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					                             Metabolic Genesis
      A Fusion of the Essential Elements of Good Health, Vitality, and Graceful Aging


                                     Life Balance

                               Nutritional Education

                           Strategic Exercise Planning



The basic body refreshing phase, below, can be followed for the first 2
weeks of your program.

During this 2 week period, the liquids listed here can replace your usual
green tea choice listed in your menu guide: “Losing Weight without
Dieting”.

The protein suggestion, below, is a general guidline to be followed
through out the 10 weeks: 8 oz of protein per every 1500 calories
consumed.

All food suggestions are just that: Suggestions. It will be important for
you to “tweek” your food choices during this program in order to meet
your individual goals.
                                  2 Week Checklist

LEMON-WATER, upon rising in the morning, & just before bed: 8 oz. cup hot water with
     lemon juice upon rising, with pinch of garlic, pinch of ginger and 1 tblsp
                        Organic high-lignin flaxseed oil.
                                      [][]


(JUST) CRANBERRY JUICE: 2 times daily—Before breakfast & well after your last meal
                                [am]    [pm]
                 8 oz. of un-sweetened JUST cranberry juice.


                   CRANBERRY-WATER: 8 / eight oz. glasses per day
                             [] [] [] [] [] [] [] []
        **8 oz. of un-sweetened JUST cranberry juice to 56 oz. of purified water.
            Sweeten with stevia if desired – Not to use more than 2 pks. daily




 Organic high-lignin flaxseed oil: Total of 1 tablespoon twice daily – One time with the
             morning lemon-water above, and then another random time.
                                          [] []

              Greens+ Wild Berry Burst (powder supplement) Once Daily:
   (1 glass directly after each work out, and one glass is to be used for a snack on your
                  non~ workout days, before your lightest meal (dinner?)
                      Recommend using through out the program [ ]

             Organic Protein Powder: To be put into your ―Greens+‖ drink.
                   Recommend using through out the program [ ]

                               OR for vegetarians:
                       LEAN &/OR VEGITARIAN PROTEIN:
                    Recommend using through out the program [ ]


         VEGETABLES: Unlimited from Low/Med (non sugery) glycemic load

                                FRUITS: 2 per day
                       from Low/Med (non sugery) glycemic load
                                      [] []
Non toxic food choices……………………………
On a tight budget and starting slowly.

You could start by not buying processed ―non foods‖. Buy organic foods ―selectively‖,
according to your budget. Also important to many: At a minimum, please consider
purchasing NON genetically modified food. Check out at least ONE website on details
as to why (The World According To Monsanto):
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3OedIuaZto

       Also worthy of sharing: *―European countries have been slow to accept gene-
       modified crops {G.M}. They are concerned about possible ecological damage
       from such crops and fear potential unintended consequesnces of genetic
       ‗tampering‘ with the food supply. In 1999 the Gerber Products Company
       decided to stop using GM corn and soy in its baby foods. Heinz followed suit for
       its baby foods, and Frito-Lay has stopped using GM crops in its snack foods…‖
       *“Nutrition” 2nd Edition, from the American Dietetic Association – pg 710

You can find out the detailed regulations companies are required to follow, in order to
be labeled ―Organic‖, on pg. 695 of “Nutrition” 2nd Edition, from the American Dietetic
Association.
The following foods have been shown to have the highest levels of pesticide residue, so
they should be purchased organic whenever available:

                     FRUIT                               VEGETABLES
              1.    Peaches                         1.   Spinach
              2.    Apples                          2.   Bell Peppers
              3.    Strawberries                    3.   Celery
              4.    Nectarines                      4.   Potatoes
              5.    Pears                           5.   Hot Peppers
              6.    Cherries                        6.   Peanuts
              7.    Red Raspberries
              8.    Imported Grapes
              9.    Raisens

These foods tend to be lower in pesticide levels so can be purchased conventional of
necessary:

                 FRUIT                                   VEGETABLES
             1. Pineapples                          1.   Cauliflower
             2. Plantains                           2.   Brussels Sprouts
             3. Mangoes                             3.   Asparagus
             4. Bananas                             4.   Radishes
             5. Watermelon                          5.   Broccoli
             6. Plums                               6.   Onions
             7. Kiwi Fruit                          7.   Okra
             8. Blueberries                         8.   Cabbage
             9. Papaya                              9.   Egg Plant
             10. Grapefruit
             11. Avocado

      Take Action
            Remember, your complete success is NOT dependant on going fully
            organic right now. Simply do as much as you can with the above
            recommendations, and when possible, buy free-range, anti-biotic and
            hormone free, meat, poultry and eggs.
                   Low Starch Carbohydrate Choices for Fat Loss

 Legumes: kidney beans, black beans, black-eyed peas, lima beans, red beans, marrowfat
    peas, chickpeas, pinto beans, butter beans, navy beans, lentils
   Fruit: apples, oranges, apricots, peaches, pears, grapes, kiwi, mango, watermelon,
    honeydew, cantaloupe, rhubarb, plum, pineapple, papaya, grapefruit, blueberries,
    strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, cranberries, cherries
   Light Yogurt (no-sweetner added)
   Other Vegetables: artichoke, beets, pumpkin, rutabaga, squash
   Other Grains: Quinoa
   Oatmeal, oat bran
   Sweet potato, yam
   Peas, parsnips


