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					Northwest Competitive
 Trail Ride Association

         2011

      Rule book



           1
                Northwest Competitive Trail Association
                           2011 Rule Book
                                      Dedication
 The Northwest Competitive Trail Association dedicates this book to all the people who make
it possible, the judges, riders, and “Ole Timers” that have gone before us who have promoted
                   and developed our sport for future riders to have and enjoy.

Table of Contents                                                              1

Purpose of competitive trail riding                                 2
What is a competitive trail ride?                                   2
General Information                                                 3
        How does one prepare for a competitive trail ride?          5
        What equipment may be used?                                 7
        What does the judge look for in the horse?                  8
        What does the judge look for in the rider?                  9
        How does one become a trail ride judge?                     9
Rules for Riders                                                   10
Judges Rules                                                       12
Club Rules                                                         14
How a club prepares for a competitive trail ride                   17
How scores are figured                                             18
Scorecard__________________________________________________________20
NWCTA Executive Board Duties                                       22
Voting                                                             24
Awards                                                             24
        NWCTA point system ______________                          25
        Al Steele Memorial Sportsmanship award                     26
        Vernice Lorang Junior Inspirational Award                  26
        Charlie Wellman Memorial                                   26
        John Russell Memorial Mileage Award                        26
        Rookie Novice Rider of the Year Award                      27
        Rookie Open Division Rider of the Year Award               27
        Rookie Novice Division Horse of the Year Award             27
        Rookie Open Division Horse of the Year Award               27
        Rookie CP Division Horse of the Year Award                 27
        Breed Awards                                               28
        NWCTA Combined Mileage Award                               28
        NWCTA State High Point 4-H Member Award                    28
        Lifetime Mileage Award                                     28
NWCTA 2011 Executive Board                                         29
2011 Current Judges                                                30


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PURPOSE OF COMPETITIVE TRAIL RIDING:
Competitive trail rides are sponsored primarily to:

Stimulate greater interest in breeding and use of good saddle horses possessed of stamina, hardiness,
and quality to make good mounts for trail use.

Demonstrate the value of type and soundness and proper selection of horses.

Encourage horsemanship in distance riding. To provide a family oriented activity.

Train and demonstrate the best methods of caring for horses during and after rides without the use of
artificial methods or stimulants.


WHAT IS A COMPETITIVE TRAIL RIDE?
There is a nation-wide interest in saddle horses. Horsemen everywhere are turning to the hills and back
country to enjoy their favorite pastime. Groups of riding horse owners have been getting together in
friendly competition to compare the abilities of their mounts as working trail horses for many years.
Their goal has been to improve their horsemanship in distance riding and better their knowledge of
what makes a good working saddle horse. Much has been learned in the last 50 years about exercise
physiology in the distance horse mostly due to the dedication of these horsemen that have ridden
before us.

All over the country there are rides from 10-35 mile Competitive Trail and Limited Distance endurance
rides all the way to 100 mile, three day competitions and many 50-100 mile one day endurance rides.
We, here in Washington State, being favored with some of the nation’s finest riding country have been
riding judged competitive trail rides since 1952. For a number of years before this, local riding clubs
have sponsored competitions from 20 to 30 miles to test trail manners, ability and longer events from
40 to 100 miles to test endurance and condition.

Some rides are held in relatively level, open country where speed is of primary importance. Other
events are held in heavily wooded, hilly terrain where agile footwork, climbing ability, and trail hazards
complicate the marked trail.

Horses of any type, size or breed are eligible; entry is open to mares, stallions and geldings, with the
exception of nursing mares. Riders and all their gear are weighed in the Novice & Open Divisions at the
beginning of the ride. Gear weighed must include everything the horse will wear or carry on the ride
with the exception of lunch/water for horse or rider and rain gear.

Winners are placed according to performance and condition of the animal at the end of the ride.




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GENERAL INFORMATION:
The following is a rundown of valuable hints to aid the competitive trail rider, both the experienced and
the inexperienced. As is so often the case, everything you need to know is NOT in the list of OFFICIAL
rules. An enormous amount of what the competitor needs to know to compete well is found out the
hard way, trial and error. You will find that the judges and other competitors are a wealth of
information and every ride is a learning experience for you and your horse. We list here a few things
that we hope will make the learning a little easier, and you and your horse future winners!

We encourage the riders like to get to the campground the night before the ride. This not only gives you
time to set up camp, but your horse can adjust to the surroundings. This is to his advantage, as he will
be more relaxed and tractable the following day and can decrease incidence of metabolic problems that
might occur from the stress of traveling to the ride. Getting there early prevents delays of a sort- flat
tires, motor trouble and just plain getting lost. The people taking entries are also grateful, for they can
start registering the night before and judges can get most of the horses pre-judged and save time in the
morning. This helps the ride to start on time and finish at a reasonable hour. This is much appreciated
by the competitors and ride management also.

Judging usually starts after 3 pm the day before the ride. If you must arrive the morning of the ride,
please check with the ride manager to be sure they can accommodate you. The night before the ride is
an excellent time to get your “after ride” needs together. Have all your cleaning aids, buckets of water
for drinking and cleaning, feed for your horse and everything ready that you think you might need
before it is over. There will be a riders meeting the night before the ride and possibly in the AM for late
riders. This is where ride management will go over the trail, markings, official times and other important
information. Your horse does not need to attend this meeting.

You will need to weigh in if you are in the Open or Novice Division. Have everything that goes with you
and your horse, including spurs. Juniors & Competitive Pleasure do not need to get weighed. Don’t
forget to wear your number at all times from start to finish after your preliminary judging. There may be
a safety check before the riders leave camp or sometimes a judged obstacle. Be sure to be ready in
plenty of time to start on time. Having a fancy outfit doesn’t help in the least if it doesn’t fit you or your
horse. Have the blanket or pad straight. Keep the back cinch up, don’t let it hang loose as a stick or foot
could get caught in it. An exceptionally tight cinch is not necessary if you are a balanced rider or use a
breast collar.

During this time, the riders may be asked to draw numbers for their position to go out. If you prefer to
ride with a group, one person draws for the group. While you are waiting to be timed out, remain
dismounted, as waiting mounted excites some horses. Remember to be courteous and good mannered
to riders and horses around you, as sometimes a judge is at the gate judging you and your horse’s camp
manners.

After you are timed out, pace your horse according to ride times on your map. If you move out too fast
or too slow you may risk not being seen by the judges or missing the P & R teams. Remember, it’s not a
race. The goal is to show your ability to pace your horse, whatever the pace may be. If you arrive at the
halfway point 15 to 20 minutes early, then it is probable you will need the balance of time to finish the
ride. Rest your horse once in a while, especially after a hard climb. Let him take a few deep breaths.
You can tell when he is ready to go on. At the top of a hill, check your saddle and reset if necessary.
Some judges prefer your horse to walk up all hills, small or large, but others have different views. It’s up
to you to figure out what will seem most sensible and shows the best horsemanship. When you come
upon other riders, don’t crowd them. Be considerate and ask permission to pass. Slow your horse

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somewhat as you are passing; some horses spook when they are passed on the trail and you don’t want
to be responsible for another horse’s acting up. When at water holes, wait if someone is ahead of you
watering their horse. Let your horse drink if he wants and if another horse approaches, wait and see if
his horse will drink. If you leave as another horse is approaching, the other horse might get too excited
to drink. This doesn’t mean you spend the whole day “babysitting” but good manners never hurt
anyone and you may need the favor some time.

Ride the ride as if you were out for business—don’t be visiting and dawdling along. The judges like to
see riders alert and watching the trail. The distress signal for a rider needing help or a judge is to turn
your number over so the blank side is visible. Judges can then step into view and help the rider.

Travel faster when the trail permits, for there may be slower going where you can’t make time. These
rides are timed to travel the appropriate speed for the terrain, but you know your horse and should
make allowances if necessary. Judged obstacles are natural and tough, but not dangerous, as no one
intends for horses to get hurt. Treat your horse right and he will work well for you. You always have the
option of refusing to complete a judging obstacle if you feel it is unsafe for your horse.

