UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

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					                                 International Studies:

The University of Notre Dame offers Film, Television, and Theatre classes in various
countries around the world for course credit. These countries include, but are not limited
to, Ireland, England, Australia and Chile. For more information and updates, please visit:
http://www.nd.edu/~intlstud online, or visit the International Studies Program, located in
152 Hurley Building.


                                     Abbreviations:

M= Monday
T= Tuesday
W= Wednesday
R= Thursday
F= Friday
MW= Monday/Wednesday
MWF= Monday/Wednesday/Friday
TR= Tuesday/Thursday

                        Faculty names and contact information:

Barry, Kevin           1-4443              kbarry2@nd.edu
Becker, Christine      1-7592              Becker.34@nd.edu
Chalmers, Jessica      1-8823              Chalmers.2@nd.edu
Cole, Ken              1-4117              Cole.38@nd.edu
Collins, Jim           1-7161              Collins.3@nd.edu
Donaruma, William      1-3034              Donaruma.1@nd.edu
Donnelly, Richard      1-5958              Donnelly.4@nd.edu
Gibbons, Luke          1-3419              Gibbons.23@nd.edu
Godmilow, Jill         1-7167              Godmilow.1@nd.edu
Heisler, Karen         1-7486              Heisler.4@nd.edu
Jerez-Farran, Carlos   1-6558              Jerez-Farran.1@nd.edu
Juan, Anton            1-2732              Juan.1@nd.edu
Magnan-Park, Aaron     1-8806              Magnan-Park.1@nd.edu
Mandell, Ted           1-6953              Mandell.1@nd.edu
Ortoleva, Peppino      1-6886
Paice, Brett           1-7054              Paice.1@nd.edu
Phillips, Emily        1-5956              Phillips.94@nd.edu
Pilkinton, Mark        1-7171              Pilkinton.1@nd.edu
Scott, Siiri           1-8243              Scott.45@nd.edu
Shamoon, Deborah       1-9035              Shamoon.1@nd.edu
Sieber, Gary           1-4206              Sieber.1@nd.edu
Sieving, Christopher   1-0387              Sieving.2@nd.edu
Skelton, Jay           1-2636              Skelton.4@nd.edu
Storin, Matt           1-8696              Storin.2@nd.edu
Torres, Belkys         1-3796              btorres@nd.edu



                                                                                      1
                          University of Notre Dame

                              College of Arts and Letters


         Department of Film, Television, and Theatre

                                For up-to-date information,
                               visit insideND: Class Search


             All courses are available “by permission of the instructor” unless space
            and resources are limited. Contact the instructor for more information.




                          Spring 2008 Course Descriptions:



FTT 10101            Basics of Film & Television                          3 Credits
                     01     Christopher Sieving    9:35-10:25             MW
FTT 11101                   Lab                    7:00-9:00 p.m.         M
FTT 12101            01     Tutorial               10:40-11:30            F
                     02     Tutorial               11:45-12:35            F
                     03     Tutorial               12:50-1:40             F
                     04     Tutorial               12:50-1:40             F

An introduction to film and television studies from a critical perspective, this course
examines the form, meaning and style of film and television texts. The course aims to
develop student skills in the critical analysis of film and television. Students will be
introduced to the major elements of film and television form--editing, cinematography,
mise-en-scene, sound. With a strong emphasis on narrative, the course also examines film
and television genre, and authorship. Evening screenings and tutorials are required.
Class and lab held in the Browning Cinema, tutorials in DeBartolo Hall.
Co-requisites: FTT 11101 & 12101.
Cross list: FTT 20101.
This course serves as a pre-requisite to all upper-level film and television courses and
fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Freshman Only.



                                                                                        2
FTT 10701             Introduction to Theatre                               3 Credits
                      Ken Cole                       10:40-11:30            MWF
A study of theatre viewed from three perspectives: historical, literary, and contemporary
production practices. Through lectures, readings, and discussions, students will study this
art form and understand its relevance to their own life as well as to other art forms. A basic
understanding of the history of theatre and the recognition of the duties and responsibilities
of the personnel involved in producing live theatre performances will allow students to
become more objective in their own theatre experiences.
Requirements: Attend classes and live theatre performances. View screenings, complete
papers and projects, 1 mid -term exam, and 1 final exam.
Cross list: FTT 20701.
This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Class held in the Browning Cinema.
NOTE: Freshmen ONLY.



