behave, over time, when you are trying to influence the performance of others and
the outcomes of a group.



                                          Advising Skills
Flexibility- You have to learn to use a variety of advising styles flexibly. You must be able to
move from one style to another so that you can relate to many different types of people and
chapter leaders.

Diagnosis- You have to learn to diagnose the needs of the students you advise. Additionally, it
is important to prioritize.

Contracting- You have to learn how to come to some agreements with students, anticipate the
style they need from you.

                                          Advising Skills
Directing –The advisor provides specific instructions and closely supervises task
accomplishments.

Coaching - The advisor continues to direct and closely supervise task accomplishment, but also
explains decisions, solicits suggestions, and supports progress.

Supporting – The advisor facilitates and supports the efforts toward task accomplishments
and shares responsibilities for decision-making with the student.

Delegating – The advisor turns over responsibility for decision-making and problem solving to
the student.


               When the BEST advisor’s work is done, the students say, “We did it ourselves!”

                                                                                                            5
                               Tips for Advisors
      Know the students with whom you are working. It is important to know your audience.

      Have the goals or objectives of the group firmly in mind (priorities, too).

      Express a sincere interest in the group and its mission.

      Express a sincere interest in the each individual in the group.

      Assist the group in setting, realistic, obtainable goals.

      Assist the group in developing a system through which they can evaluate their progress.

      Assist each individual in achieving his/her needs while helping the group achieves its goals.

      Assist the group in understanding the dynamics of the group and human interaction.

      Realize the importance of the peer group and its effect on individual participation or lack thereof.

      Understand you are not the chairperson, nor should you usurp that role.

      Work on developing a style that balances being an active and passive group member.

      Be aware of the various roles you will be filling from time to time.

      Be aware of the institutional power structure—both formal and informal.

      Provide continuity for the group from year to year.

      Challenge the group to grow and develop.

      Be creative and innovative.



Students lose their commitment after they realize a good performance doesn’t make a difference….Recognize
                                                    them!



                                                                                                              6
         Attributes of a Good Advisor
   Knowledgeable
   Able to motivate
   Genuine interest in the group advised
   Knows when to assist and when to back off
   Objective
   Good listening skills
   Understands the needs of the organization
   Prepared
   Organized
   Open and Approachable
   Allows mistakes, but also knows when to jump in
   Able to assess individual strengths and limitations
   Able to analyze situations and remove emotional feelings when necessary
   Team-oriented: willing to work with the group
   Able to bring continuity to the organization
   No fear of saying “I don’t know” or “I was wrong”
   Patient
   Able to give positive reinforcements and rewards
   Dependant and Consistent
   Respectable




          Attributes of a Poor Advisor
   Takes on too much responsibility
   Doesn’t attend the organization’s meetings or activities
   Tells a group what to do
   Doesn’t provide a good advising balance (too strict OR too laid back)
   Pigeonholes individuals
   Has a poor attitude
   Unable to help individuals grow
   Doesn’t encourage participation
   Does not realize his/her own potential
   Unwilling to change or allow initiative

                                                                              7
Chapter Advisor Resource Manual
    Section Two: Reference




                                  8
AKPsi Staff: Who Does What?
ACAC – James Mayer                                        Road to Brotherhood – Amanda Areces
Academic Team – Jess LaNore                               Sapphire – James Mayer
Academy – Jessica Seitz                                   Scholarships – Jess LaNore
Address changes – Cathy Cole, Hazel Collier, Debby Orff   Show Cause – Jennifer Adamany
Affinity Programs – James Mayer                           Staff Concerns – Gary Epperson
Alumni eBulletin – James Mayer                            Strategic Planning – Gary Epperson
Alumni Development – James Mayer                          Student eBulletin – Jennifer Adamany
Alumni Association – James Mayer                          Surveys (online) – Chris Pye
Alumni Chapter Information – James Mayer                  Technology – Chris Pye
Alumni Listings – James Mayer                             The Diary – Jess LaNore
Annual Chapter Report – Jennifer Adamany                  Volunteer Services – Jessica Seitz
Awards, Alumni – James Mayer                              Volunteer Updates – Hazel Collier
Awards, Student – Jennifer Adamany                        Web site – Chris Pye
CAB eBulletin – Jessica Seitz
Career Center (online) – Chris Pye                        Alpha Kappa Psi
                                                                   th
Case Competition – Jessica Seitz                          7801 E 88 Street
Certified Fraternity Volunteer (CFV) – Jessica Seitz      Indianapolis, In 46256-1233
Chairman’s Advisory Council – James Mayer                 Phone Number: (317) 872-1553
Chapter Account Information – Cathy Cole                  Fax Number: (317) 872-1567
Chapter Advisory Board (CAB) – Jessica Seitz
Chapter Collection Problems – Cathy Cole                  Chief Executive Officer
Chapter Services – Jennifer Adamany                            Gary Epperson, Ext 101, gary@akpsi.org
Charters – Debby Orff
College of Leadership – Amanda Areces                     Managing Director of Operations
Conference Calls – Brian Parker                                Brian Parker, Ext 105, brian@akpsi.org
Convention – Jessica Seitz                                Managing Dir Alumni Services/FCOO
Dean’s Council – James Mayer                                   Jess LaNore, Ext 109, jess@akpsi.org
Educational Programming – Amanda Areces                   Managing Dir Student Services
eLearning – Amanda Areces                                      Jessica Seitz, Ext 103, jessica@akpsi.org
E-Mail Addresses - Debby Orff                             Dir of Chapter Services & Expansion
Event Registrations – Melinda Rosenthall                       Jennifer Adamany, Ext 106, jennifer@akpsi.org
Expansion, Alumni Chapter – James Mayer                   Director of Information Services
Expansion, Student Chapter – Jennifer Adamany                  Chris Pye, Ext 102, daniel@akpsi.org
Expense Reimbursement – Brian Parker                      Director of Alumni Development
Financial Statements, Fraternity & Found. – B. Parker          James Mayer, Ext 108, james@akpsi.org
Foundation Contributions – Jess LaNore                    Director of Education
Galley – Jennifer Adamany                                      Amanda Areces, Ext 119, amanda@akpsi.org
General Communications – mail@akpsi.org                   Expansion Coordinator
Initiate Certificates – Debby Orff                             Tana Dippolito, Ext 113, tmdippolito@akpsi.org
Invoice and Statement Processing – Cathy Cole             Expansion Coordinator
Jewelry Orders – Hazel Collier                                 Michael Heer, Ext 114, mcheer@akpsi.org
Liability Insurance – Brian Parker
Life Loyal Program – James Mayer
Major Giving – Jess LaNore                                Membership Services
Marketing – Chris Pye                                          Debby Orff, Ext 110, debby@akpsi.org
Member Processing – Debby Orff                            AKPsi Marketplace/Foundation
Meeting Planning – Jessica Seitz                               Hazel Collier, Ext 111, hazel@akpsi.org
Merchandising Programs – Jess LaNore                      Finances & Collections
Merchandise Orders – Hazel Collier                             Cathy Cole, Ext 112, cathy@akpsi.org
Officer Training – Amanda Areces                          Administrative Assistant
Officer Updates – Hazel Collier                                Melinda Rosenthall, Ext 104, melinda@akpsi.org
Operations, Fraternity & Foundation – G. Epperson
PBLI – Jessica Seitz
Planned Giving – Jess LaNore
Pledge Education Program – Amanda Areces
Project Reconnect – Chris Pye
Recruitment – Jennifer Adamany
Risk Management – Brian Parker
RMT Training – Amanda Areces

