Course Syllabus

Document Sample
Course Syllabus Powered By Docstoc
					                                      Course Syllabus 

                      Microfinance and Wealth Creation (GSBA 594) 

             Professors:  Stephen J. Conroy, Ph.D. and Patricia Marquez, Ph.D. 

                                         Summer 2008 
 
Class Sessions: 
    • Aug 4 – Aug 20  (USD:  SOLES building‐‐MRH 102, and via videoconference with 
       Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Guadalajara) 
    • In Guadalajara:  Aug 13 – 17 at Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Guadalajara   
 
Office:  
    • Conroy:  University of San Diego, Olin Hall 111 
    • Marquez:  University of San Diego, KIPJ 274 
 
Telephones: Conroy:  (619) 260‐7883; Marquez:  (619) 260‐7875 
Emails: sconroy@sandiego.edu; pmarquez@sandiego.edu 
Course web page: http://pope.sandiego.edu   
 
Last revised:  July 28, 2008.  Please be sure to check the WebCT site for the most current 
syllabus. 

                                     Course Description 

This course provides a unique opportunity to explore the area of microfinance and wealth 
creation—both from a theoretical and practical point of view.  Ever since Grameen Bank 
founder, Professor Muhammad Yunus, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006, awareness of 
and interest in the microfinance business model has risen dramatically.  This course is 
designed to explore and analyze the key issues associated with microfinance and wealth 
creation.  In the process we will address such questions as:  What is microfinance?  What 
are the various business models for microfinance institutions (MFI’s) and wealth creation?  
What are common factors among successful MFI’s?   What is the social and economic 
impact of MFI’s? What are the limitations of microfinance as a path for alleviating 
poverty?  What is social venture capitalism?   

Students will have a chance to explore these questions through course readings, class 
discussions, group projects, on‐site visits to MFI’s and meetings with MFI practitioners 
and their clients.  The highlight of the course is a visit to the city of Guadalajara, Mexico, 



                                                                                                  1
where students will have the opportunity to see first‐hand how different types of 
organizations are offering financial services to low income citizens in Latin America.   

                                    Learning Objectives 
 
The principal aim of this course is to critically analyze the various forms of wealth creation 
for households and businesses, with a specific emphasis on the microfinance model(s).  By 
the end of the course, students should be able to  
 
  - Describe the basics of lending, saving and investing including how firms deal with 
    risk, moral hazard and adverse selection 
 - Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of different types of organizations in the  
    simultaneous creation of social and economic value  
 - Identify success factors of high performing MFIs  
 - Identify the managerial challenges of MFIs 

In addition to assigned readings on these topics, students will also have the opportunity to 
learn from interactions with real‐world practitioners and experts in the field of 
microlending, especially through the Guadalajara trip experience.  Students will 
demonstrate their knowledge and awareness of these topics through quizzes and a final 
group project and presentation.      

                    Learning Methods and Measurement of Learning 
 
The topics in the Course Calendar section will be addressed at length throughout the 
course using a myriad of teaching devices. Among these are the following: 

   1.   Assigned readings 
   2.   Meetings with microlending practitioners and their clients 
   3.   Quizzes on assigned material 
   4.   Group project (including presentation) 

                                        Prerequisites 

There are no prerequisites for this course.  Graduate level background in Business 
Economics and Financial Management and Analysis are strongly recommended.   

                  Expectations for Academic Conduct/Plagiarism Policy 

We expect all students enrolled in this course to accept the responsibility of reading, 
understanding, and meeting all course requirements and policies as set forth in this 


                                                                                             2
syllabus and other accompanying documents. You are expected to inform the professor 
immediately of any personal circumstances that may require special consideration in 
meeting course requirements or adhering to course policies. We expect all students to 
abide by the Universityʹs Student Code of Rights and Responsibilities as published on the USD 
web site, available at http://www.sandiego.edu/administration/studentaffairs/policies.php 
. Failure to do so will result in disciplinary actions as specified in the Code. 

                                    Email Correspondence 
 
A few considerations: 

   •   When we send out “broadcast” emails to students, we will also post the contents of 
       these messages in WebCT (course webpage) under the “announcements” section. 
   •   When sending assignments via email attachment to us, please:  
          1. Make sure that when we open the file everything is on one page and/or 
              spreadsheet so that we do not have to keep opening files or tabbing through 
              spreadsheets to print out problem after problem. An ʺidealʺ attachment 
              would be in Word or PDF format, with tables/graphs cut and pasted into the 
              document.   
          2. Make sure your name is at the top of each page.  
          3. For spreadsheets, check the ʺPage Set‐Upʺ to make sure that when we print 
              out a spreadsheet, we will print out only the content part of the spreadsheet.  
              (If it is possible, use the ʺfit to __ pagesʺ option and try to get everything into 
              one or two pages (exception being if this makes the font too small to read).)  

                                                 Grading 
Grades are calculated at the end of the semester based on the following weighting:  
 
           A:  94% and above         C+:  77 – 79.99% 
           A‐:  90 – 93.99%          C:  73 – 76.99% 
           B+:  87 – 89.99%          C‐:  70% or below 
           B:  83 – 86.99%            
           B‐:  80 – 82.99%           
 

   1. Participation (class discussions, including discussion of cases and readings; 
      Guadalajara participation):  15% 
   2. Quizzes: 35%  
   3. Project: 50% 

       Course Material: 


                                                                                                3
Books: 

       •    Armendariz, Beatriz and Jonathan Morduch, The Economics of Microfinance, MIT 
            Press, (2005) 2007 [First three chapters are posted in WebCT as PDF files.] 
       •    Yunus, Muhammad, Banker to the Poor:  Micro‐lending and the Battle against World 
            Poverty, Public Affairs:  New York, (1999) 2003 – needs to be purchased 