FTT 13182 01       University Fine Arts Seminar:                3 Credits
      Chinese Cine-Heroics Hong Kong Styled Action Contra-Hollywood
                   Aaron Magnan-Park          3:30-4:45         TR
FTT 11182          Lab                        5:00-7:30 pm      T
Recent Hollywood blockbuster films such as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, The Matrix
trilogy, Hero, and Mission: Impossible II became box-office successes in large part due to
the infusion of a Hong Kong styled action aesthetics into the Hollywood action genre.
While many have celebrated this event, this course provides a more critical assessment of
this phenomenon. First, we will define Hong Kong action aesthetics in historical, economic,
and cultural terms. Then we will embark on a number of comparative case studies dealing
with a major Hong Kong film talent who was invited to work in Hollywood. The key
question is, does working in Hollywood provide a qualitative enhancement of that which
was already possible in Hong Kong? Some of the key individuals under analysis may
include Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Jet Li, John Woo, Yuen Woo-Ping, and Michelle Yeoh.
No knowledge of Chinese is required. Most if not all of the films will be screened in
their original languages with English subtitles.
There is a separate mandatory lab for film screenings outside of our regular classroom
meeting times.
Meets Fine Arts requirement
Class and Lab held in B042, DPAC.
Note: Freshmen ONLY


FTT 13182 02      University Fine Arts Seminar:                    3 Credits
      Women on the Fringe: Poets, Painters and other Revolutionaries
                  Emily Phillips       11:00-12:15                 TR
What does it mean to be on the Fringe? On the edge? Throughout history we have many
examples of women who have been marginalized because of their work and its impact on
society. From Eve, to Josephine Baker, to Barbara Kruger, (Continued on next page)


                                                                                          3
to Kathleen Cleaver, women have expressed their vision of the world through artistic and
revolutionary means. As they moved from the private to the public sphere, the role and
voice of women took on another tone, one which threatened and often ostracized them. This
course will take a critical look at the changing roles of women, as expressed through
different women throughout time.
Meets Fine Arts requirement
Class held in DeBartolo Hall.
Note: Freshmen ONLY



FTT 20009             Broadway Theatre Experience                           1 Credit
                      Richard Donnelly         6:00-9:00 PM                 T
This short course offers students the opportunity to experience professional theatre at its
finest. The course will include three days, two nights in NYC where we will see four
professional productions: three Broadway shows (a musical, a comedy, a drama) and one
off-Broadway show. The trip will include a talkback with professional theatre artists as well
as a backstage tour of a current Broadway show. The course has a lab fee, (per person):
$762.75-Quad, $792.75-Triple, $842.75-Twin/Double, which includes round-trip bus and
air transportation from Notre Dame to the Hotel Edison in Manhattan, 2 nights at the hotel,
best seats available for the four shows, and the theatre talkback and backstage tour. Prior to
the tour the class will meet to discuss the shows that will be seen, to become familiar with
production practices, and to understand the structure and development of professional
theatre in America. The course will include the keeping of a journal by each student and
will culminate with a paper discussing aspects of the plays that were seen. The class will
meet for three Tuesdays from 6:00–9:00: April 15, 22, and 29, 2008.
No pre-requisites. By application only. Field Trip is required. Field trip to New York
City: Friday - Sunday, April 25 -27, 2008.
May be repeated for credit.
Class held in B043, DPAC.



FTT 20101             Basics of Film & Television                           3 Credits
               02     Christopher Sieving            9:35-10:25             MW
FTT 21101             Lab                            7:00-9:00 p.m.         M
FTT 12101             01 Tutorial                    10:40-11:30            F
                      02 Tutorial                    11:45-12:35            F
                      03 Tutorial                    12:50-1:40             F
                      04 Tutorial                    12:50-1:40             F
An introduction to film and television studies from a critical perspective, this course
examines the form, meaning and style of film and television texts. The course aims to
develop student skills in the critical analysis of film and television. Students will be
introduced to the major elements of film and television form--editing, cinematography,
mise-en-scene, sound. With a strong emphasis on narrative, the course also examines film
and television genre, and authorship.                     (Continued on next page).
Evening screenings and tutorials are required.

                                                                                          4
This course serves as a pre-requisite to all upper-level film and television courses and
fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Co-requisites: FTT 21101 & 12101.
Cross list: FTT 10101.
Class and lab held in the Browning Cinema, tutorials in DeBartolo Hall.




FTT 20260             La Telenovela: history-culture-production             3 Credits
                      Kevin Barry                 9:30-10:45                TR
NOTE: Students must be fluent in Spanish.
The aim of this course is to explore the genre of the telenovela, a major social, cultural,
political, and economic force in Latin America. You will sharpen oral and written language
skills through watching, analyzing and discussing authentic telenovelas from Spain and
Latin America, and through the creation and production of your own telenovela. You will
learn the idiosyncrasies of Hispanic culture as well as popular expressions and apply this
knowledge during the creation of your telenovela. Writing and oral production will be
stressed as you write, produce, direct, act, tape and edit a telenovela. During this process
you will learn and apply basic videography and on-line video and audio editing techniques.
Grade Distribution:
20% Class Preparation and discussion, 25% Midterm exam, 25% Final exam,
30% Final project
Fulfills FTT international requirement.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Class held in B043, DPAC.