Along the trail there will be at least 2 Pulse & Respiration stops. As you come into a P&R you should
dismount and line your horse up as directed by the P& R volunteers. Your horse will have 10 minutes for
his pulse to fall and then he will have it checked by a P&R volunteer. It is good etiquette to remain in
line after your horse has been examined until the horse next to you has also been checked, especially if
you came into the P&R very close together. If you were to walk off immediately, the next horse may
have an artificially elevated pulse only due to excitement. This pulse rate will later be scored by the
judges. You will find that the better your horse’s condition, the lower his pulse will fall within the 10
minutes. There will be a minimum criteria announced at the pre-ride meeting that your horse must
meet in order to continue on the ride. Typically that would be a return to both a pulse and a respiration
of no greater than 16 in 15 seconds although that could be changed by the judges depending on
humidity and temperature factors.

When you are back at camp and the riding is over, that is when the hard work begins! As you check in
with the timer, dismount, loosen your cinch but be sure not to block the gate for other riders coming to
check in. Cool your horse properly allowing him small amounts of water.

Take him to where he will be groomed and tie him safely. A full bag of hay should be available for your
horse at the end of the ride; the judges note whether the horse is too tired to eat. Bring into action
every brush, comb, hoof pick, wipes, rags and currycomb you have with you. A good rubdown will help
relax the horse. The rider is allowed to have one assistant at a time to help cool down and clean their
horse. Proper grooming will help stimulate his circulation and aid in the cleansing of metabolic wastes
from his tired muscles. It is not so important that your horse is spit-shined as it is that he is properly
cooled out and made comfortable after the ride.

If it is cool out it is best not to overdo the use of water as he may get chilled. Likewise if the
temperature is hot it is perfectly fine to sponge him off with water you have set aside at your camp for
cleaning. Remember though to use your water early as he should be dry before being presented to the
judges for your final judging. Hot muscles won’t be dry on a horse that is not fit for the ride conditions.
The judges will have no choice but to penalize you on your condition if he is still wet from the overuse of
water for cleaning and cooling.

While you are grooming your horse, you may notice the judges walking around taking notes. No matter
how hot and thirsty you are, take care of your horse first. If you came in towards the end of the ride,

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you will probably have more than an hour to take care of grooming. Just be patient; the judges are
working as efficiently as they can, trying to judge everyone as fairly as possible and still move right
along. As time goes along and you go to more and more rides, you will find there are times that you
don’t place when you feel you should and there are times that you’ll place when you feel you shouldn’t.
We like to think it all evens out in the end. The judges are just people and can’t be expected to see
everything that goes on out on the trail. They sincerely try their best and that is all anyone can do.


                   HOW DOES ONE PREPARE FOR A COMPETITIVE TRAIL RIDE?

It takes time to train and condition a good trail horse, just as it takes time to train them for any other
type of competition. It means long hours on the trail for you and your horse. Not all horses or people
enjoy trail riding, but those who do really love what they are doing, and take great pride in their animal
working for them. The condition of both horse and rider is all-important. Hard riding one or two days a
week, then nothing for the rest of the week will not condition either horse or rider. Riding should
include lots of work at the walk, up and down hills, considerable exercise at the trot and towards the
end of your conditioning, lengthy gallops.

Grooming stimulates the muscles and increases the circulation, thus relieving fatigue and enabling the
horse to benefit from his rations as well as toughening his skin.

Sensible feeding at regular hours and a proper division of his feed insures good digestion and good
health. If lunch is back in camp, your horse will benefit from a nice lunch of hay and a mash of either
bran or beet pulp with apples and carrots mixed in. If it is out on the trail, be sure and stop occasionally
and allow your horse to eat some fresh grass. This will help to give him energy to last the whole day and
help keep his digestive system working properly.

Plenty of water at the right time is important. Do not keep water from your horse all night and then let
him fill himself up the next morning just before starting the ride. Let him have all he wants to drink
during the whole night before the competition. On the trail, allow your horse to drink his fill at every
watering opportunity, and then move right on without pressing too hard for a short while; do not let a
“HOT” horse drink his fill and stand.

On the trail, walk or travel easily the first mile out to warm up the horse slowly. Walk going up or down
steep hills; use caution on lesser hills. Remember that you can trot where the terrain might not be safe
to lope or gallop.

In cantering, change the leads frequently.

When resting a horse on a hill, stand him across the grade, rather than up or down, if the width of the
trail allows. This helps to return the blood to your horse’s heart and lungs where it can be cooled and
re-circulated faster.

Watch your horse’s feet. Pick them out carefully before leaving and inspect them whenever you stop to
rest. See that he is well shod. If he needs shoeing; it should be done at least a week before the ride to
give him time to become accustomed to the new length and angle.

Watch your tack to see that it is clean where any part of it may touch the horse. The cinch should be
smooth, flexible and comfortably adjusted.


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A good rider does not need an excessively tight girth to maintain his balance. The horse cannot breathe
properly with a too-tight cinch and may develop sores from a too loose cinch. An improperly positioned
cinch may also cause sores.

On all-day rides, your horse is probably not used to bearing the weight of the rider for seven or eight
successive hours. He will be less likely to develop tenderness, swelling or abrasions under his saddle &
tack if the following precautions are taken:

Do not ride more than 10 minutes at any gait. Change diagonals frequently.
At least once an hour, dismount, loosen the girth and perhaps lift the saddle for a few seconds to allow
the air to get under it. Be sure the hair is lying flat under both the blanket and the cinch.
Do not expose a hot back to cold wind or rain; the same applies to a wet back.
At the end of the ride, loosen the cinch and walk the horse a few minutes with the saddle in place; this
allows the circulation to come back slowly.

After unsaddling, give the horse a thorough hand rubbing.

Learn how to pace your horse. Mark out one mile, two miles or more along the side of the road. Time
your horse over these marked distances at the walk, trot, lope and canter. Time him when he is fresh
and when he is tired. Bear in mind that you will not make this same speed over wooded trails, steep
hills, etc. Therefore, if you have some idea of the miles per hour your horse travels, and you know the
total length of the ride and the time in which you have to make it, you should be able to pace yourself
by the markers either on the trail or on your ride map.

Some tips on the condition of the horse: The muscles should be hard and firm, and be plainly visible
when the horse moves. A horse can be thin and still be in top condition for hard trail work. Look at his
eyes and coat – is the eye bright and eager? The coat may be a little off color or dull from hard work
and sweat, but it should still lie flat and smooth.

The judges keep a close eye on all animals that are very thin or very fat. They watch to see that the thin
horses are not thin from being ill, and they continue to have alert, eager eyes. They watch the fat horse
for laboring excessively, eyes becoming dull and distressed and head hanging when stopped. Such a
horse is not in good condition. It is very hard to judge heavily on conditioning on short rides of 15-29
miles.

Tiredness is part of condition. A horse may go out stiff from standing all night and come in free and
going easily. But he has gone the distance. No horse comes in the same condition he went out as far as
tiredness is concerned.

Along the trail there will be at least 2 Pulse & Respiration stops. Your horse will have 10 minutes for his
pulse to fall and then he will have it checked by a P&R volunteer. You will find that the better your
horse’s condition, the lower his pulse will fall within the 10 minutes. You can use this also in your
conditioning program to see how your horse is progressing. On a very short ride of less than 20 miles,
the second P&R may be held at the completion of your ride. Ride management also has the option of
having a 1 hour post ride P&R after the completion of the ride. This must be announced to all riders
before the start of the ride.

The feet are also a part of a horse’s condition. If he is not well shod, he is not in top condition. The
shoes should be on well and not starting to grow into the feet. Judges should check top and bottom of
the feet if at all possible.

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A horse should have a good layer of meat over his ribs to be in good condition. This helps him from
getting sores.

Condition is more than riding a horse’s heart out before a ride. It is the other care he gets, such as feed,
conditioners, grooming, shoeing, gear that fits him well and is comfortable to horse and rider---above
all, kindness.

The key to distance riding is Long Slow Distance training, also known as LSD. This means that most of
your conditioning is done at a walk and a trot with gradual increases in speed and distance. It is usually
recommended that a horse has at least 2 years of LSD training before any interval or speed training is
added into his regimen. It takes at least 2 years of LSD to adequately strengthen his bones for the rigors
of any heavy long distance career.

A horse need not be over-ridden every day of his life to be in good condition. A good rule is to work up
to riding him 25 miles per week spread over 2-3 days with rest days in between. Some riders have
recommended that after any strenuous competition (25 miles or more) your horse should have at least
1 days rest for every 10 miles ridden. Others feel that they should have 1 week rest after every 25 miles
ridden. Much will depend on your horse and how he is doing. This rest time allows his bones and soft
tissues to heal and strengthen themselves. Horses are just like us, they need a rest but how much can be
variable at times and different for every horse. As you progress to the longer distances and are able to
make more consistent rides, then the rides become your conditioning program.