Harvard Business School Cases: 

   •   Banco Solidario:  The Business of Microfinance (Robert E. Kennedy), 2002 [ No. 9‐702‐
       019] 
   •   Banco Compartamos:  Life after the IPO (Michael Chu, Regina Garcia Cuellar), 2008 
       [No. 9‐308‐094] 
   •   Banca Regional Andino:  Facing the Globalization of Microfinance (Michael Chu and Jean 
       Steege Hazell), 2007 [No. 9‐307‐060] 

   [Note:  We have set up a special course pack at HBS Press.  To access this, please to the 
   following URL:  
   http://harvardbusinessonline.hbsp.harvard.edu/relay.jhtml?name=cp&c=c28900 .  You 
   may need to go to the main site at http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu/hbsp/case_studies.jsp 
   (note:  there is an underscore between “case” and “studies” in this URL) to set up an 
   account with a user name and password.  Just follow the instructions online, or, if you 
   have questions, contact HBS Customer Support at:  Phone: (800) 545‐7685 or (617) 783‐
   7600 outside U.S. and Canada or email custserv@hbsp.harvard.edu .  They are quite 
   good at responding to inquiries, so do not hesitate to contact them with questions.] 

Other Readings: 

   •   The Economist, “The Hidden Wealth of the Poor:  A Survey of Microfinance,” 
       November 5, 2005, pp. 1‐10. [Available in WebCT] 
   •   Epstein, Keith and Geri Smith, “The Ugly Side of Microlending,” Business Week, 
       December 13, 2007. [Available in WebCT] 


                    Course Calendar  
 Prospective Course Outline, Reading and Assignment List  
                          (Current as of July 28, 2008) 
Class         *Time  Activity                                           Readings 
              (PST) 
8/4/2008      5:30 ‐    Syllabus; Course requirements;    
              9:00      Project; Overview of 

                                                                                            4
                        Microfinance 

8/6/2008     5:30 ‐     Learning Activity; Class             Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the 
             9:00       Discussion of Banker to the Poor     Poor (Chs. 1 ‐ 6); Armendariz & 
                        (Chs. 1 ‐ 6); The Economics of       Morduch, The Economics of 
                        Microfinance, Ch. 1                  Microfinance, Ch. 1 
8/9/2008     9:00       Quiz on Readings; Lecture and        Banker to the Poor (Chs. 7 ‐ 14); The 
             AM ‐       Discussion of Banker to the Poor,    Economics of Microfinance, Ch. 2 
             12:00      Chs. 7 ‐ 14; The Economics of 
                        Microfinance, Ch. 2 
8/11/2008    5:30 ‐     HBS Case:  Banco Solidario:          HBS Case:  Banco Solidario:  The 
             9:00       The Business of Microfinance         Business of Microfinance (Robert E. 
                        (Robert E. Kennedy); Roots of        Kennedy); The Economics of 
                        Microfinance:  ROSCAʹs and           Microfinance, Ch. 3 
                        Credit Cooperatives; Linking to 
                        Businesses (Elektra, Patrimonio 
                        Hoy, Casa Bahia, 
                        Microinsurance, CEMEX); 
                        Microfin Software 
8/13/2008    TBA        USD Students:  Travel to             The Economist, “The Hidden Wealth 
                        Guadalajara  (Read on                of the Poor:  A Survey of 
                        Airplane)                            Microfinance,” November 5, 2005, 
                                                             pp. 1‐10; Epstein, Keith and Geri 
                                                             Smith, “The Ugly Side of 
                                                             Microlending,” Business Week, 
              
                                                             December 13, 2007. 
              
8/14/2008    9:00       Visit FOJAL;                         [See Agenda for Guadalajara for 
             AM ‐                                            specific details] 
             11:30:      

             12:30 –     
             3:00:  
                        Visit Emprende Guadalajara 
             4:00 – 
             5:00       (At Tec de Monterrey Campus 
                        Guadalajara) 
                        Discussion/Analysis 
8/15/2008    9:00       Visit Electra/Banco Azteca;           
             AM – 
             11:30:      

                                                                                                 5
                           (At Tec de Monterrey Campus 
                           Guadalajara)   
             4:00 – 
             5:00:         Compartamos 

             5:30 –        Credex 
             6:30:      
8/16/2008    9:30          Discussion/Analysis;                  
             AM – 
             10:30:         

             11:00 –       Group Activity 
             4:00:   
8/17/2008    TBA           USD Students Return to San            
                           Diego (Work on Group 
                           Projects) 
8/18/2008    5:30 ‐        Discuss HBS Case:  Banco             HBS Case:  Banco Compartamos:  Life 
             9:00          Compartamos:  Life after the IPO;    after the IPO (Michael Chu, Regina 
                           Meet with Accion San Diego           Garcia Cuellar), 2008; Visit Accion 
                           Representative; Discuss HBS          San Diego Website:  
                           Case:  Banca Regional Andino:        http://www.accionsandiego.org/; 
                           Facing the Globalization of          HBS Case:  Banca Regional Andino:  
                           Microfinance                         Facing the Globalization of 
                                                                Microfinance (Michael Chu & Jean 
                                                                Steege Hazell), 2008. 
8/20/2008    5:30 ‐        Presentations of Group Projects    
             9:00 

*Note:  All times are in Pacific Standard Time (PST), which is two hours earlier than CST.  
In sum, if this reads “5:00” then this means 5:00 PM in San Diego, which would be 7:00 (or 
19:00) in Guadalajara.  All times are PM (afternoon or evening), unless otherwise specified.




                                                                                                6

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:10
posted:7/31/2011
language:English
pages:6