                                                                                                                9
                     Running Effective Meetings
During the meeting:
   1. Greet members and make them feel welcome, even the late ones (but do not backtrack
       on the agenda)
   2. Start on time. End on time.
   3. Stick to the agenda. Encourage members who want to discuss tangent items to stay
       after and approach the appropriate officer with his/her concern.
   4. Encourage group discussion to get all viewpoints and ideas. You will have better quality
       decisions because of highly motivated members and the buy-in the discussion creates.
   5. Keep conversation on topic, toward an eventual decision. Feel free to ask for only
       constructive comments.
   6. Delegate responsibilities and establish due dates. Give members a voice in decision
       making.
   7. Have the secretary keep minutes of the meeting for future reference in case a question
       or problem arises.
   8. Summarize agreements reached and end the meeting on a unifying or positive note. For
       example, have members volunteer thoughts of things they feel are good or successful,
       reciting a group’s creed, or a good of the order.
   9. Make sure you go over upcoming dates and the time and place for the next meeting.


After the meeting:

   1. Prepare and distribute minutes within 24 hours. Quick action reinforces importance of
      meeting and reduces error of memory.
   2. Discuss problems during the meeting with officers so that improvements can be made.
   3. Follow-up on delegation decisions. See that all members understand and carry out their
      responsibilities.
   4. Give recognition and appreciation to excellent and timely progress.
   5. Put unfinished business on the agenda for the next meeting.
   6. Conduct a periodic evaluation of the meetings. Weak areas can be analyzed and
      improved for more productive meetings.




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11
      Chapter Advisor Resource Manual
Section Three: Calendar and Chapter Planning




                                               12
          Creating S.M.A.R.T. Goals
                                    Specific
                                    Measurable
                                    Attainable
                                    Realistic
                                    Timely

Specific - A specific goal has a much greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal.
To set a specific goal you must answer the six "W" questions:

*Who:     Who is involved?
*What:    What do I want to accomplish?
*Where:     Identify a location.
*When:     Establish a time frame.
*Which:    Identify requirements and constraints.
*Why:     Specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal.

EXAMPLE: A general goal would be, "Get in shape." But a specific goal would say, "Join a
health club and workout 3 days a week."


Measurable - Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of each
goal you set. When you measure your progress, you stay on track, reach your target dates, and
experience the exhilaration of achievement that spurs you on to continued effort required to
reach your goal.

To determine if your goal is measurable, ask questions such as......How much? How many? How
will I know when it is accomplished?


Attainable - When you identify goals that are most important to you, you begin to figure out
ways you can make them come true. You develop the attitudes, abilities, skills, and financial
capacity to reach them. You begin seeing previously overlooked opportunities to bring yourself
closer to the achievement of your goals.

You can attain most any goal you set when you plan your steps wisely and establish a time
frame that allows you to carry out those steps. Goals that may have seemed far away and out
of reach eventually move closer and become attainable, not because your goals shrink, but
because you grow and expand to match them. When you list your goals you build your self-
image. You see yourself as worthy of these goals, and develop the traits and personality that
allow you to possess them.
                                                                                                13
Realistic - To be realistic, a goal must represent an objective toward which you are both willing
and able to work. A goal can be both high and realistic; you are the only one who can decide
just how high your goal should be. But be sure that every goal represents substantial progress.
A high goal is frequently easier to reach than a low one because a low goal exerts low
motivational force. Some of the hardest jobs you ever accomplished actually seem easy simply
because they were a labor of love.

Your goal is probably realistic if you truly believe that it can be accomplished. Additional ways to
know if your goal is realistic is to determine if you have accomplished anything similar in the
past or ask yourself what conditions would have to exist to accomplish this goal.


Timely - A goal should be grounded within a time frame. With no time frame tied to it there's
no sense of urgency. If you want to lose 10 lbs, when do you want to lose it by? "Someday"
won't work. But if you anchor it within a timeframe, "by May 1st", then you've set your
unconscious mind into motion to begin working on the goal.

T can also stand for Tangible - A goal is tangible when you can experience it with one of the
senses, that is, taste, touch, smell, sight or hearing. When your goal is tangible you have a
better chance of making it specific and measurable and thus attainable.




