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Running Club Handbook April 30th_ 2011 - Beregszasz Wine Country

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Running Club Handbook April 30th_ 2011 - Beregszasz Wine Country Powered By Docstoc
					Running Club Handbook
    April 30th, 2011
Table of Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS.........................................................................................................................................2
CREATING A RUNNING CLUB.............................................................................................................................3
  PARTICIPANT RECRUITMENT............................................................................................................................................ 3
  ROLE OF THE CLUB LEADER............................................................................................................................................ 3
RUNNING PLAN FOR FIRST-TIME RUNNERS.......................................................................................................4
HALF MARATHON AND 10K TRAINING PLANS...................................................................................................5
  BEGINNER’S 10K PLAN................................................................................................................................................ 5
  INTERMEDIATE 10K PLAN.............................................................................................................................................. 6
  ADVANCED 10K........................................................................................................................................................ 7
  BEGINNER’S HALF MARATHON PLAN................................................................................................................................ 8
  INTERMEDIATE HALF MARATHON PLAN.............................................................................................................................. 9
  ADVANCED HALF MARATHON ...................................................................................................................................... 10
NUTRITION......................................................................................................................................................12
  WATER HYDRATION................................................................................................................................................... 12
  PROTEIN............................................................................................................................................................... 12
  CARBOHYDRATES...................................................................................................................................................... 12
  WHAT SHOULD A RUNNER EAT?................................................................................................................................... 13
FITNESS...........................................................................................................................................................14
   CROSS-TRAINING..................................................................................................................................................... 14
   INJURY PREVENTION/TREATMENT................................................................................................................................... 14
FAQS...............................................................................................................................................................17
  STARTING OUT.................................................................................................................................................. 17
  AILMENTS AND ISSUES..................................................................................................................................... 18




                                                                                                                                                                        2
Creating a Running Club
“I run because it always takes me where I want to go”
                                    -Dean Karnazes

Running is a tremendous sport, one with positive, long lasting health benefits for the human body.
Through running, people are able to develop their mind and body, finding the resolve to push
through adversity and realize their potential. Unfortunately, here in Ukraine running is
uncommon.

This guide is designed to provide Peace Corps volunteers with the information necessary to start
and lead a running club in their community. We hope that by educating community members
about running and engaging them in the sport, the prevalence of running will increase in Ukraine,
along with its health benefits.


Participant Recruitment
Your first step should be to ask around to see if you can find interested candidates. These could
be people you work with, members of organizations that you have developed, or acquaintances
you have made where you live.

- Run yourself. Interested community members may approach you.
- Ask school sports teachers to announce your club particulars to 10 th and 11th graders.
- Post information about the club around the community


Role of the Club Leader
The role of the club leader is to coordinate, empower, monitor and motivate club runners.

Coordinate – Information sessions, meeting location and time, distance and route, pace, pre and
post run stretches

Empower –Educate runners on all aspects of running so that they may make informed decisions
about their health, streches, cross trining, pace, distance, etc.

Monitor – monitor the progress of the group; monitor runners moral, participation, runners’
health, etc. and address as necessary.

Motivate- Make runs fun. If you know why people are running you may use this to help motivate
them…are they running for health, for social interaction, to practice their English, etc.
Running Plan for First-time Runners
"The miracle isn't that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to start."
                                                                        - John Bingham

Running is often regarded as a difficult sport, so to begin running may be an intimidating feat for
people who have never done so before. Others may have an initial interest but find their
enthusiasm quickly waned after attempting a long run that leaves them sore, tired, and defeated.
The key for any new runner is to begin small; if you have never run before, you need to prepare
your body for the ability to do so.

The following plan is designed to enable you to run for half an hour after 6 weeks, but if you feel
like you are capable of increasing time, do so and adjust your plan to the correlating week. Make
sure that you are running at a comfortable pace: not too difficult but with an elevated heart rate.
Try to do these exercises at least 3-4 times a week.
Week 1- Walk for 5 minutes, and then run for 2 minutes. Repeat this exercise 3 times.


Week 2- Walk for 3 minutes, and then run for 4 minutes. Repeat this exercise 4 times.