Ideally, the bulk of carbs on these days should come from legumes and fruits and a small amount
of the starchier carbs listed toward the latter part of the list.
                           Friendly FAT Choices for Fat Loss


Oils                                                Peanuts (in moderation)
 Coconut Oil                                       Pecans
 Extra-virgin Olive oil                            Walnuts
 Flax-seed Oil
 *Krill Oil
 Marine/Fish Oils                                 Fish
 Hemp Oil                                          Anchovies
                                                    Bluefish
Fat-containing Meats                                Herring
 Beef                                              Salmon
 Chicken (dark meat)                               Mackerel
 Duck                                              Sardines
 Lamb                                              Tuna
 Pork
                                                   Other
Raw Nuts                                            All natural peanut butter (in moderation)
 Almonds                                           Almond butter
 Brazil Nuts                                       Avocado/Guacamole
 Hazelnuts                                         Flax seeds (ground)
                                                    Eggs




NOTE: Because some protein sources are also ample sources of fat, they are listed under both
the acceptable proteins and fats lists
                         Free Veggies

   Asparagus
   Broccoli
   Brussels Sprouts
   Cabbage
   Carrots
   Cauliflower
   Celery
   Swiss Chard
   Collard Greens
   Cucumber
   Eggplant
   Fennel
   Green onion
   Kale
   Leek
   Lettuce – any type
   Mushrooms
   Okra
   Onion
   Pepper, bell
   Radish
   Snow Peas
   Spinach
   Tomato
   Zucchini
                         The Function of Nutrients
More detailed nutrition information can be found in the book: The World’s Healthies Foods”
by George Mateljan, as well as “Nutrition” 2nd Edition, from the American Dietetic
Association

 Listed in parenthesis are some of the estimated nutrient levels from the – 2005 - USDA Food
                               Guide at the 2,000-calorie level

Vitamin A (1,052 ug {*RAE})
      FOOD SOURCES- Alpha-carotene can be found in concentrated amounts in a
      variety of foods including sweet potatoes, carrots, kale, spinach, turnip greens,
      winter squash, collard greens, cilantro, fresh thyme, cantaloupe, romaine lettuce
      and broccoli
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps preserve &
      improve eyesight; Helps fight viral infections, colds, & flu
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Frequent viral
      infections, night blindness, hair loss, goose bump-like appearance of the skin

Alpha-Carotene
      FOOD SOURCES- Food sources of alpha-carotene include carrots, winter
      squash, tomatoes, green beans, cilantro and Swiss chard. To maximize the
      availability of the carotenoids in the foods listed above, the foods should be eaten
      raw or steamed lightly
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Protect your cells from
      the damaging effects of free radicals, provides a source of vitamin A, enhance the
      functioning of your immune system, and helps your reproductive system
      function properly. It is a "provitamin A" compound, one of approximately 50
      carotenoids able to be converted in the body into retinol, an active form of
      vitamin A. Alpha-carotene has approximately one-half of the vitamin A activity
      of beta-carotene.
      In addition to their antioxidant and immune-enhancing activity, carotenoids
      including alpha-carotene have shown the ability to stimulate cell to cell
      communication. Researchers now believe that poor communication between cells
      may be one of the causes of the overgrowth of cells, a condition which eventually
      leads to cancer. By promoting proper communication between cells, carotenoids
      may play a role in cancer prevention.
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- In addition, long-term
      inadequate intake of carotenoids is associated with chronic disease, including
      heart disease and various cancers. One important mechanism for this carotenoid-
      disease relationship appears to be free radicals. Research indicates that diets low
      in alpha-carotene and carotenoids can increase the body's susceptibility to
      damage from free radicals. As a result, over the long term, alpha-carotene
      deficient diets may increase tissue damage from free radical activity, and
      increase risk of chronic diseases like heart disease and cancers.
B7 (BIOTIN)
       FOOD SOURCES- Chard, tomatoes, romaine lettuce, carrots, almonds, chicken
       eggs, onions, cabbage, cucumber, cauliflower, goat's milk, cow's milk,
       raspberries, strawberries, halibut, oats, and walnuts.
       POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps support healthy
       skin & maintains nerves‘ energy supply; Helps your make efficient use of sugar.
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Depression;
       Nervousness; Memory problems; Hair loss; Muscle cramps; Lack of good muscle
       tone or coordination


CHOLINE
     FOOD SOURCES- : soybeans and soybean products, egg yolk, butter, peanuts
     and peanut butter, cauliflower, tomatoes, banana, milk, oranges, lentils, oats,
     sesame seeds, flax seeds, and whole wheat bread.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps promote cell
     membrane function; Assists nerve-muscle communication; Helps prevent
     homocysteine build-up
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Fatigue; Insomnia; Fat
     accumulation in blood; Nerve muscle problems

B1 (2.8 mg) (THIAMIN)
        FOOD SOURCES-Asparagus, romaine lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, sunflower
        seeds, tuna, green peas, tomatoes, eggplant and Brussels sprouts.
        POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Maintain your energy
        supplies; Coordinate the activity of nerves and muscles; Support proper heart
        function. POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Loss of
        appetite; "Pins and needles" sensations; Feeling of numbness, especially in the
        legs; Muscle tenderness, particularly in the calf muscles.

