Nike_ INC

Document Sample
Nike_ INC Powered By Docstoc
					 




                                                                                        
Nike, INC. 
Nike is the largest footwear company in the world selling footwear, apparel, 
equipment through an estimated 25,000 retailers.  As a stable, yet fast growing 
company Nike is being punished due to the recent market conditions.  The 
portfolio is in an excellent position to increase its stake in both a premium brand 
and undervalued company by selling shares of SBUX, which is currently perceived 
by the market as a much less stable brand with a much longer and treacherous 
recovery ahead.     

 




Eric Dwyer                   HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


 


Contents 
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3 
Company Structure ....................................................................................................................................... 3 
    Products and Markets............................................................................................................................... 3 
       Apparel.................................................................................................................................................. 4 
       Footwear ............................................................................................................................................... 5 
       Equipment............................................................................................................................................. 6 
       Subsidiaries ........................................................................................................................................... 6 
       Markets ................................................................................................................................................. 7 
    Production and Distribution ..................................................................................................................... 8 
    R & D ......................................................................................................................................................... 8 
    Life Cycle/Company Strategy .................................................................................................................... 9 
    Competitive environment......................................................................................................................... 9 
    SWOT ...................................................................................................................................................... 10 
       Strengths ............................................................................................................................................. 10 
       Weaknesses ........................................................................................................................................ 11 
       Opportunities ...................................................................................................................................... 11 
       Threats ................................................................................................................................................ 12 
    Capital Expenditures ............................................................................................................................... 12 
    Other Considerations .............................................................................................................................. 12 
    Relevant Financial Data........................................................................................................................... 13 
Future Trends.............................................................................................................................................. 17 
Valuations ................................................................................................................................................... 18 
    Relative Valuation ................................................................................................................................... 18 
    FCF Valuation .......................................................................................................................................... 18 
Summary ..................................................................................................................................................... 21 
 

 




Eric Dwyer                                              HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


Introduction 
Nike Inc is involved with the design, development and marketing of athletic equipment, apparel, and 
footwear throughout the world.  As the world’s largest seller of athletic footwear and apparel, Nike is 
one of the most recognizable brands in the world.   


Company Structure 
As of 2006, the Nike brand started to ‘re‐align’ its business from a divisional focus to a category focus, 
which means instead of having three main divisions (footwear, equipment and apparel), the company is 
actually organized into six athletic divisions “running, basketball, soccer, women's fitness, men's 
training, and sport culture”1.  However, these six divisions are not separated or discussed as separate 
entities in any of the current financial reporting provided by the company, so this analysis primarily 
focuses on the divisions, however the category re‐alignment is important for Nike in the long‐term, so 
additional references to this re‐alignment are throughout the analysis. 

Products and Markets 
 




                                                                                                                  
                                                    Figure 1 ‐ Global revenue distribution between divisions2 

Globally, Nike’s primary source of revenue is footwear, making up 60% of revenue provided by the 
primary business lines.  This percentage is fairly consistent globally, although there is some variation 
between the regions as seen by the figures below. 




                                                            
1
     http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/feb2007/db20070206_233170.htm 
2
     http://invest.nike.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=100529&p=irol‐finReporting 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 




                                                                                                                 




                                                                           

Apparel 
According to S&P Net Advantage, the global athletic apparel market “totals over $100 billion”3 and 
Eurometer’s World clothing report reports the global clothing market at over $850 Billion as of 2006.  
With markets that size it is no surprise there are a myriad of competitors within the clothing and more 
specifically the athletically‐inspired clothing industry.  Counter‐intuitively, only 30% of athletic apparel 
goods are bought with the intent of actually doing something athletic4, so it’s is no wonder that Nike has 
widened its net outside the hardcore athletes.  To this end the athletic consumer has been updated to 
include the layperson and according to one of Nike’s maxim “If you have a body, you are an athlete.”5   

Ultimately, the multitude of competitors and shifting of fashion trends make it difficult for companies in 
the athletic apparel industry to achieve and maintain economies of scale simply from the production of 
a single product line.  This means Nike, like other players, generally have higher costs than other types of 
industries where products change less frequently (such as consumer durables).  Instead of achieving 
economies of scale by increased single product lines, Nike leverages its supply chain which is shared 
across all of the product lines to decrease total shared costs as total volume increase.  The company also 

                                                            
3
   
http://outlook.standardandpoors.com/NASApp/NetAdvantage/cp/companyOverView.do?TICKER=NKE&pc=NET&tr
acking=NET&auth=null 
4
   
http://outlook.standardandpoors.com/NASApp/NetAdvantage/cp/companyOverView.do?TICKER=NKE&pc=NET&tr
acking=NET&auth=null 
5
   http://www.nikebiz.com/company_overview/ 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


seems committed to a “…continued focus on lean manufacturing and product design that strives to 
eliminate waste.”6  This is not only done as a cost saving measure, but the company promotes this as a 
“green” initiative, especially when combined with the elimination of toxic chemicals from the 
manufacturing process7.  

Footwear 
According to Euromonitor International, the worldwide market for footwear is at least $172 Billion and 
should grow about 5.6%/year until 2011.  Women are the current force driving the market8, and overall 
it is a more casual market, focusing less on pure athletic goods, and more towards athletically‐inspired 
footwear.   

Within the footwear division there are several types of product being sold at retail. The so‐called 
“marquee” models such as the “Shox” or “AirMax” 360 typically found in high‐end specialty retailers and 
the more value‐driven cross‐training brands which are found in all kinds of retailers (such as Kohls).  
Within the marquee product line of shoes a major partner for Nike’s footwear business in the US is 
Footlocker.  Although Nike has had disputes with the retailer over pricing strategies9 which de‐valued 
marquee brands, the retailer currently represents approximately 9% of Nike’s business.  Conversely Nike 
is responsible for an estimated 50% of FoorLocker’s total sales, which makes Nike a critical business 
partner for the company.10  This marquee product line is a very high margin market segment for Nike 
and shoes typically retail for $120 or more.  This kind of high‐margin product is a signature of the Nike 
brand and may be especially vulnerable to consumer demand during a recession (although there is an 
almost cult‐like following for some limited edition shoes). 