Week 3- Walk for 2 minutes, and then run for 6 minutes. Repeat this exercise 4 times.


Week 4- Walk for 2 minutes, and then run for 8 minutes. Repeat this exercise 3 times.


Week 5- Walk for 2 minutes, and then run for 10 minutes. Repeat this exercise 3 times.


Week 6- For the first run of the week, try to run for 15 minutes without stopping. Increase it by 5 minutes every day
so that on your fourth run for week 6, you run a full 30 minutes. Walk 5 minutes before and after each exercise.


This plan should enable you to start running a distance of about 5 kilometers. Hopefully, if you are
dedicated enough to continue running at this point, you should gradually be able to increase the
distance you run with time.




                                                                                                                        4
Half Marathon and 10k Training Plans
"The will to win means nothing without the will to prepare."
                          -Juma Ikangaa, 1989 NYC Marathon winner




Beginner’s 10k Plan

The Beginner’s Program is designed for people that are new to the sport of running, but are able
to run at least a few kilometers. As a Beginner, your goal should be to complete the race, and your
training plan is aimed at preparing you for the level of fitness required to do this.
As a beginner, your plan should consist of building your endurance to the point of being able to
run the 10 kilometers. If you can handle running this distance, practices are included in the
Intermediate and Advanced levels, which aim at shorting the amount of time it takes you to
complete the race.


WEEK Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday                       Saturday   Sunday
                     30 minute                                       40 min
 1    Rest    4k run           6k run   Rest                                    5k run
                        run                                            run
                     30 minute                                       40 min
 2    Rest    4k run           6k run   Rest                                   5.5k run
                        run                                            run
                     35 minute                                       50 min
 3    Rest    4k run           6k run   Rest                                    6k run
                        run                                            run
     Optional        35 minute                                       50 min
 4            5k run           6k run   Rest                                    6k run
      Run               run                                            run
     Optional        40 minute                                       60 min
 5            5k run           6k run   Rest                                    7k run
      Run               run                                            run
     Optional        40 minute                                       60 min
 6            5k run           6k run   Rest                                    8k run
      Run               run                                            run
                     45 minute                                       60 min
 7    Rest    5k run           6k run   Rest                                    6k run
                        run                                            run
                     30 minute
 8    Rest    5k run           6k run   Rest                         Rest      10k Race
                        run
Intermediate 10k Plan

The Intermediate 10k Program introduces the concept of speed work, or exercise aimed at
increasing your ability to run faster, thereby decreasing the time it takes to run the race. The plan
is also designed to prepare you for running 10 kilometers, so the plan is a mix of endurance and
speed. You should be able to manage running the distance of the race to begin this plan.


       WEEK Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
                            35 min                   60 minute
        1   5k run  5k run            6k run   Rest            6.5k run
                            Tempo                       run
                            8 x 400                  60 minute
        2   5k run 5.5k run           6k run   Rest             8k run
                            sprints                     run
                            40 min                   60 minute
        3   5k run 6.5k run           6k run   Rest            9.5k run
                             tempo                      run
                            9 x 400
        4   5k run  7k run            6k run 3k Run Rest       5k Race
                            sprints
                            45 min                   60 minute
        5   5k run  8k run            6k run   Rest            9.5k run
                             tempo                      run
                                       10 x 400                        60 minute
          6     5k run     9k run                    6k run     Rest                 11k run
                                        sprints                           run
                                      50 minute                        60 minute
          7     5k run    9.5k run                   6k run     Rest                 13k run
                                       tempo                              run
                                       5 x 400
          8     5k run     5k run                    2k run     Rest      Rest      10k Race
                                       sprints




                                                                                                    6
Advanced 10k

Advanced 10k is designed for you to competitively run your race, and complete 10 kilometers
with a personal record. Speed work is the main part of this plan, as it is one of the key
components to your performance, since you will be competitively pacing yourself the entire time.
This program is very difficult, and requires specific focus on your timing and dedication to
improve.