A horse that has not been over-ridden should be able to compete for years. It is recommended a horse
not be heavily competed before age five.

Remember that the judges are there just to give us their opinion as to what they saw out on the trail
that day. Unfortunately, our horse may do his very best work that day while we are out there alone on
the trail. No judge may have the opportunity to catch the two of you while you are being your very best.
You still have every right to be proud of our horse anyway. You will know that the you have had a good
day, so enjoy it! Everyone at some point will have their day in front of the judge. It just may not be on
that day this time.


                                  WHAT EQUIPMENT MAY BE USED?

Equipment is entirely optional except that saddles with stirrups and headstalls with reins must be used.
The use of any safety equipment is encouraged, including helmets. New equipment is frequently
uncomfortable to horse and rider; it should be broken in prior to the ride. It should be clean and in good
condition; equipment that is not properly cared for often becomes dangerous.

The use of halter, cloths, saddle pads, and ordinary grooming tools is permitted, but no leg protection is
allowed. Type of hoof protection is optional and any standard hoof boot is allowed including Easyboots,
Old Mac’s and Marquis. Horse blankets of any type may be used at all times.

The use of hand rubbing and water at normal temperature is allowed, but no liniments, salves or any
medication except as that which may be approved by the judges of the day on an individual basis. I.e.
antibiotic ointment or salves to treat a preexisting wound that would not otherwise jeopardize a horse
from starting the ride.


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In consideration of the well being of the horse, fly repellant may be used at any time.


                         WHAT DOES THE JUDGE LOOK FOR IN THE HORSE?

Manners, way of going, suitability, soundness, and condition are the principle things the judges will be
considering about your horse.

A horse with good manners will stand quietly for mounting or dismounting. He will remain calm,
mounted or dismounted, at the halt and travel quietly in front, behind, beside or between horses at any
gait. He should remain tractable in confusion and turmoil. Such a well mannered animal will submit
patiently to grooming, saddling, shoeing, leading, or other handling, and will not exhibit excessive
timidity or become frightened at a strange object. He will be alert and bold, and be responsive to leg,
hand, voice and other aids.

Your horse’s way of going is another factor. This will vary with breed and type, but should be safe,
comfortable for you and easy on him. He should be safe and move easily at all gaits, traveling in a
straight line, and have true action with no excess or loss of action or motion. He should be sure-footed
and readily adapt his speed to meet the situation, and then carry on with a consistent gait and rate. He
should move along without having to be pushed by the rider, and if properly conditioned, should appear
to be enjoying the ride.

Not all horses are suitable for trail riding, nor are all horses well suited to their riders. They should make
a good pair, working together at all times, and exhibiting confidence in each other. A good trail horse
will be level-headed and will concentrate on the job at hand, alert to his rider’s wishes and to the task.

His conformation too will vary with his breed or type, but he should be generally well balanced and
properly proportioned. He should be muscled sufficiently to denote power and agility.

A working trail horse must be serviceably sound. Horses that carry unsoundness such as enlarged
tendons, ringbones or have fresh injuries such as raw cinch sores are generally a poor risk, but those
with old splints, minor blemishes, well healed and not interfering with his way of going, generally will
work sound.

Condition too will vary with each horse and rider, but both should be prepared to do the task at hand,
i.e., to make the ride with ease and comfort. Guard against either over-conditioning or under-
conditioning. Your horse may or may not be in high flesh but should make the ride without undue loss
of weight or excessive tiring. The entries in top condition will finish the day’s ride strong, alert and with
the appearance of having strength in reserve for many additional miles.

                          WHAT DOES THE JUDGE LOOK FOR IN THE RIDER?

Some riders are excellent horsemen but very poor in horsemanship. A good horseman will get a
maximum degree of efficient performance from his horse with a minimum of effort. His posture in the
saddle is upright, relaxed and balanced. Light hands are usually associated with a moderately loose rein,
and light but steady contact with the horse’s mouth.

A quiet but commanding voice is a good aid. A good horseman dominates his mount in an unobtrusive
manner, exacting precision performance with effort that is hardly perceptible. He should inspire


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courage and confidence in his mount and will not worry him unnecessarily. He will get a smooth
performance at all gaits, without commotion or disturbance.

Horsemanship pertains to the rider’s ability to care for his horse. One who excels in this field will give
full consideration to the welfare and care of his horse at all times. He will keep a watchful eye on his
equipment to see if it is adjusted and comfortable to his mount. He will feed and water his horse at
appropriate times, including grazing and watering en-route.

He will properly cool out his animal at the end of the ride, will loosen his saddle to take the weight off
the back gradually, moving him about, still saddled for a while before exposing his hot, wet back to the
weather.

Riding, trail and camp manners are very important along with good sportsmanship. Mount and
dismount quietly, allowing plenty of room for others, whether in camp or on the trail. Yield ground to
others in close quarters on the trail, and point out danger spots to those who follow closely. Control
your mount at all times so he is not an annoyance or danger to others. Along roads or highways, bring
the horse down to a walk when a car or truck is passing. All horses please keep to the right side of the
roadway.

On one-lane roads, Please yield right-of-way to the judge’s vehicles; they often have to travel fast to get
from one check point to another. Maintain a safe distance between horses on a narrow trail, both for
courtesy’s sake and safety. Increase this distance as the pace increases. If you come upon another rider
or group going at a slower pace and wish to pass, please ask permission and wait for others to pull off
the trail. Those being passed should keep their horse’s heads toward the trail to prevent kicking the
passing animals, and those passing should go by with as little commotion as possible.

If you stop to rest, pick out a place where you and your horse can be completely off the trail so others
may continue without waiting for you to get out of the way. Comply with all rules and regulations
pertaining to the ride.

                           HOW DOES ONE BECOME A TRAIL RIDE JUDGE?

  What is it that separates a competitive trail ride from a club fun ride, a poker ride, an endurance ride,
or just a plain old trail ride? Quite frankly, it's the fact that we are putting ourselves and our horse up to
the scrutiny of being judged in a competitive situation. Our horse is being evaluated on his ability to
successfully carry us over a natural trail course and we are being evaluated on how we take care of our
horse over that trail. Even though everyone is there to have fun, we are all really there to see how well
we work as a team with our horse. How does our horse handle the obstacles presented to him? How is
our conditioning program? Are there any holes in our training program? How much have we improved
at the end of the season as compared to when we started the season? We are all really there to learn.
But, for us to reap all the rewards that competitive trail has to offer for both our horses and ourselves
requires that we have adequate judges that are knowledgeable, consistent and fair.
  That said, being a judge can be a heavy responsibility. You need to have a keen eye in evaluating
horses and their riders. It takes a true interest in learning about our sport and in trying to give a fair
evaluation of the animals and horsemen you will be seeing that day. Most importantly though, it is what
makes our sport what it is and if riders can learn something about themselves and their horse that day
they will be forever grateful to you and go home with a great sense of personal accomplishment. This is
what they really want. If you feel that this is something that you can give to our sport please try and
become certified and be an active judge. You will end up learning far more than you ever thought you


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would about the sport of distance riding, you will be helping our sport to grow and preserve the
knowledge and horsemanship skills that are being lost in our fast paced, mechanized world.

JUDGES CERTIFICATION- An annual judges training will be provided for those members desiring to
become certified judges. After completion of this training, said judge will have a provisional certification
and after judging 2 rides they will meet with the judges committee to review those ride results. The
judges committee has the option of recommending certification or requiring additional training or
provisional judging experience. In order to remain an active judge, said judge must be a supportive
member of the division in the opinion of the advisory board by actively judging rides, attending division
meetings, and promoting competitive trail within Northwest Competitive Trail Association. Please check
with the President or the Judges chairperson to find out more about becoming a certified CTR judge.