In a recessionary environment, footwear is usually a purchase which can be deferred longer than other 
purchases such as apparel.  Many consumers have extra shoes in the closet and when consumers 
ultimately do turn to buy a pair of shoes, they may look more towards a cheaper cross‐trainer with 
standard “air” soles sold at a normal department store such as Kohl’s.  In contrast to better times when 
the same person would instead look to buy a high‐end shoe like a “Shox” or “AirMax 360” from Foot 
Locker.  However, Nike has significant brand advantage over other competitors, so if someone is only 
going to buy a single pair of shoes, Nike is almost certainly on the short list of options.  Just being at the 
top of the list when the consumer (or retailer) decides what to actually buy at retail is critical, since all of 
the marketing and effort put into getting the shoe to the shelf doesn’t matter if the consumer doesn’t 
ultimately purchase the product. 

The counties which have provided growth for Nike in the past may take a back seat in the future.  With 
slowing or even declining birth rates in developed countries, the number of feet requiring shoes is also 
declining; however a global player such as Nike is well‐positioned as an experienced global footwear 

                                                            
 
6
   Nike, INC. 2008 10‐K (pg 21) 
7
   http://www.nikebiz.com/responsibility/considered_design/index.html 
8
   http://www.portal.euromonitor.com.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/passport/ResultsList.aspx (Global Footwear Report) 
9
   http://articles.latimes.com/2003/feb/18/business/fi‐rup18.9 
10
    http://www.bizcovering.com/Business/The‐Distribution‐of‐Athletic‐Shoes.234111 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


brand to ramp up its marketing and sales efforts in emerging markets to take advantage of the faster‐
growing markets, such as South Africa, India, China, Brazil and Malaysia.  China especially is seen as a 
growth opportunity and as of August of 2007 had about 3000 “retail destinations”11.  The Beijing 
Olympics, although officially sponsored by Adidias, was a catalyst for the recognition of sports 
throughout the country and even after the completion of the games, the national pride generated from 
the gold medal count should help maintain growth above that of more developed markets like the US. 

Equipment 
In addition to footwear and apparel, Nike also sells sports‐related equipment. Equipment was the last 
division to be added to Nike and generally accounts for less than 10% of Nike’s total sales in any given 
region and only 7% globally.  According to a NPD report, in general, sports equipment is the slowest 
growing segment at only 2%; however the EMEA (Europe Middle East and Africa) region shows much 
higher growth rates than the global market (4%, primarily due to an increase in Bicycle equipment).   

Subsidiaries 
 “Wholly‐owned Nike subsidiaries include Cole Haan, which designs, markets and distributes luxury 
shoes, handbags, accessories and coats; Converse Inc., which designs, markets and distributes athletic 
footwear, apparel and accessories; Hurley International LLC, which designs, markets and distributes 
action sports and youth lifestyle footwear, apparel and accessories; and Umbro Ltd., a leading United 
Kingdom‐based global football (soccer) brand.”12   Nike’s subsidiary companies account for 
approximately 14% of global revenue.   

These subsidiaries, along with a general globalization strategy, are a key driver for Nike’s continued 
growth.  The pure athletically‐driven markets are fairly saturated and losing favor with consumers.  The 
acquisition of subsidiary brands by Nike allows it to compete across different market segments with 
different brands while maintaining the core Nike brand for marquee sports product and sport‐inspired 
designs.  The general decline of the pure athletic market has driven the increase of more casual and 
sport‐inspired value shoes13 (both in products sold through the subsidiary companies and the Nike 
brand).  A recent example of this brand differentiation is the partnership of Nike and JC Penny to sell the 
Converse brand inside JC Penny stores14.   

Although no future purchases have been announced, one possible strategy for a strong performing 
company like Nike during a recession is to purchase brands which have been hit hard by over leveraging 
and poor financial discipline.  It has even been suggested (by Cramer) that Nike should purchase Under 
Armor now that UA is trading at a relative discount15 (compared to past valuations).  After purchasing 
quality or up and coming brands at a discount, Nike can roll them into the existing product creation 
footprint and supply chain developed for the existing Nike product and immediately lower costs through 
superior operational discipline and purchasing power.  (This analyst feels that it is unlikely that Nike will 

                                                            
11
    http://www.nikebiz.com/media/pr/2007/08/3_beijing.html 
12
    http://invest.nike.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=100529&p=irol‐newsArticle&ID=1201810&highlight= 
13
    http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/feb2007/id20070227_004086.htm 
14
    http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2008/11/10/daily28.html?ana=from_rss 
15
    http://www.thestreet.com/video/10433520/cramer‐nike‐is‐running‐strong.html 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


purchase UA, as Nike has a very competitive culture16 which would rather compete head to head and 
drive the company out of business.) 

Markets 
 




                                                                                                             
                                                               Figure 2 ‐ Revenue distribution by region 

Nike operates globally and divides it sales into four major regions.  

       •      Asia Pacific (Including Australia) 
       •      Americas (Including Canada, Mexico and South America) 
       •      EMEA (Europe, Middle‐East and Africa) 
       •      US (United States) 

Across the three major divisions of Nike, the largest single market share is the US ($6,414.5), although 
the majority of business is actually generated outside of the US.  Approximately 60% of total revenue is 
generated outside the US ($9,681.5).  The bulk of Nike’s major expansion opportunities are also outside 
the US, with potential “Billion dollar markets” being Russia, India and Brazil17.  Nike has been a 
beneficiary of positive current exchange rates due to a weakening dollar.  Operating in so many 
countries does leave Nike vulnerable to weakening foreign currencies and a strengthening dollar, which 
is a common risk for globalized companies.  Currency valuations may be a business risk, but there is little 
evidence that Nike will stop expanding into not only these potential billion dollar markets, but any other 
market which offers significant growth potential. 