       WEEK Monday Tuesday         Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday            Sunday
                      30
                                    6 x 400 m                Rest 8k total,
        1   5k run  minute                         5k run                        9.5k run
                                     sprints                 or 5k 3k pace
                     run
                      40
                                    7 x 400 m                Rest    8k total,
        2   5k run  minute                        6.5k run                        11k run
                                      sprints                or 5k   3k pace
                     run
                      50
                                    8 x 400 m                Rest    8k total,
        3   5k run  minute                         8k run                        13k run
                                      sprints                or 5k   5k pace
                     run
                      30
                                    9 x 400 m                Rest
        4   5k run  minute                         5k run             Rest       5k Race
                                      sprints                or 5k
                     run
                      50
                                   10 x 400 m                Rest 9.5k total,
        5   5k run  minute                        9.5k run                       13k run
                                     sprints                 or 5k 5k pace
                     run
                      30
                                    11 x 400 m               Rest
        6   5k run  minute                         5k run             Rest       8k Race
                                      sprints                or 5k
                     run
                      60
                                   12 x 400 m                Rest 9.5k total,
        7   5k run  minute                        9.5k run                       13k run
                                     sprints                 or 5k 5k pace
                     run
                      30
                                    6 x 400 m                Rest
        8   5k run  minute                         5k run             Rest       10k Race
                                      sprints                or 2k
                     run
Beginner’s Half Marathon Plan

The Beginner’s Program is designed for people that have never run a Half Marathon before. As a
Beginner, your goal should be to complete the race; any lofty aspirations of completion within a
set time should be reserved for the higher level programs as running 21 kilometers is an arduous
task if you have never done it before. If you are a regimented runner and have managed running
distances of more than 10 kilometers, you should consider the Intermediate Level.

WEEK Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday                    Sunday
                                               30 min
 1    Rest   5k run  3k run    5k run   Rest                              6.5k run
                                                 run
                                               30 min
 2    Rest   5k run   3k run   5k run   Rest                              6.5k run
                                                 run
                                               40 min
 3    Rest 5.5k run   3k run  5.5k run Rest                                8k run
                                                 run
                                               40 min
 4    Rest 6.5k run   3k run  6.5k run Rest                               9.5k run
                                                 run
                                               50 min
 5    Rest   7k run   5k run   7k run   Rest                              11k run
                                                 run
                                               60 min
 6    Rest   8k run   5k run   8k run   Rest                              13k run
                                                 run
                                               60 min
 7    Rest   8k run   5k run   8k run   Rest                              16k run
                                                 run
                                                                           Half
   8      Rest     6.5k run     5k run      3k run     Rest     Rest
                                                                         Marathon




                                                                                               8
Intermediate Half Marathon Plan

The Intermediate Half Marathon Plan also incorporates speed work, and combines running long
distances with interval training, which teaches you to increase your speed and maintain during
the race. While not as intense as the Advanced Plan, the Intermediate Plan is difficult and
requires dedication to complete.



      WEEK Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
                           5 x 400
       1    Rest   5k run            5k run   Rest   5k run    8k run
                           sprints
                           35 min
       2    Rest  5.5k run           5k run   Rest   5k run   11k run
                            tempo
                           7 x 400
       3    Rest   6k run            5k run   Rest 5k pace 13k run
                           sprints
                           8 x 400
       4    Rest   7k run            5k run   Rest 6.5k pace 15-K Run
                           sprints
                           40 min
       5    Rest   7k run            5k run   Rest 8k pace    16k run
                            tempo
                                     45 min
         6      Rest     8k run                   5k run    Rest    8k pace     18k run
                                     tempo
                                    10 x 400
         7      Rest     8k run                   5k run    Rest    5k pace     19k run
                                     sprints
                                     30 min                                     Half
         8      Rest     6k run                   3k run    Rest      Rest
                                     tempo                                    Marathon
Advanced Half Marathon

The Advanced Half Marathon plan is for runners who have little problem running the long
distance of 21 kilometers, and instead seek to competitively run the race and finish in as quick a
time as possible. Because endurance plays an important part in the half marathon, the plan still
requires you to run long distances, but incorporates many other training exercises to prepare
your body for your personal record. This plan is the most difficult to complete.