                            If a man knows not what harbor he seeks,
                                    any wind is the right wind.
                                              -Seneca




                                                                                                 14
Chapter Advisor Resource Manual
Section Four: Crisis Management




                                  15
                                Tips to help your chapter minimize risk

You can utilize the following tips to help minimize risk in your chapter. Risk can never be eliminated, but
putting good practices in place at the chapter level can help reduce risk. For questions about these tips,
please contact the Judiciary Committee.

    1. Ensure that risk management policies found in the Board of Directors Statement of Policy are
       reviewed by the chapter each term and collect signed acknowledgements; verify that one is
       received from each brother. A sample acknowledgement can be found in the Judiciary
       Committee Operations Manual.
    2. At least annually, review chapter Bylaws to ensure there are no conflicts with higher level
       documents.
    3. Establish a compliance committee. Information about a compliance committee can be found in
       the Judiciary Committee Operations Manual.
    4. Create professional programming around alcohol/hazing/sexual harassment. Have a professor,
       student health, Greek life, student activities, an AKPsi volunteer, etc. present a session.
    5. Avoid drinking while wearing letters.
    6. Avoid tagging photos on-line with “AKPsi.”
    7. Seek out your CAB –Risk Management representative for assistance for conveying the policies.
    8. When in doubt concerning risk management policies, contact the Judiciary Committee.
    9. If using a bartender, this person must be a third party, independent person with liability
       insurance.
    10. If alcohol is present, utilize an independent third party such as security or bartender to check
        IDs.
    11. BYOB Guideline: the amount one person can reasonably consume and can maintain within their
        control during the event. Reasonable consumption can be determined by time elapsed, weight,
        gender, age, medication in system, physical condition, and type of alcohol. Ensure compliance
        with local and state laws pertaining operating a motor vehicle.
    12. For insurance liability reasons, chapters are advised against having or running an organized
        designated driver program. Recommended options include public transportation, walking, or
        staying at the place of where drinking takes place.
    13. Consider setting public website pages to private viewing only (MySpace, Facebook, etc.)
    14. In the context of risk management, a pledge program may be defined as an event designed for
        pledges, hosted by pledges, or otherwise included in the pledge class calendar.




                                                                                                           16
Chapter Advisor Resource Manual
    Section Five: Resources




                                  17
                                   Board of Directors Statement of Policy



This statement of policy is to be used as guidance in establishing and maintaining procedures at all levels
of the Fraternity. In addition to the policies stated in this document, all other documents published by
the Board of Directors shall be considered the policy of the Board, and may only be altered by the Board
of Directors or another governing body, which is authorized by the Board to do so. These other
documents include but are not limited to the “Bylaws for College Chapters,” the “Pledge Manual,” and
the “Employee Handbook.”


It covers the following topics in detail and is essential for daily fraternal operations:


                 Acceptable methods of Communications
                 Conflict of Interest
                 Convention committees / standing committees
                 Good Standing
                 Disciplinary Procedures
                 Dues
                 Financial Policies
                 Fraternity Anniversaries
                 Initiation Fee Waiver Policy
                 Chapter installations
                 Mail Ballots
                 Official Seal, Badge and Logo
                 Personal Liability of Officers and Directors
                 Policy change procedures
                 Reinstatement of Chapters
                 Rights and Obligations of Probationary Chapters
                 Rights of Membership
                 Risk Management
                 Student Chapter Attendance Policy
                 Board of Director Job Descriptions
                 Board of Director Committee Descriptions


This is a document all chapter officers should be aware of and have working knowledge of. It is available
in at http://www.akpsi.org/resource/resmgr/Docs/BODSOP.pdf.




                                                                                                        18
            5 Steps to Effective Delegation
                   Working with your CAB and your chapter


1. Identify the Key Task
  The first critical step is to recognize and track all the main tasks that the members of
  your group must accomplish. Develop a task list for you group. Define the task and
  establish your goals for a project. Have a vision to carry through a project.

2. Delegate Each Task Appropriately
  Review the list in order to identify the tasks that you should do and those that can be
  delegated to the members of your group. Choose members whose skills and personality
  styles match the assignment. Empower the members so as to provide them an
  opportunity to grow and be challenged.

3. Explain Each Task to Your New Members
  Define and clarify the nature of task that is delegated to your members. To ensure a
  collaborative approach, do properly communicate to all the members of your group as
  to what tasks and to whom it has been delegated. Be sure to give specific directions and
  to make your expectations clear, for both quality and time frame. Explain to the
  members clearly as to why the task is important and how it contributes to the
  organization as a whole.


4. Develop a Plan for Each Task Assigned
  A sound plan is essential for the projects to succeed. Good planning is a critical part of
  the delegation process. The plan should define how the task will be accomplished; list
  the subtasks, and their completion dates. Make sure your members have all the
  necessary resources to complete the assigned task. Encourage your members to take a
  lead in developing a plan.

5. Monitor the Progress
  Review the progress of each task on a regular basis. Set checkpoints for both short-
  range and long-range projects. Give members the freedom to perform and avoid close
  supervision. Measure success by quantifiable criteria. Give praise and constructive
  criticism where it is due. Look at a failed act of delegation as a learning opportunity.
  Help your members to learn to grow through both their successes and their failures.

                          Core Values and Guiding Principles

                                                                                             19
Core Values
Brotherhood– Trust, respect, cooperation, companionship, and aid to Brother Members is the expected
norm

Knowledge – Education and experience, whether gained in the classroom or the workplace, is
emphasized and shared

Integrity – All actions, whether in business or in life, are guided by honesty, ethics, and fairness

Service – Sharing of time, talent, and treasure with both communities and with our Fraternity is a
priority

Unity – A common understanding of our vision and values that transcends chapter, generation, and
profession is utilized to anticipate and create the future

Guiding Principles
Building Brotherhood- The esoteric quality we call “Brotherhood” is of vital importance though difficult
to define. Our members, from the day they become brothers until the end of their lives, foster a great
love of the fraternity and a fondness for brother members. While brotherhood manifests itself in a
multitude of ways, at its center is a sense of duty and respect for both the fraternity and individual
members. All activities and decisions that involve the fraternity are guided by a sense of stewardship
and selflessness. Members are anchored by the need to do what is in the best interest of the fraternity
as a whole and are not swayed by individual self-interest.