 

                                                            
16
      http://www.zenentrepreneur.com/blog/2008/11/stanford‐business‐entry‐14‐nike‐paccar.html 
17
      http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/feb2007/db20070206_233170.htm 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


 

Production and Distribution 
Neither Nike nor its subsidiaries have significant manufacturing capabilities, which is common amongst 
many apparel companies.  Nearly all of its manufacturing capability is outsourced outside the US, and all 
products sold within the US are imported.  Nike recently divested its US and Americas distribution 
capacity from Wilsonville, OR, choosing to build a new facility in Memphis, TN where it previously had a 
smaller facility.  This was a cost‐saving effort, but it did increase PPE and is one of the few facilities which 
Nike owns instead of leasing.   

Nike strategy relies on its supply chain, along with relative economies of scale (compared to industry 
peers), to decrease costs and increase margins.  Orders are taken through several channels, including 
Nike’s ‘futures’ program, at‐once and replenishment orders.  The futures program essentially has 
retailers place orders for product ahead of the product’s actual production, which among other things, 
allows Nike to better forecast and plan for product demand.  From the retailer’s perspective, they 
receive discounts for using the futures program as well as a guarantee that they will have 90% of 
requested amount of product delivered on‐time.  According to Nike’s 2008 10‐K, “Worldwide futures 
and advance orders for NIKE brand athletic footwear and apparel, scheduled for delivery from June 
through November 2008, were $8.8 billion compared to $7.7 billion for the same period last year.”   

In addition to retail channels such as specialty footwear and department stores, Nike also has a retail 
branch which provides the ability to capture full retail pricing on its product instead of selling wholesale 
to retailers.  Closely related is Nike’s online sales which sell directly to consumers through sites such as 
Nike.com, swoosh.com and nikeid.com.  According to the 10‐K there are about 25,000 retail outlets for 
the Nike brand with 296 Nike‐owned US stores and 260 Nike‐owned stores outside the US. 

R & D 
Nike takes R &D seriously, employing “biomechanics, exercise physiology, engineering, industrial design 
and related fields” within the innovation kitchen.  New products are developed and regularly tested by 
internal and external product testers, including professional athletes and amateurs.  Many of the 
company’s innovations are incremental in nature, and the creation of fabrics which ‘wick’ water from 
the skin and allow better cooling are some of the more recent industry trends.  The company “Under 
Armour” actually took compression/wicking fabric and did a much more effective job marketing it within 
the US football industry (for footpall players by a former player), which effectively launched the 
company18.   

Other innovations include the Nike “Free”, “Air Max 360”, “Shox” Shoes along with “Dry‐Fit” and 
“Sphere” apparel materials.  These marquee products are meant to elevate the brands premium 
presence, not only to sell the high margin marquee product, but also to drive the sales of the more 
value‐driven goods through brand association.  The Nike brand needs to be seen as the innovator in the 
sports footwear and apparel market in order to maintain its brand allure.  Which means, not only do 

                                                            
18
      http://investor.underarmour.com/index.cfm 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


these marquee brands serve to provide Nike high margins though the marquee shoe sales, they also 
provide the platform for Nike’s future growth.  Today’s marquee shoe will eventually be sold as 
tomorrows ‘value’ shoe.  A prime example of this is Nike “Air”.  The “Air” product is now standard in the 
most basic show design, which “Air” insoles even making cross‐brand appearances in Nike’s luxury 
subsidiary brand “Cole Haan”.   

Life Cycle/Company Strategy 
Although the company enjoys good organic growth opportunities, it is definitely in the mature growth 
stage.  To counter this, Nike has increasingly turned to acquiring brands both for inorganic growth, and 
to allow the company to compete on different levels in the industry.  For example, the Converse brand is 
generally used as a more value‐oriented brand, positioned in discount retailers such as Target and JC 
Penny’s.  Through this type of brand portfolio use, Nike is able to sell in discount retailers, increasing 
growth and ultimately revenues without fear of discounting the core Nike brand.    

The company’s track record is generally favorable with its acquisitions, with exceptions including the 
relatively recent sales of Bauer (April 2008) and Starter brands (Dec 2007).  Not all portfolio acquisitions 
have been extremely successful for Nike, so future purchases must be examined carefully before an 
analyst can assume the purchase will be a significant growth driver for the company.  For example, 
Bauer was sold for $200M after being purchased in 1995 for $409M19.  Although hockey seemed like a 
hot market at the time, the market softened and a re‐evaluation of the brand found that Bauer was 
primarily in a North American position, not becoming a global growth driver.  This geographic limitation 
and slow growth ultimately lead to Nike selling the company to focus on faster growing global sports 
markets20. 

Cole Haan, Converse, Exeter Brands Group, Hurley, Umbro, NIKE Bauer Hockey (which sold in April, 
2008) and NIKE Golf accounted for approximately 14 percent of total revenues.  The subsidiary 
companies will probably grow at a faster rate than the Nike brand, but the company expects the bulk of 
revenue increases to be from the Nike brand through the category re‐alignment and increases in the 
direct to consumer market.  China will be a significant player for this category growth.  For example, 
“some 50 million kids between the ages of 10 and 19 have begun playing basketball”, which means an 
additional 50 million kids who will need athletic shoes to play in. 21 

Competitive environment 
The competition for apparel and footwear is diverse, as there are many niche players and segments to 
the market.  Nike primarily focuses on the global athletic market, but also markets to the sport‐inspired 
casual, or sport culture market.  However, as part of the ever‐increasing brand/subsidiary management, 
Nike also leverages its brands to do business in different markets.  For example, through its Cole Haan 
brand, Nike competes in the luxury footwear and accessory market (similar to Coach).  The Converse 
                                                            
19
    http://portland.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2008/04/14/daily42.html 
20
    http://www.forbes.com/afxnewslimited/feeds/afx/2008/02/21/afx4682770.html 
21
    
http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2007/02/12/story8.html?q=nike%20subsidiary%20brand%20strateg
y 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


brand is used as a more value‐oriented brand, while finally the Nike brand is the “marquee” athletic 
brand, which sells the highest margin athletic shoes such as the “Jordan”, “Shox” and “Air Max 360”.   