FTT 20701 01          Introduction to Theatre                               3 Credits
                      Ken Cole                       10:40-11:30            MWF
A study of theatre viewed from three perspectives: historical, literary, and contemporary
production practices. Through lectures, readings, and discussions, students will study this
art form and understand its relevance to their own life as well as to other art forms. A basic
understanding of the history of theatre and the recognition of the duties and responsibilities
of the personnel involved in producing live theatre performances will allow students to
become more objective in their own theatre experiences.
Requirements: Attend classes and live theatre performances. View screenings, complete
papers and projects, 1 mid-term exam, and 1 final exam.
Cross list: FTT 10701.
This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Class held in the Browning Cinema, DPAC.
Sophomores only.




                                                                                          5
FTT 20703 01           Theatrical Production                                 3 Credits
                       Ken Cole                       11:45-1:00             MW
A practical introduction to techniques, processes, and material. The student will explore
traditional and modern theatrical production methods: carpentry, rigging, scenic painting,
lighting, basic technical drafting, equipment use, safety, material handling, and costume
construction sewing techniques. Students will gain practical experience participating on
realized projects and productions.
This course is part of the Theatre core concentration.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Class held in B019, DPAC.



FTT 20703 02           Theatrical Production                                 3 Credits
                       Ken Cole                       11:45-1:00             MW
A practical introduction to techniques, processes, and material. The student will explore
traditional and modern theatrical production methods: carpentry, rigging, scenic painting,
lighting, basic technical drafting, equipment use, safety, material handling, and costume
construction sewing techniques. Students will gain practical experience participating on
realized projects and productions.
This course is part of the Theatre core concentration.
Freshmen and Sophomores only.
Class held in B019, DPAC.



FTT 20704              Theatre, History, and Society                         3 Credits
                       Mark Pilkinton              11:00-12:15               TR
This course treats theatre as a culture industry and employs the case-study approach to
examine deeply selected periods and sites in theatre history to understand the theatrical
event and how it was marketed and to whom, and what cultural attitudes prevailed. Each
case study will emphasize theatre as a site of cultural debate and political and social change,
while considering the larger question of the role of representation in human society through
time.
This course is part of the Theatre core concentration.
Must be enrolled in FTT. Interested non-majors require permission of Instructor.
This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Class held in DeBartolo Hall.




                                                                                           6
FTT 20705              Performance Analysis                                  3 Credits
                       Jay Skelton                    12:30-1:45             TR
Performance Analysis moves beyond analysis of scripts to teach a student how to “read” a
performance. How do we understand an artist’s choices in a given performance? Can we
determine who is responsible for every choice in a production? Attention will be given to
the role of each individual theatre artist and how the collaborative process evolves. This
course will introduce theories of representation and interpretation and will involve analysis
of both performances and text.
This course is part of the Theatre core concentration.
Must be enrolled in FTT. Interested non-majors require permission of Instructor.
Class held in B024, DPAC.


FTT 20900              Script Analysis and Dramaturgy                        3 Credits
                       Siiri Scott               1:30-2:45                   MW
In this course, students will learn:
1) how to read and interpret a playscript for production (script analysis) and
2) how to read and understand a dramatic text in terms of its historical and literary contexts
(dramaturgical analysis). Must be enrolled in FTT.
This course is part of the Theatre core concentration.
This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Class held in B042, DPAC.


FTT 21001              Acting: Process                                       3 Credits
                       Jay Skelton                    2:00-3:15              TR
The purpose of this class is self-discovery and growth as an actor. This is not a traditional
class. It is essentially experiential. You will be introduced to basic principles and
techniques for preparation and performance, as well as a context for developing a working
methodology for personal creative growth as an actor, the creation of a role, realization of a
scene, and an introduction to the production process. You are expected, therefore, to know
and apply these principles and processes. Scene work is prepared and rehearsed with a
partner(s) outside of class for presentation in class. Written textual analysis (including
detailed character study) is required for all scene work.
Class held in B024, DPAC.


FTT 21007              Writing for Screen and Stage 1                        3 Credits
                       Jessica Chalmers           2:00-3:15                  TR
This class focuses on the basics of dramatic writing: story, dialogue, character, and style.
Students will develop three short scenes as stage plays or as screenplays. The last section
will be devoted to developing one of these for public reading.




                                                                                           7
FTT 30004             Makeup for the Stage                                3 Credits
                      Richard Donnelly              1:30-2:45             MW
The theory and practice of makeup design, including: basic techniques, corrective, old age,
and special character makeup. Requirements: attend class and makeup demonstrations,
practical makeup design projects, mid-term exam, and final exam project. Students will
provide their own supplies. Due to the practical nature of the class, all male students
need to be clean-shaven.
No pre-requisites. Class held in B020, DPAC.




FTT 30101             History of Film I                                   3 Credits
                      Christopher Sieving           11:00-12:15           TR
FTT 31101             Lab                           4:30-6:30 pm          W
This course traces the major developments within the history of US and international
cinema from its beginnings to 1946. It will look at films from the major cinematic
movements and genres and from major filmmakers. These films and filmmakers will be
considered in terms of the social, economic, technological and aesthetic forces that have
shaped them.
This course is part of the core curriculum for the Film Concentration.
Co-requisite: FTT 31101.
Pre-requisite: FTT 10101 or 20101.
Class and lab held in the Browning Cinema, DPAC.