B2 (2.8 mg) (RIBOFLAVIN)
        FOOD SOURCES- Mushrooms, calf liver, spinach, romaine lettuce, asparagus,
        chard, mustard greens, broccoli, collard greens, venison, turnip greens, chicken
        eggs, yogurt and cow's milk.
        POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Help protects cells from
        oxygen damage; Support cellular energy production; Maintain your supply of
        other B vitamins.
        POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Low Bio-Scan levels;
        Sensitivity to light; Tearing, burning and itching in and around the eyes;
        Soreness around the lips, mouth, and tongue; Cracking of the skin at the corners
        of the mouth; Peeling of the skin, particularly around the nose.

B3 (22mg) (NIACIN)
       FOOD SOURCES- Mushrooms and tuna, beef liver, halibut, asparagus, sea
       vegetables, venison, chicken, and salmon.
       POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps stabilize blood
       sugar levels; Helps lower cholesterol levels; Helps body process fat. It is said
       that this helps cancer prevention by stabilizing DNA; Protection against
       Alzheimer's disease and age-related cognitive decline.
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Fatigue, listlessness;
       Sensations of weakness; Numbness, tingling, & shooting pains in feet.


B5 (PANTHOTHENIC ACID)
      FOOD SOURCES- Mushrooms, cauliflower, broccoli, calf's liver, turnip greens,
      sunflower seeds, tomato, strawberries, yogurt, eggs, winter squash, collard
      greens, chard.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps transform
      carbohydrates & fats into energy; can improve ability to respond to stress; Helps
      assure adequate production of healthy fats in cells; Helps body process fat
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Fatigue, listlessness;
      Sensations of weakness; Numbness, tingling, & shooting pains in feet

B6 (2.4 mg) (PRIDOXINE)
        FOOD SOURCES- spinach, bell peppers, turnip greens, garlic, tuna,
        cauliflower, mustard greens, banana, celery, cabbage, crimini mushrooms,
        asparagus, broccoli, kale, collard greens, Brussels sprouts, cod and Swiss chard.
        POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Support a wide range of
        activities in your nervous system; Promote proper breakdown of sugars and
        starches; Help prevent homocysteine build-up in your blood. Helps to control
        inflammation
        POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Fatigue; Anemia; Skin
        disorders including eczema and seborrheic dermatitis; Convulsions or seizures;
        Cardiovascular system conditions, including atherosclerosis,
        hyperhomocysteinemia, and hypertension; Nervous system conditions,
        including carpal tunnel syndrome, depression, diabetic neuropathy, autism and
        epilepsy; Skin conditions, including acne, eczema, and seborrheic dermatitis;
        Also linked to B6 status are alcoholism, adrenal function, asthma, HIV/AIDS,
        kidney stones, PMS, and vaginitis.

B (INOSITOL)
      FOOD SOURCES- Liver, brewer's yeast, dried lima beans, grapefruit, raisins,
      wheat germ, unrefined molasses, peanuts, and cabbage
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Inositol is essential for
      the transportation of fat in the body. Like choline, it has been found important in
      providing nourishment to the brain cells. It helps lower cholesterol levels.
      Inositol also promotes the growth of healthy hair and helps to prevent its falling.
      It helps in preventing eczema
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Hair loss or patchy
      baldness, gastritis (inflammation of the lining of the stomach), hypertension,
      fatty infiltration in the liver, hardening of the liver, and eczema.
B9 (FOLIC ACID)
      FOOD SOURCES- Romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, mustard
      greens, calf's liver, parsley, collard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, and
      lentils.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps support red blood
      cell production & heart health; Helps nerves to function properly
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Depression; Irritability;
      Mental fatigue; Confusion; Forgetfulness; Insomnia. Cells with very short life
      spans (like skin cells, intestinal cells, and most cells that line the body's exposed
      surfaces or cavities) are highly dependent on folic acid for their creation. For this
      reason, folic acid deficiency has repeatedly been linked to problems in these
      types of tissue.
      In the mouth, these problems include gingivitis, cleft palate, and periodontal
      disease. In the skin, the most common folate deficiency-related condition is
      seborrheic dermatitis. Vitiligo (loss of skin pigment) can also be related to folic
      acid deficiency. Cancers of the esophagus and lung, uterus and cervix, and
      intestine (especially the colon) have been repeatedly linked to folate deficiency.
      Prevention of neural tube defects in newborn infants is only one of the nervous
      system-related functions of folic acid. Deficiency of folate has been linked to a
      wide variety of nervous system problems, including general mental fatigue, non-
      senile dementia, depression, restless leg syndrome, nervous system problems in
      the hands and feet, irritability, forgetfulness, confusion, and insomnia. The link
      between folate and many of these conditions may involve the role of folate in
      maintaining proper balance in nervous system's message-carrying molecules.