       WEEK Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday                  Saturday     Sunday
                    6 x 400           40 min
        1   5k run          5k run             Rest                    5k run    90 min run
                    sprints           tempo
                    7 x 400           45 min
        2   5k run          5k run             Rest                    5k pace 90 min run
                    sprints           tempo
                   8 x 400            40 min
        3   5k run          5k run             Rest                     5k run   90 min run
                    sprints           tempo
                   2 x 1600           45 min
        4   5k run          5k run             Rest                    5k pace 90 min run
                    sprints           tempo
                   3 x 1600           50 min
        5   5k run          5k run             Rest                    8k pace    1:45 run
                    sprints           tempo
                                               Rest
                    5 x 800           30 min     or
        6   5k run          5k run                                       Rest     2:00 run
                    sprints           tempo    easy
                                                run
                   4 x 1600           55 min
        7   5k run          5k run             Rest                    8k pace    2:00 run
                    sprints           tempo
                    6 x 400           30 min                                       Half
        8   5k run          5k run             Rest                      Rest
                    sprints           tempo                                      Marathon




                                                                                                 10
Nutrition
“Let your body tell you what it wants."
               - Joan Benoit Samuelson

As running is a sport that requires a lot from your body, Nutrition plays an important part in your
ability to be physically active. Like running, what you eat directly contributes to your physical
health, so it is important to eat healthy and avoid certain foods. The following is a list of things
that your body needs in order to be an active runner.


Hydration

Hydration is by far the most important thing you need to pay attention to while running, as it will
directly affect your running. Water, like oxygen, helps to carry nutrients to the muscles in the
body that a person uses while running to keep them operating normally. Insufficient water intake
leads to dehydration, fatigue, muscle cramping, and more serious illnesses such as heatstroke. It
is critical for you as a runner to stay hydrated and drink ample water throughout the day to avoid
injury and illness that dehydration brings.

It is important to mention that the water you need to be drinking is non-carbonated. Sparkling
water is not a good for an active body, as the gas in the bubbles actually absorbs the oxygen from
your lungs and bloodstream, which is harmful for runners. Drink plenty of clear, gas free water or
sports drinks, preventing over-hydration.


Protein

Protein is an equally important part of the runner’s diet. Protein is needed to build and repair
muscle tissue, and because runners are constantly using their muscles, they need the nutrients
provided by protein to do so. Meat is an excellent source of protein but try to avoid it if it is really
high in fat, as fat does little to provide nutrients. Instead, eat fish, chicken, and lean cuts of pork or
beef. Other great sources of protein are eggs, nuts, and beans.


Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are an ideal part of our diet, because they are digested by the body and turned to
glucose, a chemical in the body that provides an excellent source of energy. When talking about
carbohydrates, it is important to distinguish between the two types: quickly metabolized
carbohydrates, and slow digesting carbohydrates. Because these two carbohydrates affect the
body’s energy level in certain ways, runners should choose to eat specific kinds of foods with
specific carbohydrates to provide the most suitable form of energy. Slowly digested
carbohydrates, foods rich in fiber, help to keep you feeling energetic longer, as the energy level
progresses over time with the slow digestion.
What Should a Runner Eat?

A runner should, as well as all other people that seek to lead a healthy lifestyle, eat a diet of
healthy foods, containing decent amounts of protein to build their working muscles, slowly
digesting carbohydrates to provide energy, and small amounts of fat, which are important sources
of energy but are unhealthy in large quantities. A diet high in fruits and vegetables is good for the
body, as they contain many vitamins that your body needs to be active and are known to reduce
the risks of heart disease. Foods with high sugar and salt should be avoided, as they affect your
blood pressure and this may interfere with your running performance. Runners should avoid
things like candy, cakes, desserts, soft drinks, and sugar, things high in quickly metabolized
carbohydrates.

And, of course, a runner should always drink lots of water to help digestion and help nutrients
travel to other parts of the body.

A few tips:

- If you’re sore, try eating a banana. Potassium, a nutrient found in bananas, has been known to
help fight inflammation of the muscles and provide relief.

- Try and eat a little protein after a run. Studies show that a meal of protein eaten within 30
minutes after a run is the best time to help the body repair and build its muscles. A piece of
chicken, a hardboiled egg, and even a handful of nuts may be the key to helping you recuperate
after a difficult run.