FTT 30102             History of Film II                                  3 Credits
                      Brett Paice                   11:45-1:00            MW
FTT 31102             Lab                           4:30-6:30             M
This course traces the major developments in world cinema from the post-WWII era to the
present. The course will examine the shifting social, economic, technological and aesthetic
conditions of this period, especially the demise of the Hollywood studio system, the rise of
television, and the increasing importance of new technologies and increasing auxiliary
markets. The course will not be limited to Hollywood filmmaking, but will also look at a
variety of international movements. The course will be a combination of lecture and
discussion, and the assignments will include a midterm and a final, as well as 2-3 short
papers.
This course is part of the core curriculum for the Film Concentration.
Co-requisite: FTT 31102.
Pre-requisite: FTT 30101.
Class and lab held in the Browning Cinema, DPAC.




                                                                                        8
FTT 30236              Introduction to Japanese Popular Culture           3 Credits
                       Deborah Shamoon                11:45-1:00 pm       MW
FTT 31236              Lab                            4:30-6:30 pm        W
This course will examine postwar Japanese popular culture using the theories and methods
of cultural studies, media studies and gender studies. We will explore some of the primary
sites of postwar popular culture across media, as well as emphasize the theoretical
distinctions between those media. Rather than following a chronological order, the course
will be grouped into sections by media, including novels, film, television, manga, and
anime. As we discuss issues specific to each of these media and across genres, however,
our discussion will be framed by some key questions: What was the role of popular culture
in defining a national identity in the postwar? What role did foreign influences, most
importantly, American pop culture play? How have popular culture texts spoken to and
defined specific audiences (for instance, teenagers, women, non-Japanese)?
This course is taught in English and no knowledge of the Japanese language is
required.


FTT 30410             Intro to Film and Video Production                    3 Credits
                      Ted Mandell                3:15-4:30                  TR
FTT 31410             Lab                                                   3 Credits
                                                 4:45-6:00                  TR
An introductory course in the fundamentals of writing, shooting, editing, and lighting for
narrative film and video productions. This is a hands-on production course emphasizing
aesthetics, creativity, and technical expertise. Expect significant amounts of shooting and
editing outside of class as well as helping classmates on their shoots.
Requirements: Digital Video projects, two Super 8-film projects, one studio exercise,
selected readings, and a midterm exam.
Materials Fee Required
Pre-requisite: FTT 10101 or 20101.
Must be enrolled in FTT. Interested non-majors require permission of Instructor.
Class held in B043, DPAC.


FTT 30430              History of Documentary Film                          3 Credits
                       Jill Godmilow                  2:00-3:15             TR
FTT 31430              Lab                            7:00-9:00             T
This course will track the history of non-fiction film and television, examining various
structures and formats including expository, narrative, experimental, formalist and
docudrama. It will also examine the uses of "actuality" footage in films that make no
pretense to objectivity. At the center of the course will be a deconstruction of the notion of
"film truth". Students will develop skills in the critical analysis of documentary and
examine the standards by which we evaluate them. One weekly evening screening is
required.
Co-requisite: FTT 31430
Pre-requisite: FTT 10101 or 20101
Class and Lab held in the Loft, O’Shaughnessy Hall.



                                                                                          9
FTT 30450             Television Criticism and Aesthetics                  3 Credits
                      Christine Becker           3:00-4:15                 MW
FTT 31450             Lab                        7:00-9:00                 T
This course builds upon the concepts that students are introduced to in Basics of Film and
Television and offers more advanced study of television criticism and aesthetics. We will
seek, first of all, to understand television as a unique meaning-producing medium,
dissecting television's narrative and non-narrative structures and its distinctive visual and
aural aesthetic. Second, we will confront the critical methodologies that have been applied
to the medium under the rubric of academic television studies: semiotics, genre study,
ideological analysis, cultural studies, and so on. Thus, our goals will be to understand how
television makes meaning and to explore how media scholars approach television in
meaningful ways. The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion, and the
assignments will include a midterm paper and final essay, as well as a handful of short
papers and a longer analytical essay.
Co-requisite: FTT 31450.
Pre-requisite: FTT 10101 or 20101.
Must be enrolled in FTT. Interested non-majors require permission of Instructor.
Class and Lab held in DeBartolo Hall.



FTT 30461             History of Television                                3 Credits
                      Christine Becker              11:45-1:00             MW
FTT 31461             Lab                           6:30-8:30              M
This course analyzes the history of television, spanning from its roots in radio broadcasting
to the latest developments in digital television. In assessing the many changes across this
span, the course will cover such topics as why the American television industry developed
as a commercial medium in contrast to most other national television industries, how
television programming has both reflected and influenced cultural ideologies through the
decades, and how historical patterns of television consumption have shifted due to new
technologies and social changes. Through studying the historical development of television
programs and assessing the industrial, technological and cultural systems out of which they
emerged, the course will piece together the catalysts responsible for shaping this highly
influential medium.
Co-requisite: FTT 31461.
This course is part of the core curriculum for the Television Concentration.
This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.
Class and Lab held in DeBartolo Hall.