B12 (8.3 ug)
(COBALAMINS)
        FOOD SOURCES- snapper, calf's liver, venison, shrimp, scallops, salmon, beef,
        sea plants (like kelp), algaes (like blue-green algae), yeasts (like brewer's yeast),
        and fermented plant foods (like tempeh, miso, or tofu)
        POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Support production of
        red blood cells and prevent anemia; allow nerve cells to develop properly; Help
        your cells metabolize protein, carbohydrate, and fat
        POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Red or sore tongue;
        Tingling or numbness in feet; Nervousness; Heart palpitations; Depression;
        Memory problems; Dandruff; Decreased blood clotting; Decreased reflexes;
        Menstrual problems; Paleness; Sore tongue; Weakness; Weak pulse

VITAMIN C (155 mg)
     FOOD SOURCES- (Synergistic w/Vitamin K3) *Amla. Broccoli, bell peppers,
     kale, cauliflower, strawberries, lemons, mustard and turnip greens, brussel
     sprouts, papaya, chard, cabbage, spinach, kiwifruit, snow peas, cantaloupe,
     oranges, grapefruit, limes, tomatoes, zucchini, raspberries, asparagus, celery,
     pineapples, lettuce, watermelon, fennel, peppermint and parsley
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Help protect cells from
     free radical damage; Lower your cancer risk; Regenerate your vitamin E
     supplies; Improve iron absorption
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Poor wound healing,
       frequent colds or infections, lung-related problems

CALCIUM (1,316 mg)
     FOOD SOURCES- Spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens and collard greens.
     Blackstrap molasses, Swiss chard, yogurt, kale, mozzarella cheese, cow's milk,
     and goat's milk. Basil, thyme, dill seed, cinnamon, and peppermint leaves are
     also very good sources of calcium. Romaine lettuce, celery, broccoli, sesame
     seeds, fennel, cabbage, summer squash, green beans, garlic, tofu, Brussel sprouts,
     oranges, asparagus and crimini mushrooms. Oregano, rosemary, parsley,
     kombu, and kelp
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Maintain healthy, strong
     bones; Support proper functioning of nerves and muscles; Help your blood clot
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Frequent bone
     fractures; Muscle pain or spasms; Tingling or numbness in your hands and feet;
     Bone deformities and growth retardation in children;

CAROTENOIDS
    FOOD SOURCES- carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale, collard greens, and
    tomatoes (cooked are highest)
    POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps protect cells from
    free radicals; Helps promote eye & lung health; Helps enhance functioning of
    immune system
    POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED- Low intake of fruits &
    vegetables; Smoking; Regular alcohol consumption

*CYSTEINE *(powerful antioxidant / detox assist)

       The production of cysteine involves several nutrients. As a result, dietary
       deficiency of methionine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, s-adenosyl methionine
       (SAMe) and folic acid may decrease the production of cysteine.
       Supplemental cysteine, given as N-acetyl cysteine, may reduce the nausea and
       vomiting caused by chemotherapy.
       N-acetyl cysteine may increase the effectiveness of corticosteroids, a class of
       drugs with anti-inflammatory activity.
       Researchers are investigating the role of N-acetyl cysteine in preventing heart
       damage caused by certain chemotherapy drugs and in enhancing the
       effectiveness of interferon in treating hepatitis C.
       Many people take supplemental cysteine as a way to increase the level of
       glutathione in the body. As a dietary supplement, cysteine is available as L-
       cysteine hydrochloride, and more commonly as n-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). NAC is
       a more water-soluble form of cysteine, and as such is believed to be more
       bioavailable than oral L-cysteine hydrochloride.

       FOOD SOURCES- Cysteine is found in a variety of foods including poultry,
       yogurt, egg yolks, red peppers, garlic, onions, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, oats, and
       wheat germ.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS- Helps protect cells from
      free radical damage; Helps detoxify chemicals and heavy metals; Helps break
      down excess lung mucous.
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Frequent colds; COPD;
      Comprimised immune system.

      {Consumption of foods containing cysteine, or its precursor methionine, is not
      likely to cause toxicity symptoms. However, cysteine is a brain excitoxin that can
      cause damage to brain cells in susceptible individuals. Such individuals do not
      metabolize the amino acid correctly, and, as a result, may be at risk for certain
      neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, amylotrophic lateral
      sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) and Alzheimer's disease.

      High doses of oral N-acetyl-cysteine, such as those given to patients with
      acetaminophen (Tylenol) toxicity, can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
      Intravenous administration of N-acetyl cysteine can cause allergic reactions in a
      small percentage of people, characterized by skin flushing, a drop in blood
      pressure, irregular heart beat, and respiratory distress. Accidental overdose of
      intravenous N-acetyl-cysteine has proven to be fatal.}

*COPPER (1.5 mg)

      *Elimination of free radicals. Excessive intake of copper can cause abdominal
      pain and cramps, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and liver damage. In addition,
      some experts believe that elevated copper levels, especially when zinc levels are
      also low, may be a contributing factor in many medical conditions including
      schizophrenia, hypertension, stuttering, autism, fatigue, muscle and joint pain,
      headaches, childhood hyperactivity, depression, insomnia, senility, and
      premenstrual syndrome.

      Since excess copper is excreted through bile, copper toxicity is most likely to
      occur in individuals with liver disease or other medical conditions in which the
      excretion of bile is compromised.

      FOOD SOURCES – Calf's liver, crimini mushrooms, turnip greens and
      molasses.
      Chard, spinach, sesame seeds, mustard greens, kale, summer squash, asparagus,
      eggplant, and cashews. Peppermint, tomatoes, sunflower seeds, ginger, green
      beans, potato, and tempeh.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help your body utilize
      iron
      Reduce tissue damage caused by free radicals;
      Maintain the health of your bones and connective tissues;
      Help your body produce the pigment called melanin;
      Keep your thyroid gland functioning normally;
      Preserve the myelin sheath that surrounds and protects your nerves.
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Iron deficiency
       anemia;
       Blood vessels that rupture easily;
       Bone and joint problems;
       Elevated LDL cholesterol and reduced HDL cholesterol levels;
       Frequent infections;
       Loss of hair or skin color;
       Fatigue and weakness;
       Difficulty breathing and irregular heart beat; Skin sores.