Lifelong Learning - College is merely the beginning of business education. Our members share their
knowledge and experiences openly with the people they work with, regardless of rank or position. In
addition, they seek out opportunities to share their real-world experience with brother members, and in
doing so they enhance the lifelong learning of those members.

High Ethical Standards - While the business world offers many opportunities for success and
advancement, it also requires us to make decisions about how we succeed. Our members understand
the importance of making decisions and conducting business in a way that takes into account both legal
and ethical considerations. Our members serve as role models through their consistently fair and ethical
conduct.

Improving Communities - Much is expected of those to whom much is given. Business professionals who
seek to improve the communities in which they do business improve lives and develop goodwill. Our
members actively give back to their communities through volunteer activities and monetary support.

Enhancing the Fraternity for Life - College chapters serve as living laboratories for classroom concepts
and professional conduct. In turn, lessons learned in the fraternity prepare members for success in the
business world. Because they recognize the value and importance of our Fraternity, our members are
united in their passion to build a legacy for the future. They support the fraternity through volunteer
leadership and monetary gifts.




                                                                                                       20
                                               Brotherhood


                                      “Win As Much as You Can!”

Divide chapter into 4 smaller teams. Depending on the size of the chapter, it is possible that
you may want to have more than one simulation. Teams should be no larger than 8-10
members.

Distribute tally sheets to each participant. Facilitator should recreate the scoring chart on a flip
chart.



Facilitator shares the following instructions:
     The title of this activity is “Win As Much As You Can.” You are to keep this goal in mind
        throughout the experience.

       There are three key rules:

            1. You are not to confer with members of the other groups unless you are given
            specific permission to do so. This applies to nonverbal as well as verbal
            communication.

            2. Each group must agree upon a single choice for each round.

            3. You are to insure that the other groups do not know your group’s choice until you
            are instructed to reveal it.

        Let the Game Begin!



Facilitator shares the following instructions:
        There are ten rounds in this exercise. During each round, you and your group will have
        one minute to mark your choice for the round. Remember the rules regarding sharing
        your team’s choice. Mark your choice for round one.

        The key to this exercise is to keep in mind brotherhood and the collective YOU in “Win as
        much as you can!” The students will struggle to get the most for their individual groups,
        but if they are agree to choose Y’s each time, they ALL win.



 “You cannot contribute anything to the ideal condition of mind and heart known as Brotherhood, however much
                               you preach, posture, or agree, unless you live it.”
                                                 - Faith Baldwin

                                                                                                          21
                                   WIN AS MUCH AS YOU CAN

Instructions: You and your group must select an X or Y during 10 trials of decision-making.
Depending on your group’s selection, as well as the selection of other groups, you will be
rewarded or punished as a function of the pay-off matrix displayed below.


                           THE OBJECT IS TO WIN AS MUCH AS YOU CAN


Pay-off matrix:
       1. 1 X and 3 Y’s = X wins 3 points, Y’s lose 1 point
       2. 2 X’s and 2 Y’s = X’s win 2 points, Y’s lose 2 points
       3. 3 X’s and 1 Y = X’s win 1 point, Y loses 3 points
       4. 4 X’s = X’s lose 1 point
       5. 4 Y’s = Y’s win 1 point

ROUND             GROUP 1            GROUP 2            GROUP 3         GROUP 4
1
2
3
4
5*                X3=                X3=                X3=             X3=
6
7
8*                X5=                X5=                X5=             X5=
9
10*               X 10 =             X 10 =             X 10 =          X 10 =

     *IN ROUNDS 5, 8, AND 10 YOUR WINNINGS OR LOSSES WILL BE MULTIPLIED BY 3, 5, 10.

      INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION CAN OCCUR ONLY DURING ROUNDS 3, 5, 8, AND 10.




                                                                                              22
                                                  Unity

   Presenter explains that the groups will now have an opportunity to apply their leadership skills and
                             values in an activity designed to highlight UNITY.

Divide participants into equal teams that fit easily around a table and make sure everyone has a paper
and a pen. One person will be designated as a time keeper.

Prior to start of session, Facilitator ensures that each team has a bag of 9 blocks. The bag should contain
8 blocks belonging to that team and one block from another team’s bag. The extra block should be a
necessary piece of the model. This information should not be revealed to participants until late in the
large group processing.

Facilitator:

         In the next room is a model made of blocks. THE GROUP’S GOAL IS FOR EACH TEAM TO
         CONSTRUCT AN IDENTICAL MODEL IN THE QUICKEST TIME.

         Take the blocks given to your team and spread them out on the table so that no two blocks are
         touching. Verify that you have 9 blocks. . THE GROUP’S GOAL IS FOR EACH TEAM TO
         CONSTRUCT AN IDENTICAL MODEL IN THE QUICKEST TIME. You will have 30 minutes to
         complete the whole task. The duplicate model must be EXACT. Everything about the model
         must be the same.

         This activity is divided in to two parts. The first part is preparation. Take as much of the 30
         minutes for preparation as you need as it will not count against you in the competition. During
         preparation, you may handle the blocks, but you may not remove them front the table or place
         them so that they are touching ANY other blocks. You may use your paper to make drawings,
         but you may not remove the paper from the table.

         One at a time, a group member may go in to the room with the model. He or she may look at
         the model from ONLY one side. He or she may look at the model for as long as he or she likes.
         Each time a person goes to look at the model, 15 sec. is added to the total construction time for
         the group. Team members may view the model at any time during the preparation or
         construction.

         When your team feels ready to construct the model, notify your timekeeper and begin
         constructing. Your construction time will automatically start if two blocks are intentionally
         placed so that they are touching. When you believe your model is correct, notify the
         timekeeper, who will stop the timing and check your model for accuracy. If it is incorrect you
         will be told that there is at least one mistake in your construction and your construction time
         will resume.