FTT 30462             Broadcast Journalism                                 3 Credits
                      Gary Sieber                   12:30-1:45             TR
Four major topics are covered:
1) Writing for broadcast news, with emphasis on developing the student's understanding of
grammar and style in the construction of effective stories. (Continued on next page)


                                                                                        10
2) Newsroom structure: Understanding who does what in today's broadcast newsroom and
how economic realities affect the flow of information.
3) Journalism ethics: Analysis of personal values, ethical principles, and journalistic duties
that influence newsroom decisions.
4) Legal considerations in newsgathering with special attention to libel and invasion of
privacy laws. Three books are required: One each on the topics of libel, ethics, and
broadcast news writing. Various in-class handouts are provided.
Cross list: JED 30300.
Must be enrolled in FTT or JED. Interested non-majors require permission of
Instructor.
Class held in B042, DPAC.



FTT 30463             Broadcasting and Cable                                3 Credits
                      Karen Heisler                   9:30-10:45            TR
This course focuses on how the broadcast and cable television industries operate in
contemporary society.     Lecture/discussion sessions will examine topics such as
programming strategies and practices, regulatory guidelines, sales and advertising, ratings
and research methodology, ethical issues and concerns, cultural effects and news, sports
and entertainment programming. Students are required to write two papers and take two
exams.
Class held in DeBartolo Hall.



FTT 30491 01                  Debate                                        2 Credits
                              Susan Ohmer            6:00-9:00 p.m.         T
This course will focus on research of current events and the efficacy of proposed
resolutions toward the alleviation or reduction of societal harms. It will also involve
discussion of debate theory and technique.
This course requires permission of Instructor.
Will not apply to Overload.
Class held in DeBartolo Hall.



FTT 30491 02                  Debate                                        2 Credits
                              Susan Ohmer            6:00-9:00 p.m.         T
This course will focus on research of current events and the efficacy of proposed
resolutions toward the alleviation or reduction of societal harms. It will also involve
discussion of debate theory and technique.
This course requires permission of Instructor.
Will not apply to Overload.
Class held in DeBartolo Hall.



                                                                                         11
FTT 31002             Voice and Movement                                   3 Credits
                      Siiri Scott                   3:00-4:15              MW
A course designed to help advanced acting students to focus on kinesthetic awareness.
The actor will identify and work to remove physical and vocal tensions that impede un-
habituated movement and natural sound production. Through movement and vocal
exercises created for actors, students will experience what "prepared readiness" and sound-
sense for the stage consists of, and how to meet those demands.
Class held in B024, DPAC.


FTT 31006             Directing: Process                                   3 Credits
                      Anton Juan                    3:30-4:45              TR
This course guides the student of directing through the fundamental principles of directing
for the stage and the basic approaches and attitudes to the task, art and craft of directing.
This involves exploring the transfer of dramatic concepts into concrete theatrical shapes and
language. The student participates in the analysis of a dramatic text and creating from it a
theatrical language in space that gives life to the playwright’s work. This creative process
involves the reading of the text and the research into other materials or sources that shed
light on the text, and applying them to scene studies presented in class. Through work done
for the class and other paradigms, the student understands the different relationships
involved in a collaborative work, the processes of guiding and motivating the actors, and
shaping the visual and aural unity of the elements of theatre.
Pre-requisites: FTT 10701 or 20701, or 21001, or by permission of Instructor.
Class held in B024, DPAC.


FTT 31011             Theatre Production Workshop                   Variable Credits
                      Staff
A workshop course in the process of theatre production in which students assume a major
non-performance production responsibility including, but not limited to: stage manager,
assistant stage manager, prop master, costumer, technical director or assistant director.
This course can be repeated for up to four hours credit.
This course requires permission of Instructor.



FTT 31015             Performance Theory                                   3 Credits
                      Jessica Chalmers              11:00-12:15            TR
This class will take a philosophical approach to drama and performance. We will look at
theoretical texts by theorists such as Antonin Artaud ("The Theater and It's Double"), Peggy
Phelan (The Ontology of Performance), Philip Auslander (Liveness), and Jacques Derrida
(“The Theater of Cruelty and the Closure of Representation”).
The class will serve as an introduction to the discipline of Performance Studies.
Cross list: ENGL 20901.
Class held in B042, DPAC.


                                                                                        12
FTT 40008     Dramatic Text, Production, and Social Concerns:             3 Credits
                   From The 1900's To The Present
                   Anton Juan                  2:00-3:15                  TR
This course will explore dramatic text, and production as an artistic expression and social
comment on social problems and issues affecting a cultural condition from the 1900's to the
present. It will study the use of modern tragedy, farce, burlesque, satire, symbolic drama,
religious drama, social realism, street theatre forms, chameleon plays and performance art
as expressions and agents of social change.
Open to students of the theatre, history, social concerns, and literature.
Class held in 211, the FTT Conference room, DPAC.