- A glass of milk after a run is helpful. Besides containing vitamins like calcium, which strengthen
the bones you use in your legs to run, it also contains many minerals that the body sweats out
during a run, like magnesium. The amounts of protein in milk can also help repair muscles.




                                                                                                   12
Fitness
"Somewhere in the world someone is training when you are not"
 - Tom Fleming

Fitness, the state of good health and well-being, is the product of running, a natural result that
occurs from the long hours spent in exercise. The main bulk of a runner’s fitness stems from
running, but the key to a healthy, sustainable level of fitness results from other exercise and
practice as well. Besides a good diet, something mentioned in the nutrition section previously,
cross training and injury prevention/treatment are equally important if a runner is to stay fit.


Cross-Training

Cross Training is defined as any form of exercise or training that is utilized to improve your
overall sport performance and fitness. As a runner, cross training helps to build other muscles
you would not normally use while running, which offers overall support to the body and prevents
injury. Although cross training is included in some of the running plans by incorporating varying
exercises, the following are a few forms of cross training that may prove beneficial to your fitness.

One of the best forms of cross training for running is Cycling. Cycling builds your quadriceps
muscles, which are used during running, and also strengthens the tendons around your knee. It
also helps to increase your speed and endurance. Days spent riding a bicycle instead of running
might be the difference between a good race time and your personal record.

Swimming is also an excellent form of cross training. Swimming is an efficient form of
cardiovascular exercise, and uses nearly all of the muscles in the human body, including those
that aren’t used in running.

Situps and Pushups are an important part of cross training, and are sorely overlooked in the
running community. Pushups help to strengthen your shoulders, which keep your back straight
for good running posture, and arms, which naturally move in a pendulum motion while running
to maintain balance. Situps strengthen the abdominal muscles, which provide support to the
spine and lower back to relieve tension. A few sets of situps and pushups every day can help a
runner to perform as best as they can.


Injury Prevention/Treatment

Injury Prevention plays an important part in a runner’s ability to stay fit. Like all sports, running
puts strain on the body, and on occasion injuries do occur. It is important to take steps to prevent
injury and keep the body healthy. If an injury does occur, the issue must be addressed accordingly.

- Stretching: Stretching is an essential part of running, but many people neglect to do it.
Stretching helps prevent injury, cramping, muscular fatigue, and increases muscle efficiency and
movement as well as stride length. Stretching should be performed before and after one's run.
Because muscles are cold and tight before a run, dynamic stretching is recommended. It is
stretching utilizing momentum from form to improve range of motion, increasing heart rate while
loosening up muscles. Static stretching, holding a muscle in an elongated, fixed position for 30
seconds or more, is good for after a run and can be also done for pre-race stretching if done 5-10
minutes into one's run. It is especially important to stretch after a run to remove the lactic acid
buildup in one's legs.

Ten minutes of stretching is ideal, and it is important to cover all the muscle groups in the leg:
quads, hamstrings, calves, groin, and hip flexors. For static stretching, holding each for 30 seconds
to a minute is best. Be sure not to overstretch; stretch until you feel slight discomfort, but not
pain. Stretch uniformly, that is everything you do to one leg you do to the other as well.

-Warm up: As it is often a shock for the body to immediately start participating physically, a
warm up is a great way to get your blood flowing and muscles moving so you can handle the
stress of exercise. Jumping jacks, pushups, and situps are great warmups, as is a few minutes of
walking. Like stretching, this eases the tension in your muscles.

-Cool down: A Cool down occurs after a run, and helps to prevent tension in the body that is
created during running. Stretching is an excellent cool down, as is walking a few minutes after
your run.

-Treatment: If you find yourself injured during a run, the first step is to STOP RUNNING. Do not
worry about whether or not you’re staying to your weekly schedule or if this will affect your
performance if you take a break, making an injury worse by pushing through obvious pain will
surely result in you spending much time away from the sport healing. If the injury feels muscle
related, adhere to the following method:

REST- Do not run. Until the injury COMPLETELY heals, you should not be running. The time spent
away from running depends directly on the injury.