         Finally, as in real life, there are some in your group who may have different goals than the
         group. Sometimes people do things to reach personal goals rather than team goals. They may
         work against team goals because of lack of trust, disagreements with team members, different
         leadership styles, and inability to get along with other officers. There may be such a person in
         your group. We will call that person a “spy.” It is possible to have more than one spy per
         group.

         If you are a spy, you are to do everything in your power to hinder the efforts of your team,
         without letting anyone know that you are a spy. If someone on your team asks you directly if
                                                                                                           23
         you are a spy, regardless of your true status, your only response should be “Do you think I am a
         spy?” If a team member thinks that another member is a spy, he/she can accuse the person of
         spying and a team vote is held. Majority vote results in the spy being excluded from the
         remainder of the exercise and deliberations.

RECAP:

         THE GROUP’S GOAL IS FOR EACH TEAM TO CONSTRUCT AN IDENTICAL MODEL IN THE QUICKEST
         TIME.

         Members may view the model as many times as they wish; viewing only one side per visit. Each
         visit costs 15 seconds of construction time.

         Construction time begins as soon as two blocks are intentionally placed in a touching position
         regardless of the groups intentions.

         Members may write on their papers, but are not allowed to take their papers with them when
         they view the model.

         There may be one or more spies in a group.

         The activity will continue for 30 minutes.

         The timekeeper is charged with keeping time for his or her group. Construction time is the raw
         construction time (from the time the blocks make initial contact or the group says they are ready
         to begin constructing) plus 15 seconds per visit to the model.

Facilitator:

         Call time after 30 minutes have gone by. Have timekeepers add up their teams’ total
         construction time. One by one, have each group report their time and whether or not the
         model was correctly completed.
        How was the activity? What dynamics emerged?

        What did the observers notice? Point out specific leadership styles, etc.; conversations or
         comments that you heard that either support or negate the concept of unity.

        Ask as a follow-up, “How does this relate to AKPsi and our chapter?” when referring to concepts
         the students bring up.

        Did the group work together?

        How?

        Did the group accomplish their goal?

        Was the best possible outcome achieved?

Facilitator:
         Begin to make the connection to the chapter and its strength or weakness in “unity”
     How many of you had spies in your group? (then ask spies to stand up---there will be none)


                                                                                                          24
   In the chapter context, why do we sometimes think others are “working against us” or why does
    it appear that way?

   How did this group respond to the concept of UNITY?

   Regarding spies and blaming, does this chapter place blame or are we always unified?

   Why do you think “unity” is on of our core values?

   What would our chapter be like/look like if we all decided to be unified?




                                                                                              25
                                                  Service

  After a chapter has completed a service project or engaged in service learning, it is an important next
    step to process the experience. This facilitation guide will teach you the four-step service learning
      process and well and help you to lead a discussion with chapter members as a vital piece of the
                                              “reflection” step.
Introduction to Service Learning
Service leaning is an intentional experiential learning process that utilizes hands-on service coupled with
reflective thinking to provide richness and meaning to the Alpha Kappa Psi experience.

This definition means that the service learning experience follows an intentional process, uses "hands
on" experiences, and employs critical thinking skills to process the experience. When used together,
service experiences can have a deep and lasting impact on youth and adults. There is a huge difference
between service and philanthropy. While both are important, service is defined by being a hands-on
experience; service is not indirectly beneficial like raising money is. While serving, a person has face-to-
face interaction with the beneficiary of the service. Hands-on service cannot be substituted by books,
videos, or broad anecdotes.

The Four-Step Service Learning Process




The service learning process is a tool to aid in service experiences that produce longer-term,
transforming effects on youth and adults. The process includes four stages:




                                                                                                          26
Preparation: Anticipation of, and preparation for, a service experience.
Preparation often focuses only on the logistics of raising money, gathering supplies, and making travel
arrangements. Good preparation, on the other hand, includes an effort to build community, share
expectations, acquire skills that will be needed in the service experience, learn about a culture the group
will be working among, and listening to the needs of a community to learn what type of assistance or
support is actually needed (versus imposing your own expectations). Don't circumvent the process by
skipping the important elements of preparation!

The service project that you choose for your group should be done intentionally, as the motivation for
the project will guide much of the process. Ask your students:
     Why did we choose this particular type of service?

       What about this service is meaningful to us?

       How do we expect to affect and engage the community?


Action: Engaging in a meaningful service experience.
The beauty of the Action stage is that it will be different for every group and every experience of service
that ever happens. This stage includes any activity (large or small) that allows people to engage in
unselfish service to, with, or on behalf of others. Challenge yourself to think outside the box in creating
service activities. (A good reminder: Youth often learn and grow when they are involved in activities that
move them beyond their comfort zones.)

Leaders must caution themselves against evaluating the validity or effectiveness of a service experience
based solely on what is visible and measurable (who showed up, how many hours were invested, how
many people were served, etc.) and neglecting less quantifiable, yet deeply meaningful activities (such
as time spent listening, observing, playing, learning, growing, etc.)


Reflection: Process of deep reflection and learning during and following a service experience.
Often overlooked or delayed, the reflection stage has been called the "linchpin" of the service learning
process, because it is through critical reflection that individuals create meaning and gain new knowledge
from their experiences. In looking back, thinking over, and sharing about experiences, youth begin to see
the connections, often in "Ah-ha!" moments when suddenly "it all makes sense."

The most common form of reflection is group discussion about the experience. Moving through a series
of questions to help youth analyze their feelings and thoughts about the experience, conversation can
shift toward determine how any new learning can be applied to their lives, including how will the
participants reconsider their attitudes and stereotypes or change behaviors.

Reflection can also happen in a variety of creative ways, including painting, skits, journaling, poetry,
photography, and story telling. Consider a variety of options for reflection, including ways that engage
both sides of the brain. Invite creativity in to this process.