       CoQ10
       FOOD SOURCES – Sources of coenzyme Q include: fish, organ meats (like liver,
       heart, or kidney), and the germ portion of whole grains.
       POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Restore the power of
       your vitamin E
       Help prevent cardiovascular disease
       Stabilize blood sugar; Coenzyme Q lies at the heart of our cells' energy
       producing process. Special organelles (tiny organs) inside our cells, called
       mitochondria, take fat and other substances and convert them into usable energy.
       This process always requires coenzyme Q. In some cells, like heart cells, this
       energy conversion process can be the difference between life and death - and so
       can the activity of coenzyme Q. Coenzyme Q is a well-established antioxidant
       used by the body to protect cells from oxygen damage. The exact mechanism for
       this protective effect is not clear. Nevertheless, up to 95% less damage to cell
       membranes has been demonstrated following supplementation with coenzyme
       Q.
       The antioxidant protection that can be supplied by coenzyme Q has prompted
       clinicians to use this nutrient in a wide variety of heart-related conditions in
       which the heart muscle needs special protection from oxygen damage. These
       conditions include arrhythmia, angina, heart attack, mitral valve prolapse, high
       blood pressure, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, and congestive heart
       failure.
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Heart problems like
       angina, arrhythmia, or high blood pressure. Problems with the gums. Stomach
       ulcers. High blood sugar

CYSTEIN
     FOOD SOURCES – Poultry, yogurt, egg yolks, red peppers, garlic, onions,
     broccoli, Brussel sprouts, oats, and wheat germ.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help your body
     detoxify chemicals and heavy metals. Protect cells from free radical damage
     Help breakdown extra mucous in your lungs
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Frequent colds

D (5 ug)
       FOOD SOURCES – Salmon. Shrimp and broccoli. Cod and eggs.
       POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help optimize calcium
       metabolism; Help optimize phosphorus metabolism; Help prevent type 2
       diabetes, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, heart attack, congestive heart
       failure, and stroke;
       Help prevent falls and muscle weakness; Help prevent osteoporosis while
       maintaining bone integrity; Help regulate insulin activity and blood sugar
       balance; Help regulate immune system responses; Help regulate muscle
       composition and muscle function; Help regulate blood pressure; Lower risk of
       excessive inflammation; Lower risk of some bacterial infections; Support
       cognitive function, especially in older persons; Support mood stability, especially
       in older persons; Help prevent chronic fatigue. Help prevent the following types
       of cancer: bladder, breast, colon, ovarian, prostate and rectal
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Muscle aches and
       muscle weakness; Frequent falls, particularly among older persons; Bone pain,
       frequent bone fractures, or soft bones; Stunted growth in children; Asthma in
       children (especially severe asthma); Impaired cognitive function, especially
       among older persons; Lowered immunity; Chronic low energy and fatigue;
       Depression, particularly among older persons; Presence of any autoimmune
       disorder; Lack of exposure to sunlight for any reason, including geography, use
       of sunscreen, or wearing of protective clothing


E (15mg *AT )
Some members of the vitamin E family are called tocopherols. These members include
alpha tocopherol, beta tocopherol, gamma tocopherol, and delta tocopherol. Other
members of the vitamin E family are called tocotrienols. These members include alpha,
beta, gamma, and delta tocotrienol. *mg e-a-tocopherl
        FOOD SOURCES – Mustard greens, turnip greens, chard, and sunflower seeds.
        Almonds and spinach.
        Collard greens, parsley, kale, papaya, olives, bell pepper, brussels sprouts,
        kiwifruit, tomato, blueberries, and broccoli.
        POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Protect your skin from
        ultraviolet light; Prevent cell damage from free radicals; Allow your cells to
        communicate effectively; Help protect against prostate cancer and Alzheimer's
        disease
        POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Deficiency symptoms
        for vitamin E are difficult to pinpoint and controversial in the research literature.
        The area of broadest agreement involves malabsorption. In many research
        studies, low levels of vitamin E are associated with digestive system problems
        where nutrients are poorly absorbed from the digestive tract. These problems
        include pancreatic disease, gallbladder disease, liver disease, and celiac disease.
        A second area of focus for vitamin E deficiency symptoms is called peripheral
        neuropathy. This area focuses on nervous system problems in the arms, hands,
        legs, and feet. Pain, tingling, and loss of sensation in these extremities have been
        associated with vitamin E deficiency. Although many healthcare practitioners
        report that skin problems appear closely linked to vitamin E deficiency, there are
        limited human research studies to support this view.
FIBER (31 g)
      FOOD SOURCES – Raspberries, Turnip greens, mustard greens, cauliflower,
      collard greens, broccoli, Swiss chard, romaine lettuce, celery, spinach, fennel,
      green beans, eggplant, cranberries, strawberries and flax seeds, cucumber,
      apricots, navy beans, grapefruit, rye, sweet potato, beets, buckwheat, shiitake
      mushrooms and oats.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Helps support bowel
      regularity; Helps maintain normal cholesterol & blood sugar levels; Helps
      provide satiety (quenching of appetite) to help promote weight loss. Is said to
      prevent many diseases
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Constipation;
      Hemorrhoids; High blood sugar levels; High cholesterol levels. Categories of
      Dietary Fiber: Cellulose, found in bran, legumes, peas, root vegetables, cabbage
      family, outer covering of seeds, and apples. Hemicellulose, found in bran and
      whole grains. Polyfructoses (Inulin and Oligofructans).
      Galactooligosaccharides. Gums, found oatmeal, barley, and legumes.
      Mucilages. Pectins, found in apples, strawberries, and citrus fruits. Lignin,
      found in root vegetables, wheat, fruits with edible seeds (such as strawberries).
      Resistant Starches, found in ripe bananas, potatoes.