With the exception of some very high‐end products, most footwear and apparel has the same general 
function, which is essentially why Nike is able to contract with factories to produce product (factories in 
Asia are often shared with competing companies like Adidas22).  With this type of un‐differentiated 
product, ultimately the real differentiator is simply the self‐image which is bestowed upon the consumer 
when wearing a branded product.  To this end, while the management of a brand within a market is 
critical for any company, it is especially critical for Nike.  Although Nike’s products also have real utility, 
much of the allure of the Nike brand is an image‐based for the consumer.  When a premium brand is no 
longer seen as such, there is no motivation for the consumer to pay a premium for the product and Nike 
will be vulnerable.   

SWOT 
Strengths 
Brand Recognition – The swoosh is one of the most recognizable brands in the world, which provides 
significant advantage for Nike in terms of retail placement.  The brand awareness works both ways.  If 
consumers are simply asked to name shoe companies, there is a very good chance that Nike will be on 
that list.  This means that when the consumer is looking for shoes or other athletic goods, the Nike 
brand is at the top of their mental list.   

Supply Chain Excellence ‐ Nike purchases from 700 factories and delivers product to about 25,000 retail 
outlets, developing new product with each season. That takes a lot of IT resources and a significant 
investment in a supply chain.  AMR Research recently ranked Nike 15 on the list of top 25 supply chains, 
placing them with companies like Apple, Dell, Wal‐Mart and Best Buy23.  This was based on a formula 
including ROA, inventory turns, and revenue growth as well as peer and research opinions. 

Marketing Excellence – Athletic stars such as Tiger Woods and LeBron James lead the way in terms of 
Nike’s celebrity appeal, but Nike is world‐renowned for its marketing campaigns.  This level of 
professional athletic and celebrity endorsement is expected by the Nike consumer, so the inability of 
Nike to get the next marquee player may have a detrimental effect on the brand.   

Design Excellence – New technology such as the ‘Shox’ provide Nike patented designs which are a 
competitive advantage for the company. Nike aggressively manages the brand and also protects it 
portfolio of patents.  As an example, Nike is currently in litigation with the retail giant WalMart for 
patent infringement on Nike’s “Shox” line of products24 which Nike feels too closes resemble the real 
thing. 

Quality Products – When premier professional athletes choose to use a product, the ‘normal’ consumer 
tends to consider that a good sign.  The sheer number of athletes does not seem to be as important as 
                                                            
22
    Nike Culture the Sign of the Swoosh, Robert Goldman, Stephen Papson, SAGE, 2000, p9 
23
    http://www.amrresearch.com/supplychaintop25/default.asp 
24
    http://www.reuters.com/article/hotStocksNews/idUSTRE49F5GA20081016 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


the quality of the athlete sponsored25, which may be why Nike does not choose to be the ‘official 
sponsor’ for events (like the 2008 Olympics).  Even professional athletes are people, and if the 
teammates of LeBron James thinks that Nike products are providing an advantage for LeBron, they may 
choose Nike just like the average consumer, trying to emulate the most successful professional athlete 
as well (especially if they are not under a specific endorsement contract). 

Brand  portfolio (through subsidiary companies) – This allows Nike to compete in channels which are 
not typically ‘athletic’ in nature.  It also allows Nike to complete in different market segments (such as 
the value and luxury segments). 

Weaknesses 
Generally seen Athletic‐Only brand, making the Nike brand relatively weak in the casual and formal 
markets (one of the reasons why the Brand Portfolio is important to the company). 

Subject to foreign currency valuations due to global market presence. 

Mature brand and industry ‐ Large company difficult to change quickly with consumer desire. 

Opportunities 
Developing Countries have developed an increased need for shoes both through population growth and 
a rising middle class in India and China.  This presents a great market opportunity as the middle class 
begins to do more middle class activities, including shopping for brands which have not traditionally 
been affordable or available in the market.  To gain credibility and brand recognition in India, Nike 
sponsored the national cricket team with great success.  In China, Nike is pursuing similar strategies of 
sponsoring local “athletic federations and key Chinese athletes”26.  This local sponsorship strategy 
combined with a dramatic retail presence increase (“the company [Nike] has been opening stores on a
            27
daily basis” ) provides Nike standing within the country and the ability to simply sell product to 
consumers.  These strategies combine to position Nike to take advantage of growth opportunities in 
these countries. 

Increased “Sport Inspired” shoe and apparel designs should provide the company a bridge to the people 
who want to look like a professional athlete, even if they don’t have the ability to perform at the same 
level.  Also Nike should be able to capitalize on the casual market, as it is seen as acceptable to wear 
sporty clothes casually. 

Consolidation of industry players through acquisition.  If a solid brand is not performing financially, Nike 
has the ability (through working capital and cash‐reserves) to purchase and develop the brand within its 
portfolio in order to compete more effectively.  