Celebration: Recognizing, celebrating, and evaluating the ministry that has been accomplished through
the service experience.
Celebration offers an opportunity for young people to honor the work accomplished and to continue to
tell the stories of their experiences. In effect, it can be a continuation of the Reflection stage, as
preparing for celebratory events also requires adequate reflection to determine what and how best to
share with others.

                                                                                                           27
The Celebration stage can include considering a longer-term commitment to the service site, evaluating
the service project, and/or engaging ongoing conversation about "What next?" It is a time to recognize
why one of our core values in Alpha Kappa Psi is service.

Outcomes of Service Learning




Where does the service learning process lead? What actually happens when young people serve? How
are lives transformed? The SALLT (Service And Learning Leadership Team) Project has identified six
distinct outcomes of the service learning process: compassion, community, advocacy, lifelong
servanthood, leadership, and exploration of vocation.


Compassion: Serving involves coming along side neighbors and in that closeness begin to see, sense,
feel, and experience "the other."



Community: When we serve, we experience a deepened sense of community in our chapter as we
prepare, act, reflect, and celebrate. Acquaintances become friends, and equally important is the
community created with those we serve as we become a part of each other's lives.


Advocacy: Often our limited help doesn't address underlying social problems. For example: We feed, but
                                                                                                      28
people are still hungry. Through service learning, youth begin to ask the deeper, tougher "why?"
questions, probing the root causes of homelessness, hunger, poverty, environmental destruction, etc.


Lifelong Servanthood: As one of the values of Alpha Kappa Psi is service, we are challenged to
participate in repeated and frequent displays of service, no matter the size of the task, context, amount
of preparation, or recognition received. The more a person "practices" service, the more it becomes a
regular part of their daily life for years to come.


Leadership: As people actively serve, they grow in their sense of how they can make a difference in the
world and how they can be leaders among their peers and in their communities. Service invites a variety
of gifts to be used and shared, giving chapter members confidence in their ability to become servant
leaders. Adults take an important role in presenting leadership opportunities for youth and provide a
steady measure of support.


Exploration of Vocation: Theologian Frederick Buechner said, "Vocation is where the world's greatest
need and a person's greatest joy meet." Service learning provides a vocational "learning laboratory"
where young people experiment with how their gifts, passions, and values intersect with the world's
most pressing needs.


This introduction to the service learning process is adapted from the following sources:

       Mark J. Jackson, Service Learning Overview, Model, & Outcomes. (Everett, WA: Trinity Lutheran
        College, September 2007).
       David R. Ellingson and Mark J. Jackson, "SALLT: Stories, Service Learning and Statistics." Connect:
        Journal of Youth & Family Ministry, Summer 2008.
       Mark J. Jackson, Service Learning Field Guide. (Unpublished, 2009).




                                 A Guide for Facilitators: Processing Service

There are a number of ways you can process service learning. Simply taking a 20-30 minute period of
time after your group has completed service learning will provide a great opportunity to reflect and
connect to the experience. Try these techniques for reflections (choose one):




1. One to Three words: Each student uses one to three words to describe experience.
2. One Minute Cards: Each student responds to a question in writing (can do this on index cards).
                                                                                                        29
3. Guided Journaling: Answer questions posed throughout semester. Include timeline for completion.
4. Compose a letter to site supervisor offering suggestions for working with future students.
5. Read a piece of pertinent literature and have students respond and draw correlations to their service.
6. Letter to self: Prior to the project, have students write a letter to themselves about their personal and
career goals regarding the project. Place in sealed envelope and return to students at end of semester
for reflection.
7. Ask questions related to each of the 6 outcomes.
      What did you learn about compassion today?

       Is this a typical side of the community that you see?

       How do we advocate for the population we just served?

       What did today teach us about servanthood?

       What did today teach us about leadership?

       How did today’s experience affect your career path?




                                                                                                         30
                                   Knowledge: True Colors Word Sort
Describe yourself: In the rows below are groups of word clusters printed horizontally. Look at
all of the letters in the first row (A, B, C, D). Read the words and decide which group of words is
most like you. Give that letter a “4”. Then rank order the next three letters from 3 to 1 in
descending preference. You will end up with a row of four letters, ranked from “4” meaning
most like you to “1” meaning least like you. Continue this process with the remaining rows
down the page until you end up with five horizontal rows that each has 4,3,2,1 rankings.

Row One
A_____                B_____                 C_____                    D_____
Active                Parental               Authentic                 Versatile
Opportunistic         Traditional            Harmonious                Inventive
Spontaneous           Responsible            Compassionate             Competent

Row Two
E_____                F_____                 G_____                    H_____
Curious               Unique                 Practical                 Competitive
Conceptual            Empathetic             Sensible                  Impetuous
Knowledgeable         Communicative          Dependable                Impactful

Row Three
I_____                J_____                 K_____                    L_____
Loyal                 Devoted                Realistic                 Theoretical
Conservative          Warm                   Open-minded               Seeking
Organized             Poetic                 Adventuresome             Ingenious

Row Four
M_____                N_____                 O_____                    P_____
Concerned             Daring                 Tender                    Determined
Procedural            Impulsive              Inspirational             Complex
Cooperative           Fun                    Dramatic                  Composed

Row Five
Q_____                R_____                 S_____                    T_____
Philosophical         Vivacious              Exciting                  Orderly
Principled            Affectionate           Courageous                Conventional
Rational              Sympathetic            Skillful                  Caring

Add the corresponding numbers (1, 2, 3 or 4) that you assigned to each letter together in each
color below. The color with the highest ranking is your color.

ORANGE_______                                        GOLD_______
(A, H, K, N, S)                                      (B, G, I, M, T)

BLUE_______                                  GREEN_______
(C, F, J, O, R)                                   (D, E, L, P, Q)


                                                                                                31
                                                 ORANGE


                                          I act on a moments notice.
                                      Witty… Charming… Spontaneous
                                 I consider life as a game, here and now.
                                     Impulsive… Generous… Impactful
                            I need fun, variety, stimulation, and excitement.
                                           Optimistic… Eager… Bold
                               I value integrity and unity in relationships.
                                      Physical… Immediate… Fraternal
                                       I am a natural trouble-shooter,
                                          A performer, a competitor.