FLAVENOIDS
     Present-day research has clearly documented the synergistic (mutually
     beneficial) relationship between flavonoids and vitamin C. Each substance
     improves the antioxidant activity of the other, and many of the vitamin-related
     functions of vitamin C also appear to require the presence of flavonoids.
     FOOD SOURCES – Apples, apricots, blueberries, pears, raspberries,
     strawberries, black beans, cabbage, onions, parsley, pinto beans, and tomatoes.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help prevent excessive
     inflammation; Help promote blood vessel integrity; Helps protect cells from free
     radicals; Enhance activity of vitamin C; In some cases, flavonoids can act directly
     as antibiotics by disrupting the function of microorganisms like viruses or
     bacteria. The antiviral function of flavonoids has been demonstrated with the
     HIV virus, and also with HSV-1, a herpes simplex virus.
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Easy bruising;
     Excessive swelling after injury; Frequent colds or infections; Frequent nose
     bleeds; Low intake of fruits & vegetables.

GLUTAMINE
    FOOD SOURCES – Beef, Fish, Chicken, Beans and Dairy Products.
    POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Helps maintain health of
    intestinal tract; Helps produce glutathione, a key antioxidant; Helps ensure
    proper acid/base balance; Helps maintain muscle mass
    POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Regular high-intensity
    exercise; Intestinal dysbiosis; Frequent colds or flu.
    Glutamine may play a role in the prevention and/or treatment of the following
    health conditions: Alcoholism, Chemotherapy side effects, Food allergies,
       HIV/AIDS, Irritable bowel syndrome, Candida yeast overgrowth, Post-exercise
       colds and flu, Severe burns, Ulcerative colitis

IODINE (1,100 mcg)
     FOOD SOURCES – Concentrated food sources of iodine include sea vegetables,
     yogurt, cow's milk, eggs, strawberries and mozzarella cheese. Fish and shellfish
     can also be concentrated sources of iodine.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Helps ensure proper
     thyroid function.
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Goiter (enlargement of
     the thyroid gland); Fatigue; Weakness; Depression; Weight gain.

IRON (1.5 mg)
      FOOD SOURCES – Chard, spinach, turmeric and thyme.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Enhance oxygen
      distribution throughout your body;
      Keep your immune system healthy;
      Help your body produce energy;
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Fatigue and weakness
      Decreased ability to concentrate, Increased susceptibility to infections, Hair loss
      Dizziness, Headaches, Brittle nails, Apathy, Depression

K (120 ug)
       FOOD SOURCES – Excellent sources of vitamin K include: spinach, Brussels
       sprouts, Swiss chard, green beans, asparagus, broccoli, kale and mustard greens.
       Very good sources include green peas and carrots.
       POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Allow your blood to clot
       normally; Help protect your bones from fracture; Help prevent postmenopausal
       bone loss; Help prevent calcification of your arteries; Provide possible protection
       against liver and prostate cancer
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Excessive bleeding,
       including heavy menstrual bleeding, gum bleeding, bleeding within the
       digestive tract, or nosebleeding; Easy bruising; Problems with calcification of the
       blood vessels or heart valves; Problems with bone fracture or bone weakening.
       Vitamin K may play a role in the prevention and/or treatment of the following
       health conditions: Anticoagulant therapy; Bone fracture; Chronic liver disease
       Cystic fibrosis; Hardening of the arteries; Inflammatory bowel disease; Liver
       cancer; Pancreatic cancer; Kidney stones; Nausea and vomiting during
       pregnancy;
       Osteopenia (bone loss);
       Osteoporosis (decreased bone mineral density); Thrombosis

LYCOPENE
     FOOD SOURCES – Foods highest in lycopene include tomatoes, pink
     grapefruit, watermelon, and guava. Other foods containing small amounts of
     lycopene include persimmon and apricots.
       POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Protect your cells from
       the damaging effects of free radicals; Help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol,
       thereby slowing the development of atherosclerosis
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Smoking and regular
       alcohol consumption; Low intake of fruits and vegetables

MAGNESIUM (380 mg)
    FOOD SOURCES – Swiss chard and spinach.
    POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Relax your nerves and
    muscles
    Build and strengthen bones, Keep your blood circulating smoothly
    POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Muscle weakness,
    tremor, or spasm; Heart arrhythmia, irregular contraction, or increased heart
    rate; Softening and weakening of bone; Imbalanced blood sugar levels;
    Headaches; Elevated blood pressure

MANGANESE
    FOOD SOURCES – Excellent food sources of manganese include mustard
    greens, kale, chard, raspberries, pineapple, romaine lettuce, collard greens and
    maple syrup.
    POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help your body utilize
    several key nutrients such as biotin, thiamin, ascorbic acid, and choline; Keep
    your bones strong and healthy; Help your body synthesize fatty acids and
    cholesterol; Maintain normal blood sugar levels; Promote optimal function of
    your thyroid gland; Maintain the health of your nerves; Protect your cells from
    free-radical damage
    POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED – Nausea, Vomiting,
    Poor glucose, tolerance (high blood sugar levels), Skin rash, Loss of hair color,
    Excessive bone loss, Low cholesterol levels, Dizziness, Hearing loss,
    Reproductive system difficulties.