ICE- Take a bag of ice, a pack of cold meat, or any super cooled grocery bag you can find, wrap it
in a towel, a put it directly on the area of pain. This helps to numb the pain, soothe the area, and
prevent inflammation.

COMPRESS- Compress the area of injury by wrapping it in a snug bandage. This will limit
swelling and internal bleeding, which will quicken the healing process.

ELEVATE- As the injury will probably be in your leg, try and raise the area above the level of your
heart. This will prevent blood from pooling in the area, which causes pain and swelling, which do
little to hasten your healing process. The best way to elevate an injury leg is to lie on your back in
bed with a pillow propped under your injured leg, which immediately raises it above your heart.

This method, referred to as the R.I.C.E method in the running community, is the most accepted way
of healing a muscle.

                                                                                                       14
If you receive a common bone injury, like shin splints, in running the only appropriate way to heal such
an injury is time. Do not run, and give your bones time to repair. Stretching at this time is advisable, as
it is helps increase blood flow and is a quick way to see if you are fully healed.

*Note* We are not accredited doctors, and any tips offered on injury treatment are merely advice. If
you are injured during running, you should consult a doctor.
FAQs
Now, if you are going to win any battle you have to do one thing. You have to make the mind
run the body.
           -General George S. Patton

Because starting a Running Club in Ukraine may present a complex feat, this FAQ will serve as a
source of answers for many questions you may have during the creation of your Running Club.


STARTING OUT

Q: Who should I ask to go running with me?
A: Running is a sport. People engaged in living an active lifestyle or participating in sports are
usually ideal candidates, as they’re less likely to be opposed to trying such a rigorous sport. In
reality however, anyone is an ideal candidate. Ask your friends or local residents you’re familiar
with if they’re interested, or anyone you feel may be suited to the sport.

Q: How should I go about asking people if they want to go running?
A: If you’re nervous about asking complete strangers to go running with you, stick with people
you’ve already developed relationships with. These may be members of clubs or organizations
you have created over a period of time, co-workers you’re comfortable with, or host family
members and their acquaintances. It is usually much easier to ask people you know!

Q: Where should my group and I go running?
A: Running in Ukraine presents an interesting challenge because of the lack of facilities dedicated
to running. Also, because the standard for sidewalks is different within this country, it is not
assumable that taking a group of people running on the side of the road can be a safe option. If
you are interested in running long distances, it is important to find a safe, accessible area. Check
with locals on finding paths outside. Some areas have bike paths or even sidewalks, and these are
great options. A football field, stadium, and even a gymnasium are suitable alternatives to running
around town and may even be more viable options, as they are usually located within close
proximity to home.

Q: How should I monitor group progress?
A: Try to always keep a chart of individual and group progress. This doesn’t mean carrying
around a clipboard every time you go running; make a conscious effort to remember the progress
of your running group. Keep a journal to monitor progress and update it daily after each run,
writing down distances and times. It is a good idea to chart individual progress and group
progress, as both will help you to determine the next workout in your running plan.

Q: I have a group to go running. What do we do now?
A: You have the hardest part of the job done! The next step is to figure out a time and workout
plan for the entire group. Coordinate with your group when the best time to run during the day is,
and try to plan around their schedules. Next, assess everyone’s strength and weaknesses and plan
                                                                                                     16
accordingly. It is important to mention that since this is a Running Club, the workout plan should
accommodate the needs of the entire group. This includes making adjustments for slower
runners or picking up the pace if the majority is in need of a challenge. For people new to
organizing group plans, included within this handbook are plans designed for preparing for
upcoming races, and they serve as great examples for implementing a schedule.

Q: How can I be an effective, responsible running group leader?
A: Since you are the head of the group, you are responsible for everyone’s well-being. A running
leader should monitor the progress of the group, and also prepare for any incidents that may
occur. Bring a cell-phone in case of emergencies, or always make sure that one is present while
running. Bringing water for your group on a run is also a commendable effort, or at least be sure
that you have access to it if it is ever needed. The most important thing is to be cautious and alert.
Be rational in your planning and make sure that you are making your venture as fun and
responsible as possible. Encourage runners to bring their own water.