                                                            
25
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25690584/ 
26
    http://www.forbes.com/markets/2007/02/07/nike‐earnings‐china‐markets‐equity‐cx_mw_0207markets09.html 
27
    http://www.reuters.com/article/reutersEdge/idUSN1932948120080820 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


Threats 
Protracted Recession would not bode well for Nike, as consumers may start to look at alternative 
brands and then not come back to Nike when times are better.  Additionally, Nike is seen as a ‘luxury’ 
brand by many, so when times are bad these luxury items will not do as well. 

Eroding Brand Loyalty as consumers get ‘tired’ of the same name, or even consciously turn away from 
the brand in order to be a ‘rebel’ or against ‘the man’.  (Example here might be a ‘Goth’ kid or someone 
who wants to support local brands for eco‐reasons.)  Erosion could also occur though a loss of the 
‘sneaker culture’28. 

Loss of Celebrity Endorsements would mean eroding brand loyalty and a reduction of marketing 
exposure for the company.  Since the Nike brand is what is really being sold, celebrity endorsements are 
critical to keep the brand in the media eye. 

Counterfeit Products are a major issue for Nike and other premium brands.  In some cases the same 
contract factories making ‘real’ Nike’s by night may be making counterfeit products in an off‐shift.  
Other times fake shoes are designed from an inappropriately released (or stolen) shoe picture (as an 
example, these can be spotted when only one side of the shoe is a perfect counterfeit29). 

Corporate responsibility & factory/contract labor has been an issue for Nike in the past and may be an 
issue again.  Anything that negatively impacts the brand is a serious concern for the company. 

Decline of sport relevance to youth through decline of sports participation30 means that fewer kids will 
grow up wearing and wanting athletic (or athletically‐inspired) shoes, equipment and apparel. 

Capital Expenditures 
Capital expenditures in the form of long‐term debt for Nike are extremely limited.  Almost all of Nike’s 
Capital Expenditures are funded by internally generated cash flow and the company carries almost no 
long‐term debt on its balance sheet. The balance sheet currently has about $441M in long‐term debt.  
Instead of long‐term debt and land purchases, Nike typically utilizes off‐balance sheet operating leasing; 
including all retail stores and most buildings except the US and EMEA headquarters.  The total obligation 
for all operating leases is about $1.854B, with $300M of that due in 2009.  There have been no 
announcements for major capital expenditures, and the most recent PPE was a new distribution center 
in Memphis, TN.  This $107M31  facility is replacing the distribution facility in Wilsonville, OR.   

Other Considerations 
Current, long‐term senior unsecured debt ratings of A+ from Standard and Poor’s Corporation and A1 
from Moody’s Investor Services,” the interest rate charged on any outstanding borrowings would be the 
prevailing London Interbank Offer Rate (“LIBOR”) plus 0.15%. The facility fee is 0.05% of the total 


                                                            
28
    http://tinycomb.com/2008/12/02/sneaker‐culture‐losing‐speed‐bad‐news‐for‐nike/ 
29
    http://www.spotcounterfeits.co.uk/spotting‐fake‐shoes‐and‐boots.html 
30
    http://premium.hoovers.com.proxy.lib.pdx.edu/subscribe/ind/overview.xhtml?HICID=1551 
31
    http://www.bizjournals.com/memphis/stories/2007/10/15/story10.html 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


commitment.”32  Nike has debt on the 10‐K as low as 2%, so an A+ rating certainly provides the ability to 
borrow at exceptionally low rates and provides flexibility for business operations (such as portfolio 
acquisitions).  However, Nike seems to prefer cash from operations for any acquisitions. 

Relevant Financial Data 
                                                                                          2005           2006           2007           2008
    Fiscal Year Ended May 31,
Revenues                                                                              $ 13,739.7 $ 14,954.9 $ 16,325.9 $ 18,627.0
Gross Margin                                                                             6,115.4    6,587.0    7,160.5    8,387.4
Gross Margin %                                                                             44.5%      44.0%      43.9%      45.0%
Restructuring Charge, net                                                                    -          -          -          -
    Income before cumulative effect of accounting change                                 1,211.6    1,392.0    1,491.5    1,883.4
Cumulative effect of accounting change                                                       -          -          -          -
    Net Income                                                                           1,211.6    1,392.0    1,491.5    1,883.4
Basic Earnings Per Common Share:
 Income before accounting change                                                              2.31           2.69           2.96           3.80
 Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle                                             -              -              -            -
 Net income                                                                                   2.31           2.69           2.96           3.80
Diluted Earnings Per Common Share:
 Income before accounting change                                                              2.24           2.64           2.93           3.74
 Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle                                             -              -              -            -
 Net income                                                                                   2.24           2.64           2.93           3.74  

                                                           Figure 3 ‐ Summarized Historical Income Data33 

Many companies announce share re‐purchase programs in order to boost the perception of the 
company, but not all companies actually complete the share re‐purchases.  Nike’s outstanding common 
shares have gone from 518M in 2006 to 495.6M in 2008.  This indicates the company is re‐purchasing 
far more shares than it issues through its incentive programs for employees and executives.  This 
aggressive re‐purchasing program is partially responsible for the increase in EPS during the same period. 