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS
    (total fat = 65 g / 29% of calories)
    FOOD SOURCES – Salmon, flax seeds and walnuts are excellent food sources of
    omega-3 fatty acids. Krill oil is one of the best sources that include an
    abundance of DHA/EPA, unlike flax.
    POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Reduce inflammation
    throughout your body, Keep your blood from clotting excessively, Maintain the
    fluidity of your cell membranes, lower the amount of lipids (fats such as
    cholesterol and triglycerides) circulating in the bloodstream, decrease platelet
    aggregation, preventing excessive blood clotting, inhibit thickening of the
    arteries by decreasing endothelial cells' production of a platelet-derived growth
    factor (the lining of the arteries is composed of endothelial cells), increase the
    activity of another chemical derived from endothelial cells (endothelium-derived
    nitric oxide), which causes arteries to relax and dilate
    reduce the production of messenger chemicals called cytokines, which are
    involved in the inflammatory response associated with atherosclerosis, reduce
       the risk of becoming obese and improve the body's ability to respond to insulin
       by stimulating the secretion of leptin, a hormone that helps regulate food intake,
       body weight and metabolism, and is expressed primarily by adipocytes (fat
       cells), help prevent cancer cell growth
       POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Dry, itchy skin; Brittle
       hair & nails; Fatigue; Depression; Inability to concentrate; Joint pain

PHOSPHORUS (1,740 mg)
Helps form bones & teeth; Vital for energy production

POTASSIUM (4,044 mg)
     Potassium plays an important role in muscle contraction and nerve transmission.
     Many of our muscle and nerve cells have specialized channels for moving
     potassium in and out of the cell. Sometimes potassium moves freely in and out,
     and sometimes a special energy-driven pump is required. When the movement
     of potassium is blocked, or when potassium is deficient in the diet, activity of
     both muscles and nerves can become compromised.
     FOOD SOURCES – Excellent sources of potassium include chard, crimini
     mushrooms, and spinach.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help your muscles and
     nerves function properly. Maintain the proper electrolyte and acid-base balance
     in your body
     Help lower your risk of high blood pressure
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Muscle weakness,
     Confusion
     Irritability, Fatigue, Heart problems, Chronic diarrhea, Regular, intense exercise,
     Use of certain diuretics.

PROTEIN (91 g / 18% of total calorie intake)
     FOOD SOURCES – Tuna, shrimp and cod.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Helps maintain healthy
     skin, hair, & nails; Keeps immune system functioning properly
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Muscle wasting
     Weight loss, Fatigue and weakness, Frequent infections, Severe edema (fluid
     retention)
     Slow growth and development in children.

SELENIUM
     FOOD SOURCES – Button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, cod, shrimp,
     snapper, tuna, halibut, calf's liver, and salmon.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Protect cells from free-
     radical damage. Enable your thyroid to produce thyroid hormone. Help lower
     your risk of joint inflammation
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Weakness or pain in
     the muscles, Discoloration of the hair or skin, Whitening of the fingernail beds.
TYRYPTOPHAN
     FOOD SOURCES – Red meat, dairy products, nuts, seeds, bananas, soybeans
     and soy products, tuna, shellfish, and turkey.
     POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Required for proper
     sleep & appetite regulation.
     POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED – Depression, Anxiety,
     Irritability, Impatience, Impulsiveness, Inability to concentrate, Weight gain or
     unexplained weight loss, Slow growth in children, Overeating and/or
     carbohydrate cravings, Poor dream recall, Insomnia

ZINC (14 mg)
      FOOD SOURCES – Calf's liver, mushrooms and spinach.
      POTENTIAL HEALTH PROMOTING FUNCTIONS – Help balance blood
      sugar
      Stabilize your metabolic rate, Prevent a weakened immune system, Support an
      optimal sense of smell and taste.
      POSSIBLE INDICATIONS THAT MORE IS NEEDED - Impaired sense of taste
      or smell, Lack of appetite, Depression, Growth failure in children, Frequent colds
      and infections


          For More Detailed Information, Please Visit: http://www.whfoods.com
                 USDA Food Guide:
                 The suggested amounts of food to consume from the basic food groups, subgroups, and
                 oils to meet recommended nutrient intakes at 12 different calorie levels. Nutrient and
                 energy contributions from each group are calculated according to the nutrient-dense
                 forms of food in each group (e.g., lean meats & fat-free milk). The table also shows the
                 discretionary calorie allowance that can be accommodated within each calorie level, in
                 addition to the suggested amounts of nutrient-dense forms of foods in each group.