AILMENTS AND ISSUES

Q: Some of my runners are new and aren’t sure how to prepare for their first run. What should I
advise?
A: Running, unlike other sports only requires a few things. Encourage a new runner to wear
comfortable clothes: a pair of shorts and a t-shirt is good for the spring and summer, and a jacket,
a hoody, sweatpants, mittens or earmuffs, and track pants are all suitable options for the fall or
winter (although make sure the runner is adequately warm in cold weather). A good pair of shoes
and socks is key for running. Encourage the investment in a nice pair of running shoes, but if that
isn’t possible for the runner, make sure they have something adequate. A snug, comfortable shoe
that can lace up is important, and make sure that the sole has traction and is supportive enough
but also able to bend near where the toes are located.

Q: Some of my members are having problems with motivation. What should I do?
A: Be persistent. Developing a stable running pattern is often the most difficult part for most
runners. Expect a few interests to wane at the start of running. Some people will not be able to
handle running at first and want to quit. This is a normal part of developing a running group.
While you will ultimately lose a few runners, encourage discouraged runners to continue training.
Assure them that it will be rewarding in the long run. If you need to, adjust the time or running
plan set during the day and be flexible so that the runner will feel at ease, as this show of support
can help motivate the runner to continue.

Q: The weather is terrible today, the running path we picked is a disaster, and some of us are having
problems staying upbeat. What should we do?
A: Sometimes the conditions that you run in are not ideal, and this may cause you to consider
quitting for the day. It is the responsible thing to err on the side of caution; if a storm is truly
terrible and you risk getting lost on a run because of the path, a viable option is to quit. The
important thing to remember though is that Running should be fun. Consider changing the
running plan for the day, and even incorporate these problematic elements to ensure that your
group has a good time. Have you ever considered running in a bathing suit during the rain? If
you’re path is horrible, can you turn it into a game, taking turns jumping over the potholes and
running sprints through the grass? Make the best of every situation, and it may just become an
advantage.

Q: One of my runner’s is lagging behind. Others are running ahead. What should I do?
A: Since all runners will usually have a different running level, you’re bound to run into this
problem quite often. A running club needs to run together, and this is the most important part of
the group dynamic. Make sure the group keeps the same pace, and ask the faster runners to be
supportive of the slower ones. Nothing helps a runner more than the kind, encouraging words of
a fellow runner.

Q: Some of my runners are complaining that the running plan isn’t enough for them. How can I
make sure everyone is getting enough of a run in?
A: If you have some super motivated runners that are progressing past your workout plan,
congratulations on getting people passionate about the sport! As far as the plan goes, make sure
that you are doing two things: Keep the energetic athletes from over exerting themselves. Make
sure that they’re not working out to the point where they could injure themselves. If they do need
to get a little more in, suggest to them that they can continue to run after the end of the workout.
This way, they still participate in the group work out and get in that extra work.

Q: One of my runners doesn’t feel well. What should I do?
A: Stop running immediately. Check and make sure that the runner is coherent and that his body
temperature isn’t too high. Nausea and unresponsiveness are the first indicators of being
overheated. Get the runner some water to drink as soon as possible. If your runner does appear
to be fine, it is possible that he or she is simply having a hard time with the run, and an easy
solution to this is to slow your pace or adjust the workout plan.

The issue may stem from being out of breath or sore. This will probably be the most common
issue you will face. Find a balance; you don’t want to slow the entire group if it’s possible for the
runner to work through what might be a brief, difficult moment, but you don’t want to cause
injury by overexerting them. Assess the situation and make the most rational decision.

Q: One of my runners suffered an injury. What do I do?
A: Again, stop running immediately. If a runner does complain of pain, then you should always be
cautious. If it’s a sprain or a muscle pull, the important thing is to get the runner off of the injured
area. Escort them back home for first aid, or call for help if you need to. For first aid, consult the
Injury Prevention/Treatment section of this handbook.

Remember, as the leader of the running club, you are responsible for the well-being for your
group. If you do see injuries start to occur, consider this: are you pushing the group too hard? Is
your running environment suitable? Are you taking your group’s needs into consideration
effectively? Remember, your goal is to also show that running can be a fun, rewarding experience,
so take this into account.



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