    Year Ended May 31,                                                                     2005           2006           2007           2008
Cash and Equivalents                                                                  $    1,388.1   $      954.2   $    1,856.7   $    2,133.9
Short‐term Investments                                                                       436.6        1,348.8          990.3          642.2
Inventories                                                                                1,811.1        2,076.7        2,121.9        2,438.4
Working Capital                                                                            4,339.7        4,733.6        5,492.5        5,517.8
Total Assets                                                                               8,793.6        9,869.6       10,688.3       12,442.7
Long‐term Debt (excludes current portion)                                                    687.3          410.7          409.9          441.1
Redeemable Preferred Stock                                                                     0.3            0.3            0.3            0.3
Shareholders' Equity                                                                       5,644.2        6,285.2        7,025.4        7,825.3
Year‐end Stock Price                                                                         41.10          40.16          56.75          68.37
Market Capitalization                                                                     21,462.3       20,564.5       28,472.3       33,576.5  

                                                               Figure 4 ‐ Summarized Balance Sheet Data34 

Nike carries almost no long‐term debt and working capital according to Nike is over 5.5B in 2008.  This 
huge working capital allows Nike to internally finance all growth and acquisition activities as well as 
                                                            
32
    2008 Annual Report (10‐K) (nikebiz.com) 
33
    http://media.corporate‐ir.net/media_files/irol/10/100529/reporting/Q408_10YearHistory.xls (nikebiz.com) 
34
    http://media.corporate‐ir.net/media_files/irol/10/100529/reporting/Q408_10YearHistory.xls (nikebiz.com) 


Eric Dwyer                                                       HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


provide returns to the shareholders in the form of increasing and stable dividends and the 
aforementioned share re‐purchase program.  Inventories are relatively constant and the inventory 
turnover ratio (Figure 5) is slowly increasing, indicating an improvement in the supply chain through 
reduced inventory or increase sell‐through.        

    Financial Ratios:                                                                         2005                     2006              2007      2008
Return on Equity                                                                                23.2%                    23.3%             22.4%     25.4%
Return on Assets                                                                                14.5%                    14.9%             14.5%     16.3%
Inventory Turns                                                                                                                    4.3
                                                                                                            4.4                              4.4       4.5
Current Ratio at May 31                                                                                3.2                      2.8          3.1       2.7
Price/Earnings Ratio at May 31 (Diluted)                                                                  18.3                  15.2        19.4      18.3  

                                                               Figure 5 ‐ Selected Historical Financial Ratios35 

Inventory turns is an important measurement for Nike, as it is an indication of good product sell‐through 
and also an effective supply chain.  I would want to see this number increasing year over year.  A current 
ratio above 2 indicates the company has plenty of current assets to cover all current liabilities, indicating 
the company is liquid. 




                                                                                                                                                         
                                                                     Figure 6 ‐ Historical ROE/ROA (%)36 




                                                            
35
      http://media.corporate‐ir.net/media_files/irol/10/100529/reporting/Q408_10YearHistory.xls (nikebiz.com) 
36
      http://media.corporate‐ir.net/media_files/irol/10/100529/reporting/Q408_10YearHistory.xls (nikebiz.com) 


Eric Dwyer                                                        HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 




                                                                                                                     
                                               Figure 7 ‐ Returns Compared (%) 

Returns for Nike have consistently increased through organic growth and effectively completed share 
repurchase programs, and these returns are higher for Nike than the industry, sector or S&P.   

                                                               




                                                                                                                         
              Figure 8 ‐ Dividend Yield (%)                                       Figure 9 ‐ Dividend Growth (%) 

Nike’s dividend yield and growth rates are well above the industry and sector averages.  The company is 
able to increase dividends through increases in free cash flow, as well as a reduction in the number of 
common shares on the market. 

 



Eric Dwyer                                 HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 




                                                                                                                        
                                                Figure 10 ‐ Sales metrics (%) 

Five year sales growth for the company is less than the industry average, due to the size of the company 
and the fact that Nike is a mature company.   However, recent sales have been growing faster than the 
industry and sector.  The prospects for the company would be positive because consumers should turn 
to the “known quantity” of such a mature brand instead of the newcomer.  Nike may be able to 
purchase additional brands at a discount during the recession in order to generate faster subsidiary 
growth post recession.   

 




                                                                                                                            
        Figure 11 ‐ Gross Margin Comparisons                               Figure 12 ‐ Operating Margin Comparisons 

 


Eric Dwyer                             HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


As a premium brand, Nike continues to enjoy higher growth and operating margins than industry and 
sector peers.  With the recession, margins may decrease across the board, but it is unlikely that Nike will 
lose margin when compared to peers.  Nike’s supply chain and flexible manufacturing base should allow 
the company to keep margins relatively stable during the downturn, with a possible short term increase 
in SG&A as a percentage of revenue due to the smaller short‐term demand.   


Future Trends 
The future for Nike should include continuing to shift from a division–focus (footwear, equipment, 
apparel) to a category–focus (football, baseball, soccer, etc.), in order to form a closer connection to the 
consumer.  Over the last few years, the company has lost hearts and minds, and dollars, to the Under 
Armour brand37, and the category re‐alignment is a direct response to this perceived threat.  The idea is 
that through this focus on the individual sport (such as football or basketball), the company will be able 
to connect with the consumer and product lines which align across all divisions (so shoes, shorts, hats 
may ‘match’ and be released with the same product positioning and marketing campaign.)   

Nike’s traditional divisional focus is still reflected through its financial statements and no specific 
numbers have been released which prove the effectiveness of the strategy.  The next few years will be 
telling with regard to how successful the re‐alignment has been, but the transition is not an overnight 
proposition.  Positive results directly attributable to the category re‐alignment will be a market catalyst 
for Nike, once again raising Nike’s long‐term growth potential as a company which is able to re‐intent 
itself to compete with changing market conditions.   

Although the industry apparel and footwear trends may be leaning toward more and more ‘private 
label’ brands, it is unlikely that Nike will be any kind of player in the market.  Nike’s recent patent 
infringement lawsuit against retail giant Wal‐Mart in which Nike alleges “Wal‐Mart knowingly and 
intentionally sold and continues to sell the infringing Shoes as simulations of Nike shoes” (specifically, 
the Shox model which has ‘springs’ in the heels of the shoe).  Recently, a similar lawsuit awarded Adidas 
$305 from Payless after a jury found that Payless was marketing shoes which look significantly similar to 
an Adidas’ shoe38.  This type of aggressive brand protection shows how far Nike and other brand‐driven 
footwear and apparel companies are willing to go in order to protect image.  The idea that Nike would 
diminish that brand through discount retailers or by designing for private labels is unlikely.  Nike views 
its shoes as a premium product and strives to position it as such.   