RULES FOR RIDERS:
    1.   Eligibility; Entries are open to stallions, mares and geldings of all breeds, with the exception of
        nursing mares.
    2. Only paid entries with horses under saddle will be judged on the trail.
    3. Juniors may not ride stallions; a rider must be 18 (as of the beginning of the ride season) to ride
        a stallion.
    4. All juniors under 14 (as of the beginning of the ride season) must be accompanied on the trail by
    a competing adult. Entry blank of said junior shall be signed by parent or guardian and sponsoring
    adult who has agreed to be responsible for the junior.
        a.         If the sponsor should be forced to withdraw, and if another rider wishes to take the
                   junior, it is the responsibility of the original sponsor to make the decision. The junior
                   may complete the ride on their own if this occurs within the last five miles of the ride
                   AND the sponsor agrees.
        b.         If a junior cannot proceed, the sponsoring senior may proceed if the junior is left with a
                   Competitive Trail Ride Judge or other responsible adult.
        c.         The sponsoring adult shall keep the junior in sight at all times.

    5. After age 16 (as of the beginning of the ride season), a junior shall be allowed to ride as a junior
       or a senior at their own choice. Once a selection is made, rider must stay in that division for the
       remainder of the season.

    6. Riders may draw numbers for starting position if required by ride management. If riders wish to
       ride in a group, only one member of said group may draw. Consecutive starting position
       numbers must leave individually. On the second day of a two-day ride, riders shall be judged
       and depart in the same order as they came in on the preceding day.
    7. It shall be a disqualification for:

         a.     The consumption of alcoholic beverages, by riders of the day, from the beginning of
                judging until after the final judging of the day.
         b.     Loose dogs in camp or on the trail.
         c.     Firearms in camp or on the trail, except in tents, vehicles, trailers or campers.
         d.     Smoking while mounted on the trail or as against directed by ride management.
         e.     Failure to carry with him any and all gear as specified under rule 11.
         f.     A sponsor leaving his junior. Refer to rules 4 a., 4 b., and 4 c.
         g.     The use of medications, stimulants, liniments, ice water or hot water on competing
                animals except as that which may be approved by the judges of the day on an individual


                                                     11
        basis. i.e. antibiotic ointment or salves to treat a preexisting wound that would not
        otherwise jeopardize a horse from starting the ride.
h.      Rider being off horse at any time while progressing on the trail except that at any
        location designated by the trail master as hazardous, riders may be instructed to
        dismount and proceed on foot for a specified distance. Or if a rider feels a section of
        trail is hazardous they may dismount and proceed through the obstacle but could
        receive penalty points.
i.      Use of anything other than normal temperature water to clean horses from the time
        judging begins until after final judging.
j.      No competitor may show before a judge who has received remuneration for this rider’s
        training within the past three months of competitive trail rides.
k.      When tie conditions exist, all stallions must be double tied at night. The primary rope is
        tied in the normal manner, but the secondary rope must be secured around the
        stallions’ neck, run through the halter ring and tied in the normal manner. If the rope
        around the neck is secured with a knot, it must be a bowline. Other secondary methods
        may be acceptable (check with the judges). The primary and secondary rope will not be
        tied in the same spot. Stallions may be tied the same as other competing animals
        before and after the ride.
l.      If the contestant does not care for and groom his own animal. One person at a time is
        allowed to assist the rider.
m.      If on any ride of more than one day, after the first days judging is complete, a horse is
        ridden or taken from the area that has been designated by the sponsoring club’s trail
        ride committee; said animal may, however be led to water and exercised by light
        lunging.
n.      If there are changes made to horse and rider after the ride has begun. Any incomplete
        entry forms may be thrown out and no award given this entry.
o.      To wear protective leg wraps bandages or boots on the legs of the horse. There are no
        shoeing restrictions. Any type of standard hoof boot is allowed, i.e. Easy boots, Old
        Mac’s, or Marquis.
p.      Competing animals must be left out of truck and trailers until after final judging of the
        day.
q.      Ride management has the right to refuse entry, or to disqualify entries, prior to judging
        or at any time during competition if the entry displays deliberate unsportsmanlike
        conduct or unmannerly behavior. Tampering with trail markings will result in immediate
        disqualification from a ride and possible probation from competing in future rides as
        determined by the advisory board.

8. After ride judging cannot start before one hour after the first animal is in. Each animal shall
   have at least one hour before being judged.

9. EQUIPMENT: Equipment is entirely optional, saddles with stirrups and headstalls with reins
   must be used. Also, competitors must keep with them any and all gear, equipment or other
   paraphernalia with which he begins the ride. He may not leave any said items along the way
   with spectators, etc. On a two-day ride, any and all gear and equipment expected to be
   needed must be carried the entire route both days (with the exception of rain gear and
   lunch for horse or rider). On a two-day ride, riders may have two saddle blankets and
   cinches of like weight for a change each day. The rider does not have to carry this gear on
   the horse. Any rider using hoof boots for hoof protection may choose to do their
   preliminary judging and completion judging with or without their hoof boots in place at
   their choice. If the rider chooses to do their judging with boots in place, they may be

                                            12
            required by the judges to remove a boot or all boots for visual inspection but will not be
            required to trot their animal without hoof protection. (added 11/13/2010)

      10. Grooming brushes, currycombs and rub rags may be used at any time prior to lining up for
          presentation to the judges.

      11. PROTEST: Twenty-five ($25.00) dollars must be posted with the letter of protest WITHIN 48
          HOURS OF THE RIDE in question. Letter must be in writing to the NWCTA President. If
          protest is not sustained, the $25.00 is forfeited to the Association.

      12. Upon receiving protest, the President must appoint a committee of 3 besides himself,
          excluding ride officials and ride committee of the ride in question. Both sides must be
          notified within 72 hours of President receiving the protest and at least three (3) days prior
          to the protest meeting. Both sides must be investigated and both sides must be
          represented at the protest meeting, which shall be called within 14days of the protest being
          received.

      13. If judge stops a rider on the trail in excess of 5 minutes, the judge shall tell the rider and the
          time will be adjusted and added to the time of the rider. No time will be allowed for
          shoeing.
      14. Any rider who is 30 minutes early or late of the given leeway shall not be eligible for yearend
          high points for that ride and will earn completion mileage only.

      15. Any person who cannot meet any portion of these rules for reasons of medical disability as
          defined by the ADA (American with Disabilities Act) may approach the ride management
          within a week before the ride in writing or verbally for reasonable accommodations.


JUDGES RULES:
  1. Any judge officiating on a ride found to be intoxicated and unable to perform their duties shall
     be suspended for a period of one year. (changed 11/13/2010)

      a..       Failure of a judge to attend a competitive trail ride which he/she is committed to, or
                perform his/her duties at said ride shall constitute cause of disciplinary action by a duly
                constituted board, except in cases of extreme emergency. A duly appointed board of
                judges is to be made up of Judges Chairman, Association Board member and one or
                more judges to be used in emergency situations until the next judges meeting.

  2. CONDITION: Horses shall be examined at the beginning of judging. All old blemishes, faults and
     unsoundness noted by the judge, or declared by the contestants at this time are to be recorded
     by the Secretary. Horses considered unequal to the ride shall be rejected at this examination.
     Entry fees are to be refunded if the entry is not allowed to set out on the ride due to the judge’s
     decision. Final judgment on condition will be based on observation and examination at the
     finish of the ride. Entries disqualified on the ride or who are otherwise unable to finish the ride
     are not entitled to a refund of their entry fee.

      a.        There shall be a minimum of 2 pulse & respiration recovery readings taken at each days
                ride. They may be announced or unannounced at the pre-ride meeting. The recovery
                reading will be taken at exactly 10 minutes after arrival into a P & R checkpoint. A horse

                                                    13
            will be required to be removed from competition if that horse does not reach the
            recovery criteria as announced by the Ride Manager & Judges of the day at the pre-ride
            meeting within 30 minutes of entering the P & R stop.

    b.      Ride management may choose to have a 1 hour post ride in camp P&R. This must be
            announced to all riders before the start of the ride. This will be scored like a regular
            P&R. Horses not coming down to the preset P&R criteria within 30 minutes of the first
            measurement will be disqualified.


    c.      P&R Scoring Criteria-

            All horses will be timed into the P&R holding area. At 10 minutes the pulse and
            respiration will be checked by the P&R team. If the Pulse & Respiration are below the
            criteria as announced at the pre-ride meeting (usually 64, but can be changed by ride
            management) the horse and rider team is allowed to continue. If the horse is elevated
            in either pulse or respiration (respiration above HR limit) they must be held an
            additional 10 minutes. If they are still above criteria they must be held for 10 more
            minutes. The horse must reach recovery criteria within 30 minutes or be pulled from
            the ride and picked up by rescue trailer as soon as possible by ride management. P&R
            numbers are scored as follows-

            10 or less= -0
            11-12 = -2
            13-14 = -3
            15-16 = -4
            17+ = -10
            If > 16 after 2nd hold, horse is disqualified. (or max pulse criteria for the day)

            For Respirations 5 or less = no points deducted.
            For respirations 6-10, reduce score by 1 point.
            For respirations 11-13, reduce score by 2 points.
            For respirations 14-16, reduce score by 3 points.