FTT 40101             Film and Television Theory                          3 Credits
                      Jim Collins                12:30-1:45               TR
FTT 41101             Lab                        7:00-9:00                W
This course offers an introduction to the philosophical, aesthetic, cultural and historical
issues that inform current scholarship and production in film and television. The focus of
this course may vary from semester to semester.
Co-requisite: FTT 41101.
Pre-requisite: FTT 30101 or 30102, or by permission of Instructor.
This course is part of the core curriculum for both the Film and Television
Concentrations.
Class and Lab held in the Browning Cinema.


FTT 40237             French Cinema: The New Wave at 50                   3 Credits
                      Christopher Sieving     3:00-5:45 pm                M
FTT 41237             Lab                     3:00-5:45 pm                F
This seminar course will critically examine the varied contexts that helped produce the
French New Wave (Nouvelle Vague) and Left Bank filmmaking movements of the late
1950s and early 1960s. Topics include: the intersections and divergences between the two
movements; the French critical traditions (as exemplified by film journals including
Cahiers du cinéma and Positif) that provided intellectual support for these movements; the
influences of Fifth Republic politics and the cultural currents of modernization and
decolonialization; the formal characteristics shared by representative New Wave and Left
Bank films and explored by key directors; and the movements' aesthetic legacy for film
history. Featured directors will include François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais,
Claude Chabrol, Jacques Demy, Agnès Varda, Louis Malle, Jacques Rivette, and Eric
Rohmer. Film screenings outside of lab may be scheduled. All films screened will be
subtitled.
Knowledge of the French language is not required.
Co-requisite: FTT 41237.
Pre-requisite: FTT 10101 or 20101.
Must be enrolled in FTT. Interested non-majors require permission of Instructor.
Fulfills FTT International requirements.
Class held in B042, DPAC. Lab held in the Browning Cinema, DPAC.


                                                                                      13
FTT 40238             Irish Film and Culture                                3 Credits
                      Luke Gibbons                   11:00-12:15            TR
ENGL 41005            Lab                            6:00-9:00 pm           T
This course will examine some of the dominant images of Ireland in film and literature, and
will place their development in a wider cultural and historical context. Comparisons
between film, literature and other cultural forms will be featured throughout the course, and
key stereotypes relating to gender, class and nation will be analyzed, particularly as they
bear on images of romantic Ireland and modernity, landscape, the city, religion, violence,
family and community. Particular attention will be paid to key figures such as Yeats,
Synge, and Joyce, and contemporary writers such as John McGahern, William Trevor,
Patrick McCabe and Roddy Doyle will be discussed in terms of the wider implications of
their work for contemporary Irish culture. The resurgence of Irish cinema and new forms
of Irish writing in the past two decades will provide the main focus of the second part of the
semester, tracing the emergence of new distinctive voices and images in an increasingly
globalized and multi-cultural Ireland.
Co-requisite: ENGL 41005.
Cross list: ENGL 40511.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Fulfills FTT international requirements.



FTT 40241              Hong Kong Action Cinema in a Global Context 3 Credits
                       Aaron Magnan-Park              2:00-3:15 pm           TR
FTT 41241              Lab                            4:30-6:30pm            T
This course addresses the global significance of the gong fu vague [kung fu new wave] that
hit world cinema in the early 1970s and its ripple effects up to the present. As the signature
genre of the Hong Kong film industry, it does not stand in global isolation but is rather a
product of careful market research in developing a distinctive genre that could have global
popularity outside of its traditional regionalized domestic market (HK and Southeast Asia)
and its overseas ethnic Chinese enclaves in numerous Chinatowns across the world.
Some of the key issues that we will cover include: How does a small non-national
population sustain a commercially viable film industry? How can a film industry create a
version of action cinema that supercedes Hollywood's dominance in the genre? Is this
purely a “Chinese” phenomenon or one that is inherently dependent on non-Chinese
participation? Do these films have ideological, aesthetic & economic significance within a
larger framework or must they be critically dismissed outright? What does it mean that
“everybody was kung fu fighting” and continuing to do so?
Taught in English. No knowledge of Mandarin or Cantonese is required. Whenever
possible, we will view the films in their original language with English subtitles. A few
films will be dubbed in English.
Co-requisite: FTT 41241
Pre-requisites: FTT 10101 or 20101, 30101 & 30102 or by permission of Instructor.
Cross list: LLEA 40615, ASIA 40241
Fulfills FTT international requirements.
Class and lab held in Browning Cinema, DPAC.



                                                                                         14
FTT 40243             Italian Media System                                 3 Credits
                      Peppino Ortoleva              3:30-6:00              W
Taught in English.
This course explores the explosive changes in the Italian media system over the past three
decades in relation to the transformation of politics and society. Cultural production in
fashion and design, popular and serious music, television and cinema, book publishing, the
cell phone phenomenon and new media will be analyzed within the broader dynamics of
general media change.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Fulfills FTT international requirements.