At Work…                                 In Love…                               In Childhood…
I AM BORED AND RESTLESS                  I SEEK A RELATIONSHIP                  OF ALL TYPES OF CHILDREN,
WITH JOBS THAT ARE                       WITH SHARED ACTIVITIES                 I HAD THE MOST DIFFICULT
ROUTINE AND STRUCTURED                   & INTERESTS.                           TIME FITTING INTO
                                                                                ACADEMIC ROUTINE.



I AM SATISFIED IN CAREERS                WITH MY MATE, I LIKE TO                I LEARN BY DOING AND
THAT ALLOW ME INDEPENDENCE               EXPLORE THE WAYS TO                    EXPERIENCING, RATHER
& FREEDOM, WHILE UTILIZING               ENERGIZE THE RELATIONSHIP              THAN BY LISTENING &
MY PHYSICAL COORDINATION                                                        READING.
& MY LOVE OF TOOLS


I VIEW ANY KIND OF TOOL AS AN            AS A LOVER, I NEED TO BE               I NEED PHYSICAL
EXTENSION OF MYSELF.                     BOLD & I THRIVE ON                     INVOLVEMENT IN THE
                                         PHYSICAL CONTACT.                      LEARNING PROCESS &
                                                                                AM MOTIVATED BY MY
                                                                                OWN NATURAL COMPETITIVE
                                                                                NATURE & SENSE OF FUN.



I AM A NATURAL PERFORMER                 I ENJOY GIVING
                                         EXTRAVAGANT GIFTS THAT
                                         BRING PLEASURE TO MY
                                         LOVED ONE.




                                                                                                       32
                                                     GOLD


                                 I need to follow rules and respect authority.
                                          Loyal… Dependable… Prepared
                            I have a strong sense of what is right and wrong in life.
                                          Thorough… Sensible… Punctual
                                        I need to be useful and to belong.
                                           Faithful… Stable… Organized
                                       I value home, family, and tradition.
                                          Caring… Concerned… Concrete
                                  I am a natural preserver, a parent, a helper.




At Work…                                    In Love…                               In Childhood…
I PROVIDE STABILITY & CAN                   I AM SERIOUS & TEND TO                 I WANTED TO FOLLOW THE
MAINTAIN ORGANIZATION                       HAVE TRADITIONAL,                      RULES & REGULATIONS
                                            CONSERVATIVE VIEWS                     OF THE SCHOOL.
                                            OF BOTH LOVE & MARRIAGE



MY ABILITY TO HANDLE DETAILS                I WANT A MATE WHO CAN                  I UNDERSTOOD &
& TO WORK HARD MAKE ME                      WORK ALONG WITH ME,                    RESPECTED AUTHORITY &
THE BACKBONE OF MANY                        BUILDING A SECURE,                     WAS COMFORTABLE WITH
ORGANIZATIONS.                              PREDICTABLE LIFE                       ACADEMIC ROUTINE.
                                            TOGETHER.



I BELIEVE THAT WORK COMES                   I DEMONSTRATE LOVE &                   I WAS THE EASIEST OF ALL
BEFORE PLAY, EVEN IF I MUST                 AFFECTION THROUGH THE                  TYPES OF CHILDREN TO
WORK OVERTIME TO COMPLETE                   PRACTICAL THINGS I DO                  ADOPT TO THE
THE JOB.                                    FOR MY LOVED ONES.                     EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM.




                                                                                                              33
                                                  BLUE


                                     I need to feel unique & authentic.
                                   Enthusiastic… Sympathetic… Personal
                                     I look for meaning & significance.
                                Warm… Communicative… Compassionate
                             I need to contribute, to encourage, and to care.
                                        Idealistic… Spiritual… Sincere
                                I value integrity and unity in relationships.
                                      Peaceful… Flexible… Imaginative
                             I am a natural romantic, a poet, and a nurturer.



At Work…                                 In Love…                               In Childhood…
I HAVE A STRONG DESIRE TO                I SEEK HARMONIOUS                      I WAS EXTREMELY
INFLUENCE OTHERS SO THEY MAY             RELATIONSHIPS.                         IMAGINATIVE & FOUNT IT
LEAD MORE SIGNIFICANT LIVES.                                                    DIFFICULT TO FIT INTO
                                                                                THE STRUCTURE OF SCHOOL
                                                                                LIFE.




I OFTEN WORK IN THE ARTS,                I AM A TRUE ROMANTIC &                 I REACTED WITH GREAT
COMMUNICATIONS, EDUCATION                BELIEVE IN PERFECT LOVE                SENSIVITY TO
& THE HELPING PROFESSIONS.               THAT LASTS FOREVER.                    DISCORDANCE OR
                                                                                REJECTION & SOUGHT
                                                                                RECOGNITION.



I AM ADEPT AT MOTIVATING &               I BRING DRAMA, WARMTH,               I RESPONDED TO
INTERACTING WITH OTHERS.                 & EMPATHY TO ALL              ENCOURAGEMENT RATHER
                                         RELATIONSHIPS.                       THAN COMPETITION.




                                         I ENJOY THE SYMBOLS OF
                                         ROMANCE SUCH AS FLOWERS,
                                         CANDLELIGHT & MUSIC. I
                                         CHERISH THE SMALL GESTURES
                                         OF LOVE.




                                                                                                       34
                                                 GREEN


                                 I seek knowledge and understanding.
                                     Analytical… Global… Conceptual
                                        I live by my own standards.
                                           Cool… Calm… Collected
                                     I need explanations & answers.
                                    Inventive… Logical… Perfectionist
                            I value intelligence, insight, fairness & justice.
                                  Abstract, Hypothetical, Investigative
                    I am a natural non-conformist, a visionary, a problem solver.