            If respirations are greater than 16 in 15 seconds after 30 minutes rest the horse should
            be disqualified. (or max P&R criteria for the day)

            Remember to add an additional 10 minutes for each hold to the riders total allowed
            minimum and maximum ride time. A horse that is already somewhat stressed should
            not be stressed further by trying to go faster to make up lost hold time.



3. JUDGES CERTIFICATION- An annual judges training will be provided for those members desiring
   to become certified judges. After completion of this training, said judge will have a provisional
   certification and after judging 2 rides they will meet with the judges committee to review those
   ride results. The judges committee has the option of recommending certification or requiring
   additional training or provisional judging experience. In order to remain an active judge, said
   judge must be a supportive member of the Association in the opinion of the Executive board by


                                                 14
     actively judging rides, attending Association meetings, and promoting competitive trail within
     Northwest Competitive Trail Association.


CLUB RULES:
     1. NWCTA APPROVAL: Ride season is January 1 through December 31. A fee of $30.00 at least
        60 days prior to the event shall be forwarded by the sponsoring NWCTA member to the
        NWCTA President , together with the requested date, approximate length of the ride,
        location, name, address and phone number of current ride chairman. If a ride manager
        wishes to declare a ground rule for the ride, it must be done at the time of obtaining trail
        ride approval. No ground rule may conflict with an existing NWCTA rule.

          Upon receipt of this information and fee, the President will approve or disapprove your ride.
          If the ride is disapproved, your fee is refunded. If ride is approved, the President will
          register the requested date, supply the ride management with entry blanks, score sheets,
          master sheets, and a current list of NWCTA approved judges.


     a.       Ride management must send all completed entry blanks, master sheets, plus $5.00 per
              rider to the NWCTA Treasurer within 15 calendar days of said ride. Master sheet shall
              contain competitor’s name, address, total points, placing, name of horse, (registration
              number if registered), Judges of the day and NWCTA membership number. Riders must
              have applied for membership at or before their second ride for any previous ride to
              count for yearend high point awards. There shall be a $10.00 non-member fee assessed
              to each non-member who rides which will be remitted to the Association. Junior riders
              who are current members of 4-H or United States Pony Club Society or like youth equine
              organization will be exempt from this non-member fee.

     b.       If the ride management fails to abide by the above rule, penalty shall be either a $25.00
              fine or denial of the next competitive trail ride approval which the sponsoring club or
              group requests.
     c.       The President is to be notified by letter from the ride manager if a rider’s check is not
              honored. The President will notify other ride managements and the rider. The rider will
              not be able to participate in any rides until the bad check is honored.

     2. Officials: The officials shall include two or more judges, ride secretary, trail master, timer, P
        & R Chairman and as many assistants as may be necessary.

          Judges: Make this decision early and advise the President as soon as they are verified so
          that the Judges Chairman can assign student judges who wish to judge. The rules require
          two or more judges.

          No two judges should score from the same checkpoint if at all possible. It is recommended
          that no other passengers, only the driver, judges and students ride in a vehicle.

          A non-certified judge may be allowed to judge at a NWCTA sanctioned Competitive Trail
          Ride in the event there are no certified judges available. The proposed judge’s qualifications
          must be presented to the Executive Board or Judge’s Chairperson for emergency approval as
          soon as possible for review and approval.

                                                 15
3. TRAILMASTER: The trail master shall supervise the marking, measuring and planning of the
   official route. He arranges for lunch stops (if any) and other matters pertaining to the
   accommodations en-route. There will be a one mile out, five miles out, half-way, five miles
   in and one mile in marker. Halfway will be designated as halfway in time or distance. Or a
   club may choose to provide a map with several mileage and time points clearly marked. The
   better the trail is marked, the more successful the ride; therefore, the trail should be
   marked so that at any time the rider will not question being lost.

4. NUMBERS: Each entry is to be identified by a number penny. These large numbers are to
   be worn front and back at all times from pre-ride judging in the morning through final
   judging. They should be constructed in such a way that the rider can easily remove them if
   it becomes necessary to do so. No entrant can be given a score without a visible number.
   Numbers should be waterproof.

    We recommend that matching colored markers be affixed to the numbers (or sleeves) for
    Juniors and their sponsoring Seniors.

5. No one besides the judges, ring secretary, and student judges and the competitor being
   judged shall be allowed in the immediate judging area.

6. The Secretary shall officially record the findings of the judges.

7. WEIGHER: The weigher shall supervise the recording of all official weights in connection
   with the ride. All gear must be weighed in that will be used on the ride (with the exception
   of lunch and raingear) by riders in the Open & Novice Divisions.

8. TIMER: The timer shall keep an accurate record of the departure and arrival of each
   contestant. Timer to check the horses as they leave and as they return. The same watch
   should be used both times if at all possible.

9. TIME: Time of the ride to be announced by the trail master. There will be a fifteen (15)
   minute leeway, over and under the set time of the ride. One point will be charged for each 3
   minute interval or portion thereof, over and under the leeway, early or late. After ride
   judging cannot start before one hour after the first horse is in. Each animal will have at least
   one hour before he may be judged. Accurate timing is essential to good management.
   Therefore, the sponsoring club must insure that the ride has been properly timed for each
   division.

    It is expected that there will be variability in the times allowed for the different divisions and
    there may also be variability in the route as determined by ride management with the
    Novice & Competitive Pleasure divisions having a longer ride time on shorter, less difficult
    trail as being acceptable. It is also expected that the Open Divisions may have shorter ride
    times on longer, more difficult sections of trail as determined by ride management. This is
    accepted and encouraged. Or depending on the logistics of the trail the Novice, CP & Junior
    divisions may have an extended leeway while riding the same trail as the Open division as
    determined by ride management.

10. There shall be a minimum of 2 Pulse & Respiration recovery readings taken at each days
    ride. They may be announced or unannounced at the pre-ride meeting. The recovery

                                             16
    reading will be taken at exactly 10 minutes after arrival into a P & R checkpoint. P & R
    scoring will be according to Judges Committee guidelines. A horse will be required to be
    removed from competition if that horse does not reach the recovery criteria as announced
    by the ride manager & judges of the day at the pre-ride meeting within 30 minutes of
    entering the P & R stop. It is acceptable on short rides of less than 20 miles to have the
    second P&R at the conclusion of the ride.

11. Horses will come in through a designated area at the conclusion of the ride and check in
    with the timer.
12. Ride management shall provide a truck or trailer to bring in a distressed animal.

13. DIVISIONS-
    Each approved ride must offer 7 divisions: Open Senior Heavyweight, Open Senior
    Lightweight, Open Junior, Novice Senior Heavyweight, Novice Senior Lightweight, Novice
    Junior, and Competitive Pleasure.

-Senior Open Heavyweight, Lightweight & Junior Open divisions will run at a pace of 4-6mph.
-Junior divisions will not have weight restrictions.
-Novice is defined as a rider who has not won more than 5 first place standings in any
recognized -Competitive Trail Ride organization. Once a rider is entered into Novice division
they will remain in that division through the end of the ride season. Senior Novice Heavyweight,
Senior Novice Lightweight & Junior Novice Division will run at a pace of 3.5-5mph.
-Competitive Pleasure is for experienced competitive trail riders who wish to compete at the
  easier novice pace of 3.5-5mph and do not otherwise qualify for the novice division.
- Heavyweight will include all riders who weigh greater than 190# with all their tack.
 (Changed 11/13/2010)
- Lightweight will include all riders who weigh 190# or less including all their tack.
(Changed 11/13/2010)
-a horse and rider team is entered in any division at the first ride of their season and remains in
that division throughout the ride season unless they choose to discard all previous points earned
and move to another division.
-if a Senior heavyweight loses weight and becomes 190# or less, that weight must be made up
of dead weight for the remainder of the ride season or they may elect to discard all previous
points earned and begin again in the Senior Lightweight division.
-Any Senior Lightweight who gains weight and becomes 191# or more receives no advantage
and completes the year in Senior Lightweight division or may elect to discard all previous points
earned and compete in another division.