One trend which has been adopted for some time is the use of exclusive or limited edition product 
which are only sold in certain markets or limited quantity39.  This analyst believes that these limited 
edition released are used as much to stimulate demand and buzz about the brand as they are to sell a 
high‐margin shoe and should be considered the standard for Nike going forward.  A continuing future 
growth opportunity which aligns with also general industry trends is the development of additional 
retailer‐specific product.  This type of relationship has already been established with the Converse brand 
                                                            
37
    http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/jan2008/db20080129_255780_page_2.htm 
38
    http://blog.oregonlive.com/breakingnews/2008/05/portland_jury_orders_payless_t_1.html 
39
    http://store.nike.com/index.jsp?country=US&lang_locale=en_US&l=shop,pdp,ctr‐inline/cid‐1/pid‐147001 


Eric Dwyer                            HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


through JC Penny and it is reasonable to assume that Nike is willing to engage in similar agreements with 
other retailers, if the terms are mutually beneficial (providing unique product to those retailers who 
agree to promote Nike’s product prominently on the retail floor for example). 

In addition to the increased brick and mortar retail presence, in the future Nike is likely to drive sales 
direct to the consumer through its e‐Commerce sites.  Although e‐Commerce numbers are not broken 
out within the 10‐K some guidance was provided during an earnings release and for fiscal year 2008, “e-
commerce sales rose by about 30%”, and the web only accounted for 2% of annual sales40.  At only 2% 
of total sales there is an opportunity to shift some of the market back from retailers and even reach new 
consumers who do not like to shop at the malls, but the company must be careful to not alienate its 
retailers.  A power feature of the NikeID e‐Commerce site is the ability for the consumer to develop their 
own custom shoe, including color combinations and numbers.  This level of mass‐customization has 
been made possible with the web and Nike’s increase e‐Commerce presence and should be another 
segment to drive growth into the future. 


Valuations 
Relative Valuation 
Nike’s 11/28/2008 current P/E at $48.02 was $13.30 

Price to Earnings (P/E) is equal to the Price Per Share (PPS) divided by a company’s Earnings Per Share 
(EPS) ‐‐ P/E = PPS / EPS.  Given a 2008 EPS of 3.61 and the industry average P/E of 17.50 we are able to 
determine a relative valuation for Nike. 

17.50 = PPS / 3.61 
 
Indicated PPS for NKE = $63.18 
Current PPS for NKE (12/01/08): $48.02 
 

FCF Valuation 
The valuation started with financial statement data from msn MoneyCentral.  The 1008 10/K has data 
for the 2008 fiscal year ending 05/31/2008.  Based on historical and market data I then constructed a 
pro‐forma income statement, which reveals significant free cash flow.  As opposed to debt‐financing, 
this cash flow has traditionally been used by Nike for internal project investments and external 
investments such as subsidiary purchases and distributions to the shareholders in the form of both 
dividends and share‐repurchases.  




                                                            
40
      http://www.internetretailer.com/dailyNews.asp?id=26972 


Eric Dwyer                                                     HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


Pro‐Forma Income Statement Assumptions
                            2009      2010       2011       2012       2013       2014       2015       2016      2017
Tax %                      32.0%
SG&A (2008 Constant)       32.0%
"Other Exp" % Sales     0.0042%
COGS % Sales               58.0%       58%        55%        55%        55%       55%        55%        55%        55%
Revenue Growth                3%        4%         6%         8%         8%        8%         7%         6%         4%  

    Figure 13 ‐ Pro‐Forma Income Statement Assumptions (Tax is given as % NI, SG&A, COGS, Other Expense is % Sales) 

As summarized by Figure 13, company revenue was assumed to be in the low single digits for the next 1‐
2 years, then growing to a peak of 8% in 2012 and slowly declining to a 4% terminal value in 2017.  The 
initial slow growth is primarily driven by the worldwide economic recession.  However, even with the US 
market in recession, global growth and increased US market share (displacing financially distressed 
brands) should offset the effect netting a positive gain company wide.   Single digit growth is more than 
reasonable given the company’s premier positioning, brand strength and proven track record, as well as 
the solid management in place with the company.   Similarly, when the US economy begins to recover 
the company’s sales should also increase in 2011 and again in 2014, although with a $30B company is 
unlikely that the entire company will grow at a 10% return for more than a year or two.  The income 
statement begins to ramp down as the company enters another period of stable growth in 2017 as the 
emerging markets become mature and settle into growth consistent with population increases. 

I chose to keep SG&A at a constant 32%, as that is an approximate average for the last 5 years and there 
is no reason to presume a higher SG&A going forward.  My COGS in the next 1‐2 years was up from 55% 
due to higher commodity pricing, but there may actually be deflationary pressures in the short run 
which reduce the price of the input materials.  I also believe that Nike’s significant buying power will 
ultimately lead to approximately the same COGS % after 2011, and for the foreseeable future. 