FTT 40244             Films of Pedro Almodovar                             3 Credits
                      Carlos Jerez-Farran      2:00-3:15                   TR
An introduction to contemporary Spanish culture and society through a selection of Pedro
Almodovar's most representative cinematic output. Discussions focus on important features
such as postmodernist aesthetics, questions of national identity, pop culture, the
controversial representation of gender roles and sexuality in general, and the celebration of
heterodox desires vis a vis repressive social conventions.
Fulfills FTT international requirements.




FTT 40245             Migrating Melodramas:                                3 Credits
                      Latino/a Literature & Popular Culture
                      Belkys Torres              12:30-1:45                TR
This course examines how various forms of popular culture from Latin America and the
Caribbean migrate to the U.S. and are reappropriated by Latina/o cultural producers.
Focusing particularly on theories of melodrama as a feminine discursive space, we will
analyze several works of Latina/o literature which underscore women’s active interpretation
of music, film, and television. While this is a literature-based course, students will also
examine how hybrid cultural products such as contemporary boleros, films, and telenovelas
produce a transnational imaginary that connects Latinas/os in the U.S. with Latin America
and the Caribbean. We will read novels such as Loving Pedro Infante by Denise Chavez,
The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love by Oscar Hijuelos, and Tomorrow They Will Kiss by
Eduardo Santiago.
Fulfills FTT international requirements.




                                                                                        15
FTT 40410             Intermediate Film Production                        3 Credits
                      William Donaruma          9:30 -10:45               TR
FTT 41410             Lab                                                 3 Credits
                                                11:00-12:15               TR
This film production course will focus on 16mm black-and-white, silent, narrative film
production for the "short film." We will explore the technical and aesthetic aspects of how
the 16mm film camera is used as well as various grip and lighting equipment. Students will
shoot film composition and lighting exercises, while writing, storyboarding, producing, and
finally shooting and editing one silent 16mm black-and-white film in teams of two. You
will edit digitally on Final Cut Pro with no sound or FX. There is a strong emphasis on
cinematography, the technical and aesthetic skills involved and the process of working in a
crew environment. There is a lot of hands on work involved with the equipment. Class
attendance and participation are crucial. Be prepared to spend many hours working on your
projects. There is a written mid-term exam. Course structure is as follows: Final Film 50%,
Midterm 25%. Class Attendance and Participation 25% (Absences will affect your grade)
There is one book: Cinematography: Theory and Practice, and a course CD packet of
articles and relevant information. Materials fee required.
Co-requisite: FTT 41410.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Class and lab held in B042, DPAC.




FTT 40411             Advanced Digital Video Production                   4 Credits
                      Ted Mandell               3:00-5:45                 MW
A course for the advanced production student interested in the techniques and technology of
the video post-production world and the digital manipulation of the moving image. Students
will produce short projects using the DVCam tape format, while learning advanced non-
linear editing techniques with the Avid Xpress DV software, incorporating Adobe
PhotoShop, Illustrator and After Effects programs, and digital multi-track audio sweetening
with DigiDesign Pro Tools. Materials fee required.
Pre-requisite: FTT 30410
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Class held in B043, DPAC.




FTT 40414             High Definition Production                          3 Credits
                      Bill Donaruma              11:00-1:30               F
Through both practical application and critical analysis, this class will explore the use of
high definition formats in both film and video. Starting with tests in 16mm color film and
the new Panasonic HVX200 camera and P2 card system, you will explore the differences in
color and light rendition and then go on to create short,   (Continued on next page)



                                                                                       16
narrative productions in groups each month. We will utilize the P2 digital workflow and
incorporate compositing and color effects techniques.
Pre-requisites: FTT 40410 (Intermediate Film Production) is required.
Registration by Application, Instructor Permission only.
Class held in B042, DPAC.


FTT 40415              The Art & Practice of Screenwriting                   3 Credits
                       Jill Godmilow              1:30-2:45                  MW
FTT 41415              Lab                        7:00-9:00 pm               M
Filmmaking is always, at first, thinking and writing. This is a workshop for current and
would-be screenwriters, to develop original ideas for the screen and to practice those
techniques whereby those ideas can be translated into cinema on the page. Coursework will
involve many short writing exercises and finally a script for a 20 minute film. There will
also be a required lab screening.
This class is restricted to FTT film juniors and seniors and English MFA graduate
students. Application required, Instructor Permission only.
Co-requisite: FTT 41415
Cross list ENGL 50415.
Class and Lab held in the Loft, O’Shaughnessy Hall.