14. Awards and score sheets must be given on the same day as the ride. Trophies are optional,
    but awards shall be awarded to the top 5 places in each division, as well as special awards to
    Grand Champion (total highest score) and Reserve Champion (second highest score).

15. In case of ties or errors on approved rides, duplicate awards MUST be given. If an error is
    found, it must be reported to either (or both) the ride chairman and the NWCTA Executive
    Board WITHIN 48 HOURS. The points shall be corrected accordingly.

16. If any errors are made on the score sheets, master sheets or entry blanks, such changes shall
    be initialed by the person making the correction.



                                            17
        17. Ride management has the right to refuse entry, or to disqualify entries, prior to judging or at
            any time during competition if the entry displays deliberate unsportsmanlike conduct or
            unmannerly behavior. Tampering with trail markings will result in immediate disqualification
            from a ride and possible probation from competing in future rides as determined by the
            Executive Board.




HOW A GROUP PREPARES FOR A COMPETITIVE TRAIL RIDE:
EARLY PLANS: Select a tentative date, approximate length, location and ride chairman as early as
possible. Send this information to the NWCTA President, together with details about the kind of terrain
the ride will be over, time judging will start, time ride will consume, and any ground rules ride
management wishes to declare. The Ride manager will include his or her full name, address, phone
number and if possible, who is judging the ride. A fee of $30.00 at least 60 days prior to the event shall
also be included with your sanctioning request. Early approval of the date facilitates adequate publicity
in the various horse publications allowing prospective competitors to plan ahead to participate in your
ride. Dates are held for clubs that have previously sponsored a ride until March 1.

DUTIES OF RIDE MANAGEMENT: A truck or trailer should be provided so that any entry that is
disqualified or disabled on the trail can be picked up and brought back into camp. The current year’s
NWCTA rules and regulations should be posted in a prominent place in camp.

On a long ride, if a compulsory lunch stop is set, this time should be deducted from the trail time.

TRAIL: A ride that makes somewhat of a circle is much the better ride. A popular ride plan has all types
of terrain, thus enabling the rider to make his horse work well at many gaits- uphill and down, across
streams, crossing logs, and pacing himself in flat country or gravel roads. This all gives the judges
something to judge on.

When setting up the ride, try to have at least two places where horses can water.

Try to have cold water, as well as coffee and soft drinks for the riders somewhere along the trail.

Do not time the ride as a race of some kind. Do not ride the ride from the middle backwards- time the
whole ride as it is to be ridden. Try to get a fair-sized group of riders two weeks before the ride date to
ride and time the ride itself. Have them ride in groups of two or three to see where the riding time is for
both the Regular division and the Novice/Competitive Pleasure division. In timing the Open Division
remember that competitive trail riders like to work their horses at varied gaits, but working all the time.
Remember to walk up and down all steep hills and then move out briskly where the footing and terrain
allows. For the Novice /Competitive pleasure divisions the ride should be timed at an appropriate speed
for young horses and less experienced riders. It is preferred to have a slightly shorter trail for these
divisions moving at a slower pace (mostly walk/trot) while having a longer trail for the Open Division
moving at a faster pace. This works well and can lead to both divisions finishing the ride at
approximately the same time or 1 division shortly after the other. If this is not possible depending on
the availability of your trails it is acceptable to give the novice & competitive pleasure divisions a longer
leeway period as determined by your trail master.

The better the trail is marked, the easier it is for the riders to follow. We don’t want to discourage riders
by getting them confused on an unmarked piece of trail. Be sure to follow instructions required by the

                                                     18
landowners and public lands officials regarding removal of ride markers. We need to do all we can to
maintain our right to ride in our wilderness areas. If you need signs, make them large enough; 4” x 8”
shows well or large white paper or plastic plates. Arrows are good either as signs or on the ground with
something non -permanent such as lime.

Take old ribbons down as you go, they confuse riders. Never use green ribbons, as they do not show up
well in the wooded areas. A two colored ribbon system using white with other colors like pink, red,
yellow, orange or blue are very visible and also give you the ability to have different colored loops. If
you keep all your markers on the same side, you can easily reverse the trail on your second loop or the
second day.

CAMPGROUND: try to have a good campground with water for horses. If you plan to have a ride as an
annual event, pick a campsite you will be able to use year after year so people will become familiar with
the location and have no qualms about finding it. You also need a place large enough to judge the
horses so riders can show them at a walk and a trot.

PERSONNEL: Judges (2) if the club does not have a list of current judges, contact your Competitive Trail
Ride Judges Chairman. A non-certified judge may be allowed to judge at a NWCTA sanctioned
Competitive Trail Ride in the event there are no certified judges available. The proposed judge’s
qualifications must be presented to the NWCTA Executive Board or Judge’s Chairperson for emergency
approval as soon as possible for review and approval.

NUMBERS: Numbers for each entry, also sufficient pins or strings to attach them firmly.

SECRETARY: (1 for each judge, if wanted. Be sure to ask your judges ahead of time.) This person works
closely with the judge and should be someone you know is efficient and somewhat familiar with
competitive trail riding.

DRIVERS: Familiar with the area and the trail, as they must get judges to check points.

VEHICLES: To get the judges around. A truck or trailer should be available for emergency use.

HOW SCORES ARE FIGURED:
The judge’s score sheet is divided into 3 basic sections, each worth 100 points. Total points possible are
300 with the goal being not to have any point deductions and finish the ride with as many points as
possible.

        1- Metabolic Criteria, Behavior, Fitting & Handling, Pulse & Respiration
        2- Trail Scores
        3- Condition and Lameness

The first section includes metabolic criteria, Behavior and Fitting and Handling and will ideally be judged
by 1 of the judges of the day. All areas will be judged at a pre-ride judging either the night before the
ride or in the morning of the ride to obtain a baseline for that animal. The horses will all then be judged
again at the after-ride judging preferably by the same judge. Attitude, behavior and fitting and handling
will only be judged at the pre-ride and post-ride sessions. Attitude and behavior will be judged out on
the trail in the trail score category. Hydration and gut sounds may be judged out on the trail at the
judge’s discretion. Pulse and Respiration numbers will be collected by members of the P&R team and
scored by the scorekeepers.

                                                    19
The second sheet contains the Trail Score area and Condition and Lameness area. It also contains a
diagram of the horse where any preexisting blemishes are recorded before the pre-ride judging and also
again at the post-ride judging.

Trail scores will be collected out on the trail by the 2 judges of the day. Each judged observation will be
scored in the following manner. Here is the only area for potentially positive points.

        Excellent-                                +1 point
        Good-                                     0 point deductions
        Average-                                  -1-2 point
        Fair-                                     -3-6 points
        Poor-                                     -7 points
        Rider chooses to skip obstacle-           -8 points
        Rider off course and misses obstacle-     -10 points


The Condition and Lameness area will be judged preferably by the 2nd judge of the day. It will be
judged at the pre-ride judging to obtain a baseline and again at the post-ride judging. Remember, points
are only lost if the post-ride condition changes from the pre-ride condition. Please refer to the score
sheet for point deduction guidelines. A few points to remember though are-

        1. Any horse judged at the pre-ride check with a grade 1 or grade 2 lameness will
        start the ride at the judges' discretion.
        2. Any horses found to be grade 3-5 lame are considered not fit to continue and are not eligible
        for placing or completion. They should not be permitted to start a ride nor be allowed to
        continue at a ride if observed out on the trail except under absolute necessity.

There is an area on the front of the score sheet to deduct time penalty points. Deduct 1 point for every
3 minutes or part thereof.

All penalty points are then tallied and deducted from 300 for the horse/rider final score.

Here is an example of the current score sheet:




                                                    20
21
22
TIME: is kept by the official timer and recorded on the score sheets with any penalties subtracted
from the sum total of the score. One point is subtracted for each three (3) minutes, or portion thereof,
early or late of the given leeway.

DIVISIONS: Each approved ride must offer 7 divisions: Open Senior Heavyweight, Open Senior
Lightweight, Open Junior, Novice Senior Heavyweight, Novice Senior Lightweight, Novice Junior, and
Competitive Pleasure.
Each entry competes only with those in his own division, for awards within the division. All entries,
including juniors are eligible for Grand Champion and Reserve Champion within each Division for day
awards.