At Work…                               In Love…                             In Childhood…
I AM CONCEPTUAL & AM AN                I PREFER TO LET MY                   I APPEARED TO BE OLDER
INDEPENDENT THINKER.                   HEAD RULE MY HEART.                  THAN MY YEARS &
                                                                            FOCUSED ON MY GREATEST
                                                                            INTERESTS, ACHIEVING IN
                                                                            SUBJECTS THAT WERE
                                                                            MENTALLY STIMULATING.


I AM DRAWN TO CONSTANT                 I DISLIKE REPITION, SO IT            I WAS IMPATIENT WITH
CHALLENGE IN CAREERS, & LIKE TO        IS DIFFICULT FOR ME TO               DRILL & ROUTINE,
DEVELOP MODELS, EXPLORE IDEAS,         CONTINUOUSLY EXPRESS                 QUESTIONED AUTHORITY,
OR BUILD SYSTEMS TO SATISFY            FEELINGS.                            & FOUND IT NECESSARY TO
MY NEED TO DEAL WITH THE                                                    RESPECT TEACHERS
INNOVATION.                                                                 BEFORE I COULD LEARN
                                                                            FROM THEM.



ONCE I HAVE PERFECTED AN IDEA,         I BELIEVE THAT ONCE
I PREFER TO MOVE ON, LEAVING           FEELINGS ARE STATED, THEY
THE PROJECT TO BE MAINTAINED &         ARE OBVIOUS TO A PARTNER.
SUPPORTED BY OTHERS.


                                       I AM UNEASY WHEN MY
                                       EMOTIONS CONTROL ME.


                                       I WANT TO ESTABLISH A
                                       RELATIONSHIP, LEAVE IT TO MAINTAIN
                                       ITSELF AND TURN MY ENERGIES BACK
                                       TO MY CAREER.




                                                                                                 35
        What do you consider the strengths of your color type?




       What do you consider the weaknesses of your color type?




       What do you want other colors to know about your color?




               What bugs you most about other colors?

GOLD      GREEN                       ORANGE                     BLUE




          What can other colors do to work with you better?




                                                                    36
                          How to succeed with your…

Green Friends
 Be aware of their curiosity about life.
 Give them things that challenge their problem solving abilities.
 Respect their need for independence.
 Know that they are caring, even though they may not show their feelings easily.
 Respect their inventions & ideas.

Gold Friends
 Remember to be on time.
 Try to be extra organized and efficient.
 They are generous with their belongings, but like to have them returned.
 Do what you say you will do.
 Be dependable.
 Respect their need for security.
 Understand that they may see things as right or wrong, with on in-between.

Blue Friends
 Spend quality time with them one on one.
 Be aware that they wear their hearts on their sleeves.
 Be sensitive.
 Praise their imagination and creativity.
 Be supportive of their endeavors.
 Share your thoughts and feelings with them.
 Listen to them as they listen to you.

Orange Friends
 Be active, and don’t slow them down.
 Be spontaneous and fun, not a heavy.
 Compete in fun, when appropriate.
 Be adventurous and optimistic.
 Be energetic and ready to go.
 Delegate tasks to them that are not repetitive.




                                                                                    37
                                                 Integrity

Designate for the chapter a straight line on which they should assemble (may not all fit ON line; they just
need to know where the line is “drawn.”) Have the chapter face the same direction.

Instructions: Distribute a blank sheet of paper to each participant. Ask each person to tear a hole out of
the center of the paper. There should be enough space around the hole for them to write some phrases.

Provide the following instructions: “You are currently standing on a fence. I will read several choice
statements; and following each statement, you will need to decide which to side of the fence you will
step. You cannot stay on the fence – you must make a choice. After you have made your choice, look to
see where others are standing, and then write your choice somewhere on your paper. For example, if I
asked you ‘do you like foods that are salty (point to one side) or sweet (point to the other side)’ you
would move to the side that applies to you. If you chose sweet, you would move to the appropriate side
and then write ‘sweet’ on your paper.”

Proceed with the activity. The choice statements are listed below.
• I impact the world; the world impacts me
• I’m all about the task; I’m all about the relationship
• I create my own reality; stuff happens
• I form quick judgments about situations and people; I ask questions to learn more before judging
• Egalitarian; hierarchical
• Carry images of hope and optimism; carry images of criticism and negativity
• Spontaneous; planner
• Problems are to be fixed; problems are opportunities.
• I build rapport easily; I find it a challenge to get comfortable with others
• Talker; listener.
• I love taking risks; I prefer to avoid risky situations
• I’m always early; I’m usually running late
• I recharge my batteries alone; I need others to help me recharge my batteries
• Open; closed
• Manage fear by sharing it; manage fear by shutting down
• Morning; night
• Buttons easily pushed; buttons hard to push
•The world is huge; it’s a small world
•I; we
•Young; old
•Doer; observer

Ask the participants to stand in a circle and hold their papers about 6 inches from their face (all of the
statements they wrote should be facing toward them). What do they see?

Now ask participants to pull the paper slowly closer to their face.

How did this influence what they see?

Processing Questions:
• How did you approach this activity?
• How do our perspectives, opinions, beliefs, and experiences influence what we see?
• How did the movement of others influence your own movement? What does this say about our
integrity? Is it hard to stick with your values when others are on the other “side?”
• How will this knowledge influence interactions with each other in the chapter?
                                                                                                             38
Moving Forward:
• Why are “our frames” important for us to explore as members of Alpha Kappa Psi?
• How can this translate to our integrity?
• What benefits can be drawn from the diversity that surrounds us? How do we “see” the diversity
around us?
• How do shared values affect our experience in Alpha Kappa Psi?
• What will the chapter take from this activity?

As you complete the activity, have participants fold their frame and
place it in their nametag notebook or planner. It should serve as reminder about our personal core
values and perspective about our integrity as it relates to others.




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