FTT 40437              Media Culture                                         3 Credits
                       Brett Paice                    1:30-2:45 pm           MW
FTT 41437              Lab                            9:00-11:00 pm          T
This course will trace the career of auteur filmmaker David Lynch from his early short
films, through his motions pictures, his momentous television work, and finally, his recent
shift into the medium of digital video. We will discuss Lynch’s productions in relation to
mainstream cinema and television, and how in his late work, Lynch positions himself
against the notion of filmmaking as a commercial endeavor. This course will foster the
critical skills necessary for you to evaluate and advance your own arguments about David
Lynch’s artistic practices, addressing his work at the level of aesthetics, politics, ideology,
and economics. We will posit Lynch’s work in film and television as an intersection of
various genres and traditions, from film noir, to melodrama, to surrealist film, to horror
cinema. Our examination of Lynch’s work will include engaging Hollywood as a cultural
space/icon that is both glamorous and equally treacherous, network television’s culture of
conformity, the social impact of fetish in Lynch’s work, and Lynch’s production of horror.
Screenings will include: Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Wild at Heart, Twin Peaks, Mulholland
Drive, and INLAND EMPIRE.

Co-requisite: FTT 41437
Pre-requisite: FTT 30101 and 30102.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Cross list: ENGL 40120


FTT 40490              Media Ethics                                          3 credits

                                                                                          17
                      Matthew Storin               11:45-1:00             MW
What questions need to be asked--and answered--in deciding what's news at newspapers,
magazines, and broadcasting outlets? This course will examine the journalistic and ethical
challenges that newsroom managers face as well as the issues that reporters in the field
must tackle on a daily basis. Roughly half of the course will deal with case studies of
ethical dilemmas, and the other half will involve students in making choices for the front
page of a mythical newspaper. Although there will be readings from books on the topic,
students will be expected to read The New York Times,      (Continued on next page)
The South Bend Tribune and The Observer on a regular basis, especially on the class days
when front page decisions will be made. The stories in those newspapers will provide the
basis for those decisions. We will also consider how television deals with the news on
network and local levels. Classroom participation will count for a major part of the grade.
Two papers will be assigned for mid-semester and final exams.
This course requires permission of Instructor.
Must be enrolled in FTT.
Cross list: AMST 43110, JED 40106.



FTT 43604             Honors Seminar:                                     3 Credits
                      English Drama before Shakespeare
                      Mark Pilkinton           2:00-3:15                  TR
This course focuses on research methods, project development, and advanced writing
techniques through an examination of early English theatre and drama, primarily in relation
to performance. Students will research English theatre and drama from the beginnings to
Marlowe in the 1590s, with special attention to the English cyclic drama and such plays as
The Castle of Perseverance. Students will consider different historiographical approaches
and the value of primary records research. They will take advantage of the unique
opportunities afforded them by the "Faust at Notre Dame" project which includes the
department's production of Doctor Faustus.
For FTT Honors students.
Class will be held in B042, DPAC.



FTT 45001             Theatre Internship                          Variable Credits
                      Staff
This course is a placement of advanced students with professional or community theatre
organizations. Students can take no more than two 45001 internships for a total of no more
than six credit hours.
Instructor’s permission only, by application. Application may be obtained from the
website, http://www.nd.edu/~ftt or in the FTT office, 230 Performing Arts Center.
DOES NOT COUNT AS A REQUIRED 400-LEVEL COURSE.



FTT 45501             Media Internship                            Variable Credits

                                                                                      18
                       Karen Heisler
Students who successfully complete at least two of the following courses, FTT 30410,
FTT 30462 or FTT 30463 may be eligible for an internship at a television station or
network, radio station, video production company, film production company or similar
media outlet. Interns must work 10-15 hours per week and compile 150 work hours by the
end of the semester (120 hours for the summer session).     (Continued on next page)
Interns will complete a project, mid-semester progress report and a final evaluation paper.
Students can take no more than two 45501 internships for a total of no more than six (6)
total credits.
Does NOT count as a Film/TV upper level course.
Application to instructor required. Students must apply for the course and receive the
Instructor’s permission.
Application may be obtained from the website, http://www.nd.edu/-ftt or in the FTT office,
230 Performing Arts Center.
Cannot be repeated more than twice.
Not to exceed more than 6 credit hours total.



FTT 46600              Thesis Undergraduate Research              Variable Credits
                       Jim Collins
Permission required.



FTT 47600              Film Society                               0-1 Credits
                       Christine Becker     7:00-9:00 p.m.        Sunday
The Film Society is a film screening-and-discussion group that meets once a week in the
Browning Cinema to watch an independent, foreign or classic film. Students can take the
course for either zero credit or one credit. Those taking it for one credit will have a
minimum attendance and writing requirement. The meeting times and requirements may
vary from semester to semester. Contact the sponsoring professor for more information.
Does not count as a Film/TV upper level course. Open to all.
Screenings held in the Browning Cinema, DPAC.



FTT 47601              Special Studies (Sections 1-21)            Variable Credits
                       FTT Faculty
Research for the advanced student.
Application and permission of the sponsoring professor and department chair is required.
Application may be obtained from the website: http://www.nd.edu/~ftt or in the FTT office,
230 Performing Arts Center.




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Notes:




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