NORTHWEST COMPETITIVE TRAIL ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE BOARD :


1. Northwest Competitive Trail Association shall have an annual Awards Banquet and
   Membership meeting. This meeting will be preceded by an Executive Board meeting open
   to all members. Rule changes or proposals must be presented to this meeting by any
   member or executive board member where they are discussed and possibly reworded.
   The proposals are then taken to the annual membership meeting to be further discussed
   by the membership and voted on. There shall be a spring meeting of the Executive Board
   and any interested members to plan for and publish the upcoming ride schedule in the
   Associations newsletter and on their website.

        2. The Executive Board of Northwest Competitive Trail Association will consist of the
        President elected for a 2 year term, Vice President, elected for a 2 year term
        alternately with the President; and Secretary elected annually. The Executive Board
        will also include 2 rider reps each elected for a 2 year term alternately, and 2 ride
        manager reps also elected to a 2 year term alternately. For the initial 2011 Executive
        Board, the Vice President, 1 rider rep and 1 ride manager rep will be elected for a
        single year term in order to begin the alternating format. There shall be a Judges
        Chairperson that shall be elected by the current judges and shall hold an advisory
        position on the Executive Board. That chairperson may also hold a concurrent voting
        position on the Executive Board. The Executive Board will also appoint a treasurer
        who shall hold an advisory position on the Executive Board. This person may also hold
        a concurrent voting position on the executive board.

        3. Duties of the Executive Board will be to:

            a) Oversee the overall functioning of the Association.
            b) Promote and market the Association to the equine community in our region.
            c) To annually do a financial review of the Treasurer’s books before the annual
               membership meeting and report to that meeting in written form the results of
               that review.

                                                   23
    d) Set up a budget for the current year.
    e) Meet to hear complaints and resolve them. Issues must be submitted to the
       President or Vice-President in writing.
    f) Appoint an Association Historian to compile all records, past and present.


4. The President of the Association shall have the responsibility to:

   a) Approve rides for the current year and accept fees.
   b) Appoint a treasurer to keep a ledger detailing the source of income and
      expenditures.
   c) Prepare with the treasurer, an annual financial report to be submitted to
      members at the annual Membership Meeting.
   d) Meet with members of the Executive Board during the year as needed to
      address business involving the Association. These meetings may be either in
      person, via telephone or e-mail.
   e) Edit the rule book as needed.
   f) Write articles for the Association newsletter and other magazines and
      publications.
   g) Promote & market NWCTA to members of the equine community in our region.
   h) Write a Resume of the past year for the Annual Membership Meeting.


5. The Vice President of the Association shall have the responsibility to

    a) Assist the President in his/her functions and to be responsible for those
       functions in the event the President is unable to perform them.
    b) Write articles for the Association newsletter and other magazines and
       publications.
    c) Assist new ride managers in putting on Competitive Trail Rides.
    d) Promote & publicize NWCTA to the members of the equine community in our
       region.

6. The Secretary of the Association shall have the responsibility to:

    a)   Keep minutes of meetings and present them at the next meeting.
    b)   Deal with all correspondence of the Association during the year.
    c)   Arrange for the printing of forms & score sheets required during the year.
    d)   Arrange for printing of the rule books when necessary.
    e)   Promote & publicize NWCTA to the members of the equine community in our
         region.

7. The Treasurer will be responsible for:
   a) Collecting all fees from the President, following any CTR or fundraisers.
   b) Paying all bills and reimbursements for expenses for the Association.
   c) Keeping detailed records of all income and expenditures for the Association.
                                       24
          d) Promote & publicize NWCTA to the members of the equine community in our
             region.


  8. The President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer are to be empowered to sign
     checks.


  9. Rider Reps will have the responsibility to:
     a) Support members’ issues at the Executive Board meetings.
     b) Offer support to new members and riders and to act as liaisons between riders,
        ride managers and the Executive Board during the year.
     c) Promote & publicize NWCTA to the members of the equine community in our
        region.


  10. Ride manager reps will have the responsibility to:
      a) Support ride managers, especially new ride managers, in putting on a CTR.
      b) Support ride manager issues at the Executive Board meetings.
      c) Promote & publicize NWCTA to the members of the equine community in our
         region.


                                              VOTING

      Only NWCTA members are allowed to vote at meetings. A person becomes a member
      of NWCTA immediately upon receipt of a membership application & dues by a NWCTA
      board member. Membership shall be from Jan. 1 through December 30 of said year or
      part thereof.

      (Approved 11/13/2010, Membership meeting)



AWARDS:
  1. A horse and rider must be entered in the same division, Open Junior, Open Senior Heavyweight,
     Open Senior Lightweight, Novice Junior, Novice Senior Heavyweight, Novice Senior Lightweight
     or Competitive Pleasure on at least 2 rides to be eligible for yearend high point awards and will
     include up to the highest 6 rides completed in that season. The rider must have become a
     member of Northwest Competitive Trail Association prior to the second ride where points are to
     be accrued. If a horse or rider elects to change divisions during the season they would only
     qualify for the high point award from the last division that they competed in that season.

  All horse/animal and rider teams are automatically entered for State High Point awards on joining
  Northwest Competitive Trail Association and completing the required 2 minimum rides. For all
  other awards the horse/rider/individual needs to be nominated before Dec. 15th of each year.

                                                25
    2. There shall be at least 3 year end awards for each division with a qualified entry. In case of a tie,
       placings will be broken by:

        a. highest 2 day ride placing
        b. by most miles in the 6 maximum rides being counted for yearend awards.
        c. By most miles accumulated for the ride year. Duplicate placings will not be awarded.

    3. Horse & Rider combination must complete at least 2 rides in the same division for their points to
       count for yearend awards up to a maximum of 6 rides.

    4. A member of NWCTA who competes in a CTR sanctioned by other CTR organizations to include,
       but not limited to, North American Trail Ride Conference, Arabian Horse Association, Middle of
       the Trail Distance Riders Association or Competitive Trail Association of British Columbia may,
       upon paying a $5.00 rider's fee (per ride) supply the NWCTA points chairman with their ride
       scores and include these rides in their high point calculations. If there are any differences in ride
       divisions, they will be placed in the division that they would qualify for if they had been in a
       NWCTA sanctioned CTR. Scores from these rides & rider's fee must be supplied to the points
       chairman by Dec. 15th of each year.

    5. The Yearend High Point Horse (or animal) & Rider Team Awards shall be presented at our annual
       Awards Banquet.


                                         NWCTA POINT SYSTEM:

Class AAA must be 60+ miles                                         Class AA must be 50+ miles
1st     14     6th    9                                             1st     13     6th     8
2nd     13     7th    8                                             2nd     12     7th     7
3rd     12     8th    7                                             3rd     11     8th     6
4th     11     9th    6                                             4th     10     9th     5
5th     10     10th 5                                               5th     9      10th 4


Class A must be 40-49 miles                                         Class B must be 30-39 miles
1st     12      6th    7                                            1st     11      6th    6
2nd     11      7th    6                                            2nd     10      7th    5
3rd     10      8th    5                                            3rd     9       8th    4
4th     9       9th    4                                            4th     8       9th    3
5th     8       10th 3                                              5th     7       10th 2

Class C must be 5-29 miles
1st     10      6th     5
2nd     9       7th     4
3rd     8       8th     3
4th     7       9th     2
5th     6       10th 1


All horses (or animals) that finish a ride shall receive one (1) point for completion.

                                                     26
Nomination deadline for the following awards for the season is Dec. 1st of each year.

AL STEELE MEMORIAL SPORTSMANSHIP AWARD

This award honors Al Steele for all his efforts in promoting Competitive Trail through his work as the
President of the Happy Horse Club. The Al Steele Memorial Sportsmanship Award may be awarded at
Convention. It shall be by nomination for something done by a rider, judge, or person which the letter
writer feels merits consideration by the Sportsmanship Award Committee. A rider, judge or CTR
member must nominate a person in writing, describing in detail what that person has done that was
outstanding. The Director of the Competitive Trail Ride Division shall appoint a committee of three
people who shall review the nominations. If the committee feels that there is nothing outstanding to
merit a winner, no award will be given. The winner’s name will be engraved on the perpetual trophy
donated by Moonshadow Ranch in McKenna, Washington in 2003. A small permanent award,
purchased by the Association or by an honored sponsor, shall be given the winner of this award.