These assumptions allowed me to construct the following pro‐forma income statement: 




Eric Dwyer                              HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


                                         2008       2009     2010      2011     2012       2013      2014     2015     2016     2017
                    Period End Date 5/31/2008
                   Stmt Source Date 7/28/2008                                      Pro‐Forma Income
                                                        1        2        3         4          5         6        7        8        9
                            Revenue     18,627     19,000   19,760   20,945    22,621     24,430    26,385   28,232   29,926   31,123

              Cost of Revenue, Total    10,240     11,020   11,461   11,520    12,441    13,437    14,512    15,527   16,459   17,117
                         Gross Profit    8,387      7,980    8,299    9,425    10,179    10,994    11,873    12,704   13,467   14,005

       SG&A Expenses as % Revenue        5,954      6,073    6,316    6,695     7,230     7,809     8,433     9,024    9,565    9,948
    Other Op Expenses as % Revenue           8          8        8        9        10        10        11        12       13       13
            Operating Income (EBIT)      2,503      1,899    1,975    2,722     2,940     3,175     3,429     3,669    3,889    4,044

                 Income Before Tax       2,503      1,899    1,975    2,722     2,940     3,175     3,429     3,669    3,889    4,044

                  Income Tax ‐ Total       620        608      632      871       941     1,016     1,097     1,174    1,244    1,294
                   Income After Tax      1,883      1,291    1,343    1,851     1,999     2,159     2,331     2,495    2,644    2,750

     Net Income Before Extra. Items      1,883      1,291    1,343    1,851     1,999     2,159     2,331     2,495    2,644    2,750

           Total Extraordinary Items         0          1        0        0         0         0         0         0        0        0
                         Net Income      1,883      1,290    1,343    1,851     1,999     2,159     2,331     2,495    2,644    2,750

                     Change NWC             25        377      236      368       520       562       606       573      526      371
       Net Working Capital (CA ‐ CL)     5,518      5,895    6,131    6,499     7,019     7,580     8,187     8,760    9,285    9,657
                       Change PPE                      37       77      120       170       184       198       187      172      121
                    PPE AS % Sales       1,891      1,928    2,006    2,126     2,296     2,480     2,678     2,866    3,037    3,159  


                                                 Figure 14 ‐ Pro Forma Income Statement 

With the income statement provided I was finally able to calculate the Free Cash Flow for the firm 
through 2017.  PPE was assumed to be an average of sales, as of 2008.  The change in PPE over time 
should account for any possible acquisitions.  The working capital increased during this period would 
account for the increased inventory any other capital requirements for normal growth.  Given the track 
record of the company over the last five years, and the extensive contract manufacturing and retail 
location relationships, this would seem to be reasonable.  Additional assumptions can be seen in the FCF 
Assumptions figure below.  Detailed WACC calculations can be seen in the WACC calculations (WACC is 
7.64%).  The only thing of note in the WACC is how insignificant the debt costs are on the overall WACC 
due to the relatively low debt load carried by the company.   

                                                 FCF Values
                                                 Perpetual Growth                  4.00%
                                                 WACC                              7.64%
                                                 AVG NWC % Rev                    31.03%
                                                 PPE % Sales                       10.2%  

                                                 Figure 15 ‐ FCF Assumptions/Static Values 




Eric Dwyer                                        HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 
 


               Nike, INC (NKE) - Weighted Average Cost of Capital
                                                                                                                             WACC
                                                                                                                            7.64%
Beta (11/28/08)                                             0.72                            ((1-Tax) * (% Debt * Debt Yield)) + (% Equity * Equity Rate)
Stock price (11/28/08)              $                   53.25
Shares outstanding (millions)                            490.4
Book value of debt ($ millions)                          441.1                                                         @ $53.25 / share
Equity Market Value                                    26114.5                                                          1.66% % Debt (BV Debt / Total Value)
Total Value                                            26555.6                                                         98.34% % Equity (Market / Total Value)



Rf (Average of 30 Yr Bonds)                             4.00%
(Rm - Rf)                                               5.17%                               Tax Rate                                                       32.00%
Market Return (Rm+Rf)                                   9.17%                               Cost of Debt (Note 7 - 2008 10K)                                6.00%
Cost of Equity                                          7.71%                               After Tax Cost of Debt                                          4.08%
=Risk Free+(Beta*(Market-Risk Free))                                                        =((Cost of Debt)*(1-Tax Rate))                                           
                                  Figure 16 ‐ WACC Calculations – Beta is average of Yahoo, Google, MSN finance 

 

      FCF Valuation
                                       2009      2010      2011      2012      2013      2014      2015      2016      2017
Revenue                            19,185.81 19,953.24 21,150.44 22,842.47 24,669.87 26,643.46 28,508.50 30,219.01 31,427.77
EBIT                                1,917.83 1,994.30 2,748.47 2,968.34 3,205.81 3,462.28 3,704.64 3,926.91 4,083.99

‐  Taxes                                 613.7     638.2            879.5       949.9     1025.9         1107.9           1185.5          1256.6           1306.9
‐  Change NWC                            435.2     238.1            371.5       525.0      567.0          612.4            578.7           530.7            375.1
‐  Change PPE                              56        78              122         172        185            200              189             174              123

Free Cash Flow                          812.67   1,040.11      1,375.98     1,321.73     1,427.46      1,541.66        1,751.16        1,965.95        2,279.37
PV Discount %                             93%        86%           80%          74%          69%           64%             60%             55%             52%
PV Free Cash Flow                       754.95     897.62      1,103.14       984.39       987.64        990.89        1,045.61        1,090.49        1,174.55

TV @ yr 2017                       32,224.04
SUM PV FCF                          9,029.28                           Class A          96191444
SUM PV FCF + TV                    41,253.32                           Class B          ########
# Shares (M)                          490.41         Friday, July 25, 2008              ########
$ / Share                              84.12                                                                                                                             
                                                                   Figure 17 ‐ FCF Valuation 

As of October 28, 2008 Nike’s share price on the NYSE was 53.25, making the shares about 58% under‐
valued, according to my calculations.   


Summary 
Nike is a solid historical performer with excellent global market positioning.  Its massive cash flows will 
allow it to capitalize on opportunities while providing dividend payouts, both through cash and share re‐
purchases.  Now, due to recent market conditions, it is also a great bargain.  We made a great choice to 
buy Nike, but now is the time to increase our stake in this marquee brand order to capitalize in the 
sheep mentality of the market.   




Eric Dwyer                                            HOLD REPORT – NIKE, INC. (NKE) 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:37
posted:7/31/2011
language:English
pages:21