Daily Amount of Food From Each Group (vegetable subgroup amounts are per week)
Calorie level    1,000     1,200     1,400     1,600     1,800     2,000     2,200    2,400    2,600     2,800     3,000     3,200

Fruits           1c        1c        1.5c      1.5c      1.5c      2c        2c       2c       2c        2.5c      2.5c      2.5c
                 (2srv)    (2srv)    (3srv)    (3srv)    (3srv)    (4srv)    (4srv)   (4srv)   (4srv)    (5srv)    (5srv)    (5srv)
Vegetables       1c        1.5c      1.5c      2c        2.5c      2.5c      3c       3c       3.5c      3.5c      4c        4c
                 (2srv)    (3srv)    (3srv)    (4srv)    (5srv)    (5srv)    (6srv)   (6srv)   (7srv)    (7srv)    (8srv)    (8srv)

  Dark green     1c/wk     1.5c/wk   1.5c/wk   2c/wk     3c/wk     3c/wk     3c/wk    3c/wk    3c/wk     3c/wk     3c/wk     3c/wk
  Orange veg.    0.5c/wk   1c/wk     1c/wk     1.5c/wk   2c/wk     2c/wk     2c/wk    2c/wk    2.5c/wk   2.5c/wk   2.5c/wk   2.5c/wk
  Legumes        0.5c/wk   1c/wk     1c/wk     2.5c/wk   3c/wk     3c/wk     3c/wk    3c/wk    3.5c/wk   3.5c/wk   3.5c/wk   3.5c/wk
  Starchy veg.   1.5c/wk   2.5c/wk   2.5c/wk   2.5c/wk   3c/wk     3c/wk     6c/wk    6c/wk    7c/wk     7c/wk     9c/wk     9c/wk
  Other veg.     3.5c/wk   4.5c/wk   4.5c/wk   5.5c/wk   6.5c/wk   6.5c/wk   7c/wk    7c/wk    8.5c/wk   8.5c/wk   10c/wk    10c/wk
Grains           3oz-eq    4oz-eq    5oz-eq    5oz-eq    6oz-eq    6oz-eq    7oz-eq   8oz-eq   9oz-eq    10oz-     10oz-     10oz-
                                                                                                         eq        eq        eq
 Whole grains    1.5       2         2.5       2.5       3         3         3.5      4        4.5       5         5         5
  Other grains   1.5       2         2.5       2.5       3         3         3.5      4        4.5       5         5         5
Lean meat &      2oz-eq    3oz-eq    4oz-eq    5oz-eq    5oz-eq    5.5oz-    6oz-eq   6.5oz-   6.5oz-    7oz-eq    7oz-eq    7oz-eq
beans                                                              eq                 eq       eq
Milk          2c           2c        2c        3c        3c        3c        3c       3c       3c        3c        3c        3c
Oils          15g          17g       17g       22g       24g       27g       29g      31g      34g       36g       44g       51g
Discretionary 165          171       171       132       195       267       290      362      410       426       512       648
calorie
allowance
What Does “1 Serving” Look Like?
    Grain Products
    1 cup of cereal flakes = fist
    1 pancake = compact disc
    1/2 cup of cooked rice, pasta or potato = 1/2 baseball
    1 slice of bread = cassette tape
    1 piece of cornbread = bar of soap
    Vegetables and Fruit
    1 cup of salad greens = baseball
    1 baked potato = fist
    1 medium fruit = baseball
    1/2 cup of fresh fruit = 1/2 baseball
    1/4 cup of raisins = large egg
    Dairy and Cheese
    1 1/2 oz. cheese = 4 stacked dice or 2 cheese slices
    1/2 cup of ice cream = 1/2 baseball
    Fats
    1 tsp. margarine or spreads = 1 dice, thumb tip
    Meat and Alternatives
    3 oz. meat, fish or poultry = deck of cards
    3 oz. grilled/baked fish = checkbook
    2 Tbsp. peanut butter = ping pong ball
    Source: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
                            Bhagavati’s disease-free smoothie ;-)
         Inspired from the book: “Beating Cancer with Nutrition” by Patrick Quillin
                                             &
                    “Natural Compounds in Cancer Therapy” by John Boik


                              General combination of ingredients
Fruit / Liquid   Protein           Vegetables       Thicken            Other             Enzyme

ONE or TWO:      ONE               ALL:             ONE                ALL               ALL

Fruit:           Garden of Life    Raw:             Banana             Sea Weed(kelp)    Papaya,
Blue berry,      ―Raw Protein‖     Carrots,                            Garlic            Pineapple
Pomegranate,                       Broccoli,                           Ginger
Tomato,          Bee Pollan        Cauliflower,                        Turmeric          Can‘t do
Strawberries                       Scallion,                           Flax oil          these, try:
Cranberries      Immunocal         Asparagus,                                            Wobenzyme
                 organic whey      Spinach,                            Occasionally      supplements
                 powder            Kale,                               Organic yogurt
                                   Alfalf,a                            Sweet potato
                                   Celery                              Pumpkin
                                                                       Romain lettuce
                                                                       Braags: organic
                                                                       kelp seasoning,
                                                                       Parsley
                                                                       Swiss Chard
                                                                       Beets (cook)




        FOR MANY SCRUMPTIOUS, HEALTHY RECIPIES, PLEASE GO TO THIS FABULOUS
        WEBSITE. SCROLL DOWN TOWARDS THE BOTTOM OF IT AND YOU WILL FIND MANY
        MENU IDEAS!

                                  http://whfoods.org/recipestoc.phps
                                       Name:
F o o d J o u rn a l                   Date:

            Meal             Protein     Carbohydrate     Fat
BREAKFAST
SNACK
LUNCH
SNACK
DINNER




                   TOTAL



BEGINNING OF WEEK - WEIGHT: _____________________
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