VERNICE LORANG JUNIOR INSPIRATIONAL AWARD

This award honors Vernice Lorang who was instrumental in encouraging youth in Competitive Trail. She
always tried to make the rides fun and rewarding for the youth members who attended their rides at
the Lorang Ranch in Tenino, WA. Presentation of this award is based on letters received by the
Competitive Trail Judges Chairman. Letters may be submitted by anyone involved in the Competitive
Trail Ride Program. Juniors who have been truly inspirational in any aspect of Competitive Trail shall be
considered. This award is sponsored by NWCTA or by an honored sponsor.

CHARLIE WELLMAN MEMORIAL

The Charlie Wellman Memorial honors a man who was instrumental in promoting Competitive Trail in
his local area on the Olympic Peninsula by encouraging and helping riders get to rides and to attend the
annual meetings for the division and the Annual Convention. This award may be won by someone
other than a High Point Horse Award winner.

This award is won by the rider, regardless of horses ridden, with the most points compiled from all
approved Competitive Trail Rides attended and ridden during the season. Junior and Senior awards are
to be given.

A large plaque and a smaller one was presented to the top rider at the WSH convention each year. The
rider kept the smaller plaque and the larger one was retained by the original sponsor. The original
plaque was filled up and then retired with Ken Hurley, a successful CTR competitor and judge as his
name was on it more than any other rider.

Points are computed the same as Hi-Point awards and include all sanctioned CTR rides held in WA.
Beginning in 2004, this award was sponsored again by Peggy Kean and Kean's Farm in Spanaway,
Washington with the donation of a Perpetual Trophy and individual plaques to the junior and senior
recipients.

JOHN RUSSELL MEMORIAL MILEAGE AWARD

This award will be presented annually by the NWCTA or by an honored sponsor to the WSH rider who
has completed the most Competitive Trail Ride miles on approved rides on any number of horses for
                                                   27
that year. A perpetual Plaque was donated for this award in 2005 by Moonshadow Ranch for both
Junior and Senior riders.

If two or more riders tie on number of miles ridden, points (as computed for Hi-Point awards) will be
used to break the tie. If there still is a tie, duplicate awards will be presented. Rules for qualification will
be the same as for NWCTA Hi-Point System.

ROOKIE NOVICE RIDER OF THE YEAR AWARD

This award is sponsored by the NWCTA or by an honored sponsor. It will be presented at our annual
Awards Banquet to the NWCTA rider in the Novice Division who in their first year of competitive trail
riding, receives the most points for the year using the NWCTA point system. The rider must not have
ridden more than 1 competitive trail ride prior to the year that they are nominated for this award.

ROOKIE OPEN DIVISION RIDER OF THE YEAR

This award is sponsored by the NWCTA or by an honored sponsor. It will be presented at our annual
Awards Banquet to the NWCTA rider in the Open Division who in their first year of competitive trail
riding in the Open Division, receives the most points for the year using the NWCTA point system. The
rider must not have ridden more than 1 competitive trail ride in the Open Division prior to the year that
they are nominated for this award.

ROOKIE NOVICE DIVISION HORSE OF THE YEAR

This award is sponsored by the Competitive Trail Ride Division or by an honored sponsor and will be
presented at convention. The horse must be in his first year of competing on sanctioned rides and be
ridden by a NWCTA member within the Novice Division. Points will be totaled up from the six (6) best
rides using the NWCTA Point system.

ROOKIE OPEN DIVISION HORSE OF THE YEAR

This award is sponsored by the NWCTA or by an honored sponsor and will be presented at our annual
Awards Banquet. The horse must be in his first year of competing on sanctioned rides in the Open
Division and be ridden by a NWCTA member. Points accumulated in the Novice and Competitive
Pleasure Divisions will not count against this award. Points will be totaled from up to the six (6) best
rides using the CTR High Point system.

ROOKIE CP DIVISION HORSE OF THE YEAR

This award is sponsored by NWCTA or by an honored sponsor and will be presented at our annual
Awards Banquet. The horse must be in his first year of competing on sanctioned rides in the
Competitive Pleasure Division and be ridden by a NWCTA member. Points accumulated in the Novice
Division will not count against this award but any Open Division points will disqualify the horse from this
award. Points will be totaled from at least 2 up to the six (6) best rides using the NWCTA Point system.

In the event of any tie for a Rookie Award, duplicate awards will be given.




                                                      28
BREED AWARDS

Breed Awards will be presented at our annual Awards Banquet as available. Proof of registration (if
applicable) must be mailed to the Points Chairman no later than the deadline as in our newsletter and
on our website. The horse must have completed a minimum of 2 approved rides, a maximum of 6 rides
(a two-day ride is not required). The points will be computed the same as yearend hi-point Awards.

NWCTA COMBINED MILEAGE AWARD

This award is sponsored by NWCTA and is given to the NWCTA member with the most miles completed
for the current ride season between sanctioned Competitive Trail rides and/or AERC Endurance rides.

NWCTA HIGH POINT 4-H MEMBER OF THE YEAR

This award is given to a NWCTA member also enrolled in their County 4-H program who has the most
points accumulated up to the highest 6 rides completed in that season on sanctioned CTR rides held
within each state. Ties will be broken by miles completed. Award to be sponsored by NWCTA or an
honored sponsor.

LIFETIME MILEAGE AWARDS:

NWCTA LIFETIME MILEAGE AWARD PROGRAM

Rider’s mileage is on any number of horses.

        After completing 100 qualified CTR miles the rider would receive a plaque. For every 100 miles
there after they would receive a mileage plate for the plaque showing the mileage increment. i.e. 100
miles, 200 miles, 300 miles. After completing 1000 miles they would receive a belt buckle
commemorating their accomplishment.

Horse Mileage

For horse mileage awards the horse will receive something nice like a cooler or blanket and also a
plaque for every 1000 qualified CTR miles.

We will budget money for this by allocating $1.00 from the $5.00 riders fees collected to go into a
special fund for the lifetime mileage awards. The advisory board will evaluate this on an annual basis
and see if it needs to be increased or decreased.




                                                   29
2011 EXECUTIVE BOARD:
President              Andrea Hurn
                       PO Box 1286
                       Spanaway, WA 98387
                       253-405-8659
                       shadowah6@q.com

Vice-President         Kathryn Lewandowsky
                       12805 Jim Creek Rd
                       Arlington, WA 98223
                       360-403-8471,
                       KKMoonshadowranch@msn.com


Secretary              Gay Johnson
                       28102 SE 416 ST
                       Encumclaw, Wa 98022
                       360-825-6548
                       morningsunfarm@hotmail.com

Treasurer              Michelle Decker
                       1042 S 64th ST
                       Tacoma, WA
                       253-820-6239
                       LADYBUF@aol.com

Rider reps             Teri Reinemer
                       22863 Bulson Rd
                       Mt. Vernon, Wa 98274
                       425-870-1330
                       wadeandteri@earthlink.net

                       Suzanne Smith
                       21604 Starbird Rd
                       Mt. Vernon, Wa 98274
                       360-445-3348
                       suzanne.x.smith@gmail.com


Ride Manager Reps- To be determined
Judges Chairperson- To be determined

Currently the Judges Chairperson is Andrea Hurn



                                         30
CURRENT APPROVED JUDGES LIST

Andrea Hurn                                        Barb Talbot
PO Box 1286                                        16911 49th St. E
Spanaway, WA 98387                                 Lake Tapps, Wa 98391
253-405-8654                                       253-312-3626
shadowah6@comcast.net                              barbtalbot@comcast.net

Peggy Kean                                         Pat Grey
17403-49th Ave. Ct. E.                             6501 1st St Ct E
Tacoma, WA 98446                                   Tacoma, Wa 98424
253-536-7354                                       253-922-6052

Kathryn Lewandowsky                                Katie Vonderau
12805 Jim Creek Rd.                                117 W 11th Ave Apt 7
Arlington, WA                                      Ellensburg, Wa 98926
360-403-8471                                       253-380-3902
kkmoonshadowranch@msn.com                          Vonderauk@gmail.com

Pat Kennard                                        Michelle Decker
P.O. Box 1286                                      1042 S 64th St
Spanaway, WA 98387                                 Tacoma, Wa
253-651-9587                                       253-820-6239
pkcows@comcast.net                                 LADYBUF@aol.com

Steve Vonderau
28015-112th Ave. E
Graham, WA 98338
253-847-0360
spotsndots@juno.com



*Last edited 11/15/2010 by Andrea Hurn, President NWCTA




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